Happy New Year from BB!

(click to enlarge)

Lomont_004
Boulevard Haussman, taken tonight in Paris, with the rear of the Opera at center.

BB writes:

“…At least once a month, I want to photograph this little dome in color, but I’ve been working all month photographing romanesque chapels, day and night.

New Year’s Eve was my first day off.  I ran straight to the terraces on the 7th floor of the Printemps located on boulevard Haussmann.  From there, one can contemplate Paris and its magnificent 19th century domes; far from the crowded streets, we dream in a celestial field of buildings and monuments sculpted by light … Just before the new year !

Dear Ameer – Our 1902 Advance on Afghanistan

Here’s a double rarity for this media.  The attached is not from Ron Edge’s “clipping service” but from a microfilm reader at the U.W. Library.  The reason for sharing this page from the Jan 10, 1902 Daily Bulletin (a Seattle tabloid “devoted to Courts, Finance, Real Estate, Building and All Industrial Improvements”) is its clue to contemporary politics, which can be read directly below the part marked with a translucent red marker.  It expresses a sentiment that comes out of the joy of war got for Hearst and Roosevelt (representative citizens – pars pro toto – then for the nation) by beating up on Spain and the Philippines and so exhilarated the nation and brought such confidence that it was ready and eager for more broad-shouldered foreign jarring – or “big stick” jousting – in the name of “20th century progress.”  This was the first bloom and blush in the courtship of government and industry that soon gave birth to what we now call the “military industrial complex.”  Those that recall their world history will remember that 1902 was in the thick of the Age of Imperialism.  We never left it.

(Double click to Enlarge)

Afgan-Professy-Jan02-WEB

Up the Down Chimney, Part II

Thanks to all who attended one of our shows this year!  The first, at Town Hall, sold out the downstairs space and was a ripsnorter, indulging in oodles of spirited holiday fare.  The second, at the Good Shepherd Center Chapel, drew a more intimate 70 or so, but revealed its own candid pleasures.

Performers included Julie Briskman, Frank Corrado, Paul Dorpat, and Jean Sherrard, displaying a wide range of seasonal tonics, anecdotes, and antidotes. Musicians included John and Tia Owen, Mark Kramer, Stu Dempster, and Ethan Sherrard. We particularly thank our tech support staff – artists both – the always inspired David Verkade and Jean’s brilliant former student Rhys Ringwald.

Here are a few photos from both events:

Town-Hall-pan-WEB
Wier Harman exhorts the crowd at Town Hall
Frank Corrado reading 'Red Ryder nails the Cleveland Street Kid'
Frank Corrado reading 'Red Ryder nails the Cleveland Street Kid'
Jean with Julie Briskman singing "Christmas Island"
Jean with the remarkable Julie Briskman
Paul conducts
Dorpat conducts; Dempster's on his axe.
IMG_1874
Mark Kramer, John and Tia Owen, as the Town Hall show begins
Canon 2 046
Mark, John, and Tia
Mark Kramer
Mark Kramer
Quartet-Up-Down#1-WEB
John, Ethan Sherrard, Jean, and Stu
Paul reads Thurber (photo from Rhys Ringwald's cell phone)
Paul reads Thurber (photo from Rhys Ringwald's cell phone)

Street Poet revisited

Vladimir Augustin near First & Main
Vladimir Augustin near First & Main

Vladimir Augustin, whom some may remember from an April post, walked into John Siscoe’s Globe Bookstore, looking cold and a bit blurred around the edges.

He writes poems on cards for passersby and lives rough. For the most part, the tourist trade has dried up, but he carries a small boombox (which was playing a Mozart concerto), and continues scavenging for customers.

Needle postcard
Needle postcard

John gave Augustin a postcard of the Space Needle and when I found him in front of the soon to be evacuated Elliott Bay Bookstore, he wrote me another poem. It was night and hard to decipher under the streetlight, but he read it to me aloud. ‘A Masterpiece of Christmas’ he called it, and I’d share it with you but I can’t quite make out the script.

