Seattle Now & Then: The Latona Bridge

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The Latona Bridge was constructed in 1891 along the future line of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge.  The photo was taken from the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway right-of-way, now the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. The Northlake Apartment/Hotel on the right survived and struggled into the 1960s.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
THEN: The Latona Bridge was constructed in 1891 along the future line of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge. The photo was taken from the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway right-of-way, now the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. The Northlake Apartment/Hotel on the right survived and struggled into the 1960s. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
NOW: Knowing the shared line-up of the two bridges, and the footprint of the Northlake Apartments on what is now the parking lot for Ivar’s Salmon House, it was easy for Jean to make his confident repeat from the old railroad bed at the top of the 5th Avenue N.E.steps.
NOW: Knowing the shared line-up of the two bridges, and the footprint of the Northlake Apartments on what is now the parking lot for Ivar’s Salmon House, it was easy for Jean to make his confident repeat from the old railroad bed at the top of the 5th Avenue N.E.steps.   John Sundsten came along as beholder.

This, I believe, is the oldest surviving photograph of the Latona Bridge.  For the 27 years following 1891 it was the only span where Lake Union conveniently channels into Portage Bay.  The pile-driven bridge was constructed to carry David Denny’s electric trolley into the then new Latona and Brooklyn (University District) additions and to real estate as far north as Ravenna Park, the trolley terminus.

Another early look at the Latona Bridge - but not as early.  This view from the cupola of Denny Hall dates from 1896 when the campus opened or soon after.  Queen Anne  Hill covers most of the horizon, although West Seattle takes some of it rare left.  The "Wallingford Peninsula" and future home of the Gas Works holds above the bridge.  The north end of Capitol Hill enters from the left to connect with the bridge.(Courtesy University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections)
Another early look at the Latona Bridge – but not as early. This view from the cupola of Denny Hall dates from 1896 when the campus opened or soon after. Queen Anne Hill covers most of the horizon, although West Seattle takes some of it far left. The “Wallingford Peninsula” and future home of the Gas Works, holds above the bridge. The north end of Capitol Hill enters from the left to connect with the bridge. (Courtesy University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections)

The state legislature’s Feb. 23rd 1891 recommendation that this “Interlaken” neighborhood become the University of Washington’s new home was encouraging to all north end developers, Denny included.  After the university’s 1895 move to the new campus most of the students rode the trolley to school. However, by then the earnest but in the end naïve younger of the pioneer Denny brothers, was bankrupt.

The nearly new Latona Bridge and much else can be found on this "Real Roads Map" from 1894.
(Click to Enlarge) The nearly new Latona Bridge and much else can be found on this “Real Roads Map” from 1894.   A rail head or spur off of the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern RR line leads to what in 1894 was the new U.W. Interlaken Campus construction site for the Administration Building, aka Denny Hall.   There is as yet no neighborhood named Wallingford, but Latona, its southeast corner, is there with its bridge.  “Ross” and “Boulevard” are map names here of size – names hardly known now.  And note, far right, how Foster Island is treated with bold type.  The “Shingle Capitol of the World,” Ballard, is well lined and dotted.
Five or six years later and the UW campus is dotted with its few first structures.
Five or six years later and the UW campus is dotted with its few first structures.  The future University District is still Brooklyn, the name chosen by its developer.  Latona abides, and its bridge too.  And here is Edgewater claiming much of Wallingford, which is still not named.  Fremont and Ross hold sides to a straightened Ross Creek, or Lake Union outlet.  It is shown or imagined as a “regularized ” channel, but in 1899 that is still a few years away.

A combination of the nation’s 1893 financial panic and poor investments quickly led to what Seattle trolley historian Leslie Blanchard rates as “unquestionably the most disastrous venture of its kind in the city’s history.” Much of the route was “inhabited only by squirrels and gophers.”  In 1890 David Denny, with Henry Fuhrman, opened the 160 acres of their namesake addition at the north end of Capitol Hill, here on the far south side of the Latona Bridge.  But where are the homes?  It is hard to find here any potential passengers or purchasers.

With meager evidence of the ambiguous captions in the Lowman family photo album, we will describe this view as looking south from north lake to the north end of Capitol Hill, which is
With meager evidence of the ambiguous captions in the Lowman family photo album, we will describe this view as looking south from north lake to the north end of Capitol Hill, which is the Denny Fuhrman addition in 1887, three years before it was opened, and four years before our “first photo” of the Latona Bridge.
A kind of "now" from Ivar's Salmon House and a few  years ago.
A kind of “now” from Ivar’s Salmon House and a few years ago.

But then where are the trolley wires on the Latona Bridge on our “first picture” of it?  Perhaps the photo was taken before the poles, rails, wires and hopes were in place for the bridge’s July 1, 1891 dedication.  Is that snow in the foreground or an extended spring puddle chilling enthusiasm?  By 1913 the spot got hot.  The Super of Public Utilities then counted an average of 23,058 passengers crossing the bridge every 24 hours, with the ironic result that in 1919 the at last bustling Latona would lose its bridge on 6th Avenue to the University District and its new and surviving cantilever span on 10th Avenue.

A Seattle Times clipping from Nov. 20, 1913.
A Seattle Times clipping from Nov. 20, 1913.  The clip’s band wagon claim that the canal is “within a twelve month of completion” exhibits industry about two years quicker than the canal’s builders.
Getting more service from our oft-used Baist Real Estate Map of 1912.  Note the yellow footprint for the hotel on Northlake Ave. between 4th and 5th Avenues, on lots 8 and 9 of the Latona Addition's 6th block.
Getting more service from our oft-used Baist Real Estate Map of 1912. Note the yellow footprint for the hotel (right-of-center) on the north side of Northlake Ave. between 4th and 5th Avenues, on lots 8 and 9 of the Latona Addition’s 6th block.   The north end of the Latona Bridge is illustrated, bottom-right.
A aerial of the Latona Hotel from the early 1930s - it seems.  4th Ave on the left and 5th at the top enter Northlake to the two sides - west and east - of the hotel.  Across Westlake is the cedar mills that Ivar razed for his Salmon House, which opened in 1969.
A detail of the Latona Hotel from an aerial of the early 1930s – it seems. 4th Ave on the left and 5th at the top enter Northlake to the sides – west and east – of the hotel. Across Westlake is the cedar mill that Ivar later purchased and razed for his Salmon House, which opened in 1969.
Another aerial of the neighborhood - perhaps from the same flight as that penultimate to this.  Note that the University Bridge at the bottom is two bridges.  The small two lane span was built for temporary service during the years that the wooden pilings of the original bridge's approaches were replaced in 1932-33 with the concrete pilings that still support it - we believe.
Another aerial of the neighborhood – perhaps from the same flight as that penultimate to this. Note that the University Bridge at the bottom is two bridges. The small two lane span at the bottom was built for temporary service during the years – 1932-33 – when the wooden pilings of the original bridge’s approaches were replaced in with the concrete pilings that still support it – we believe.
The Latona watefront ca. 1952, with Green Lake on top.
The Latona waterfront ca. 1952, with Green Lake on top.
This for some agoraphobic look north through the construction line for the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge includes a late glimpse of the Latona Hotel, far-right, across Northlake from it the Wigwam Shingle Mill.  This rare capture is shown again in one of the three linked photos featured below.
This for some agoraphobic look north through the construction line for the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge includes a late glimpse of the Latona Hotel, far-right, across Northlake from it the Wigwam Shingle Mill. This rare capture is shown again in one of the three linked photos featured below.
Robert Bradley's look over Grandma's Cookies and the Latona waterfront on January 17, 1960, to the University District, the Laurelhurst ridge and a Cascade horizon.
Robert Bradley’s look over Grandma’s Cookies and the Latona waterfront on January 17, 1960, to construction on the Ship Canal aka Freeway bridge, the University District, the Laurelhurst ridge and a Cascade horizon.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Surely Jean – a few more pictures and stories from the neighborhood – my neighborhood too, now for more than 30 years.  I was awakened by Mt. St. Helens in a Wallingford bed.   We wlll begin again with Ron Edge’s enterprise.  Ron shook this blog for past features that best fit this feature, which he introduced immediately below with three photo-links.  Following those we will lay out more from North Lake.

