Seattle Now & Then: The Four Winds

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Photographed in the late 1950s, the floating restaurant’s huge on deck hooligan got no competition as yet from the Space Needle (1962) in breaking the horizon.
THEN: Photographed in the late 1950s, the floating restaurant’s huge on deck hooligan got no competition as yet from the Space Needle (1962) in breaking the horizon.
NOW: With its 21st century improvements, the southwest corner of Lake Union has replaced its industrial charms with artful landscaping.
NOW: With its 21st century improvements, the southwest corner of Lake Union has replaced its industrial charms with artful landscaping.

On the Friday morning of June 8 1956, the graduating seniors of Bellevue High School were served a “pirate breakfast” aboard the Four Winds floating restaurant at the southwest corner of Lake Union.  By then many of the 194 seniors were surely nodding after an “All Night Party” of movies, dancing Dixieland, and a night club show at Seattle’s Town and Country Club.  All was paid for by their parents who also selflessly served in two-hour relays of 25 as chaperones.

For the seniors the “pirate theme” was extended that morning with on board gifts of jewelry, aka booty.  For the city the thieves’ theme was marked around the clock by what the eccentric restaurant’s management advertised as their “huge pirate atop the ship Four Winds, Headquarters for the Seattle Seafair Pirates.”

SW-Corner-4-Winds-Armory-Aerial-lk-w-WEB

Ron Edge found a print for this subject years ago in Bernie’s antique shop on Bothell Way before Bernie closed the shop for good. Ron Jensen, the photographer, is listed in the 1956 City Directory as a City Light photographer, and this kindles an irony.  On July 22, 1966, the Surfside 9 (its last name) sank at this southwest corner of Lake Union for want of paying City Light. When the bilge pumps failed the restaurant tipped and dropped to the shallow bottom while its piano floated around the cocktail lounge.

Surfside-9-formerly-40-Winds-w-space-needle-WEB

Surfside-9-leaning-in-slip-WEB

First built in Everett in 1900 as the City of Everett, the long-lived mosquito fleet steamer was later widened into the auto ferry Ballard for routine Puget Sound crossings to Port Ludlow.

The ferry Ballard leaving Ludlow for its crossing to Ballard. (Courtesy, Dan-E)
The ferry Ballard leaving Ludlow for its crossing to Ballard. (Courtesy, Dan-E)
Surely an early study of the City of Everett  (Courtesy Michael Maslan)
Surely an early study of the City of Everett (Courtesy Michael Maslan)
Courtesy, Michael Maslan
Courtesy, Michael Maslan

The Four Winds aka Surfside 9 will be remembered by many Pacific Readers, for the sunken vessel rested rusted and rotted until lifted ton by ton in 1972 by Mason Construction’s floating derrick, the Viking.  In the environmental spirit then prevalent, Mason donated the Viking’s labor and the Army Corp contributed two haul-away barges.  The pieces were buried by the Corp in a land fill near Everett, the vessel’s original home port.

Not to be  mistaken with the San Mateo, the ferry that arrived to this little waterway at the southwest corner of Lake Union later and also left too soon for Canada and a slow collapse in its Fraser River slip.
Not to be mistaken with the San Mateo, the ferry that arrived to this little waterway at the southwest corner of Lake Union later and also left too soon for Canada and a slow collapse in its Fraser River slip.

ALSO – NOT TO BE MISTAKEN WITH THE GOLDEN ANCHOR

Three Seattle Times clips for the Golden Arches, another converted Mosquito Fleet steamer, and one easy to confuse with the Everett.  Below, she is being towed thru the Montlake Cut on her way, most likely, to West Seattle.
Three Seattle Times clips for the Golden Arches, another converted Mosquito Fleet steamer, and one easy to confuse with the Everett. Below, she is being towed thru the Montlake Cut on her way, most likely, to West Seattle.

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WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

Surely Jean, beginning with links to four or five past blogs, each of which trails a variety of features with maritime subjects – including Lake Union.  Ron Edge will put those up first.  Later this evening I’ll add more pixs – those that I find by then.

 

 

A RANDOM SAMPLER of LAKE UNION SUBJECTS Briefly Noted

Probably the oldest photograph of any part of Lake Union, the South years before the Western Mill and on the "free rides" for citizens on the railroad that ran from the here to the Pike Street dock and coal bunkers.  The date is late 1871.  By the end of the 70s the coal cars were rerouted on a new line from Newcastle, thru Renton and around the south end of Lake Washington to a new coal wharf at the waterfront foot of King Street (seen many times in these now more than 400 pages).
Probably the oldest photograph of any part of Lake Union, the south end  a decade before the Western Mill opened there. Here locals await their inaugural day “free rides” for citizens on the railroad that ran from the here to the Pike Street dock and coal bunkers. The date is late 1871. By the end of the 70s the coal cars were rerouted on a new line from Newcastle, thru Renton and so directly around the south end of Lake Washington to a new coal wharf at the waterfront foot of King Street (seen many times in these now more than 400 pages) thereby avoiding barges altogether on both Lake Washington and here on Lake Union.

 

Dated 1887 it is also a very early record of the lake.   (Courtesy Michael Maslan)
Dated 1887 it is also a very early record of the lake. (Courtesy Michael Maslan)
Looking east across the south end of Lake Union to most of an early Western Mill, and perhaps the oldest photograph of it, ca. 1884.  Capitol HIll is on the horizon.
Looking east across the south end of Lake Union to most of an early Western Mill, and perhaps the oldest photograph of it, ca. 1884. Capitol Hill is on the horizon.  This most southern end of the lake has been long since filled in.
These two tots in the toolies are the Brown kids.  The father was a plumber and played the clarinet in the popular Wagner's Band.  Western Mill is beyond and Capitol Hill on the horizon.  The Westlake Trestle, before the landfill hear, created this protect southwest corner of the lake, which on the evidence of the Brown negatives - several - was a popular bay for summer sports.  I used this image on the cover of my first "now and then" book.  It has been very very good to me.  (You can inspect/read it in this blogs library or bookstore attached with its own button.  And you can do the same with Vols. 2 & 3 and several more books.
These two tots in the tooleys are the Brown kids. The father was a plumber and played the clarinet in the popular Wagner’s Band. The live in the neighborhood on Dexter Ave. Western Mill is beyond and Capitol Hill on the horizon. The Westlake Trestle, before the landfill here, protected this southwest corner of the lake, which on the evidence of the Brown negatives – several – was a popular cove for summer sports. I used this image on the cover of my first “now and then” book. It has been very very good to me. (You can inspect/read it in this blog’s library or bookstore attached nearby with its own button. And you can do the same with Vols. 2 & 3 and several more books.

 

Jean, Berangere and I used the Brown classic for our "Repeat Photography" exhibit at Mohai in 2011.  We recorded photos like this one of every part of the exhibit and also interpreted them all on video with a mind to making a documentary about it all.  Perhaps.  We got busy.
Jean, Berangere and I used the Brown classic for our “Repeat Photography” exhibit at Mohai in 2011. We recorded photos like this one of every framed part in the exhibit and also interpreted them all on video with a mind to making a documentary about it all. Perhaps. We got busy.  If you double-click this you may be able to read the caption.  Maybe.

