Seattle Now & Then: 'Lost Seattle'

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THEN: Between the now lost tower of the Pioneer Building, seen in part far left, and the Seattle Electric Steam Plant tower on the right, are arranged on First and Railroad Avenues the elaborate buzz of business beside and near Seattle’s Pioneer Square ca. 1904.
THEN: Between the now lost tower of the Pioneer Building, seen in part far left, and the Seattle Electric Steam Plant tower on the right, are arranged on First and Railroad Avenues the elaborate buzz of business beside and near Seattle’s Pioneer Square ca. 1904.
NOW: Both views were recorded from the roof of the Alaska Building at the southeast corner of First Ave. and Cherry Street. In the about 109 intervening years most of the Seattle waterfront here of long finger piers has been flattened and fitted with cranes for containers and more room for the ferries.
NOW: Both views were recorded from the roof of the Alaska Building at the southeast corner of First Ave. and Cherry Street. In the about 109 intervening years most of the Seattle waterfront here of long finger piers has been flattened and fitted with cranes for containers and more room for the ferries.

On the recent afternoon of one of our inconstant autumnal days Jean Sherrard joined author Rob Ketcherside on the roof of the Alaska Building to repeat the ca. 1904 subject that Ketcherside has placed on the front cover of his first book, the new “Lost Seattle.”

What by now is lost here?  Besides West Seattle, most of which is hidden behind a deep cloud bank, Jean’s look west from the top of Seattle’s first skyscraper (1904) is missing most of the long wall of brick structures that in the decade following the city’s “great fire” of 1889 were squeezed along the east side of First Avenue to both sides of Cherry Street.  Surely many Pacific readers will remember when these ornate red brick beauties were replaced with the big buff parking garage, showing here on the right.

It could make you nostalgic, and those pining feelings are surely what the many titles included in the London publisher, Pavilion’s series on lost cities (Including New York, Chicago, San Francisco and many others) is, in part, counting on.  And it works.  Ketcherside has chosen his subjects well for this polished hard back, and orders them by decades, beginning with the effects of that “great fire” in 1889.

The new book’s subjects are a mix of local classics and the author’s favorites.  For instance, Ketcherside’s sidewalk display of Seattle’s old street (aka Jeweler’s) clocks is a refined pleasure and, again, not a little nostalgic.  (Surely many Pacific readers could be of some help with the author’s continuing research on the subject of these “pedestal clockworks.”  Readers with pictures of street clocks and/or stories to share may contact him at roket@gwu.edu.)

Besides working full time managing programs and programmers for a computer services company, and raising a family, Rob has taken an active roll in the local heritage community.  For instance, he is an appointed member of the Mayor’s Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board.  Happily for us and himself, Rob Ketcherside continues his research and writing.  Let’s support him and go out and find his Lost Seattle.

WEB EXTRAS

Rob Ketcherside atop the Alaska building
Rob Ketcherside atop the Alaska building

Anything to add, Paul?  Certainly Jean, and as has become our custom we begin with Ron Edge’s help with links (pictures to tap) that will take our readers to a few other relevant features from the neighborhood.

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: Huck Finn in SODO

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THEN: Part of the pond that here in 1946 filled much of the long block between Massachusetts and Holgate Streets and 8th Avenue S. and Airport Way. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
THEN: Part of the pond that here in 1946 filled much of the long block between Massachusetts and Holgate Streets and 8th Avenue S. and Airport Way. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
NOW:  With freezing, the few captured ponds that dotted the tideflats south of King Street as late as the 1940s, were busy with skaters.  Now this rolling neighborhood of settling fill that was recently named SODO is home for light industry, and lots of parking.
NOW: With freezing, the few captured ponds that dotted the tideflats south of King Street as late as the 1940s, were busy with skaters. Now this rolling neighborhood of settling fill that was recently named SODO is home for light industry, and lots of parking.

If one gives little attention to the homes on the hill and none to the junk dumped into this waterway then these adventurous young boys captaining their crafts might remind Pacific readers of their own youthful adventures or of those shared with them by Mark Twain. This, however, is not the Mississippi, but one of the last evidences of the mudflats south of King Street where for millennia twice every 25 hours – about – the waters of Puget Sound sloshed as far east as Beacon Hill, here on the right.

This summer subject was first printed in The Times on August 24, 1945, the day that Gen. Douglas MacArthur announced that an advanced party would land in Japan two days later to prepare the way for occupation.  A half-century earlier the reclamation of these tideflats began in earnest.  There is with this vestige no longer any direct connection to the tides, and so no chance that these lads will drift into the shipping lanes.  Most likely this is a catching basin for run off – a big one.   In a 1946 aerial photograph it can be measured reaching thru most of this 660-foot long block east of Airport way and between Holgate and Massachusetts Streets

Airport Way proceeds up the middle of this 1946 aerial of what was once the tidelands south of King Street and west of Beacon Hill.  The hill's greenbelt climbs up the right third of the aerial.  Holgate Street leads to Airport Way from about mid-way up the left border of the subject.  In the corner drawn by Holgate and Airport Way appears one of the last submerged vestiges of these tideflats.  Courtesy, Municipal Archive with thanks also to Ron Edge for the scanning.
(Click to Enlarge) Airport Way proceeds up the middle of this 1946 aerial of what was once the tidelands south of King Street and west of Beacon Hill. The hill’s greenbelt climbs up the right third of the aerial. (The Interstate-5 Freeway is here a mere 20 years distant.)  Holgate Street leads to Airport Way from about mid-way up the left border of the subject. In the corner drawn by Holgate and Airport Way, appears one of the last submerged vestiges of these tideflats, a pond or catch basin for run-off. The white mass entering the big pond south of Massachusetts Street is land fill. (Courtesy, Municipal Archive with thanks also to Ron Edge for the scanning.)
A 1929 aerial centered on the same pond shows its regulated sides
A 1929 aerial centered on the same pond shows its regulated sides, and not yet any of the depression-time shacks and sheds that created one the tideflats mid-sized Hoovervilles for out-of-work single (mostly) men. [The safety pin shaped path near the center of the block is puzzling – isn’t it?)
A Post-Intelligence retouching editorial artist has juxtaposed the pointing figure of Beacon Hill resident who complained to "authorities" about the build-up of the shack-town on the tidelands below her.  She may have been given time to choose that lovely flower-print dress for the shooting.  Here efforts were, however, in vain.  Until razed with the beginning of World War Two with that advance in opportunities for employment, these "home owners" stayed just west of the "our" pond.  (Courtesy, Post-Intelligencer)
A Post-Intelligence retouching editorial artist has juxtaposed the pointing figure of a Beacon Hill resident who complained to “authorities” about the build-up of the shack-town on the tidelands below her. She may have been given time to choose that lovely flower-print dress for the shooting. Her efforts were, however, in vain. Until razed with the beginning of World War Two with that advance in opportunities for employment, these “home owners” stayed put just west of the “our” pond. (Courtesy, Post-Intelligencer)