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Latona Bridges, side by side, ca. 1918
Latona Bridges, side by side, ca. 1918

BRIDGE to BRIDGE

(First appeared in Pacific, Jan. 13, 1991)

            The Latona Bridge, in its 11th hour, was two bridges whose antipathetic designs were best detected when they were opened – a here – to permit passage of any vessel that required the bridge tender to plod through the steps required to one bridge  (for trolleys) and swing the side (for everyone else).

            The original Latona Bridge was simple, with a fixed span.  The complicated mechanics shown here were required when the completion of the Ship Canal in 1916 opened Lake Washington to ocean-going ships. (The canal was dedication on July 4, 1917, but its use earlier, in the fall of 1916.) 

            The Latona Bridge was dedicated July 1, 1891 – 28 years to the day before the University Bridge, which replaced it, was opened with m8sic and speeches.  University of Washington history professor Edmond Meany was at both dedications and was the principal speaker at the second.

            The above view (with two bridges) was photographed from the University Bridge while it was under construction.  (The accompanying photo directly below looks north through the line of the University Bridge during its construction.)  The ridge lines of Wallingford and Queen Anne Hill are in the background.  

Construction of the University Bridge, recorded on March 21, 1918 from the south - Capitol Hill - side. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)
Construction of the University Bridge, recorded on March 21, 1918 from the south – Capitol Hill – side. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

 

Upper-left, Latona Bridge seen from the heights of a tank at the Gas Works, ca. 1907.
Upper-left, Latona Bridge seen from the prospect of a steel tank at the Gas Works, ca. 1907.
From Queen Anne Hill, ca. 1911, most of Wallingford with the temporary Stone Way Bridge (1911-1917) lower left, and the Latona Bridge (1891-1918) upper-right, in the distance beyond and above the Gas Works.
From Queen Anne Hill, ca. 1912, most of Wallingford with the temporary Stone Way Bridge (1911-1917) lower left, and the Latona Bridge (1891-1918) upper-right, in the distance beyond and above the Gas Works.

 

LATONA BRIDGE EDGE CLIPPINGS

A clipping from the very new Latona-Brooklyn news - Dec. 1, 1890.
A clipping from the very new Latona-Brooklyn news – Dec. 1, 1890.
An advertisement from the 1890 Polk City Directory, page. 35
An advertisement from the 1890 Polk City Directory, page. 35

 

From The Seattle Times, June 11, 1901.
From The Seattle Times, June 11, 1901.
 A clip from March 25, 1902
[Click Twice to Enlarge] A clip from March 25, 1902
The Seattle Times, June 10, 1902
The Seattle Times, June 10, 1902
From The Seattle Times, January 17, 1914
From The Seattle Times, January 17, 1914

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A NIGHT IN OLD MASONIC TEMPLE ADDENDUM – Jef Jaisun Pixs and Reports

Our old friend (who yet does not seem to age), rock-n-roller, bluesman, front-stage photographer, party-thrower, columnist, incessant wit and politico, Jef Jaisun sends this press-photo and clipping – his creations from a 1979 concert at the Capitol Hill Masonic Temple on Pine Street, the site of the Link Lingenbrink’s Artist League balls covered here earlier this week.  Thanks to Jef.

Butterfield-WEB

ButterfieldDankoStory2-WEB

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Night in Old Alexandria

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)
THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)
NOW: Built in 1914-16 to the designs of Seattle architect George Willis Lawton, the Masonic Temple was renovated as “The Egyptian” in the early 1980s.  It is home for the Seattle International Film Festival.  Here Jean has found some early birds waiting on a festival matinee.
NOW: Built in 1914-16 to the designs of Seattle architect George Willis Lawton, the Masonic Temple was renovated as “The Egyptian” in the early 1980s. It is home for the Seattle International Film Festival. Here Jean has found some early birds waiting on a festival matinee.

Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink, Seattle’s long-lived commercial artist and show card instructor, is almost certainly posing here on the stage of the Masonic Temple – although, as yet, I have not found him among the about 200 costumed Egyptians.

Arthur "Link" Lingenbrink figures
At the top, Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink lectures other artists on the “high aims” of the Seattle Art Club at the club’s first exhibit in the summer of 1921.
"Link" preparing to demonstrated and/or teach his show card talents.
“Link” preparing to demonstrated and/or teach his show card talents.

BELOW: Art offers a lecture on “show card writing” through The Seattle Art Club School in 1921.  Below that, he gives an illustrated lecture on his 1941 trip thru Mexico.  He has named it, “Our Allies to the South.”

teach ST-12-18-1921-Link-'show-card-writing'WEB

Link was one of the Seattle Fine Art Society’s more activist leaders in the 1920s.  He had the knack for delivering inspirational messages about art and culture at club meetings while also organizing club events, like their popular costume balls.  His illustrating hand was both fine and strong.  For instance, for this Nov. 24, 1921 revelry titled A Night in Old Alexandria, Link decorated the Temple with its Egyptian figures and symbols.  Arthur was also celebrated for his tableaus, a then popular art form that arranged actors and sets in recreations of famous paintings – with figures – on stage.

Arthur loaned me his cherished print of this ball during one of my many visits to the exotic environment of his Capitol Hill home in the mid 1980s.  I managed then to fill up a small suitcase with cassette recordings of Links reminiscences.  That the nonagenarian was an often ecstatic narrator was appreciated because Link repeated his best stories.

The Seattle Times splash on the Artist League's A Night in Old Alexandria for Feb. 2, 1922.
The Seattle Times splash on the Artist League’s A Night in Old Alexandria for Feb. 2, 1922.

1 Link's-Old-Alexander-poster-WEB

It was only weeks before his death in 1987 at the age of 94 that Arthur stopped taking the bus to join his brother Paul in their storefront sign shop on the border of both Capitol and First Hills.

Brothers Paul and Arthur (left and right, ca. 1984) in front of their sign shop on the 7th Avenue side of the old Eagles Auditorium, now part of ACT Theatre and the Convention Center.
Brothers Paul and Arthur (left and right, ca. 1984) in front of their sign shop on the 7th Avenue side of the old Eagles Auditorium, now part of ACT Theatre and the Convention Center, and an example of their early-century work at window dressing.

For readers so interested, Jean and I will be giving an illustrated lecture on First Hill History at Town Hall at 8th & Seneca St. on Tuesday, June 25th at 7:30 pm. (There’s a $5 fee.)  The Masonic Temple, aka The Egyptian, is nearby on Pine Street at Harvard Avenue and so is probably more often identified with Capitol Hill.  However, for the sake of both art and culture, during our presentation we will temporarily move the Egyptian over to First Hill or the hill to it.  Whatever, the lecture will still be at Town Hall and we plan to be there as well.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Yes Jean, and most of it holding on to Link, the record-setting sign painter (see the clips of his records far below) I met in the early 1980s and routinely visited until his passing in 1987.  Link, aka Arthur Lingenbring, past along most of the film he shot – both films and stills – of the local arts and the “charmed land” that surrounds us. I pull a few examples, and also print a few clippings on Link and/or by him.   Link wrote lots of rhyming poetry, but it was not his poems but his opinionated letters to editors that often enough got printed.   First however, we will  continue on with some more Alexandria and a “Miss Heywood” who judging by the attention he gave her – with his camera – was surely a good friend.

Copied from one of Art's many arty albums.
Copied from one of Art’s many arty albums.
Miss Haywood supported by the "two roses."  Like many of his time, age and means, arthur and his friends would rent beach side cabins on B Bainbridge Island most summers.  I recall Link describing this as an island scene.
Miss Heywood supported by the “two roses.” Like many of his time, age and means, Arthur and his friends would rent beach cabins on Bainbridge Island most summers. I recall Link describing this as an island scene.  Arthur is on the left in the cocky hat.
Most likely another Bainbridge beach scene and certainly with Miss
Most likely another Bainbridge beach scene and certainly with Miss Heywood, although she has shed her white belt.