UPDATE:

As per Maria’s request, a photo of the postcard poem — ‘A Masterpiece of Christmas’ – note it contains an acrostic: “The Collective Purpose” (click to enlarge):

'A Masterpiece of Christmas'
'A Masterpiece of Christmas'

Edge Clipping – READ ALL ABOUT IT – The Evening Dispatch for Monday Dec. 24, 1877

edge-clip-logo-1-web21

For the occasion of this Christmas 2009 Ron Edge has pulled out the full four pages of Seattle’s Evening Dispatch for the Monday Evening of Dec. 24, 1877.   For those with the steady temperament to insert themselves into a small community of well under 4000 citizens – and yet still with five churches and many more bars – a close reading of these pages will take them away.

The Dispatch was not the first newspaper in Seattle, but it was an early one.  Clarence Bagley, the pioneer Seattle historian described its editor, Beriah Brown, as “one of the old school of newspaper men, a writer of editorials worthy of the great papers of the United States.  He was a friend of Horace Greeley . . .  His custom was to go to the case and put his articles in type as he composed them. It is hard to comprehend the difficulty occasioned by the dual processes of thought this brought into play.”

We will include now all four pages of this Dec. 24, 1877 issue, and separate them by short notices of some of what we found on each page.  The reader may, of course, skip our comments and go directly to Brown’s Dispatch.

First – the first page.

In 1877, Christmas fell on a Tuesday.  This made the call for profound messages especially taxing on the small community’s several preachers.  They could not very well avoid the Christ Child with their Sunday the 23rd sermon, but they then would also be expected to come up with new materials, and roughly on the same subject, for Christmas Day services.  Rarely, of course, did they have “new material” but were skilled for the great part in the twisting or adjusting of the old stories – most of them from the Bible.  Still if you read the Page One Evening Dispatch accounts of some of Seattle’s Sunday services, you will find differences of tone or emphasis in how, for instance, Rev. D. Bagley of the “Brown Church” and Rev. I. Dillon of the “White Church” and visiting Congregationalist  Rev. W. Steward handle their subjects.  J. Ellis, the local Congregationalist, also took to the pulpit, Sunday evening.  (The Baptists, Catholics and Episcopal churches were noted in other reports.)

Of these four, it was Steward, the visitor from the north, who after warming up gave the best example of a fire and brimstone sermon noting that “commonsense, sound philosophy and our home experience unite, in tones of thunder, ‘that heaven is no place for the ungodly.  The very thought of the atheist, the Deist, the liar, the murderer or blasphemer going to heaven is absurd.  There is nothing so much out of place and unfit, that would be justified for a moment by any respectable tribunal on earth, much less in the court of heaven, where nothing that defileth or maketh a lie can enter, and where ‘Holiness if the Lord’ is the imprint on every commodity.”  Commodity!?    Jumping forward to page three, we learn that Steward when relaxing with a cup of tea in the living room is a kindly “84 years of age.  He is visiting with Dr. Weed, Mrs. Weed being his niece.  Mr. Stewart has been an extraordinarily temperate (non-drinking) man all his life, and consequently is now in the enjoyment of a serene, healthful and happy old age.”  (You will find an advertisement for Dr. Weed, Steward’s host, on page three below.)

It was Ellis, the other and younger Congregationalist, who was kinder to mankind – and progress too – with his sermon.  Ellis told his congregation “Well, one thing is assured: (The coming of the Christ Child) is not a bolt from far aloft shot athwart the pathway of the race to smite it and cut if off from its onward march.  Christ is not a force antagonistic to man – He is Man Himself.  He gets the momentum of humanity, casts himself into a stream of life and comes to the surface a Babe!”