 

Work in progress on the landfill that reclaimed the swimmer's cove for commerce.   The photo is from the Municipal Archive and is dated Oct. 28, 1915.
Work in progress on the landfill that reclaimed the swimmer’s cove for commerce. The photo is from the Municipal Archive and is dated Oct. 28, 1915.   Capitol hill is again on the horizon, and Western Mill may be glimpsed, far right.
Before the fill and, most likely recorded from the Westlake trestle.  Part of the cover is here used by Western Mill for its mill pond.   The tank is on the west side of 9th Avenue near Republican Street.  (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
Before the fill and, most likely recorded from the Westlake trestle. Part of the cove is here used by Western Mill for its mill pond. The tank is on the west side of 9th Avenue near Republican Street. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
The south end of Lake Union with a Queen Anne Hill horizon.  The view dates from ca. 1902.  Western Mill is, again, evident, and the Westlake Trestle with the temporary cove beyond it to the west.
The south end of Lake Union with a Queen Anne Hill horizon. The view dates from ca. 1902. Western Mill is, again, evident, and the Westlake Trestle with the temporary cove beyond it to the west.

 

Returning the above look, here from the Queen Anne side, although a few years earlier.  The rough grades climbing capitol hill include Mercer, Republican, Harrison Street and Denny Way.  A small glimpse of First Hill beyond Pike Street is on the far right.
Returning the above look, here from the Queen Anne side, although a few years earlier. The rough grades climbing capitol hill include Mercer, Republican, Harrison Street and Denny Way. A small glimpse of First Hill beyond Pike Street is on the far right.
An early panorama of the lake most likely from the mid-late 1880s.  Western Mill is there but not yet the Westlake viaduct.  This was taken from near Boren and John.
An early panorama of the lake most likely from the mid-late 1880s. Western Mill is there but not yet the Westlake viaduct. This was taken from near Boren Ave. and John Street.
An early look to Lake Union and the milltown at its southern end, taken from Denny Hill.  The view below approximates the historical photographer's prospect. I recorded it about 30 years ago for a Pacific feature then.
An early look to Lake Union and the milltown at its southern end, taken from Denny Hill. The view below approximates the historical photographer’s prospect. I recorded it about 30 years ago for a Pacific feature then.  An approximate or circa date is 1885.
A circa 1982 repeat of the woodsy scene above it.
A circa 1982 repeat of the woodsy scene above it.
A aeroplane look north thru the lake taken on March 20, 1949.   Courtesy Ron Edge.
A look from above north thru the lake on March 20, 1949. The post-war lake was then mostly still a “working lake.”  Courtesy Ron Edge.
An early King County generated map of the first claims on the lake.  The names and dates are recorded.
An early King County generated map of the first claims on the lake. The names and dates are recorded.
Shoreline changes on Lake Union, from a geography project of the Fed. Commerce Dept.  The project covered all the reclaimed shorelines hereabouts, and not just Lake Union's.
Shoreline changes on Lake Union, from a geography project of the Fed. Commerce Dept. The project covered all the reclaimed shorelines hereabouts, and not just Lake Union’s.   Note the fill to all sides of Westlake at the south end of the lake.
A detail of that corner of the lake pulled from the 1912 Baist real estate map.
A detail of that corner of the lake pulled from the 1912 Baist real estate map.
An early 20th-century impression of the important of the neighborhood, and long before its recent and on-going "Allentown" make-over.
An early 20th-century impression of the important of the neighborhood, and long before its recent and on-going “Allentown” make-over.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HELIX Volume Four No. 6 (A Day in August, 1968)

Helix Banner 04-06 2k

After an about three month wrestle with our blog’s server we have persuaded it with a little more cash and plenty of pitiful coaxing to do us right, and so have returned for more weekly (we hope) postings of HELIX.  This week it is the issue penultimate to the first SKY RIVER ROCK FIRE FESTIVAL.  It is for the most part about the line-up of artists expected over that Labor Day Weekend outside of Sultan on Betty Nelson’s strawberry farm.  (The berries were not in season.) Again, Bill White and I have returned with some joined reflections on what we find within the tabloid, and this time Bill has also attached a MEDLEY of SONGS performed by SKY RIVER ARTISTS at that time – or nearly then.  He found them , of course, on YouTube. Ron Edge is engineering it all – or nearly.   The long-distance recording on Skype that features Bill and I did not record off of Skye Itself.  Rather, Bill (in Peru) had to fall back on the work of his small recorder set between himself and his computer in his apartment about 100 yards from the Pacific surf.  It is a prudent precaution he consistently takes.   So this week, while Bill’s voice is not filtered through the computer’s speaker, mine is, and resembles, Ron notes, a “mouse in the corner.”

 

B.White and P. Dorpat

04-06 Cover

For a MEDLEY of SONGS performed by SKY RIVER ARTISTS, click below image:

Sky River  Sept 1,1968

Seattle Now & Then: Queen Anne Pioneers

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: This row of homes, right to left, from 2104 to 2110 7th Ave. West were built in 1905-6, and so they are, by some calibrations, antiques. They are well cared for Queen Anne Hill pioneers.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
THEN: This row of homes, right to left, from 2104 to 2110 7th Ave. West were built in 1905-6, and so they are, by some calibrations, antiques. They are well cared for Queen Anne Hill pioneers. Public School teacher Lou R. Key lived for time at 2104 7th Ave. West, the second house from the right, if I have figured it correctly.  For notes on these homes – and on Ms. Key too – see the bottom of this feature. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
NOW: Only the small home directly on the northeast corner of 7th Ave. West and Crockett Street has grown with impressive changes.
NOW: Only the small home directly on the northeast corner of 7th Ave. West and Crockett Street has grown with impressive changes.

For those who pay attention to credits and have been following this feature for a few years, Lawton Gowey is a familiar name.  This is another of the probably hundreds of historical subjects that Lawton has shared with Pacific readers because he shared them with me.

Here we look northeast through the Queen Anne intersection of Crockett Street, and 7th Ave W.  The photo was recorded sometime before 1912, when these streets were paved, and after 1905-6 the years the houses were built facing Seventh.  Archivist Phil Stairs at the Puget Sound Regional Archive checked their “tax cards” for remodels and concluded,  “You could say that there was an enterprising asbestos salesman in the neighborhood in 1957.”  That year two of the four were wrapped in that baleful blanket.

By then Lawton Gowey was in his third year as both organist and director of the senior choir at Bethany Presbyterian Church on the top of the hill.  Lawton live all his life on Queen Anne, and he knew its history, especially that side of it having to do with, “From here to there – land transportation.”  That’s the title Lawton used for a lecture on Seattle’s trollies he gave in 1962 at the Museum of History and Industry.

Lawton Gowey's Water Dept Card (one of them - copied 1983)
Lawton Gowey’s Water Dept Card (one of them – copied 1983)

Actually, this accountant for the Seattle Water Department also knew a lot about ships, churches, J.S. Bach, and English history, but it was trolleys that he chased as a boy with his father and a camera.

I met Lawton in 1981, but our friendship was a regrettably brief one. On a late Sunday morning in the winter of 1983 while preparing for church the 61-year-old organist’s heart stopped.  He left Jean, his wife, daughters Linda and Marcia, his father Clarence, scores of rail fans and his collection of trolley photos and ephemera, which Jean directed to the University of Washington Library’s Special Collections.