 

Link, sitting on the sidewalk, and Miss Heywood sitting on the steps, with others suited up.
Link, sitting on the sidewalk, and Miss Heywood sitting on the steps, with others suited up.
On the evidence of his albums and loose negatives Link was well stocked with feminine friends.   This one - if it is one - he captions, at the top. as merely "almost."  Almost what?
On the evidence of his albums, loose prints and negatives Link was well appointed with feminine friends. This one – if it is one – he captions, at the top, as merely “almost.”  But almost what he does not let on.

Arthur Lingenbrink’s album readily reveal his interests not only in women but also in civic landmarks, visiting celebrities – he sometimes chased them with his movie camera – and examples of what was then advertised as the “charmed land” that surrounds Seattle.  Curiously, while he enjoyed our splendors he was not so ready to share them with tourists, as is revealed in his letter to the Seattle Times editor printed four looks down – below Mt Index.

The 1925 staging of the Knights Templar convention was bound to excite Arthur.   This view looks south to its grand arch
The 1925 staging of the Knights Templar convention was bound to excite Arthur. This view looks south to its grand arch spanning Second Avenue at Marion Street.
Arthur was an easily excited patriot, and the visit of a battleship got his attention.
Arthur was an easily excited patriot, and the visit of a battleship got his attention.
Another proud page from a Lingenbrink album.  How many blog readers remember that the "Emerald City" - if they are still calling it that - was once "thei Queen City."  I remember it as the Queen as late as in the 1970s.
Another proud page from a Lingenbrink album. How many blog readers remember that the “Emerald City” – if they are still calling it that – was once “the Queen City.” I remember it as the Queen as late as in the 1970s.
From Link's album but not apparently from his camera.  The caption explains.
From Link’s album but not apparently from his camera. The caption explains.
Art's peeved letter to the Times editor, printed on July 29, 1951.  In a sour way - without the ironies - it is a prelude to Emmett Watson's Lesser Seattle campaign.
Art’s peeved letter to the Times editor, printed on July 29, 1951. In a sour way – without the ironies or tongue-in-cheek – it is a prelude to Emmett Watson’s “Lesser Seattle” campaign.
Another of Link's more fertile subjects.  I do not remember him sharing any interest in fishing.
Another of Link’s more fertile subjects. I do not remember him sharing any interest in fishing.
Ye Old Curiosity Shop's Pop Stanley posing with Carine, surely one of Link's more intimate paramours.
Ye Old Curiosity Shop’s Pop Stanley posing with Carinne, surely one of Link’s more intimate and mature  paramours.
Carine's hand-colored portrait.
Carinne’s hand-colored portrait, on the flip-side of which, she perhaps exaggerates her love – below.

c  Link,-Carinne's-note-WEB

Link owned a stereo camera.   This is Carrine twice from behind and nicely frame with the forest's shadows.
Link owned a stereo camera. This is Carinne twice and nicely framed by the forest’s shadows, from behind.

LINK’s photography – both stills and film – features an abundance of arty figures, often with the subjects posing and acting in lavish sets.  Although most of this art was done in the 1920s and perhaps early 30s, still he kept his props on display in the top floor of the Capitol Hill he shared with “ma” his mother.  [He did marry  - 0nce - briefly, and had a boy.]   The Lingenbrink basement was outfitted both for making and showing films.  This too  was still in place a half-century after it was first regularly used.  I visited it.  Link led the tour.  The subject included here three times as an example of his figure work is posed “tastefully” in front of a hanging that compliments Link’s talent for design.  Some of his sets were considerably more lavish than this one.   And Arthur also made films in outdoor settings, working, for instance with Cornish School dancers in Volunteer Park.  Some day all will be revealed, but for now just this one fit but not named figure.

stu  Link-nude-A-1-WEB

stu Link-nude-A-4-WEB

Arthur, the director.
Arthur, the director.
Link depicted as an auctioneer.
Link depicted as an auctioneer.

During the 1980s when Genny McCoy and I together regularly visited Arthur, Mrs. Perry was often there too.  This witty widow was always “Mrs. Perry.”   Arthur had first met her in the 1920s when she began her own career as the founder-director of a local Ballet school and company.  Mrs. Perry is wrapped below in a Persian rug – on the right.  Below the rug she poses with Link and I near the back porch of Link’s Capitol Hill home, ca. 1983.

z  Link--Mrs-Perry-&-friend-wrap-in-rug-WEB

Ms. McCoy took this photograph.
Ms. McCoy took this photograph during one of our visits with Mrs. Perry, on the left, and Link at the latter’s Capitol Hill home, ca. 1985.

Below, Seattle’s OLDEST SIGN PAINTERS get pretty lavish treatment in the Times both in 1976 and in 1984.

A Seattle Times report from Jan. 18, 1976.
A Seattle Times report from Jan. 18, 1976.
December 1, 1984, The Seattle Times
December 1, 1984, The Seattle Times
In his 90's the urge to perform still often overtook him - here with three costume changes.
In his 90′s the urge to perform still often overtook Arthur – here with three costume changes.

Here – or below – thanks to RON EDGE’S snooping and engineering are links to two previous features that are relevant to this week’s Capitol Hill subject.

 

Seattle Now & Then: Beacon Hill Traffic

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: A speeding coupe convertible heads north on Beacon Hill’s 15th Ave. S. in 1937.
THEN: A speeding coupe convertible heads north on Beacon Hill’s 15th Ave. S. in 1937
NOW: For his “now” Jean was careful to both align the decorative 1930s light standards along the east side of 15th Avenue S., - here right-of-center - with their similar but not duplicate contemporary “repeats,”  and stand clear of the speeding cyclist.
NOW: For his “now” Jean was careful to both align the decorative 1930s light standards along the east side of 15th Avenue S., – here right-of-center – with their similar but not duplicate contemporary “repeats,” and stand clear of the speeding cyclist

The sporty motorcar, here flying north thru Beacon Ave. on 15th Avenue S., is blurred by its speed.  And so we cannot read the year on the license plate, but we don’t need to.  The original negative has it “Sept. 16, 1937.”  It was seven years into the Great Depression.”

That day The Seattle Times reported that the 2,000,000 W.P.A. check in Washington State had just been paid out.  It was the fourth year for the “New Deal,” Pres. Roosevelt and the Democrats federal programs to spirit the economy and make work for the out-of-work.  The Works Progress Administration (WPA) made the federal government by far the largest employer in the Union.

This Thursday in the late summer of ’37, the Times also reported that the fresh but already effective Congressman Warren G. Magnuson had coaxed WPA funds from Roosevelt for “beautification” of Seattle’s libraries and their grounds.  The day’s issue also printed a photo of the newly elected Girls Club officers at Broadway High School. We learn in the caption that they too were committed to beautification. The new officers urged Broadway Co-eds, all 1595 of them, to wear “middy blouses and skirts to school for uniform attractiveness.”

By The Seattle Times’ theatre listings this day we discover that the Beacon Theatre, here on the left, featured tough guy George Brent in Mountain Justice. Including the Beacon, eleven of King County’s sixteen Sterling Theatres were neighborhood venues, showing features second run.

The Piggly Wiggly, far right, was part of a market chain that flourished by promoting self-service in grocery shopping.  By 1937 most of Seattle’s Piggly Wigglys had been converted into Safeway stores, a fate that soon fell on this little Beacon Hill Piggly Wiggly.  Beacon Hardware, just beyond the grocery, opened in the mid 1920s, and stayed so though the Great Depression.  It is last listed in this newspaper in 1965.

Proof that the towered manse seen in the feature photo survives on the east side of 15th Ave. South.  (Courtesy of Google Earth)
Proof that the towered manse seen in the feature photo survives on the east side of 15th Ave. South. (Courtesy of Google Earth)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

Yup Jean.  First Ron Edge will again insert a feature – with its own additions – that we put up a few months past, which was for the most part about the Beacon Hill prospect of Seattle.   Then from the Washington State Archive I’ll put up a few WPA Tax photos out of of the same Beacon Ave. intersection as our above feature.  These additions will feel at home – and also in need – for our primary image has also been pulled from the shadows of the Great Depression.  I’ll conclude with a key-word search for “Beacon” and see what might come forward from with tiring MAC worth mounting.  No doubt, Ron will have already uncovered some of it in what follows.