Also on page one and nearly directly to the right side of Dillon’s sober description of mankind is Fred Gasch’s announcement that he will open his “New Beer Hall” on Front Street (First Avenue) next to the North Pacific Brewery, and so also near the waterfront foot of Columbia Street. And for joyful encouragement Gasch includes in his advertisement his own sermon, of sorts, a rhyming one in song.   It goes . . .

Come to the Fountain to-night, boys, / And fill with foaming beer. / What if your heads get light, boys, / The pleasure of life is here. / Eat, drink and be merry today, boys, / The old-time philosopher said, / Then go to the Fountain and stay, boys, / Till the shadows of the night have fled.

Compared to Gasch’s New Beer Hall, William Lawrence’s Office Saloon and Billiard Room might seem a bit swanky.  It was on the south side of Mill Street (Yesler Way) opposite Yesler’s Mill.  “It is the place to get genuine J.H. Cutter, Old Golden and Gaines’, Old Hermitage Rye Whiskies, Three Star, Hennesy, and Martell Brandies, and the Best Wines and Cigars; also to have a game of Billiards on a first-class table.  We have a number of private Club Rooms for accommodation of guests.”

One more mention for Page one.  The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad is listed with a charming little graphic for the train, and a schedule for its Seattle-to-Renton runs.  Of course, not once did it make it as far as Walla Walla.

(Please DOUBLE-CLICK to enlarge to a readable size.)

dispatch-122477p1-web

Page Two

At the top of page two the Evening Dispatch’s editor, the crusading moralist Beriah Brown, with an editorial on “Political Fault-Finders” makes an analysis of Pres. Hayes administration’s failure, in spite of promises, to replace the spoils system with an apolitical civil service administration.  Page two is also stuffed with advertisements including one for the watchmaker, jeweler and engraver Charles Naher, who is also selling the “largest and best selection of Musical Instruments in the Territory and will be sold at reduced prices.  The public are invited to call and convince themselves.”  The editor appears again on this page with “news” that he is the proprietor of patents of California, Oregon and Washington Territory for the “Great Invention. Lockwood’s Portable Steam Oven.  The Best Cooking Utensil Ever Invented. Burning or Scorching of Food Impossible.”  As witness to the still small size of Seattle, L. Reinig, a well-known pioneer baker, promised groceries, provisions, fruit and vegetables, bread, cake, crackers and goods delivered to all parts of the city free of charge.”

dispatch-122477-p2-web

Page Three

So much of page three is simply a “good read.”  This begins with the far left column under the heading “The City, A Merry Christmas” and its spirited report on what to expect with Christmas, 1877.  The page includes a number of shorter reports including one about a tunnel being built below Washington Street near Third Avenue in order to re-route spring water from First Hill directly to the tideflats rather than to the basements of the the homes and establishments in that often sodden part of town south of Mill Street (Yesler Way).   Page three shows a number of notices – e.g. T. Couter asks that “all persons are hereby requested to call and pay up, as I need the money to pay my bills by the First of January. ”  It includes a complete – we assume – list of “Hotel Arrivals.”  There are also more church announcements and one report of a street corner religious service with an assembly of doubtful believers.   When the service was interrupted by a “bunch of fire-crackers” the paper concluded that this “mischief was probably the work of a hoodlum as there were a number of them in the congregation at the time.”  And page three also shows more small advertisements, although not as many as page two.

dispatch-122477-p3-web

Page Four

Page Four features more small ads – always enlightening of the times to read.  The biggest among them is for Steel’s Pain Eradicator, which is described as “The Most Wonderful Discovery of the Age.”  The jumbled lesson of this medicine is “The World moves, and unless we Progress we must go Backward.  Nothing remains Stationary.”  The producers claim no intention “to deceive the people” that their medicine is “a cure for every complaint on earth; but a really scientific article of the greatest merit, which will prove a boon to suffering humanity – both on account of its adaptability to both man and beast, [this part an appeal to farmers] its readiness of application, and the price being within the reach of all.”  The list of “aches and pains” for which their solution is a great eradicator is wonderful – from “lameness” to gout and “soar throats.” (Persons who believe that such grandiose advertising is no longer possible are invited to listed to Seattle’s own KING FM through a few ad breaks.) For those Dispatch readers whose pains were not eradicated by this or any of the other promising solutions from bottled beer to Dr. Goulard’s “celebrated foot powders,” another ad on page four for John Keenen’s Seattle Stone Yard offers headstones and tombs.

dispatch-122477-p4-web

THIRTY YEARS AGO – THIS MINUTE!