A Seattle Times adver for a nearby Queen Anne Addition, Jan. 10, 1904
A Seattle Times adver for the nearby Queen Anne Addition, Jan. 10, 1904
WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

Surely Jean – but merely what we can find in the time allowed by our shared rush to also assemble and massage our First Hill lectures.  And so a few – only – more pixs of Queen Anne Hill – most of them in the vicinity of the feature above, and also three or four links to former related features, which Ron Edge will gather and apply.  However, we will begin not with the links, but with Lawton’s own “now” for the above look north on 7th Ave. West.  He dates it March 8, 1981.  Then two more Gowey repeats from the same corner – one looking more directly north down Seventh and other other east on Crockett.  We will then show a detail of the immediate neighborhood from the 1912 Baist Map followed by the FOUR CLIPS.  Each of the pictures following the 1912 BAIST MAP, if clicked will take the reader into a many faceted exploration of a related subject.  All, again, have something to do with Queen Anne Hill (and Magnolia too).

Lawton Gowey's 1980 repeat of the feature subject on 7th West.
Lawton Gowey’s 1981 repeat of the feature subject on 7th West.
Looking north on 7th West from Crocket ca. 1911.
Looking north on 7th West from near Crockett, ca. 1911.
Lawton Gowey's repeat
Lawton Gowey’s repeat Feb. 7, 1981
610 West Crockett looking east from 7th Ave West. ca. 1911
610 West Crockett looking east from 7th Ave West, ca. 1911
Lawton Gowey's repeat on Crockett from
Lawton Gowey’s repeat from Feb. 7, 1981
CROCKETT Street runs along the bottom of this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.
CROCKETT Street runs along the bottom of this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map. The corner homes featured at the top are at its northeast corner with 7th Ave. W. and in Block 1, left-of-center at the bottom of the map. (Click Twice to Enlarge)

 

 FOUR QUEEN ANNE NEIGHBORHOOD LINKS FOLLOW

THEN: Long thought to be an early footprint for West Seattle’s Admiral Theatre, this charming brick corner was actually far away on another Seattle Hill.  Courtesy, Southwest Seattle Historical Society.

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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOME

(First appeared in Pacific April 15, 1984)  

            Seattle’s oldest charity is now one hundred (1984). On April 3, 1884, fifteen of the city’s “leading ladies” – Sarah Yesler, Babette Gatzert, Mercie Boone, and Mary Leary included – gathered in the large living room of the Leary mansion at Second and Madison. There they pledged themselves to “the systematic benevolent work of aiding and assisting the poor and destitute regardless of creed, nationality, or color.” Incorporating as the Ladies Relief Society, these women activists gave birth to “one of Seattle’s biggest families,” nurtured now for a century in the Seattle Children’s Home.

            From the beginning the “quality of their mercy” focused on “orphans and friendless children,” those little Nels and Oliver Twists who had seemingly stepped out of Charles Dicken’s novels and onto the back streets of Seattle. 1884 was a depression year, and Seattle, then recently the largest town in the territory, had its depressing and even desperate parts. The women’s charity was needed.

            Within a month, the group’s membership grew to more than 100. The women divided the city into districts and themselves into visiting committees responsible for searching out the “needs of the poor within their districts’ boundaries.” What they uncovered were new accounts of that old story of the runaway father and the distraught mother.

The Society's first home in what is now the Seattle Center, near the southwest corner of Harrison St. and 4th Ave. West.
The Society’s first home in what is now the Seattle Center, near the southwest corner of Harrison St. and 4th Ave. West.

            The Society needed a home, and in August of 1886 the first Seattle Children’s Home was opened to 30 children. The home’s site, donated by Louisa and David Denny, was at what is now [1984] another children’s gamboling ground, Seattle Center’s Fun Forest.

C-#2-Seattle-Childrens-Home-front-WEB-porch-Q.A

            Pictured above is the charity’s second home and its first at the present location on Queen Anne Hill. “Here,” the Town Crier reported in 1912, “45 children, either orphans or fatherless are cared for  . . . under the gentle guidance of Mrs. Anna Dow Urie and two assistants . . . 700 loaves of bread a month and a jolly old janitor who never lets the furnace die down.”

            This was a kind of family, and the religious Mrs. Urie never had any doubt as to its head. She said, “I have never taught creeds in the home, but all these children have been told of God, and His love, and that He will be a father to them when earthly fathers forsake, as they so often do.”

            Now in its fourth home and 100 years since its founding, this “family” enters its second century with the support of Society volunteers, donations, and the United Way. A professional staff of childcare specialists now adds its earthly skills to Mrs. Urie’s heavenly variety of “kindly custodial care to orphans and friendless children.”

CH-Seattle-Childrens-Home-dorm-WEB

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1.-QUEEN-ANNE-Christian-Science-THEN-WEB-500x282

1.-Queen-Anne-Christian-Science-NOW-WEB-500x256

SEVENTH CHURCH of CHRIST SCIENTIST: Secreted and Saved Landmark

On the late morning of Tuesday, May 22nd last (2007), the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation held a press conference intended to turn the fate of one of Seattle’s most exquisite landmarks away from its planned destruction and towards something else – something “adaptive” like another church, a community center or even a home – a big home.

The Trust not only included the Seventh Church of Christ Scientist on its 2007 list of the Washington State’s “most endangered historic properties.”   It then also used the front steps of this Queen Anne landmark as the place to circle the wagons for statewide preservation.  It was an especially strong sign by the Trust and for its extended family of historians, architects, citizens – including sensitive neighbors of the church – of how cherished is the Seventh Church.

Seattle architect and painter Harlan Thomas (1870 – 1953) created the unique sanctuary for the then energetic congregation of Christ Scientists on Seattle’ Queen Ann Hill in 1926.  It was the year he was also made head of the Architecture Department at the University of Washington, a position he held until 1940.

Although a local architectural marvel this sanctuary is not well know because of its almost secreted location.  The address is 2555 8th Ave. W. — at the Avenue’s northwest corner with West Halladay Street.  Except to live near it or to visit someone living near it there are few extraordinary reasons to visit this peaceful neighborhood, except to enjoy this fine melding of architectural features from the Byzantine, Mission, Spanish Colonial and other traditions.

Since the Trust created it in 1992 the “Endangered List” has not been an immoderate tool in the service of state heritage.  Less than 100 sites have made this register, which is really the Trust’s emergency broadside for historic preservation.  [This campaign from 2007 was successful.  The sanctuary was saved.

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RETAINING WALLS – QUEEN ANNE BOULEVARD – Architect W.R.B. WILLCOX (1913)

The following seven records of architect Willcox’s imaginative Queen Anne Boulevard retaining walls were photographed by Frank Shaw in 1976,

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FS-Q.A.-Wilcox-retaining-wall 2-16-76 -#1-WEB

FS---Q.A.-Retaining-wall-2-7-1976-#5-WEB

FS---Q.A.---Wilcox---Retaining-Wall-2-26-1976-#2-WEB

FS---Q.A.-Retainig-Wall-2-16-76-#4-WEB

FS---Q.A.-Retaining-Wall-#6-2-16-76-WEB

FS---Q.A.-Retaining-Wall-2-16-76-#3-WEB

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ANOTHER and TEMPORARILY UNIDENTIFIED Queen Anne “Now and Then” by LAWTON GOWEY

Gowey-Q.A.-Now-then-Unident-THEN-WEB

A fine example of "War Brick" that wonder siding sold by door-to-door salesmen in the early 1940s.
A fine example of “War Brick” that wonder-siding sold door-to-door in the early 1940s and later too.