The Times headline for this subject (on top) does not celebrate youth and its summer recreations, but reads, “Where Death May Be A Playmate.”  The paper shared Seattle Police Chief Herbert Kinsey’s claim that his forces were frequently called upon to rescue children who fall into this pond. A survey of tragic accidents since the first of the year named five children who had downed in backyard lily ponds or in Seattle’s wetlands like this one – although not in this one.  William Norton, City Council’s chair of its public safety committee, speculated “between 50 and 60 small children have met death in such ponds in recent years.” If true, this home front statistic is at once grotesque and fantastic.

Throughout most of the Great Depression one of the lesser Hooverville communities of shacks scavengered by homeless men crowded the west shore of the pond (to the left). Roughly one hundred of them can be counted in a 1936 aerial (not reprinted here).

A FEW MORE HOOVERVILLES, without explanation

H. Hoovervill-Shack-(ca.)-WEB

H. Hooverville--Sign-WEB

H. Hooverville-Suburbmr-WEB

H. SB-lesser-Hooverville-PI-22393-WEB

H. Wet-land-shacks-HOOVERV-31-WEB

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"Gas Cove" ca. 1884, seen from Beacon Hill with the "Piners Point" peninsula. The Felker House is noted on the south side of Jackson Street a half-block west of First Ave. S. (then Commercial Street.)
“Gas Cove” ca. 1884, seen from Beacon Hill with “Piners Point” peninsula, where was huddled most of Seattle’s commerce. The Felker House is noted on the south side of Jackson Street a half-block west of First Ave. S. (then Commercial Street.)
Looking east and back at Beacon Hill from Piners Point, and also from the early 1880s.  Ultimately our pond of interest would be "developed" a short distance to the right of this subject's right border.  (Courtesy of Ron Edge, a photo by Peterson & Bros.)
Looking east and back at Beacon Hill from Piners Point, and also from the early 1880s. Ultimately our pond of interest would be “developed” a short distance to the right of this subject’s right border. (Courtesy of Ron Edge, a photo by Peterson & Bros.)
The tidelands south of King Street a few months after the Great Fire of 1889.  The burned district is rebuilding although many businesses are still encamped in tents. The view looks south from near the corner of Second and Cherry Street.  Beacon Hill is on the left horizon.  The rows of pilings punched into the tidelands are daring and presumptive.  There fate of the tidelands is still waiting on decision's of the new state's legislature includenced by these "jumpers" and "squatters" but more effectively by the railroads.
The tidelands south of King Street a few months after the Great Fire of 1889. The burned district is rebuilding although many businesses are still encamped in tents. The view looks south from near the corner of Second and Cherry Street. Beacon Hill is on the left horizon. The rows of pilings punched into the tidelands are daring and presumptive. The fate and distribution of the tidelands is still waiting on decision’s of the new state’s legislature influenced less by these “jumpers” and “squatters” than by the railroads.
Our neighborhood - from Beacon Hill - 1914.  A. Curtis is the photographer and our Pond's location will be near the left border.    The bright street moving from the left towards the center of the pan is Deaborn a few years after its cut through Beacon Hill.
[DOUBLE-CLICK to Enlarge]  Our neighborhood – from Beacon Hill – 1914. A. Curtis is the photographer and our pond’s location will be near the left border of his panorama. The bright street moving from the left towards the center of the pan is Dearborn a few years after it was cut through Beacon Hill.
Both near busses and trackless trollies at the Muni. Bus barn.  The view looks east on the garage's parking lot somewhat in line  with Atlantic Street.  Railroad Ave. (aka 9th Avenue) is on the other side of the buildings, and the Marine Hospital is on the Beacon Hill horizon. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
Both new buses and trackless trollies at the Muni. Bus barn. The view looks east on the garage’s parking lot somewhat in line with Atlantic Street. Railroad Ave. (aka 9th Avenue) is on the other side of the buildings, and the Marine Hospital is up on the Beacon Hill horizon. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   A few more from the neighborhood and its hydraulic puzzles, Jean.

Jean here, with a quick note on behalf of dorpatsherrardlomont. Our server has once again become somewhat unstable, preventing the addition of the usual Web Extras which accompany ‘Seattle Now & Then’. We apologize for this disruption of our regular service, but will try our best to get things back up and running smoothly as soon as possible.

(That last concerned “interruption” came from Ron Edge, but the disciplined Edge soon fixed the problem and we are back.)

Directly below is a feature from Jan. 2012 that had its own timing puzzle.  The view from Denny Hill is part of the first panorama of the city recorded from there, and it also reveals in the distance the unfilled tideflats (or lands) south of King Street.  Following this Feature are – as is our custom – several more that dwell on the neighborhood.  Each of the subjects – and their extras as well -  are reached through a single appropriate image, most likely the primary image used when the feature was first presented.   Any reader aroused to study these tideland subjects should also browse the Pictorial History of Seattle’s Waterfront.  Handily it is posted on this blog.