CLICK to enlarge this and you will see by the clock on the porth that it is 1:35 pm.  Here is Frank Shaw's friend, we assume, Violet at her place (wherever) walking towards frank with a small ribboned gift in her right hand.  It is exactly 30 years ago - when I gently push the "insert" button for his little story onto the blog.  So it is countdown now with a minute to go.!!  My this is exciting.
CLICK to enlarge this and you will see by the clock on the porch that it is 1:35 pm. Here is Violet, Frank Shaw's friend, we assume, walking towards Frank and his Hasselblad from her home with a small ribbon decorated gift in her right hand. It will be exactly 30 years ago at the instant I gently push the "insert-publish" buttons for this little story sending it onto the blog. It is countdown now with a minute to go! My this is exciting - for me!

We follow Shaw’s Christmas afternoon snap of Violet with three more scenes he photographed in December 1979.  None of them are descernibly cheery.

Shaw names the photographer on the right, "Mike."  He does not name those posing for a "metro photoshoot."  The date is Dec. 12, 1979.
Shaw names the photographer on the right, "Mike." He does not name those posing for a "metro photoshoot." The date is Dec. 12, 1979.
Frank Shaw looks over the fleet of fresh Japanese autos and south through Smith Cove to the city skyline on Dec. 22, 1979.
Frank Shaw looks over the fleet of fresh Japanese autos and south through Smith Cove to the city skyline on Dec. 22, 1979.
Something has brough Shaw to the "Fort Lawton covered motor pool" on Dec. 28, 1979.
Something has drawn Shaw to the "Fort Lawton covered motor pool" on Dec. 28, 1979.

One more Frank Shaw contribution, and this from 1976.

From the balcony at the Food Circus/Centerhouse, Frank Shaw looks over the oversized winter model train set to the old Century 21 "Bubbleator" dressed as a snowman.  Shaw took this two days after Christmas, 1976, when the place is resting.
From the balcony at the Food Circus/Centerhouse, Frank Shaw looks over an oversized winter model train layout to the old Century 21 "Bubbleator" dressed as a snowman. Shaw recorded this two days after Christmas, 1976, when Seattle Center was resting.
Two two-and-a-quarter negatives side-by-side, and both by Frank Shaw on Dec. 4, 1976.  This is some perhaps short-lived Pioneer Square promotion of a "Father Christmas."  It readers look at the comment by Jana to this insertion they will find a link to photos of her's from 1978.  Included among them is a record of the "Father Christmas" booth at Pioneer Square in 1978, althought not, as far as I could determine, of the Father himself.
Two two-and-a-quarter negatives, side-by-side, and both recorded by Frank Shaw on Dec. 4, 1976. This is some perhaps short-lived Pioneer Square promotion of a "Father Christmas." If readers look at the comment by Jana to this insertion they will find a link to photos of her's from 1978. Included among them is a record of the "Father Christmas" booth at Pioneer Square in 1978, althought not, as far as I could determine, of the Father himself. Apparently this "Father Christmas" did not endure as a proliferation - after Santa - of gift-giving men with long hair. His ringlets look both attached and Scandi. And perhaps he is not giving gifts but taking ornaments from the children, which he then attaches to the P-Square tree.