PICTURE/CLIPPINGS from LAWTON GOWEY’S QUEEN ANNE ARCHIVE

 

QUEEN ANNE COUNTERBALANCEW
The QUEEN ANNE COUNTERBALANCE

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3-a.-Counterbalance,-Queen-Anne-Ave-s.-fm.-Highland-Dr-3-3-1937

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RESEARCH NOTES for the FEATURE at the Top.

Most of these notes on the first four homes on the east side of 7th Ave. West north of Crockett Street were got from the Washington State Archive’s tax cards and key-word searches of The Seattle Times.  Please forgive the typos.  They are the sins of speed typing.  Only one persons listed came forward with a picture – the public school teacher Lou R. Key.  And she is shown with some uncertainty.  The portraits as well as the group shot all come from the Seattle School District’s Archives – thanks to Archivists Aaren L. Purcell.  That is Lou R. Key posing with her in the Campfire group shot, and surely one or more of those in the three remaining single shots are also of Ms. Key.  But not all three.   Nos. 2 & 4 appear in the same informal group photo of teachers.

Public school teacher Lou R. Key with her Campfire group.  (Courtesy, Seattle School District Archive)
Public school teacher Lou R. Key with her Campfire group. (Courtesy, Seattle School District Archive)

Most likely three of these four are Lou Key, but not all of them.

Again, teachers No. 2 and 4 are from the same group photograph, but does either of them look more like Lou R. Key in photo No. 1, far-left, than the other?  To my eye No’s 2 and 3 look alike.

ST April 15, 1956 Rites for Miss Key, res 2104 7th ave. W.b

614 W. CROCKETT

The house on the east 1/2 of lot 20 (614 W. Crockett) was built in 1914

as a one story house with 3 rooms in the attic.  The first owner noted

is the Seattle Federal Saving and Loan Co., 11/10/1938.  It was

subsequently purchased by Eunice C. Smith in 1941, George & Loa Gratias

in 1952, John H. Wadeson in April 1961 and the Ruth D. Coone (?) in June

1961.  It missed having asbestos siding put on.

2102 7TH AVE. WEST

On the W 1/2 of lot 20 is the house at 2102 7th Ave. W.  It was built in

1905 and apparently remodeled in 1919.  It is a one story house with a

garage in the basement.  The original siding was cedar but that was

crossed out and “Metal 8″ was added, possibly in 1957.  The first owner

noted was Elsie M. Schroeder as of 6/27/1922.  Aurilla Doerner et al

bought the property in 1972.

* ST Dec. 19-1909 John Davis listing for Rent, Unfurnished houses”: 2102 7th Ave. W., 4-rm mod cost.16.00 (dollars a month I assume)

* ST July 30, 1978 Wallace & Wheeler, Inc. listing  QUEEN ANNE 2102 7TH AVE. W. $46,500 AN ENCHANTING SMALL HOME, WITH PUGET SOUND view FOR THE SINGLE OR COUPLE WHO WANT a nice neighborhood – in the city, charming living room with fireplace, small dining, I bedroom, basement, garage.  See  today with Marybelle Eggertsen or call 524-6210 or 325-9862 (eves)

* 1938 Polk: A.A.Schroeder  (a.a.schroeder shows up as a realtor in 4-7-29)

2104 7th ave. W

Lot 19, 2104 7th Ave. W., was a two story house built in 1905.  The

first owner noted is Jessie Schwartz who bought it on 8/12/1936.  Harold

F. Anderson bought the property in 1972.  This house also had asbestos

siding put on in 1957.

2104 7th ave. W

* ST 5-7-1906 MB. CRANE & CO. List rentals with us we advertise – we rent. HOUSES $22.00 – 2104 7th Ave. W.   6-room modern house; com. Fix

* ST 7-6-06  CRANE & Co.  2104 7th Ave W. 6-room modern hose; very fine view; on car line

* ST 4-15-56  Rites for Miss Key ex-teacher.  Christian Science funeral service for Miss Lou R. Key, a retire Seattle elementary school teach will be held at 2 in Johnson and Hamilton chapel. Cremation will follow.  Miss Key died Friday at her home, 2104 Seventh Ave. S. She retired about five years ago after teaching in Seattle schools about 40 years.  She taught many years at John Muir School and later at Leschi.  Born in Missouri grad of Cottey Junior College Nevada, Mo.  Member of 4th Church of Christ, Scientist.  Survivors include three sisters and a brother in the East.

* ST Jan 29, 1920  Lou R. Key mistaken for a man when Key is a candidate for a Times contest to send 6 teachers to Europe battlefields and 4 other teachers to Yellowstone park.  Of the 191 candidates only 18 are men, Times makes the point “ONLY 18 MEN ON LIST OF HONOR – Women Instructors Not only One who Hope to Visit Battlefields of Europe.  Votes are Pouring in . . . Eighteen forlorn gentlemen hemmed in by prejudice and necessity of hearing out their ‘ladies first’ principles, yet wanting to go to Europe as guests of The Times.  That is the status of mere man in the teachers’ selection balloting being conducted by The Seattle Times.

* ST Feb. 28, 1926 Benefit for Orthopedic Hosp. March 15. North Queen Anne Guild to give Bridge and Mah Jong Tea at Olympia.  Spanish Ballroom Among reservations are Mrs. Lou R. Key. (The school teacher Lou Key is mistaken for a man.)

* Lou R. Key listed at Muir school in 1921 and at Leschi school in 1942 & 1944 last times listing before funeral notice.

* Polke 1938 directory: 2104 7th Ave. W.  Richard C. Outsen   ST 10-3-1951 Jesdame Richard C. Outsend listed as member of Dandleers Dancing Club executive committee, beginning its seventh year and will hold its first of six dances sat eve at 8:30 in Women’s Century club.

2108 7th Ave. W.

The house on lot 18, 2108 7th Ave. W. was built in 1906.  The first

owner shown is H. I. Pappe who bought it on 8/19/1926.  It was a two

story building.  It was purchased in 1941 by Frank M. Heyland.  Asbestos

siding was added to the house in 1957.

* Only one listing that on Sept 22, 1946 Frank L. McGuire, Inc. Open for Inspection: 2 to 3 pm 2108 7th Ave. W. $7,000 Queen Anne 3-B R. Home. Full basement garage hdw floors, tiled kitchen, close to school, bus, shopping district. Call Mr. Neal Mitchell SE 1100

* 1938 Polk: Andrew Fyfe, landscape gardener.   ST 2-7-1950 obit.   65 years old died in home at 2138 4th ave w after a short illness. Born in Dundee Scotland, live in Seattle for 31 years. He was a landscape gardener. Survived by wife Elizabeth daughter Betty and Mrs Lillian Hansen, Son Andrew Fyfe Jr. and two grand children all of Seattle.

2110 7th Ave. W.   

For the house on lot 17, 2110 7th Ave. W., it was built in 1905 as a one

family dwelling, one story with attic (two rooms in attic).  There is a

note that a permit was taken out for a new garage.  The only owner shown

is G. S. Hamman who bought the property 10/24/1958.  Unfortunately the

name from c. 1937 was erased.