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We preface the unmarked historical view below with this painted one above, because we got a note from a reader (of both the smaller version that appears in Pacific and the larger one in this blog below), asking for some pointers for finding many of the landmarks noted in the text below: for instance, Second Ave., Union Street, the Denny barn, the Methodist church and the the future site of Plymouth Congregational Church’s first sanctuary. Here it is, the marked version. Have the site/server not given us so much trouble we would have added all sort of other pans and details of the neighborhood. Now that will need to come later, and there will most likely be other opportunities to add such stuff then.
THEN: The still forested First Hill, upper left, and Beacon Hill, center and right, draw the horizon above the still sparsely developed north end of Seattle’s residential neighborhood in 1872-73. Second Avenue angles across the center of the subject, and also intersects there with Union Street. (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)
NOW: Looking south through the alleyway between Pine and Stewart Streets. The rear concrete wall of the Nordstom Rack appears center-left. It was completed in 1907 at the northwest corner of Second Ave. and Pine Street, a ten-story home for “Your Credit is Good,” Standard Furniture.

Here an unnamed pioneer photographer has chosen a prospect on the southwest slope of Denny Hill to look south through what was then Seattle’s “north end.”  This may be the first look from an elevation that was understandably for years after – until it was regraded away – a favorite platform for recording the city.

The photograph was taken mid-block (block 27 of A.A. Denny’s 3rd Addition) between Pine and Stewart Streets and First and Second Avenues.  Jean Sherrard’s now is adjusted to both use and relish the alleyway that runs thru the center of the block.  The historical photographer stood a few feet left, behind (or embedded in) the concrete wall, and somewhat closer to Pine Street.  He was also thirty or forty feet above Jean, for this part of Denny Hill was graded away between 1903 and 1905.

By a mistake of my own I’d considered 1875 a most “deserving” date for this subject, but I preferred 1876, a boom year for Seattle, and an annum that “explains itself” with Seattle’s first city directory.   I was wrong by three or four years.  The date here is the blooming months of either late 1872 or early 1873, and the evidence is in two churches – one showing and the other not.

Second Avenue angles through the center of the scene.  On August 24, 1873 Plymouth Congregational Church dedicated its first (of now four) downtown sanctuary on Second a little ways north of Spring Street.  It would – but does not – appear above the roofline of Arthur and Mary Denny’s barn, here right-of-center at the southwest corner of Second and Union.

Appearing – but barely – also above the Denny barn, but to its right, is the Methodist Protestant Church near the northeast corner of Second and Madison.  In 1871 its pastor Daniel Bagley gave it a “remodel,” a second floor with mansard windows.  Both additions are showing.

In “This City of Ours,” J. Willis Sayre’s 1936 school textbook of Seattle historical trivia, Sayre makes this apt point about the Second Avenue showing here. “In the seventies it had narrow wooden sidewalks which went up and down, over the ungraded surfaces, like a roller-coaster . . . The street was like a frog pond every winter.”

WEB EXTRAS

I thought I’d throw in a related picture with a short sketch. City alleys provide us with back doors, service entrances, garages – but also occasionally reveal darker aspects. Looking for this week’s ‘now’, I took several photos up and down the alley between Pine and Stewart, and snapped ( and eavesdropped on) two kids, boyfriend and girlfriend, just arrived from a small town by bus. Something heartrending here, with that little pink backpack bobbing down the alley.

Kids in the alley

Anything to add, Paul?

This time Jean’s question is rhetorical.  We have had such a time with this blog and its “server” that it is ordinarily impossible to get on it.  The chances are that what I am writing here will not be saved.  I’ll keep it brief.  It seems we must find a different server.  This may take a while.  Again, if any of your have suggestions in this regard please share them with us.  Meanwhile please check the blog daily – if you will – but know that nothing new might appear, and  you too may not be able to open it, for instance for browsing through past features.   Hopefully we will escape these problems early in February, and come back with a site that is confident and stable.

1912&1929s

THEN: The work of filling the tidelands south of King Street began in 1853 with the chips from Yesler’s sawmill.   Here in the neighborhood of 9th Ave. S. (Airport Way) and Holgate Street, the tideland reclaiming and street regrading continue 70 years later in 1923.  (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)

pan-f-denn-hill-1885-web

 

Our wetland block would be on the left side of this 1988 snap I made of the Beacon Ave. S. freeway overpass ten Holgate Street on the left.
Our wetland block would be on the left side of this 1988 snap I made of the Beacon Ave. S. freeway overpass, with Holgate Street on the right.  The third of the links placed above by Ron Edge studies this same point-of-view (and others) during the street’s regrade in the 1920.
When I started asking question about local history in the early 1970s it was not commonplace but neither was it rare to be told first-hand accounts of ice skating on what remained of the tideflats.
When I started asking question about local history in the early 1970s it was not commonplace but neither was it rare to be told first-hand accounts of ice skating on what remained of the tideflats. [Courtesy MOHAI, a P-I Photo]

NAMU ADDENDUM

We received a fine comment from the mildly anonymous Phil D. today in response to a blog post we made some time ago about the killer whale Namu’s time at Pier 56.  The link is http://pauldorpat.com/ivar/pier-56-aquarium-in-the-1960s-very-big-sharks-and-namu/

That intrepid Boeing retiree Werner Lengenhager's capture of the Namu's sidewalk sign.  (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)
That intrepid Boeing retiree Werner Lengenhager’s capture of the Namu’s sidewalk sign. (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)

Phil’s comment follows.

“2013, and 1966 was a long time ago…but what an outstanding experience in my life.  I was privileged to be hired by Ted Griffin to work with Namu at Smith Cove in the early part of 1966 until Namu was brought to Seattle.  Then, I was given a wireless microphone and said to present demonstrations of Namu to the public…which I did many times that summer.