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TAX PHOTOS HIDE-&-SEEK

We hope – or imagine – that what follows might be treated by the reader as a hide-and-seek.   Pull out your Google Earth or slippers and visit the north Beacon Hill intersection of Beacon Ave., 15th Ave. S. and Bayview Street.   All of the tax photos that follow – from the Washington State Archive – are of structures at or near that corner, and most of them date from the late 1930s – like our primary feature at the top.   And we will begin with two snippets for Beacon Ave. and 15th Ave. S. clipped from the continuous street listings of the 1938 Polk Business directory. [Click to Enlarge - Click Twice, perhaps]

Polk-listings-for-BEACON-AVE-pars-1938--WEB

1912 Baist Real Estate Map detail centered on Bayview, Beacon Ave. S. and 15th Ave. South.
1912 Baist Real Estate Map detail centered on Bayview, Beacon Ave. S. and 15th Ave. South. (15th climbs thru the center of the map detail.)
As the tax caption notes this 2517-19 15th Ave. S. and so just south of Beacon Avenue.
As the tax caption notes this 2517-19 15th Ave. S. and so just west of Beacon Avenue, which is off-frame to the right.

 

Later but famiiar - Petrams at 2517-19 15th Ave. S., 1958
Later but familiar – Petrams at 2517-19 15th Ave. S., 1958
More of the west side of 15th Ave. S. and Beacon Ave. S. at 2515 Beacon Ave.  Note the remodel of a what appears to be a residence for incarnation as a shop, right-of-center.
More of the west side of 15th Ave. S. and Beacon Ave. S. at 2515 Beacon Ave. Note the remodel of what appears to be a residence for incarnation as a shop, right-of-center.
Same 2500 block on Beacon Avenue, but now with the remodel work far left.
Same 2500 (even east side) block on Beacon Avenue, but now with the remodel work far left.
1513-15 Beacon Ave. with remodeled storefront right-of-center.  Dated 1957.
1513-15 Beacon Ave. with remodeled storefront showing its years, right-of-center, in 1957.  The faux stone asbestos above Petram’s 10-cent Store lends its effects as well.
2502 - 2506 Beacon Ave.
2502 – 2506 Beacon Ave, with early Safeway on far right – the southeast corner of 15th Ave. S. and Bayview Street.
South on 15th Ave. S. thru Beacon Ave. S., 1924.
South on 15th Ave. S. thru Beacon Ave. S., 1924. [Not a tax photo]
2510,-12,-14 Beacon Ave. with an early Safeway.
2510,-12,-14 Beacon Ave. with an early Safeway.
A torn print for 1949 record of 2516-18-20 Beacon Ave.
A torn print for 1949 record of 2516-18-20 Beacon Ave.
A newer Safeway at 2523 15th Ave. S. mid-block to Lander, 4-29-1938.
A newer Safeway at 2523 15th Ave. S. mid-block to Lander, 4-29-1938.
Across the street at 2533 15th Ave.South.
One door south of Safeway (eventually)  at 2533 15th Ave.South.
2520 Beacon Ave. tax photo
2520 Beacon Ave. tax photo
Later at 2524 Beacon Ave.S.
Later at 2524 Beacon Ave. S.
And later yet - late enough for landscape at 2530 Beacon Ave S. and a destingished City Light standard.
And later yet – late enough for landscape at 2530 Beacon Ave S. and a distinguished City Light standard.
2524 Beacon Ave. S. with Bug May 12, 1965.
2524 Beacon Ave. S. with Bug May 12, 1965.
2538 Beacon Ave. S.
2538 Beacon Ave. S.

 

2538 Beacon Ave. S. Nov. 1, 1957
2538 Beacon Ave. S. Nov. 1, 1957
2538 Beacon Ave. S. Jan 12, 1960
2538 Beacon Ave. S. Jan 12, 1960

 

2542 Beacon Ave. S.
2542 Beacon Ave. S.
2544 Beacon Ave. S.
2544 Beacon Ave. S. with Ellis Repair Sign facing Beacon Ave. S..  There is also a shop in back facing 16th Ave. S. with the Beacon Hill Primary School (seen here in part) across 16th to the East.
The 16th Ave. S. side of the Ellis Repair Shop.
The 16th Ave. S. side of the Ellis Repair Shop.
The Beacon Hill School Store, nearby to Ellis and also on 16th Ave. S.
The Beacon Hill School Store, next door to Ellis and also on 16th Ave. S.
The Shell Station at 2535 Beacon Ave. S., in the now lost triangle south of Bayview Street.
The Shell Station at 2535 Beacon Ave. S., in the now lost triangle south of Bayview Street.  The two-story brick apartment, right of center, is at the southwest corner of 15th Ave. S. and Lander Street.
The station at 2531 Beacon in1961.  The house south of the station is still in place facing 15th Ave. South.
The station at 2531 Beacon in 1961 with a “Free Car-A-Month.” The house south of the station is still in place facing 15th Ave. South.  (In this later tax print you can see the mutilations of scotch tape.)
Shell not longer - but the home beyond abides.
Shell no longer – but the home beyond abides.
The "abiding" home at 2536 15th Ave. S.
The “abiding” home at 2536 15th Ave. S.
The neighbor to the south at 2538 15th Ave. S.
The neighbor to the south at 2538 15th Ave. S.
The neighbor at the northeast corner of Lander St. and 15th Ave. N.. addressed 1502 Lander Street.
The neighbor at the northeast corner of Lander St. and 15th Ave. N.. addressed 1502 Lander Street.
2336 to 2344 Beacon Ave. S., the east side of Beacon north of Bayview.
2336 to 2344 Beacon Ave. S., the east side of Beacon north of alley north of Bayview.

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Fremont Trolley Derailed

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The rear end of the derailed trolley on N. 35th Street appears right-of-center a few feet east of Albion Place N. and the curved track from which the unrestrained car jumped on the morning of August 21, 1903. (Courtesy, Fremont Historical Society)
THEN: The rear end of the derailed trolley on N. 35th Street appears right-of-center a few feet east of Albion Place N. and the curved track from which the unrestrained car jumped on the morning of August 21, 1903. (Courtesy, Fremont Historical Society) 
NOW: Heather McAuliffe of the Fremont Historical Society, notes that the house abutting the sidewalks on the far left corner of the “then” survives in the “now” with an added story.  This, she explains, most likely came with the 1908 regrade of the intersection.
NOW: Heather McAuliffe of the Fremont Historical Society, notes that the house abutting the sidewalks on the far left corner of the “then” survives in the “now” with an added story. This, she explains, most likely came with the 1908 regrade of the intersection.

At about 10:20 on the Friday morning of August 21, 1903, a summer picnic in Woodland Park planned by the parishioners of Ballard’s Norwegian Danish Baptist Church was derailed by what that afternoon’s Seattle Time’s named “a boy’s meddlesomeness” without naming the boy.

Both of Seattle’s afternoon dailies, the Times and the Star, printed the story front page and with pictures. The Star’s two illustrations, of which this is one, were credited to the “well-known Fremont photographer, LeRoy Buck.”  Buck lived on Aurora Ave, three blocks from the trolley mishap. The Star probably telephoned him.  Their appellation of Buck as “well-known” is, perhaps, part of the Star’s payment to this freelancer.  (I know of one other Buck photo, also from 1903, an oft-printed classic looking north through the then still low bridge into Fremont. I used it in these pages about a quarter-century ago.)

Front page for The Seattle Sun, Aug. 21, 1903 with news of the Edgewater/Fremont upset.
Front page for The Seattle Sun, Aug. 21, 1903 with news of the Edgewater/Fremont crash.

To “standing room only,” the special but fated trolley was packed in Ballard mostly with women, children and their picnic baskets.  After crossing through downtown Fremont and climbing east up Blewett Street (now N. 35th) under full power, the car crossed thru Aurora Ave. and begin its unrestrained descent to what was ordinarily a sharp but negotiable left turn on to Albion Way.  This time, however, the trolley’s “controller handle” had locked up with the brake handle, with which the “meddlesome boy” had been playing.