* ST 10-22-21   Having to do with S.Times sport contest in Upper Woodland Park but with contestant from Q. Anne Hill connected with Coe School -  Stuart Curtis 13 years old 2110 7th Ave. W. / David Curtis 11 years old 2110 7th Ave W.   1921 POLK has a Gold N. Curtis living at 2110 7th Ave.W. and listed as a “driver”   In Stimes for June 12, 1936 under Marriage licenses Gold M. Curtis, Legal , Wenatchee, and Almoa Porter, Legal, Wenatchee are listed.  Don’t know what the “legal” means.  It is commonplace in these listings but not in the majority of them.

* ST 8-16-73 Obit for Harry T. Sappenfield – 63 at 2110 7th Ave. ww2 vet. & retired longshoreman Local 19.  Viola wife. Bleitz funeral home

* 1938 Polk Vacant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: Lutherans on the Move

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN:  Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill.  Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner.  (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)
THEN: Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill. Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner. (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)
NOW:  Looking northeast from 4th and Pine may we imagine the somewhat Gothic qualities of Westlake Center’s front door a fitting repeat for the Lutheran church that 125 years earlier first distinguished this corner with its grand steeple?
NOW: Looking northeast from 4th and Pine may we imagine the somewhat Gothic qualities of Westlake Center’s front door a fitting repeat for the Lutheran church that 125 years earlier first distinguished this corner with its grand steeple?

On April 28 Denny Park Lutheran Church  celebrated its 125th Anniversary.  Thru the years the parish has changed its name and affiliations a few times while building four sanctuaries on four different corners. All were sited near the business district – at the expanding northern end of it.

As an example, this, the first of the congregation’s homes, was built quickly at the northeast corner of Pine and 4th on a lot that cost $2,000 in 1888 and was sold for $19,000 a dozen years later.  The congregation then soon moved seven blocks north to Fifth and Wall and built again on a cheaper lot.  These adept economics were typical of many congregations sitting with their churches on Seattle lots made increasingly valuable during those most booming years of the city’s growth.

Looking south over Third Avenue from Denny Hill ca. 1885.  The first Lutheran parish in Seattle, the Swedish Lutheran Church, still bottom-left near the northeast corner of Third Avenue and Pike Street.  Note territorial university on Denny Knoll and behind it and to the left the first part of Providence Hospital at the southeast corner of 5th and Spring.
Looking south over Third Avenue from Denny Hill ca. 1885. The first Lutheran parish in Seattle, the Swedish Lutheran Church, rests bottom-left near the northeast corner of Third Avenue and Pike Street. Note the territorial university on Denny Knoll and behind it and to the left the first part of Providence Hospital at the southeast corner of 5th and Spring.  On the horizon some of the first growth forest still holds on Beacon Hill. [Near the bottom of this week's offering in the fourth subject up from the bottom, the same small frame church is seen ca. 1909 in a photo taken from an upper floor or roof of the Washington Hotel.  The white church has dimmed considerably.  The Swedes have long since moved on.]
Named the Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church by its 16 founding members in 1888, services were first held nearby in the Swedish Lutheran Church and when ready in the basement of this their own first sanctuary.  To build such a stately tower must have required the charitable labor of at least a few skilled Scandinavian carpenters.  By 1890 there were twenty churches within six blocks of these Lutherans at 4th and Pine, and seven of these twenty were identified by their attachment to Sweden, Norway, and/or Denmark.  And the Scandinavian migration to Puget Sound picked-up in the 1890s when thousands more moved here, for nearly everything was like the old country: the fish, the trees, the dirt, the snow-capped peaks but without a state religion.

The second sanctuary also on the doomed Denny Hill.
The Lutheran’s second sanctuary also on the doomed Denny Hill.

Leaving this southeast slope of Denny Hill in 1904, the new parish – with less tower but more pews – was still located on the doomed Denny Hill. Then five years later the second sanctuary was razed with the hill and these Lutherans were forced to build sanctuary number three.   Erected at Boren and Virginia, it was the congregation’s home from 1912 to 1939 when they moved again, this time to Eighth and John.  The parish then changed its name to Denny Park Lutheran Church identifying with the “green pastures” of its neighbor, the city’s oldest public park.

News of Norwegian Lutheran's 50th Anniversary printed on the religion page for the Nov. 26, 1938 Seattle Times.
News of Norwegian Lutheran’s 50th Anniversary printed on the religion page for the Nov. 26, 1938 Seattle Times.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?    Mostly photos Jean, although we will start with another feature, one that looks east on Pine Street from near 2nd Avenue in the early 1890s.  It includes our Lutherans at the northeast corner of 4th and Pine, the Methodist Protestants at the southeast corner of 3rd and Pine.  The feature first appeared in Pacific on March 2, 1986, and is almost entirely about the Methodists – bless them.

Looking east on Pine, ca. 1892, from near Second Avenue.
Looking east on Pine, ca. 1892, from near Second Avenue.

METHODIST PROTESTANTS at 3rd and PINE, ca. 1892

(First appeared in Pacific, March 2, 1986)

            The first two churches in Seattle were both Methodist.  One was Methodist Episcopalian and the other Methodist Protestant. Long before any Methodists settled in Seattle, their denomination split over how much power to give bishops.

            In 1865, when the Methodist Protestants of Seattle built their church, the primary difference between it and the earlier Methodist Episcopal sanctuary was not doctrine but color. The first church was white and the new MP sanctuary was painted brown. From then on they were known simply as the white and brown churches.

            Here the “Brown Church” has lightened up, with the third “permanent” home for the congregation. The original brown colored church at the northwest corner of Second Avenue and Madison Street was replaced in 1883 with an enlarged sanctuary. Its new stone veneer skin, however, did not save it from the “Great Fire” of 1889. This is the parish that the congregation, after worshiping for a year in tents, built in 1890 at the southeast corner of Pine Street and Third Avenue.

            Clark Davis became pastor in 1885. He bought the lot and built this church for about $40,000. Next door he raised a comfortable parsonage for himself, his wife Cleo and their two sons. The Gothic Revival sanctuary could seat 1,000 and often did. Clark was ambitious and in 1896, after resigning his pastorate, he went for and won the jobs of registrar at the University of Washington and secretary to its Board of Regents.

Regrade work on Pine Street looking northeast into the front "hump" of Denny Hill with the hotel still on top.  Note the tower for the fire station far right.
Regrade work on Pine Street looking northeast into the front “hump” of Denny Hill with the hotel still on top. Note the tower for the fire station far right.

            The Pine Street Regrade (1903-06) lowered this comer 10 feet and converted the church basement into its first floor. With regrades on Third Avenue and Denny Hill coming at them, the parishioners sold their comer for $100,000 and moved in 1906 to a new stone church on Capitol Hill. As soon as the Methodists moved out, the Third Avenue Theater moved in.

Dated 1904, the stereo looks south on Third Avenue from the Washington Hotel (built as the Denny Hotel).  Note the fire station at the northeast corner of Pine and Third and the one-block long counterbalance trolley either climbing the hill from Pine to the hotel's front portico or descending from it.
Dated 1904, the stereo looks south on Third Avenue from the Washington Hotel (built as the Denny Hotel). Note the fire station at the northeast corner of Pine and Third across Pine from the Methodists.  Note also the one-block long counterbalance trolley either climbing the hill from Pine to the hotel’s front portico or the opposite.
Pine Street Regrade looking west from 4th Avenue ca. 1906.  The Lutherans are behind the photographer off-frame to the right.  The north facade of the Methodist-Protestant church stands on the left.
Pine Street Regrade looking west from 4th Avenue ca. 1906.  Fire Station No. 2 is on the left. The Lutherans are behind the photographer off-frame to the right. The north facade of the Methodist-Protestant church stands on the left.
A detail from the 1890s Sanborn real estate map includes the Norwegian Danish parish, the Methodists, the fire station and North School, one of the earliest of school structures and pictured below.
A detail from the 1890s Sanborn real estate map includes the Norwegian Danish parish, the Methodists, the Fire Station No. 2 and next to the station the Pine Street School, one of the earliest of the community’s school structures and pictured below.