“I really came to love Namu with the closeness of feeding, petting, scratching his back, sides and belly.  Many times I was able to get very close to Namu while feeding him with a slice of salmon.  I was 21 at the time, and really enjoyed the people who came to see the show.

Namu-and-Ferry-WEB

“At times, Namu, when demonstrating a high jump, would go back into the water without hardly a splash.  Other times, however, he would come down  kinda falling over so as to completely soak the ones in the way of the huge wave & spray!  One incident in the evening took place with no one there, but two men and a lady who were dressed to the hilt for a night on the town.  For them, I’m sure it was as memorable an evening as it was for me.   When I cautioned them they’d be safer from getting wet if they went up the ramp and observed from there, they decided to take a chance and see at float level.   You guessed it…it was the greatest of Namu’s jokes on the crowd…the got entirely drenched.  Their reaction???  They all, after catching their breath from the cold water drench, broke out laughing, and even grateful for this fantastic memory…seeing the huge body of Namu nearly leap completely out of the water (after having carefully popped his head out of the water prior to the jump, scoped out the situation…including the three observers and the ball held out high above the water by yours truly).  Then, with no time to react, they saw Namu falling toward them!  You can well imagine the rest…as I see it still clearly in my minds eye.

“Thanks for the memories, Namu and Seattle”

This appeared in part first in the Seattle Times for August 23, 1970.
This appeared in part first in the Seattle Times for August 23, 1970.

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Ranke Home

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THEN: We are not told but perhaps it is Dora and Otto Ranke and their four children posing with their home at 5th and Pike for the pioneer photographer Theo. E. Peiser ca. 1884.  In the haze behind them looms Denny Hill.   (Courtesy Ron Edge)
THEN: We are not told but perhaps it is Dora and Otto Ranke and their four children posing with their home at 5th and Pike for the pioneer photographer Theo. E. Peiser ca. 1884. In the haze behind them looms Denny Hill. (Courtesy Ron Edge)
NOW: Changes on the northwest corner of Pike Street and 5th Avenue have now come to – or reached - the Loft, a women’s wear purveyor.  For many years the corner was home for Nordstrom.
NOW: Changes on the northwest corner of Pike Street and 5th Avenue have now come to – or reached – the Loft, a women’s wear purveyor. For many years the corner was home for Nordstrom.

Both born in Germany in the early 1840s, Otto Ranke and Dora Duval, met, married early and soon immigrated first to Chicago, ca.1862, and then on to Seattle by 1881.  The couple raised four children while Otto, a skilled contractor, also raised many of the then boomtown Seattle’s more imposing structures, including the Yesler-Leary Building and the Boston Block.  (The former in Pioneer Place was destroyed by the city’s Great Fire of 1889, and the latter survived it, barely.)

The Yesler-Leary Building on the northwest corner of what was then Front Street (First Ave.) and Mill Street (Yesler Way.)  Built by Ranke in the mid-1880s, razed by the 1889 fire.
The Yesler-Leary Building on the northwest corner of what was then Front Street (First Ave. – on the right) and Mill Street (Yesler Way – on the left) Built by Ranke in the mid-1880s, razed by the 1889 fire.
Boston Block, built by Ranke (as contractor, not owner) at the southeast corner of Columbia and Second Ave. shortliy before the 1889 first, which it just "missed."  Not entirely.  The windows were blown out by the heat. Saved from the first it was stuffed with businesses following it, with companies sharing offices and desks.  For a time it was also the home of the Post Office.
Boston Block, built by Ranke (as contractor, not owner) at the southeast corner of Columbia and Second Ave. shortly before the 1889 fire, which it just “missed” – not entirely. The windows were blown out by the heat. Saved from the inferno it was stuffed with businesses following it, with companies sharing offices and desks. For a time it was also the home of the Post Office.

Otto was known for his singing, and Dora for her dancing.  Together with their children and other local talents they produced theatre and light opera, often here in their big home on the northwest corner of Pike Street and Fifth Avenue.  With the help of a theatre coach imported from the East, the couple staged Gilbert and Sullivan’s comic opera Patience at the Frye Opera House on Dec. 30, 1888.  The place was nearly packed to witness the performance by the Seattle Juvenile Opera Company.  Surely many of its members had parents in the audience.

One of our stock subjects - which is you may have been it before.  The Frye Opera House at the Northeast corner of Marion and Front (First Ave.) ca. 1886).
One of our stock subjects – which is you may have been it before. The Frye Opera House at the Northeast corner of Marion and Front (First Ave.) ca. 1886).

The record of the posing Ranke family – or part of it – at the top, dates from ca. 1884.  Another look at the home – down from Denny Hill – in 1885 shows it nearly doubled.  By one report that enlarged pioneer clapboard had 11 rooms.  In 1889 the prospering Rankes joined the by then smart move of Seattle’s “better-offs” to First Hill.  They purchased there the southeast corner of Madison Street and Terry Avenue, and built a truly baronial mansion ornamented with carved panels, Oriental rugs, stained glass, and oil paintings for all the halls and eleven bedrooms.

A ca. 1885 pan of the city from Denny Hill, with the Ranke home indicated with a red dot on the left.  A detail of its place near the northwest corner of 5th Ave. and Pike Street is printed below the pan, and a detail from the 1888 Sanborn Real Estate map below it.  The enlarged home is fenced in red.
A ca. 1885 pan of the city from Denny Hill, with the Ranke home indicated with a red dot on the left. A detail of its place near the northwest corner of 5th Ave. and Pike Street is printed below the pan, and a detail from the 1888 Sanborn Real Estate map below it. The enlarged home is fenced in red. (Double-click the pan to enlarge it.)