Our stock 1912 Baist Map is, again, helpful, but also 9 years later somewhat misleading.
Our stock 1912 Baist Map is again helpful, but also 9 years later somewhat misleading.  The unmarked street between Ewing (34th St.) and Kilbourne (36th St.) is the Blewett (35th St.) that figures in this feature.  The Noble Hospital noted in the map between Albion and Woodland Park Ave is still a private mansion in 1903.  We feature a sketch of it below, and a advertisement for it near the bottom, but with a different name: Keeley.
The mansion at 3515, its south and east facades as seen fro Woodland Park Ave.
The mansion at 3515 Woodland Park Ave., its south and east facades as seen from Woodland Park Ave.

introAlbion-Place-April-1952-THEN-WEB

ABOVE: Looking north up Albion from 36th in 1952.  The competing power poles for Seattle City Light and Puget Power were still an ungainly feature of Seattle neighborhoods.

BELOW: The same but recent prospect on Albion north from 36th St.   Note the surviving tower from the old City Light sub-station.

intro ALBION-April-52,-Now-WEB

Well into the long block on Albion north of 36th a glimpse of Seattle City Lights substation at 3622 Albion Place.
Well into the long block on Albion north of 36th a glimpse of Seattle City Lights substation at 3622 Albion Place.

Instead of turning at Albion, the speeding trolley then jumped the curving track seen at the center of Buck’s photo, and “plunged down an embankment” into an orchard.  The about 62 passengers plunged as well to the buried front end of the car crying out like a broken accordion.  Several were hurt badly.  One, 80-year-old Maren Eggan, was still in the hospital in September.

The Star concluded its report with “an interesting side light on the character of the average small boy.”  After the accident, they picked up the pies, sandwiches and cakes that had filled the picnic baskets and ran to and fro hawking refreshments, which they announced were “fresh from the street car accident.”

The Edgewater pharmacy and business center at 36th Street and Woodland Park Ave. then.
The Edgewater pharmacy and business center at 36th Street and Woodland Park Ave. then, ca. 1912.
Same corner - Edgewater Hardware in 1950.  Courtesy, Washington State Archive, regional branch - a Tax Photo.
Same corner – Edgewater Hardware in 1950. Courtesy, Washington State Archive, regional branch – a Tax Photo.
Edgewater business block "now" - really, recently.
Edgewater business block “now” – really, recently.

 

Edgewater Addition map from the 1890s
Edgewater Addition map from the 1889 and signed by STONE of Stone Way.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Yes Jean, and we shall start with two Edge Links (attached by Ron Edge sometimes known here for his Edge Clippings) that are relevant to the Edgewater neighborhood and/or to trolley wrecks – lots of them.  In this line I am also reminded of the Edgewater Eiffel Tour, a tragicomic episode in North End Life that naturally leads to Paris and the real thing.   During our French visit you – Jean – will share some tour pictures with use and perhaps of our Blogbuddy Berangere as well.  Closer to home, if I can find it I’ll attach a mid-1960s slide of parents Cherry and Ted Dorpat standing in profile with the famous French tower.  I show devotion to my parents and put them up first.  You follow with your own Eiffel Tour photos – and Berangere’s – and I’ll conclude the Tour part of this post with the short story – behaving like a fable – of La Tour Eiffel Edgewater.   And we might find a few things more to add Jean, like other evidences of our city in 1903.   But only a few for we are behind in our commitment to write an introductory essay for Historic Seattle’s up-coming book on First Hill.  This Jean reminds me to remind our blog consumers  that you and I will be giving a lecture on First Hill history at TOWN HALL late this month.  Do you have the details, and will you share them?

I do indeed Paul. We will be lecturing at Town Hall on June 25th at 7:30 in the evening. Here’s the link!

Cherry and Ted Dorpat in Paris and in profile, ca. 1965.
Cherry and Ted Dorpat in Paris and in profile, ca. 1965.

Still Jean here. I’ll set and match with a photo of my own mother just a couple years prior.

Edith-on-Eiffel-Tour
Jean’s mother Edith and grandmother Marian atop the tower

I’m also reminded of our blog partner Berangere Lomont’s remarkable photo of the Eiffel Tower disappearing into the clouds, part of our MOHAI Now and Then exhibit from 2011.  

Berangere's magical mystery tour Eiffel
Berangere’s magical mystery tour

 And, just for fun, let me toss in a few thumbnails of my own views of and from that evocative edifice, each of which may be clicked to enlarge.

_DSC0142 _DSC0219-Edit DSC_0922 DSC_0920 DSC_7305 DSC_7300 DSC_0850 DSC_0931 _DSC0213-2

 

Un jour, l’histoire de la Tour Eiffel Edgewater sera recontee!

         “Some day the story of the Edgewater Eiffel will be told.”

 

Introduction:

Now in a time when such muddles are often brought forward and trumpeted on television with the hope of shaming something or someone, this hidden story was also bound to rebound, and here you have it. We share it for we cannot imagine why anyone should now feel any shame.  Still we can at least wonder if any members of the Fremont Historical Society may care to exploit this history.  

Fremont's own "tower" of European birth: Lenin.
Fremont’s own “tower” of European birth: Lenin.

The photograph below of the nearly near Aurora Bridge was sent along by a concerned person who, for reasons we will not question, wishes to be kept anonymous. They did indicate, however, that before sharing the lantern slide they had attempted to find any surviving members of the club introduced below but without success.  They concluded, “Go ahead.  I’m sure it will be alright.” Such confidence is comforting. 

 

LA TOUR EIFFEL EDGEWATER

Long ago during an after school treat of cornbread and Ovaltine around the Cornbell family’s kitchen table, Fremont Chamber of Commerce Toastmaster Wally Cornbell’s mother told us, “Some day the story of the Edgewater Tower will be told.” Wally’s mother continue, “But never mind.” We were, she explained, just a few years too young to understand. 

 Eiffel-Tower-WEB

The Cornbell’s lived on Whitman Avenue in the Seattle neighborhood of Edgewater, although some now claim it all for Fremont, others divide it between Fremont and Wallingford.  Like both Fremont and Wallingford the Edgewater community was never incorporated into or unto itself.  

Edgewater got a lot of recognition on maps, and for a while had its own railroad station on the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern line, still it never reached the reputation of its neighbors.  By the time the Aurora Bridge was completed in 1932 any sense of a boundary between the east portion of Fremont and the west of Edgewater had blurred and the trend indicated that eventually Edgewater would either slip beneath the eastward tide of Fremont, or from the other direction, the somewhat later push of the Wallingford neighborhood west into Fremont would also overtake it. 

This record of the new Aurora Bridge - with the wrought iron (really wood painted flat black) tower beyond - it is a treat. The rare lantern slide looks north from Queen Anne Hill over the nearly new Aurora Bridge to the north side neighborhoods of Edgewater on the left and Wallingford on the right. The building holding to the horizon on the right is the Good Shepherd Center. The short-lived de l'Edgewater Eiffel la Tour can be seen just breaking the horizon on the left. At some point this lantern slide was hand-colored, as was often the custom, but not with care. The blue area below the bridge while meant to depict the ship canal is actually still south of that waterway's south shore. It should have been given an earth color. Otherwise we have been assured by our private donor that no retouching has been done to the antiquarian lantern slide. Fremont is out of frame to the left. Did you know that the Edgewater Eiffel Tour was built to one-tenth size of the original in Paris? It reached more than 106 feet high! By comparison this made it only ten feet shorter than the Sixth and Pine Building at Sixth and Pine. It was intended that from the top of la Tour Edgewater Eiffel you could see something in all directions including Ballard to the west in spite of Fremont being in the way.
This record of the new Aurora Bridge – with the wrought iron (really wood painted flat black) tower beyond – it is a treat. The rare lantern slide looks north from Queen Anne Hill over the nearly new Aurora Bridge to the north side neighborhoods of Edgewater on the left and Wallingford on the right. The building holding to the horizon on the right is the Good Shepherd Center. The short-lived de l’Edgewater Eiffel la Tour can be seen just breaking the horizon on the left. At some point this lantern slide was hand-colored, as was often the custom, but not with care. The blue area below the bridge while meant to depict the ship canal is actually still south of that waterway’s south shore. It should have been given an earth color. Otherwise we have been assured by our private donor that no retouching has been done to the antiquarian lantern slide. Fremont is out of frame to the left. Did you know that the Edgewater Eiffel Tour was built to one-tenth size of the original in Paris? It reached more than 106 feet high! By comparison this made it only ten feet shorter than the Sixth and Pine Building at Sixth and Pine. It was intended that from the top of la Tour Edgewater Eiffel you could see something in all directions including Ballard to the west in spite of Fremont being in the way.
Berangere's capture of these small towers plays with their shadows.
Berangere’s capture of these small towers plays with their shadows.