 

The Pine Street School, aka North School, on the north side of Pine between Third and Fourth Avenues..
The Pine Street School, aka North School, on the north side of Pine between Third and Fourth Avenues.
With the steeple of the new Norwegian Danish Lutheran sanctuary on the left, and construction still on the Methodist Protestant Church, on the right, this F. Jay Haynes photo looks southeast from Denny Hill to First Hill.  Note the greenbelt of the university campus at the scene's center.  The green reaches north as far as Union Street, the border there of the original campus.
With the steeple of the new Norwegian Danish Lutheran sanctuary on the left, and construction still in progress on the Methodist Protestant Church, on the right, this F. Jay Haynes photo looks southeast from Denny Hill to First Hill. Note the greenbelt of the university campus at the scene’s center. The green reaches north as far as Union Street, the border there of the original campus.
The Lutherans here hold the bottom-center of another recording of First Hill, or part of it, from Denny Hill.  The barren or exposed patch is at one of hill's steepest points, the intersection of University Street and 9th Avenue.
The Lutherans here hold the bottom-center of another recording of First Hill, or part of it, from Denny Hill. The barren or exposed patch is at one of hill’s steepest points, the intersection of University Street and 9th Avenue.  Today Horizon House sits to the left of  that patch and above it.
Looking northwest from First Hill back towards Denny Hill with the Washington Hotel (first named the Denny Hotel) on top and a hazy Magnolia peninsula upper-right.  Such a pan is, of course, well appointed with landmarks, and these include the Norwegian Danish Lutherans at 4th and Pine, although sans steeple.  The spire has been removed.  Near the bottom of this feature is a triad of looks north on 4th from Pike that also shows the top-less Lutherans - a detail of them.
Looking northwest from First Hill back towards Denny Hill with the Washington Hotel (first named the Denny Hotel) on top and a hazy Magnolia peninsula above it. Such a pan is, of course, well appointed with landmarks, and these include the Norwegian Danish Lutherans at 4th and Pine, although sans steeple. The spire has been removed.  The Methodist Protestants are more easily found – the Gothic south facade is fairly obvious below the hotel and to the left.  To find the Lutherans go to the right about 1/5th the width of the pan – or the one block between Third and Fourth Aves. on Pine St.  Near the bottom of this feature is a triad of looks north on 4th from Pike that also shows the top-less Lutherans – a detail of them – as the temporary home for an undertaker.  (A Reminder: DOUBLE-CLICK this pan for the full enlargement – at least it takes two clicks on my MAC to see it all.)
Looking northeast at Denny Hill from First Hill.
Looking northeast at Denny Hill from First Hill.   The Norwegian Danish Lutherans at the northeast corner of 4th and Pine appear here, from the rear, on the left.  These Lutherans are sometimes mistaken for Baptists – the Swedish Baptists – that are nearby at the northeast corner of Olive and 5th Ave., and with their own slender steeple.  They – or it – appear here on the far right.  North on 4th or up the hill from the Lutherans much of the hill is yet to be developed with the row houses that are included in the next photo below.
These row houses on the west side of Fourth Ave. south of Stewart Street nearly match another row build earlier on 2nd Avenue south of Stewart.  Like the hill they were short-lived, razed with the hill.  (Courtesy Louise Lovely)
These row houses on the west side of Fourth Ave., south of Stewart Street nearly match another row built earlier on 2nd Avenue also south of Stewart. Like the hotel they were short-lived, razed with the hill. (Courtesy Louise Lovely)
Looking south on 4th Ave. from between Stewart and Virginia Streets ca. 1886.
A few years before the Lutherans, looking south on 4th Ave. from between Stewart and Virginia Streets ca. 1886.    This steep ascent is still evident in the two subjects that follow, which look thru the same blocks in the opposite direction, north from Pike Street, and about 20 years later.

Looking north up both the new Westlake Ave, at the center, and the old 4th Ave. still climbing Denny Hill on the left.  The cross-street is Pike.  Here, as in the recording that follows, the front of the Norwegian-Danish Lutheran parish can be seen to the left of the flatiron Plaza Hotel on the left.  [We have visited this intersection, and Westlake too, many times and readers may wish to do a key word search for either or both.]
Looking north up both the new Westlake Ave, at the center, and the old 4th Ave. still climbing Denny Hill on the left. The cross-street is Pike. Here, as in the recording that follows, the front of the Norwegian-Danish Lutheran parish can be seen to the left of the flatiron Plaza Hotel on the left. [We have visited this intersection, and Westlake too, many times and readers may wish to do a key word search for either or both.]
NEXT we will ZOOM-IN on another look up 4th Ave from about the same time as the above classic.  Both are from the Webster and Stevens Collection kept at the Museum of History and Industry.

Click TWICE to ENLARGE or wait for the increased sizes of the next two subjects.  The old spire-less Lutherans to the rear of the Plaza Hotel, across Pine Street, are home here and briefly, for brother Joseph P. and Ambrose A. Collins Undertaking Parlor.  You can read some of their signs painted to the side of the still not so old church.
Click TWICE to ENLARGE or wait for the increased sizes of the next two subjects. The old spire-less Lutherans to the rear of the Plaza Hotel, and across Pine Street, are briefly home here for brothers Joseph P. and Ambrose A. Collins’ Undertaking Parlor. You can read some of their signs painted to the side of the still not so old church.