1. 1885-D-Hill-pan-detail-for-Ranke-Hm-PikeDETL-web

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The home is no more in the 1904 footprint.  In its place three store fronts. that three years later would face-off with the city's plans to widen Pike Street by 10 feet.
The home is no more in the 1904 footprint. In its place three store fronts. that three years later would face-off with the city’s plans to widen Pike Street by 10 feet.  Note that Westlake has not as yet been cut thru from 4th and Pike northeast to Lake Union.  That opened in 1907.
A Seattle Times clip from Jan. 23, 1907, introducing the stresses between the city, with its plans to widen Pike Street, and Dora Ranke's tardy behavior.
A Seattle Times clip from Jan. 23, 1907, introducing the stresses between the city, with its plans to widen Pike Street, and Dora Ranke’s tardy behavior.
In its edition for March 19, 1907 The Seattle Times reveals that Mrs Ranke
In its edition for March 19, 1907 The Seattle Times reveals that Dora Ranke gets some support from City Council.
Revealing the Ranke Building's sidewalk commerce, the Woodhouse and Platt Furniture's exploitation
Revealing the Ranke Building’s sidewalk commerce, the Woodhouse and Platt Furniture’s exploitation of the reader’s imagination for its big sale during the building’s 1907 commotion with the widening of Pike Street.  The Times clip dates – it reads – from June 2, 1907.

 

An enlarged Ranke Bldg now covering the northwest corner of Pike and 5th Avenue. The 1912 Baist map below shows it in red - built with brick - and next door to the Northern Bank and Trust Co., a mix of brick and stone. Here the Westlake cut is already six/seven years old.
An enlarged Ranke Bldg now covering the northwest corner of Pike and 5th Avenue, left-of-center. The 1912 Baist map below shows it in red – built with brick – and next door to the Northern Bank and Trust Co., a mix of brick and stone. The Westlake cut is already six/seven years old in the Baist.
The 1912 Baist Real Estate Map - again.
The 1912 Baist Real Estate Map – again.

Otto did not live long enough to enjoy the family’s new mansion for the musicales and theatrics he almost certainly had planned for it.  He died of a “throat ailment” in 1892.  Dora lived on until 1919 – and well off.  In 1907 her vacation to Europe included a one-year stay in Paris.  (This may be the first time I have truly felt envy for one of my subjects.) The four-story Ranke building that replaced this home on Pike included a venue large enough for masquerade balls.  Long accompanied there by the city’s popular and long-lived Wagner’s First Regiment Orchestra, the balls at Ranke’s hall became a local tradition.  The brick Ranke Building was razed in 1927 for a “higher and best use” of the corner.

News of Dora Ranke's planned 1907 visit to Paris - for a year.
News of Dora Ranke’s planned 1907 visit to Paris – for a year.
An early promotion for a Ranke Hall masquerade ball and Cake Walk (look it up) accompanied by the music of Wagner.  The clipping also reveals what was then a popular diversion, or hysteria for some, the readings of mediums.   Not the column far right if filled with them.
(Double click it to enlarge) An early promotion for a Ranke Hall masquerade ball and Cake Walk (look it up) accompanied by the music of Wagner. The clipping also reveals what was then a popular diversion, and hysteria for some, the readings of mediums. Note the column far right filled with them.  The choices are not tough for how could one miss Miss Clark, the greatest and most wonderful medium on earth, unless it was to attend the “materializing  seance” called forth or produced by Mrs. Elsie Reynolds in town from California, but not forever.
The "highest and best" Ranke building at the northwest corner of 5th Ave. and Pike Street
The “highest and best” Ranke building at the northwest corner of 5th Ave. and Pike Street.  It survives, although mostly covered with new skin facing both 5th and Pike.
A kitty-korner look at the Ranke Bldg with the same sidewalk businesses.   Far right is glimpse of the Coliseum Theatre, and far left the Seaboard Building, all still standing.
A kitty-korner look at the Ranke Bldg with the same sidewalk businesses. Far right is a glimpse of the Coliseum Theatre, and far left the Seaboard Building, all still standing.
An "aerial" from the top of the then new Washington Athletic Club at the southeast corner of 6th and Union. Please take note of both the Blue Mouse Theatre and to its side Don's Seafood Restaurant, both on the west side of 5th between Union and Pike.  Don's was later purchase by Ivar Haglund for his first "fancy" restaurant, Ivar's Fifth Avenue.  It later got a name change to the Captain's Table before it was moved to the waterfront near the foot of Denny Way.
An “aerial” from the top of the then new Washington Athletic Club at the southeast corner of 6th and Union. Please take note of both the Blue Mouse Theatre and to its side Don’s Seafood Restaurant, both on the west side of 5th between Union and Pike. Don’s was later purchase by Ivar Haglund for his first “classy” restaurant, Ivar’s Fifth Avenue. It later got a name change to the Captain’s Table before it was moved to the waterfront near the foot of Denny Way.
Looking west through the intersection of 5th and Pike on Feb. 10, 1926.  This is another of many negatives made for the Foser Kleiser billboard company.  The centerpiece here is the smart Camel smoker.
Looking west through the intersection of 5th and Pike on Feb. 10, 1926. This is another of many negatives made for the Foster Kleiser billboard company. The centerpiece here is the smart Camel smoker.
Earlier and a block east on Pike St. a hydrant is broken on the southeast corner of Pike and Sixth on March 3, 1920.
Earlier and a block east on Pike St. a hydrant is broken on the southeast corner of Pike and Sixth on March 3, 1920.

 

FOUR More TIMES classifieds Heralding ENTERTAINMENTS at the RANKE in the First Cold Days of the 20th CENTURY

SeattleTimes Jan 3, 1900
SeattleTimes Jan 3, 1900
The Seattle Times, Jan. 6, 1900
The Seattle Times, Jan. 6, 1900
The Seattle Times, Jan. 26, 1900
The Seattle Times, Jan. 26, 1900
The Seattle Times, March 10, 1900
The Seattle Times, March 10, 1900

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Mistah Dorpat?  Certainly Sur Sherrard!  A few shots and subjects from nearby along Pike Street, and a visit (again) to the nearly royal Ranke Manse on First Hill.  Here first is the 33rd installment of the often leaned-on Time series from 1944-45, EARLY-DAY MANSIONS by Margaret Pitcairn Strachan.   Some of the stories will be familiar to you from my and other’s borrowing, but please do double-click here to see Strachan’s work.