Since Stone Way, ran north and south along the trough of a small watershed that got contributions from both Wallingford and Fremont it seemed most likely that Stone Way would be eventually identified as the border between the two neighborhoods and that then Edgewater would be forgotten.  The Stone Way division was, however, confused by the construction of the Pacific Coast Limited Access Speedway north from the new bridge on Aurora.  It was an artificial border, but a handy one.  The story of what followed had considerable effect on these questions of neighborhood identity and on the ultimate fate of Edgewater.

Another Seattle tower obscured by an atmosphere that mixed the mists of Elliott Bay with the great loads of coal warming its buildings and generating electricity too.  Here the First Hill tower of the King Count Courthouse is dimly seen from the roof garden of the Lincoln Hotel at the northwest corner of 4th Avenue and Madison Street. The hotel was destroyed by fire in 1920 and the court house razed by dynamite in 1930.
Another Seattle tower obscured by an atmosphere that mixed the mists of Elliott Bay with contributions from the great loads of coal warming its buildings and generating electricity. Here the First Hill tower of the King Count Courthouse is dimly seen from the roof garden of the Lincoln Hotel at the northwest corner of 4th Avenue and Madison Street. The hotel was destroyed by fire in 1920 and the court house razed by dynamite in 1930.

As you may know, in 1933, the Eiffel Tower celebrated its 50th anniversary for the 1889 Centennial of the French Revolution.  It was a few years early.  The early scheduling took advantage of the cheap construction costs of the Great Depression that touched the French economy as much as ours. Worldwide French Societies were encouraged to fall in line early and do something to celebrate the building of the Eiffel Tower, which was dedicated in 1889.

Here in Seattle the Edgewaterian Eiffelers were the only local group at all prepared and they were encouraged to take the lead by the local French consul. The club was originally formed and continued to take encouragement from the fact that like the Eiffel Tower in Paris rising high above fleuve de Seine, their neighborhood stood beside a great waterway, the Lake Washington Ship Canal.

The SeaFirst Tower under construction in 1967/68.  Photo by Robert Bradley.
The SeaFirst Tower under construction in 1967/68. Photo by Robert Bradley.

The French Clubs of the nearby Wallingford, and Green Lake neighborhoods were ready to help and happy to follow the Edgewater lead.  Similarly, the French Department of the University of Washington was pleased to be included in this endeavor of mixed patriotism.  They helped with translations. Only Fremont residents were cool to the idea, for they were generally not willing to recognize the legitimacy of Edgewater as a neighborhood not enfolded in their own, and with the 1933 construction of the Aurora Avenue north approach to the new bridge these anxious concerns were heightened for, as noted, the new highway effectively created a new border.

Unknown to most, Seattle has mysterious rooftops that are not effecting from the street.  Here two flatirons help "misshape" the Pioneer Square neighborhood.  What are they?
Unknown to most, Seattle has evocative rooftops that are not effecting from the street. Here two flatirons help “misshape” the Pioneer Square neighborhood. What are they?

It is safe to say that the Edgewater tower would have been celebrated from Seattle to the Seven Arrodissement were it not for an unfortunate turn in events.  A combination of haste, cheap labor, and liters of drinkable free champagne contributed by the local French consulate resulted in shoddy work and la Tour started to collapse soon after it was topped off. Rather than risk dismantling its uncertain parts, de l’Edgewater Eiffel la Tour was torched after neighboring homes were first covered with wet sheets and traffic was stopped on the new Aurora Speedway for the duration.  Understandably feelings for the French dipped some after the fire.  It was also the end of the Edgewater club and perhaps of the identifiable neighborhood.  Certainly, one did not hear much about Edgewater or Edgewaterians after this unfortunate turn of events.  The fated memorial was an embarrassment and forgotten except for spontaneous although guarded references like that from Wallace’s mother, Mrs. Cornbell.  But now is later and, at last, the story is told – a matter of record.

Another Seattle tower willfully disposed for flat designs on Denny Hill - the Immaculate Catholics at 6th and Bell.
1929 – another Seattle tower willfully disposed for flat designs, here on Denny Hill – the Immaculate Catholics at 6th and Bell.

 

(With discipline, that is with frequent visits, one can still find an Edgewaterian Eiffelers Bowling Club shirt in a north end second-hand store.)

The north shore of Lake Union ca. 1897 with no note yet of Wallingford.
The north shore of Lake Union ca. 1899 with no note yet of Wallingford and the University District still named Brooklyn.

The next two photos are, again, Ron Edge links to first a variety of rail’s mayhem on Seattle’s streets, followed by a now-then tour of Edgewater’s Woodland Park Avenue, 1937/8 repeated in 1911.  Both groupings, the trolleys and the homes, appeared earlier on this blog.  We return then for “context.”


1903

The year of the Fremont derailing, and more.  We have pulled a few photographs of events from 1903 for illustration here with short captions.

Green Lake panorama - and not complete.  A third part, far right, of Wallingford is not included.  This looks west across the lake to Phinney Ridge in 1903 and so a few years before the lake was lowered and this east bay of the lake was largely filled in for a recreation field and field house.  Today, Interstate-5 crosses directly in front of this scene. (Courtesy Washington State Museum, Tacoma.  Photo by A. Curtis.)
Green Lake panorama – and not complete. A third part, far left, of Wallingford is not included. This looks west across the lake to Phinney Ridge in 1903 and so a few years before the lake was lowered and this east bay largely filled in for a recreation field and field house. Today, Interstate-5 crosses directly across the front of this scene.  The Olympic Mountains are on the center horizon.   (Courtesy Washington State Museum, Tacoma. Photo by A. Curtis.)  DOUBLE CLICK to enlarge.
Pier 5 - now 56 - waits for the 1903 arrival of Theo Roosevelt on the waterfront.
Pier 5 – now 56 – waits for the 1903 arrival of Theo Roosevelt on the waterfront.
Not for Seattle alone, but perhaps for all the stops in 1903.
Not for Seattle alone, but perhaps for all their touring stops in 1903.
A staged protest over street conditions at the intersection of Virginia Street and First Avenue.  The imminent arrival of Pres.T. Roosevelt was part of the pitch.
A staged protest over street conditions at the intersection of Virginia Street and First Avenue in the spring of 1903. The imminent arrival of Pres.T. Roosevelt was part of the shaming pitch.
1903 Birdseye of the Seattle Business District
1903 Birdseye of the Seattle Business District much of it still new after the city’s Great Fire of 1889.  (Double Click to Enlarge)
Eroding the waterfront bluff north of Virginia Street to begin work in 1903 on the railroad tunnel beneath the city, which was completed in 1905.
Eroding the waterfront bluff north of Virginia Street to begin work in 1903 on the railroad tunnel beneath the city, which was completed in 1905.
Looking east across University Way on N.E. 41st Street in 1903 to a nearly new Science Hall (Parrington Hall) left-of-center, on campus. The frame building on the left was razed in memory, I mean I remember it from the late 60s as the home of a guitar shop, and not a chain but a storefront for a skilled guitar "doctor."  This is an Olmsted photo done by the firm for their visit here to design the city's park system - and much else.
Looking east across University Way on N.E. 41st Street in 1903 to a nearly new Science Hall (Parrington Hall) left-of-center, on campus. The frame building on the left was razed in memory, I mean I remember it from the late 60s as the home of a guitar shop, and not a chain but a storefront for a skilled guitar “doctor.” This is an Olmsted photo done by the firm for their visit here to design the city’s park system – and much else.  This was used in Pacific, and following below is the text.
The first appeared in Pacific on July 1, 2001.
The first appeared in Pacific on July 1, 2001.
The Argus was a long-lived political/cultural journal that only stopped publishing "recently," which  means that I remember it and read it.
The Argus was a long-lived political/cultural journal that only stopped publishing “recently,” which means that I remember it and read it, although I never wrote for it.
On top a panorama aof Fremont and Phinney Ridge from Queen Anne, and at the bottom another to Ballard.
On top a panorama of Fremont and Phinney Ridge from Queen Anne, and at the bottom another looking northwest into Ballard.  An advertisement for the Keeley Institute runs centered below the Fremont pan.  The Instituted was on Woodland Park Avenue.  The grand home it took over appears far above in the main photo – from the Star – and also in a sketch below it.