XXX-UNDERSTAKE-zoom-2-WEB

The COLLINS BROS sign is seen, in part, right of center.  Further up and north on 4th Ave, a three story apartment building - or rooming house - with open balconies facing 4th Ave. sits at the northeast corner of 4th Ave. and Steward Street.  This structure appears as well in the subject printed first below this one.
The COLLINS BROS sign is seen, in part, right of center. Further up and north on 4th Ave, a three story apartment building – or rooming house – with open balconies facing 4th Ave. sits at the northeast corner of 4th Ave. and Steward Street. This structure appears as well in the subject printed first below this one.
The shadow of Denny Hotel (aka Washington Hotel) darkens the bottom-right corner of this A. Curtis shot that looks east from Denny Hill to Capitol Hill.  The structure noted in the 4th Ave. subject printed above this, appears here center-bottom at the northeast corner of 4th and Stewart.  Four blocks to the west on Stewart, the bright white west facade of the Swedish Lutheran Church (Gesthemane Lutheran) shines from the southeast corner of 8th and Stewart.  The climb east from 7th Ave. is considerably steeper than it is now and since Stewart was regrade through this block and its neighboring blocks too. At the bottom-right corner, Olive Way originates at 4th Ave.  The steepless first home of St. Marks Episcopal is squeezed onto this flatiron block with the parsonage behind it.  The slender steeple of the Swedish Baptist Church ascends above the Episopalians.  It sits are the northeast corner of Olive and 5th and so will be cut-through/eliminated with the creation Westlake Ave. in 1906.
The shadow of Denny Hotel (aka Washington Hotel) darkens the bottom-left corner of this A. Curtis shot that looks east from Denny Hill to Capitol Hill. The structure noted in the 4th Ave. subject printed above this scene, appears here center-bottom at the northeast corner of 4th and Stewart. Five blocks to the west on Stewart, the bright white west facade of the Swedish Lutheran Church (Gethsemane Lutheran) shines from the southeast corner of 9th and Stewart. The climb east from 8th Ave. (home for Greyhound)  is considerably steeper than it is now.  Stewart was regraded through this block and its neighboring blocks too. At the bottom-right corner, Olive Way originates at 4th Ave. The steepel-less first home of St. Marks Episcopal is squeezed onto this flatiron block with the parsonage to this side of it. The slender steeple of the Swedish Baptist Church ascends above the Episcopalians. It sits at the northeast corner of Olive and 5th and so will be cut-through/eliminated with the creation Westlake Ave. in 1906.   Work on the Seattle High School (Broadway Hi.) is reaching its top stories in 1900-1901, on the right horizon.
To earlier views looking east from the top of Denny Hill - for comparing to Curtis' ca. 1901 subject above it.  Notes the Swedish Baptists at 5th and Olive appear in both, as does Seattle Electric on the south side of Olive and as far as Pine Street.  They ran the trollies.
To earlier views looking east from the top of Denny Hill – included for comparisons to Curtis’ ca. 1901 subject above it. Note that the Swedish Baptists at 5th and Olive appear in both, as does Seattle Electric on the south side of Olive and as far as Pine Street. They ran the trollies.
The razing of the Methodist Protestant church ca. 1909.  The congregation has moved to its new home on Capitol Hill's 16th Ave.  This church at the southeast corner of Pine and 3rd was last used by the 3rd Ave. Theatre, which was forced from their stage(s) at the northeast corner of Madison and Third with the 1906-7 regrade of Third Ave.   Although the same regrade reached this intersection it did not destroy the church.  Instead a new main floor at the old basement level was added, and that change is witnessed here by the brighter coloring of the hall's west and south facades at the sidewalk/street level.  Above the church/theatre the top floors are being added to archtect Van Siclen's Seaboard Building at the northeast corner of Pike and 4th Ave.    St. James Cathedral, still with its dome, is on the horizon.  St. James was dedicated in 1907.
The razing of the Methodist Protestant church ca. 1909. The congregation has moved to its new home on Capitol Hill’s 16th Ave. This church at the southeast corner of Pine and 3rd was last used by the 3rd Ave. Theatre, which was forced from its stage(s) at the northeast corner of Madison and Third with the 1906-7 regrade of Third Ave. Although the same regrade reached this intersection it did not destroy the church. Instead a new main floor at the old basement level was added, and that change is witnessed here by the brighter coloring of the hall’s west and south facades at the sidewalk/street level. The brightness is dappled by what are certainly also colorful advertising broadsides.  Above the church/theatre the top floors are being added to architect Van Siclen’s Seaboard Building at the northeast corner of Pike and 4th Ave. St. James Cathedral, still with its dome, is on the horizon. St. James was dedicated in 1907.  The King County Courthouse is also on the horizon, but far right at 7th and Terrace.
The flatiron Plaza Hotel is left-of-center, and to this side of it at the northeast corner of 4th and Pine is the new masonry structure that took the place of the Lutheran's church.  This dates from ca. 1909 near the end of the Denny Regrade, or that part of it that smoothed the old hill neighborhood as far east as Fifth Avenue.
The flatiron Plaza Hotel is left-of-center, and to this side of it at the northeast corner of 4th and Pine is the new masonry structure that replaced the Lutheran’s church and the Collins brothers’ funeral home. This dates from ca. 1909 near the end of the Denny Regrade, or that part of it that smoothed the old hill neighborhood as far east as Fifth Avenue.
The same intersection of Pine and 4th - right-of-center - as that shown at street-level in the subject above this one.  This was photographed from an upper floor (or roof) of the New Washington Hotel at 2nd and Stewart.
The same intersection of Pine and 4th – right-of-center – as that shown at street-level in the subject above this one. This was photographed from an upper floor (or roof) of the New Washington Hotel at 2nd and Stewart.
A parade heads south on 4th in the block between Olive Way and Pine Street on May 30, 1953.  The Lutheran corner is - or was - on the far right.  Behind it the Hotel Ritz was home for the Carpenters Union.  Beyond that the Mayflower Hotel and the Times Square Building sit respectively on the south and north sides of Olive Way, and still do. Note the once popular Great Northern goat sign down the way.   Mid-block is the once popular Ben Paris.
A parade heads south on 4th in the block between Olive Way and Pine Street on May 30, 1953. The Lutheran corner is – or was – on the far right. Behind it the Hotel Ritz was home for the Carpenters Union. Beyond that the Mayflower Hotel and the Times Square Building sit respectively on the south and north sides of Olive Way and still do. Note the once popular Great Northern goat sign down the way. Closer at mid-block is the once popular Ben Paris.

 

 

 

 

 

=====

A few more photos will be added tomorrow after breakfast.  For now it is “climb the stairway to nighty-bears.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: Echo Lake Landmark

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN:
THEN: Three Echo Lake proprietors are signed in this ca. 1938 tax photo. On the right is Scotty’s hanging invitation to his Paradise. Eddie Erickson’s sign to his Echo Lake Camp appears, in part, far left. Between them is Aurora’s enduring landmark, Melby’s Echo Lake Tavern. (Courtesy Washington State Archive, Puget Sound Region.)
echo-lake-bldg-lr
NOW: At 19508 Aurora Ave., Melby’s Tavern survives as Woody’s. It has kept the distinguished roofline but neither the many-paned windows nor any reminder of the lake.

If for your next road trip north to Everett across our rolling “North Plateau” you should choose Aurora – and we recommend it – keep an eye out for this by now cherished landmark.  You will find it a few blocks south of the county line.  If you pay attention, the two-story flatiron Echo Lake Tavern, will seem to be pointing it’s narrowest end at you just above and west of its namesake lake.   

The Tavern on Jan 7, 1970 and another tax photo courtesy of the Washington State Archive.
The Tavern on Jan 7, 1970 and another tax photo courtesy of the Washington State Archive.
A Seattle Times clip on Echo Lake opportunities from
A Seattle Times clip on Echo Lake opportunities from May 31, 1905

In the summer of 1905 construction on the Seattle-Everett approached what artful promoters called the Echo Lake Garden Tracks.  For “$500 dollars, $50 dollars down and $10 a month” five acres parcels were plugged as “suitable for chicken duck and goose ranches.” Herman Butzke opened the Echo Lake Bathing Beach instead.  Butzke had been admired as a singing bartender at Seattle’s famed “Billy the Mug” saloon. He was also a picture-framer, and finally before opening his resort, a plumber at the nearby Firlands Sanatorium.  His first customers at the lake were nurses who paid a nickel to use his shelters for changing.

Herman Butzke's Oct. 3, 1930 obit in the Seattle Times.
Herman Butzke’s Oct. 3, 1930 obit in the Seattle Times.

Click the Firland text below TWICE to enlarge.

xFirland-page-one-WEB

The Firland feature first appeared in Pacific on
The Firland feature first appeared in Pacific on Nov. 18, 1990.