No. 33 of   1944/45 series on Seattle's EARLY-DAY MANSIONS.
No. 33 of 1944/45 series on Margaret Pitcairn Strachan’s elaborately helpful features on Seattle’s EARLY-DAY MANSIONS.   [Double-Click to ENLARGE]
Below a Capitol Hill horizon(along 15th Ave.), Broadway High School, the Lincoln Park Reservoir fountain, in the foreground a small circle of big First Hill homes forms to the sides of Madision Ave., on the far left, with the Ranke home bottom-left.  Behind the Rankes are - still - the Hanfords and at the northeast corner of Boren and Madison, the Stacy Mansion, soon and still the University Club and, far-right at the southeast corner of Madison and Boren, the Carkeek Mansion.
Below a Capitol Hill horizon (along 15th Ave.), Broadway High School, the Lincoln Park Reservoir fountain, in the foreground a small circle of big First Hill homes forms to the sides of Madison Ave., on the far left, with the Ranke home bottom-left. Behind the Rankes are the Hanfords (before replace with the Perry Hotel) and at the scene’s center the northeast corner of Boren and Madison, the Stacy Mansion, soon and still the University Club and, far-right, at the southeast corner of Madison and Boren, the Carkeek Mansion.

 

The Ranke mansion at the southeast corner of Madison and Terry with the Perry Hotel (later the Columbia Hospital) behind it at the southwest corner of Boren and Madison.
The Ranke mansion at the southeast corner of Madison and Terry with the Perry Hotel (later the Columbus Hospital) behind it at the southwest corner of Boren and Madison.

2. Ranke-Home,-Madison-Terry-seCor-Sept

2. RANKE-STRAIGHt-ON-NOWeb

The Ranke mansion with the Perry Hotel behind it.
The Ranke mansion with the Perry Hotel behind it.

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3. Trolley-flood-on-Pike web

First appeared in Pacific, Jan. 29, 1995.
First appeared in Pacific, Jan. 29, 1995.

3.-nowTrolley-flood-on-Pike-WEB

(above) Looking west on Pike from had the home been preserved in the front lawn (remembering that Pike was widened) of the Ranke’s 1884 home.

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LATER

FEB. 4, 1951, The Seattle Times
FEB. 4, 1951, The Seattle Times

 

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: First Hill by any other name…is just as steep

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: On his visit to the Smith Tower around 1960, Wade Stevenson recorded the western slope of First Hill showing Harborview Hospital and part of Yesler Terrace at the top between 7th and 9th Avenue but still little development in the two blocks between 7th and 5th Avenues.  Soon the Seattle Freeway would create a concrete ditch between 7th and 6th (the curving Avenue that runs left-to-right through the middle of the subject.)  Much of the wild and spring fed landscape between 6th and 5th near the bottom of the revealing subject was cleared for parking.  (Photo by Wade Stevenson, courtesy of Noel Holley)
THEN: On his visit to the Smith Tower around 1960, Wade Stevenson recorded the western slope of First Hill showing Harborview Hospital and part of Yesler Terrace at the top between 7th and 9th Avenue but still little development in the two blocks between 7th and 5th Avenues. Soon the Seattle Freeway would create a concrete ditch between 7th and 6th (the curving Avenue that runs left-to-right through the middle of the subject.) Much of the wild and spring fed landscape between 6th and 5th near the bottom of the revealing subject was cleared for parking. (Photo by Wade Stevenson, courtesy of Noel Holley)
NOW: Center-right, the King County’s “green” Chinook Building stacks thirteen stories above the northwest corner of 5th and Terrace.  Behind it and up Jefferson Street at its southwest corner with 6th Avenue is the county’s also new Goat Hill Parking Garage.
NOW: Center-right, the King County’s “green” Chinook Building stacks thirteen stories above the northwest corner of 5th and Terrace. Behind it and up Jefferson Street at its southwest corner with 6th Avenue is the county’s also new Goat Hill Parking Garage.

Let us now celebrate Goat Hill, the latest of the imaginative names given to First Hill or parts of it since the original settlers first climbed it in 1852. They named it then for its obvious distinction.  The about 366 foot high (near Broadway and James) ridge that lifted from the central waterfront like a green curtain of firs, cedars, hemlocks and alders was the first hill to climb and cross when either trailblazing east to the “big lake” eventually named Washington, or wisely following the “Indian Path’ that reached the lake roughly in line with the present Yesler Way.

I learned of the “Goat” tag only recently when railroad historian Noel Holley shared with me the photo printed here.  His friend, Wade Stevenson while visiting Seattle from Othello, recorded it from the Smith Tower. Noel figures “it was about 1960.”  This, then, is a late look at First Hill’s western face before the freeway was cut across it.

Another friend, First Hill historian Stephen Edwin Lundgren, first confirmed the hill’s newest moniker and then directed me to what we may fairly call its creator: Jim Napolitano.  While working on King County’s newest additions to the hill – a multi-story parking garage at 6th and Jefferson and the County’s new Chinook Office Building at 5th and Terrace – Napolitano, a Major Project Manager for King County – heard enough variations on the same amused complaint “You needed to be a goat to get up there!” that he suggested that this new public works campus be named for the goats.  And so it is now a new Goat Hill garage that clings to the steep southwest corner of 6th and Jefferson.  (I knew the cheap thrills of that free but challenging dirt parking lot for I often used it in the 1970s while visiting city hall for research.)