 

Scene from the 1903 trolley strike.  The Bon Marche was then located at the southwest corner of Second Ave. and Pike Street. So this looks north on Second from near Union.
Scene from the 1903 trolley strike. The Bon Marche was then located at the southwest corner of Second Ave. and Pike Street. So this looks north on Second from near Union.
Skating on Green Lake in 1903.  The forest on the far shore is part of Woodland Park, the destination for the Baptists that were squeezed in the run-away street car on 35th Street at Albion Pl.
Skating on Green Lake in 1903. The forest on the far shore is part of Woodland Park, the destination this year – in the summer -  for the Baptists that were squeezed, and some of them mangled,  in the run-away street car on 35th Street at Albion Pl.
Looking north into Fremont across the Fremont "low-bridge" in 1903.
Looking north into Fremont across the Fremont “low-bridge” in 1903.
A clipping
A clipping
The Fremont dam broke in 1903.  This view of work on the damn and flume is dated 1903, and so most likely after the break.  In some chronologies 1903 is the year that work began - haltingly - on construction of the Lake Washington Ship Canal.
The Fremont dam broke in 1903. This view of work on the dam and flume is dated 1903, and so most likely after the break. In some chronologies 1903 is the year that work began – haltingly – on construction of the Lake Washington Ship Canal.  Note there is as yet no Gasworks (1907) in the picture.
A "now" for what is above it.
A “now” for what is above it.
Four years later, looking east from the Fremont (still) low bridge to the dam and flume in 1907.  Here work has begun on the Gas Works, at the center.
Four years later, looking east from the Fremont (still) low bridge to the dam and flume in 1907. Here work has begun on the Gas Works, at the center.
From the bridge over the dam-flume, looking west at the Fremont low bridge.
From the bridge over the dam-flume, looking west at the Fremont low bridge.
A 1927 clip showing and explaining the planned-for corner-cutting bridge at the southeast corner of 34th Street and Fremont Ave.
A crumpled 1927 clip showing and explaining the planned-for corner-cutting bridge at the southeast corner of 34th Street and Fremont Ave., creating thereby a platform for the far future sculpture by Rich Beyers, “Waiting for the Interurban.”

 

The Seattle Times caption for this photo printed on Feb. 15, 1940 reads, in part "Once the pride of the Municipal Street Railway and the only one of its kind west of Chicago, the four-way street-car switch at North 34th Street and Fremont Avenue, at the north end of the Fremont Bridge, will be removed as part of the city's change from street cars to busses and trackless trolleys.  Called a "Grand Union track layout," it coast $48,000 to build and install in 1923, a street car entering from any direction may turn either way or go straight ahead."
The Seattle Times caption for this photo printed on Feb. 15, 1940 reads, in part “Once the pride of the Municipal Street Railway and the only one of its kind west of Chicago, the four-way street-car switch at North 34th Street and Fremont Avenue, at the north end of the Fremont Bridge, will be removed as part of the city’s change from street cars to buses and trackless trolleys. Called a “Grand Union track layout,” it coast $48,000 to build and install in 1923, a street car entering from any direction may turn either way or go straight ahead.”
1996
1996

 

The IVARY TOWER

& Underwater

 

         The Tour Eiffel Edgewater reminds us of Ivar – twice.  First, of course, his valiant attempts to prepare for Trans-Sound Submarine Commuting (TSSC) with underwater billboards promoting his ever-rejuvenating clam chowder, and second, of course, for his daring-do to fly a salmon-sock from the top of what he described as his “last toy,” the Smith Tower, aka the Ivary Tower.

The Foster & Kleiser billboard at the meeting of Westlake, Dexter and Fremont Avenues in August 1928, showing here art for Kristoferson's Milk.
The Foster & Kleiser billboard at the meeting of Westlake, Dexter and Fremont Avenues in August 1928, showing here art for Kristoferson’s Milk.
Ivar's - well not actually Ivar but something very much like him - submerged underwater billboard displayed at, again, the intersection of Fremont, Dexter and Westlake Avenues,
Ivar’s – well not actually Ivar but something very much like him, Ivar Inc. – surfaced underwater billboard displayed, again, at the intersection of Fremont, Dexter and Westlake Avenues, nearly 85 years after the milk and with increased or advanced nutrition in 2012 – or was it 2011 – or 10?

 

Ivar and his tower, one against the other - or with the other and over or upon the Sinking Ship Garage.
Ivar and his tower, one against the other – or with the other and over or upon and sticking his foot against the Sinking Ship Garage.
A fan's insight.
A fan’s insight.

Ivary-Tower-Cartoon-3-1-77-WEB

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Graystone on First Hill

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN:
THEN: Covered with cut stone the row house facing Marion Street on First Hill was intended to begin a local trend for elegant townhouse construction until such plans and much else were interrupted by the financial Panic of 1893. (Courtesy Washington State Archive, Bellevue Branch)
NOW: The last Times report I could find for 1200 Marion before it joined the Swedish Hospital campus in the early 1970s, concerned a City Hall hearing set for its owner, A.M. Bernhard’s alleged violation of minimum housing codes.  The announcement is dated Sept. 19, 1971.
NOW: The last Times report I could find for 1200 Marion before it joined the Swedish Hospital campus in the early 1970s, concerned a City Hall hearing set for its owner, A.M. Bernhard’s alleged violation of minimum housing codes. The announcement is dated Sept. 19, 1971.

The bold white writing on this stone-clad row house at the northeast corner of Marion Street and Minor Avenue confesses that this is a tax photo.  As many Pacific readers no doubt know by now, during the Great Depression the Works Progress Administration (WPA) made work for photographers with its ambitious and ultimately completed project to strike a picture of every taxable structure in King County.

Open and voided the folder that once held - with tape - the printed inventory photo from 1937.
Open and voided the folder that once held – with tape – the printed inventory photo from 1937.
A page (another) from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map - this one mutilated by wear and tear - means other than the penmanship of the photographer.  The Graystone's block 121 can be found upper-right.
A page (another) from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map – this one mutilated by wear and tear – means other than the penmanship of the photographer. The Graystone’s block 121 can be found upper-right.

Even without the captioned address, 1200 Marion St., we could find these seven attached townhouses by their legal description, here also hand-written on the negative by, we presume, the unnamed photographer.  Reading backwards this corner real estate is lot 8, of block 121 in A.A. Denny’s Broadway Addition.  Jeffrey Karl Ochsner, U.W. professor of architecture, first shared this subject with me, hoping that I might know of an earlier intimate “portrait” of this The Stone Row, its name when Architect John Parkinson designed and developed it in the early 1890s. Alas, I didn’t.

Across Marion St. from the Graystone, another 1937 WPA snapshot, this of a residence that has been (I believe) converted into a nurses dorm.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue branch)
Across Marion St. from the Graystone, another 1937 WPA snapshot, this of a residence that has been (I believe) converted into a nurses dorm. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue branch)
A Times clip for the address 1205 Marion from April 3, 1947 suggest that the old dorm (?) is being liquidated.
A Times clip for the address 1205 Marion from April 3, 1947 suggest that the old dorm (?) is being liquidated.  (True, the “lattice fence” cannot be found in the 1937 look at 1205 Marion above the clip.)