This landmark tavern came later.  After a new route for Aurora was graded here in the mid 1920s, Echo Lake resident Theodore Millan built the two-story roadhouse in 1928 on its triangular lot squeezed between the new Aurora and the old Echo Lake Pl. N.  Here the latter leads to the canoes, tents and new beds of Scotty’s short-lived Paradise.  With the uncorking of prohibition in late 1933, Millan rented his flatiron to Carl and Jane Melby, for their Tavern.

Vicki Stiles, the helpful and scholarly Executive Director of the Shoreline Historical Museum (nearby at 18501 Linden Ave. N.), had heard rumors that the florist Carl Melby had more than liked his booze during prohibition as well. The sleuthing Stiles discovered that Melby had been arrested at least three times transporting mostly illegal Canadian liquor.  (We follow below with several Seattle Times clips on Melby’s career.) One night at Sunset beach near Anacortes he was chased into the Strait of Juan de Fuca up to his neck, collared and pulled ashore.  In 1942 the then 56-year-old tavern owner was finally felled and also near Anacortes.  While fishing off Sinclair Island, he was leveled by a heart attack. Considering Carl’s inclinations his death may have been mellowed by liquor – legal bonded liquor.

Seattle Times, Dec. 27, 1924 - "illegal search"?
Seattle Times, Dec. 27, 1924 – “illegal search”?
Seattle Times, Jan 15, 1928
Seattle Times, Jan 15, 1928
Seattle Times, Jan. 29, 1928.
Seattle Times, Jan. 29, 1928.
Seattle Times March 1, 1928
Seattle Times March 1, 1928
Seattle Times, May 14, 1928
Seattle Times, May 14, 1928
Seattle Times, March-13-1932
Seattle Times, March-13-1932
Seattle Times, March 21, 1932
Seattle Times, March 21, 1932
Carl Melby hooks his mortality.  Seattle Times Dec. 8, 1942
Carl Melby hooks his mortality. Seattle Times Dec. 8, 1942

 

Twenty-one years before his death notice Carl gets his first "personal notice" in Seattle Times for April 7, 1921.
Twenty-one years before his death notice Carl gets his first “personal notice” in The Seattle Times for April 7, 1921.
Three years after his passing Melby's popularity endures with his namesake tavern, which is busted for selling beer to minors.  Seattle Times Oct. 8, 1945
Three years after his passing Melby’s popularity endures with his namesake tavern, which is busted for selling beer to minors. Seattle Times Oct. 8, 1945
Four members of the Aurora Commercial Club posing - twice.
Four members of the Aurora Commercial Club posing – twice.  No date.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   Yes, and starting with more Aurora by returning with the “Edge Patch” below to the extended feature we ran here on March 16 last, which was, I think, shortly before we started having consistent inconsistency from both our blog’s server and it program.   So touch Signal Gas immediately below and repeat a variety of what are mostly early speedway views on Aurora.

 

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A Seattle Everett Interurban trestle at the north end of Echo Lake
A Seattle Everett Interurban trestle at the north end of Echo Lake (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
The "repeat" used in the 1985 Pacific reflecting on her studies at the U.W. then, perhaps on Northwest History.  This crude copy was pulled from the Times clipping.
The “repeat” used in the 1985 Pacific.  Genevieve McCoy reflecting on her studies at the U.W.. This crude copy was pulled from the Times clipping.

ECHO LAKE

(First appears in Pacific, July 7, 1985)

            Almost half a century ago, it took a little over an hour to go from Seattle to Everett on the Interurban. The electric cars reached 60 mph on the straight stretches – an adventure still remembered by many. The Interurban stopped at North Park, Pershing, Foy, Richmond Highlands, A1derwood, Ronald – names still familiar. It also delivered passengers to several lakeside stations as well – including Martha, Silver, Ballinger, Bitter and Echo lakes. The name “Bitter” was misleading, however, because that lake was the spot for the decidedly sweet excitement of P1ayland, for many years the region’s largest amusement park. But few remember Echo Lake as it appears in this week’s historical setting.

Bitter Lake station beside Playland
Bitter Lake station beside Playland
The Giant Whirl at Playland
The Giant Whirl at Playland
Playland's miniture train with the Giant Whirl beyond
Playland’s miniature train with the Giant Whirl beyond

            Construction began on the Interurban in 1902, in Ballard. By 1905 it reached 14 miles out to Lake Ballinger, just beyond Echo Lake. The line prospered, at first not so much from paying customers as by hauling lumber and its byproducts and accessories. It’s a fair speculation that Fred Sander, the Interurban’s builder, hired Asahel Curtis to photograph this morning view of the new-looking pile trestle that spanned the swampy northeast comer of Echo Lake.

The Interurban at Alderwood Manor.
The Interurban at Alderwood Manor.

            Sander soon sold out the streetcar company to Stone and Webster. By 1910 they completed the line to Everett and replaced Sander’s little passenger cars (like the one posing in the photo) with 10 long and plush air-conditioned common carriers. In 1912 the company also buried its Echo Lake wood trestle beneath a landfill.

            The next year, 1913, Herman Butzke, his wife and daughter, Florence, moved into a two-room cabin they built at the southwest comer -  or opposite shore from the Curtis photo – of Echo Lake. They were the third family to move to the lake, and Florence Butzke Erickson still lives there. [In 1985]

The Everett Interurban about to take on a bundle of newspapers at the Seattle terminal for both buses and trolleys. (Courtesy Warren Wing)
The Everett Interurban about to take on a bundle of newspapers at the Seattle terminal for both buses and trolleys. (Courtesy Warren Wing)

            During the summer of 1917, nurses and doctors from the new and nearby Firland Sanatorium periodically escaped from their care for tubercular patients to swim in the clear waters of Echo Lake. With their help, Butzke built a few lakeside dressing rooms, and thereby began the half-century of the Echo Lake Bathing Beach. (It closed in 1966 for the construction of condos.)

            The Seattle-Everett Interurban did not last so long, but When it did quit, it was one of the last of the nation’s rapid-transit systems to surrender to the new taste in transport: the car. The modern pathway for the auto was the Pacific Coast Highway – or, in town, Aurora Avenue. It, like the Interurban, also passed by Echo Lake, and in the late 1920s when it was being built, property lots about the lake were being pushed as the “highlight of Plateau Norte, the most beautiful and attractive homesite addition ever offered … A heavily traveled highway such as the new Seattle-Everett 100-foot boulevard is like a gold-bearing stream.”

The Everett Interurban crossing the Pacific Coast Highway aka Aurora Ave near N. 157th Street (unless I am fooled.)   Courtesy Warren Wing
The Everett Interurban crossing the Pacific Coast Highway aka Aurora Ave near N. 157th Street (unless I am fooled.) Courtesy Warren Wing
An alternative: the bus to Everett.
An alternative: the bus to Everett.

            Within 30 years, this gold-bearing stream would be stripped of its glitter and give way to the freeway. Now [1985] Interstate 5 is in its third decade and looking, perhaps, for the relief of rapid transit. Much of the old Everett Interurban right-of-way is still intact: a grassy strip of power poles and little parks. It seems to be waiting for the Interurban.

A Standard Oil station near Echo Lake - another tax photo from the late 1930s.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive.)
A Standard Oil station near Echo Lake – another tax photo from the late 1930s. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive.)
Somewhere on the road to Everett from Seattle in 1913.
Somewhere on the road to Everett from Seattle in 1913.