Stephen Lundgren's look across Goat Hill from the Yesler Way Overpass with Harborview peeking from above the second growth landscape stepped above the Interstate-Five ditch - here.
Stephen Lundgren’s look across Goat Hill from the Yesler Way I-5 Overpass with Harborview peeking above the second growth landscape stepped above the Interstate-Five ditch – here.
Another of Lundgren's recordings of Snow Falling on Goat Hill - here AKA Pill Hill, Yesler Hill, Profanity Hill and First Hill.
Another of Lundgren’s recordings of Snow Falling on Goat Hill – here AKA Pill Hill, Yesler Hill, Profanity Hill and First Hill.  On the right is Harborview parking.
The Smith Tower Log Cabin Restaurant shares the Call of the Wild at the base of the Highest Piece of Modernity on the West Coast then, and unwitting wood for the forest that was felled for and and all else that followed.
The Smith Tower Log Cabin Restaurant shares the Call of the Wild at the base of the Highest Piece of Modernity on the West Coast then – unwitting wood, perhaps, for the forest that was felled and what followed.

Through its mere 162 years of development and complaints, First Hill – or parts of it – has had many names including Yesler, Pill and Profanity.  This last was a folk creation of the late 1890s when lawyers and litigants started using “bad language” during their steep climb to the King County Courthouse which sat then on the brow of the hill about 300 feet above Pioneer Square.  Now we have another ascribing folk name for the part of First Hill west of the I-5 Freeway and south of James.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, old goat?  Surely Jean, and we will start with a few goats, beginning with a goat on goats, one of the many Kodachromes left with us by Horace Sykes, whose transparencies we shared with the “Our Daily Sykes” feature that we ran for at least 500 days – we hope without missing any.   Here first is a Sykes that we did not use, waiting we were for some Call of the Goat.   Following that we will introduce a Wallingford goat on Eastern Ave. and accompany it will be a pony on Eastern Ave. as well and it’s own Pacific feature.  Both of these neighborhood animals came from my neighbor Frank Debruyn, now passed.  While his pony made it into Pacific on Nov. 15, 1992, I  assured Frank that his goat would be used as well – sometime.  Now’s the time Jean – and Frank.

Following the farm animals, Ron Edge will put up more links to related stories that have appeared on this blog previously.  Most of these are on First Hill subjects.  As with music these features are their own motifs and so gain new resonances and harmonies when mixed with other features.  That, at least, is what we hope.

Horace-Sykes-Goats-on-Goats-WEBFrank-DeBruyn-w-goat-&-wicker-wagon-4123-Eastern-ca17-webFrank-DeBruyn-snapshots-of-his-youth-on-Eastern-Ave-WEB

A story shared by Frank DeBruyn my once energetic neighbor, now passed.  This feature first appeared in Pacific on Nov. 15, 1992.
A story shared by Frank DeBruyn my once energetic neighbor, now passed. This feature first appeared in Pacific on Nov. 15, 1992.

EDGE LINKS

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

harborview-aerial-ca39-web

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WEDDED BLISS BORN ABOVE

The ordinarily battling Rev. Mathews (First Presby) and Mayor Hi Gill frame unnamed newly weds on the platform of then (1914) new Smith Tower observatory.
The ordinarily battling Rev. Mathews (First Presby) and Mayor Hi Gill frame unnamed newly weds on the platform of the then (1914) new Smith Tower observatory.
Singer-Songwriter Laura Weller and Puget Sound Disk Jockey Scott Vanderpool at their wedding party on top of the Smith Tower.
Singer-Songwriter Laura Weller and popular Puget Sound Disk Jockey Scott Vanderpool at their wedding party on top of the Smith Tower.

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First Hill aerial detail north of Yesler WEB

Above and below INTERSTATE FIVE (aka The Seattle Freeway) building south through Goat Hill in the early-mid 1960s.

First Hill aerial detail w some Yesler Housing Project WEB

From Harborview's tower, ca. 1950, across the northwest corner of Yesler Terrace, eventually lost to Freeway construction and the hospital's expansion.
From Harborview’s tower, ca. 1955, across the northwest corner of Yesler Terrace, eventually lost to Freeway construction and the hospital’s expansion.
April 11, 1950, a Pacific Aerial record of Goat Hill, nestled between the business district and Harborview Hospital.
April 11, 1950, a Pacific Aerial record of Goat Hill, nestled between the business district and Harborview Hospital.
The Smith Tower casts its shadow up the rough terrain of Goat Hill.   Yesler Way splits the landscape.
The Smith Tower casts its shadow up the rough terrain of Goat Hill. Yesler Way splits the landscape.
Lawton Gowey's juxtaposition of the squandered Seattle Hotel with the Smith Tower beyond it - June 8, 1961.
Lawton Gowey’s juxtaposition of the squandered Seattle Hotel with the Smith Tower beyond it – June 8, 1961.
All in a row, teh Great Northern tower (1904/5), the Smith Tower (1913/14) and the SeaFirst Tower (1967/68.)
All in a row, the Great Northern tower (1904/5), Smith Tower (1913/14) and SeaFirst Tower (1967/68.)

Ivar-Smith-Tower-web

In 1976 Ivar bought what he described as his “last toy” – the (about) 42-story Smith Tower, which as a child in West Seattle he watch ascending across Elliott Bay.  Ivar was born in 1905.  The tower was dedicated nine years later.

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WADE STEVENSON’S WATERFRONT

Wade Stevenson also recorded the waterfront from the Smith Tower observatory, and included prints with those he gave to his friend Noel Holley.  We print them now beside Jean’s recent coverage of the same sections of the waterfront nearest the Smith Tower and Pioneer Square.  We will include a few other examples, as well.