Christmas (Edge) Clippings

edge-clip-logo-1-web2

Ron Edge comes forward with a few Christmas related “clippings” from his collection.  They start boldly with three front covers for the once popular and studied Argus Christmas Issues, these from 1903, 1904 and 1907.  At 25 cents a copy it was not cheap, and note that by 1907 it had doubled to four bits i.e. 50 cents.  The weekly Argus began publishing in the 1890s and continued on as a respected and influential journal of local politics and culture.  The last I remember of it is from the 1970s when the then adolescent weekly – The Weekly – made it hard for the old and stiffened Argus to keep up.

(Remember: CLICK to Enlarge.)

The Argus Christmas Issue for 1905.
The Argus Christmas Issue for 1903.
For 1904 Argus again uses a big ship for its Christmas Number cover.  This is "Seattle's Own Battleship Nebraska" manufactured at Moran's Shipyard on the waterfront - near the foot of Dearborn Street.  The keel was launched in 1904, although it took much longer to install the superstructure.
For 1904 Argus again uses a big ship for its Christmas Number cover. This is "Seattle's Own Battleship Nebraska" manufactured at Moran's Shipyard on the waterfront - near the foot of Dearborn Street. The keel was launched in 1904, although it took much longer to install the superstructure, and by then was already obsolete. It was an expensive piece of post-Spanish-American War military hardware and never used except for some steaming about.
The grandly frigid outline of Alaska - terretorial still - is turned to curls and pulchritude for the 1907 Argus Christmas Number.  This was the year that construction on the 1909 Alaska Yukon and Pacific Expostion began in earnest, and as everyone may by now know three young women, although differently composed, were used in the AYPE's principal logo or symbolic bug.
The grandly frigid outline of Alaska - territorial still - is turned to curls and pulchritude for the 1907 Argus Christmas Number. This was the year that construction on the 1909 Alaska Yukon and Pacific Expostion began in earnest, and as everyone may by now know three young women, although differently composed, were used in the AYPE's principal logo or symbolic bug. A few of the many variations are printed directly below.
AYP BUG in Plaster.  The by then old description of Puget Sound as the protected waterway where "rail meets sail" was being turned over as steamships replaced schooners and such.  There was no easy rhyme to replace "rail-sail" but at least once "steam meets steam" was tried.
AYP BUG in Plaster. The by then old description of Puget Sound as the protected waterway where "rail meets sail" was being turned over as steamships replaced schooners and such. There was no easy rhyme to replace "rail-sail" but at least once "steam meets steam" was tried.
An officially staged tableau of the AYP symbol
An officially staged tableau of the AYP symbol
The Bug-Tableau on an AYP stage with chorus and minstrels.
The Bug-Tableau on an AYP stage with chorus and minstrels.
The bug pins were popular.
The bug pins were popular.
Another tableau, this one staged for the front page of the Post-Intelligencer for Sept. 9, 1909.  The caption to the screened photo reads, "From left to right: Miss Koye, representing the Orient; Miss Frances Sarver, representing Alaska and the Yukon; Miss Fannie Sarver, representing the Pacific Northwest."
Another tableau, this one staged for the front page of the Post-Intelligencer for Sept. 9, 1909. The caption to the screened photo reads, "From left to right: Miss Koye, representing the Orient; Miss Frances Sarver, representing Alaska and the Yukon; Miss Fannie Sarver, representing the Pacific Northwest."

Next Ron Edge shares a few clips from the Bon Marche as Santa sanctuary early in the 20th Century.

bon-santa-cartoon-web

When the Bon was at Second and Pike.
When the Bon was at Second and Pike.

Every new “big thing” like Northgate needs “the biggest” of something, and the northend mall found it’s.

The "Tallest Christmas Tree" in the world needed a parking lot to parody the mere trees we put up in our mere living rooms.  Both shots - consecutive by their numbers - were photography by the prolific Ellis out of Arlington.
The "Tallest Christmas Tree" in the world needed a parking lot to parody the mere trees we put up in our mere living rooms. Both shots - consecutive by their numbers - were photography by the prolific Ellis out of Arlington.