The WPA photo and the professor’s reflections on it are shared on page 243 of his and Dennis Andersen’s book, “Distant Corner, Seattle Architects and the Legacy of H.H. Richardson.”  Published by the U.W. Press in 2003 it has not, of course, grown old, and deserves to be read by persons interested in those architecturally zestful years of recovery and mostly rampant growth following Seattle’s “Great Fire” of 1889.

A Seattle Times clip from Feb. 21, 1906.
A Seattle Times clip from Feb. 21, 1906.
A Times classified from Oct. 15, 1906.
A Times classified from Oct. 15, 1906.
The Graystone - one of its enchanted events.  From the Seattle Times for Nov. 6, 1907.
The Graystone – one of its enchanted events. From the Seattle Times for Nov. 6, 1907.

In 1900 – or thereabouts – The Stone Row was named anew The Graystone, and promoted variously as a residential hotel (with waitresses and chambermaids and music room) and as an apartment house in the “choicest residence neighborhood, between the Madison and James St. car lines.”  With the boisterous arrival of the Graystone Athletic Club on the scene in 1910 – the men’s club staged smokers with boxing – the name “Graystone” and its connotations fell from favor.  Its elegant Tenino “bluestone” finish may have seemed tarnished, although it looks fine here in 1937.

Latter days for the Graystone.
Latter days for the Graystone.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   Yes Jean, some ephemera from the Times and some photographs too.

We must, however, begin with a confessional response to Brandon and Steve, both of whom correctly instructed that I was wrong with last week’s feature on the Four Winds aka Surfside 9.   Rather I should have “confused” the Golden Anchor, another and earlier dinner-boat, with both the Winds’ and the Surfside’.  They are the same vessel – originally the City of Everett – although with elaborate changes for different services.  Long ago I believed a much and only recently abandoned that Anchors part of it.  The reason is Margaret Pitcairn Strachan’s 1946 feature that had the Golden Anchor converted out of the Lake Washington Ferry, Lincoln.  I should have known better, and did.  I’d written about the Lincoln often enough and knew that it’s last service continued after WW2 both on the big lake and on the Sound, and not as a restaurant.  I supposed it was in part my haste but more my respect for the heritage writing of Pitcairn Strachan that fogged my watch.  I’ve used the Marine Digest often enough but missed the contradicting history offered there.  It is also curious that I found so little in my maritime library about the Golden  Anchor.  The Pitcairn Strachan history was found – you are correct to assume – with another key-word search of the Seattle Times through the Seattle Pubic Library.  As many of you know the addition of this resource makes such a difference in doing/research on regional history – it is suddenly like taking a trip to Mars when earlier you were only carried to Ballard.  But that comparison is misleading.  I would always prefer a visit to Ballard over any of the known planets.   Directly below is a cut from the Pitcairn Strachan feature of 1946.  She is best known for a year-long weekly feature on Seattle’s grand homes and their families, which she researched and authored in 1944-45.  That was earlier enough to involve direct contact with informants that were also pioneers – often the persons who built the homes.

Excerpt from Times feature, March 10, 1946.
Excerpt from Times feature, March 10, 1946.

Below and in order, the progression implied from the Times clips on the Anchor’s “experienced waitress” search in 1945, to attempts to sell the – get this – “Nationally known boat” early in 1947, do not bode well for the Anchor’s chances of staying golden.  The crude illustration of the City of Everett aka Ferry Ballard aka diner-ship Golden Anchor tied to a bank on the Duwamish River near the old highway to SeaTac on the freezing afternoon of Jan. 15, 1950, reveal a moment in its new metamorphosis as quarters for the West Seattle Athletic Club.  The Four Winds followed and the old mosquito fleet steamer turned ferry went terminal with the Surfside 9.

Goden Anchor 2 clips GRAB

 

The converted Ferry Ballard, aka the Golden Anchor, parked on the Duwamish as home for the West Settle Athletic Club in 1950.
The converted Ferry Ballard, aka the Golden Anchor, parked on the Duwamish as home for the West Seattle Athletic Club in 1950.

========== RETURN to FIRST HILL

 The PATHETIC or PITIFUL STORY of the German immigrant girl BERTHA HOPKINS

As told – nearly – by the CLIPS ALONE!

The Seattle Times April 23, 1905, Front Page
The Seattle Times April 23, 1905, Front Page
Seattle Times, April 19, 1905
Seattle Times, April 19, 1905
The Seattle Times, May 23, 1905
The Seattle Times, May 23, 1905
A Times clip from June 6, 1905.
A Times clip from June 6, 1905. (Click once and then twice to enlarge)
Six  months for Bertha at Walla Walla.  Times 12-2-1905
Six months for Bertha at Walla Walla. Times 12-2-1905  (Click TWICE to enlarge)
Looking northwest thru the intersection of Summit and Marion.  The Graystone appears, in part, on the far left, and the Adrian Court apartments (at the southwest corner of Madison and Summit) on the far right.
Looking northwest thru the intersection of Summit and Marion. The Graystone appears, in part, on the far left, and the Adrian Court apartments (at the southwest corner of Madison and Summit) on the far right.
Looking northeast from some prospect connected to the then nearly new St. James Cathedral.  On the left is the Ranke home at the southeast corner of Terry and Madison.  Far right is the west facade of the Adrian Court, and a high corner at the rear of the Graystone shows far right.  The horizon is Capitol Hill's.
Looking northeast from some prospect connected to the then nearly new St. James Cathedral. On the left is the Ranke home at the southeast corner of Terry and Madison. Far right is the west facade of the Adrian Court, and a high corner at the rear of the Graystone shows farther right. The horizon is Capitol Hill’s.
A 1905 Aerial of much of the First Hill neighborhood south of Madison Street.  Left of center is St. James Cathedral at the southeast corner of Marion and 9th Avenue.
A 1905 Aerial of much of the First Hill neighborhood south of Madison Street. Left of center is St. James Cathedral at the southeast corner of Marion and 9th Avenue.  The Ranke mansion is still around, far left, a home for nurses at Cabrini/Columbia Hospital at the southwest corner of Madison and Boren. The white facades of Swedish Hospital in 1950 appear upper-left.  Trinity Episcopal Church is bottom-right, at the northwest corner of 7th and James.  There is, of course, much more to discover here – if you CLICK TWICE to “blow it up real good.”  Can you, for instance, find the Graystone?
An early 20th Century peek from, I believe, the south facade of the Hotel Stetson (see the 1912 Map) east along Marion Street to the Otis Hotel Row on Summit between Seneca and Marion.  The question returns - can you find the Graystone . . . part of it?
An early 20th Century peek from, I believe, the south facade of the Hotel Stetson (see the 1912 Map) east along Marion Street to the Otis Hotel Row on Summit between Columbia and Marion. The question returns – can you find the Graystone – part of it?
The Otis Hotel on the right - looking south on Summit.  Dr. Rininger's home on the left, the then future site for Rininger's own hospital and then in 1913 Swedish Hospital.  (see the clips soon below.)
The Otis Hotel on the right – looking south on Summit. Dr. Rininger’s home on the left, the then future site for Rininger’s own hospital and then in 1913 Swedish Hospital. (see the clips soon below.)
Part of the now-and-then feature from Pacific, March 28, 2001.  For a "then" it used the photo printed above the map above.
Part of the now-and-then feature from Pacific, March 28, 2001. For a “then” it used the photo printed above the map above.
Another Tax photo, this one showing Swedish Hospital across the intersection of Summit and Columbia - looking northwest.
Another Tax photo, this one showing Swedish Hospital across the intersection of Summit and Columbia – looking northwest.
The neighborhood, looking northwest from Harborview Hospital in 1956.
The neighborhood, looking northwest from Harborview Hospital in 1956.  James Street runs from lower left east to upper-right and Boren Ave. left-right thru the middle.

GIVE CLIPS for SWEDISH HOSPITAL

S.TIMES, March 2, 1913.
S.TIMES, March 2, 1913.
The Seattle Times Feb. 16, 1913
The Seattle Times Feb. 16, 1913

Swede Grab 11-1-37 over 12-26-37

Seattle Times clips from Nov. 1, 1937, above, and Dec. 26, 1937, below.