Wade Stevenson looks west-southwest to piers 45 thru 48.  Bottom-left is the intersection of First Ave. South and Main Street.
Wade Stevenson looks west-southwest to piers 45 thru 48. Bottom-left is the intersection of First Ave. South and Main Street. Ca. 1960.
Nearly the same coverage, ca. 1940.
Nearly the same coverage, ca. 1940.
Lawton Gowey's recording from Aug. 27 1971.  The Port of Seattle's early parking for containers is far left, and an Alaskan Ferry is parked along the north side of its terminus then, Pier 48.
Lawton Gowey’s recording from Aug. 27 1971. The Port of Seattle’s early parking for containers is far left, and an Alaskan Ferry is parked along the north side of its terminus then, Pier 48.
Jean's recent and wider look down on the same waterfront.  The big shed on Pier 48 no longer holds on.  I fondly remember the Bookfairs there.
Jean’s recent and wider look down on the same waterfront. The big shed on Pier 48 no longer holds on. I fondly remember the winter Book Fairs there, sans heat, but warmed by crowds.
Wade Stevenson's ca. 1959 record of Piers 50 thru 53 - left-to-right.  The 1930s Art Deco style Colman Dock is still holding to Pier 52.  The Kalakala is parked between Piers 50 and 51, the Alaska Piers.
Wade Stevenson’s ca. 1959 record of Piers 50 thru 53 – left-to-right. The 1930s Art Deco styled Colman Dock is still holding to Pier 52, right-of-center. The Kalakala is parked between Piers 50 and 51, the Alaska Piers.
The pier shed on Alaska Pier No. 1, far left, is still in place.  Pier No. 2 has been striped for the Polynesia Rest. and parking in anticipation of Century 21.  Gowey dated this June 21, 1961.
The pier shed on Alaska Pier No. 1, far left, is still in place in 1961. Pier No. 2 has been striped for the Polynesia Rest. and parking in anticipation of Century 21. Gowey dated this June 21, 1961.  The Kalakala has moved one slip to the north.  The pan reaches as far north as the water end of Pier 56.
On its last trip for scrap (to Japan) the Dominion Monarch parked at Pier 1 as a "botel" through the Century 21, summer of 1962.  Lawton Gowey.
On its last trip for scrap (to Japan) the Dominion Monarch parked at Pier 1 as a “botel” through the Century 21 summer of 1962. Lawton Gowey.

 

Lawton Gowey records the new Colman Dock, with the Grand Trunk Pier 53 also razed for DOT parking.
Lawton Gowey records the new Colman Dock, with the Grand Trunk Pier 53 also razed for DOT parking.
Jean's recent recording continues north in feature what has become the Dept. of Transportation's sprawl to both sides of Colman Dock for its ferries.
Jean’s recent recording continues north to feature what has become the Dept. of Transportation’s sprawl for ferries to both sides of Colman Dock.

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A recent look up Goat Hill to Harborview.  I do not remember who recorded it.  Perhaps she or he will show up.
A recent look up Goat Hill to Harborview. Earlier I did not remember who recorded it. I speculated “Perhaps she or he will come forward.”  He did.  It is, again, Stephen Lundgren.  I should have known.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Anthony Family Bindery

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN:  Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards.  Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor.  (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)
THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)
NOW: For his “repeat” Jean was welcomed into Blue C Sushi on 7th Avenue – of course – where he shouldered the popular sushi bar’s east wall for a revealing prospect of what was long ago the home and work site for the Anthony families home and bindery business.
NOW: For his “repeat” Jean was welcomed into Blue C Sushi on 7th Avenue – of course – where he shouldered the popular sushi bar’s east wall for a revealing prospect of what was long ago the home and work site for the Anthony families home and bindery business.

On the Sunday morning of June 30, 1963, Frank Shaw loaded his Hasselblad camera with color film, and climbed a narrow driveway off 7th Ave. between Pike and Pine Street approaching the center of Block 66 of the Denny Addition.  Although surrounded by hotels including the Waldorf behind him and above him the towering Art Deco landmark, the Roosevelt, (seen here across 7th Avenue), Shaw focused instead on this fading gray pioneer, for more than 70 years the clapboard home of the Anthony family. It was built ca.1887 on a 60×100 foot lot that the German immigrant Ferdinand Anthony purchased directly from Seattle’s “father-founder” Arthur Denny.

The Frye Opera House ca. 1887 looking northeast across the intersection of Front Street (First Ave.) and Marion Street.
The Frye Opera House ca. 1887 looking northeast across the intersection of Front Street (First Ave.) and Marion Street.

Anthony began his pioneer book binding business in the Frye Opera House in the early 1880s. Eventually the family business was moved into a long shed built for it behind their home.  (Here the bindery is out-of-frame to the right, but it is included in two of the five transparencies of the home site that Shaw exposed this Sunday.  We will attach them, with captions, following the text for this feature.)  As his many surviving cityscapes confess, when Frank Shaw, a Boeing quality control inspector, was not out climbing with the Mountaineers, he liked to walk the city taking pictures of what he characterized for Bob Geigle, a friend at Boeing, as the “what is.” Shaw was a “realist” with his camera, who typically found something old more embodied than something new.

The 66th Block at colorfully recorded on the old faithful 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.
The 66th Block as colorfully recorded on the old faithful 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.  Lot 5 is the Anthony’s and their bindery is in the long yellow-caste shed running with the alley between Pike and Pine.  The shed is between the home and the Jackson Apartments that face 8th Avenue.  They were later renamed the Maxwell Apts, as we see them in Smith’s other photos of the site inserted here below the text.  Capt. Jackson’s mansion is seen in footprint on parts of lots 2 & 3.  We will include a feature on the Jackson Mansion below – but not directly below.
A few of the "key-word" choices for the Jackson Apt. appearing in the Seattle Public Library's web page opportunity to search The Times from 1900 to 1984.  Beside it is a detail of the block from a 1925 commercial map.
A few of the “key-word” choices for the Jackson Apt. appearing in the Seattle Public Library’s web page opportunity to search The Times from 1900 to 1984. Beside it is a detail of the block from a 1925 commercial map, which consequently gives no footprint for the Anthony Home or industry .

Robert Shaw consistently dated and named his negatives and transparencies.  He did not, however, keep a photographer’s diary, and so we don’t know what he knew about the Anthony family – if anything.  Following their father Ferdinand’s death in 1919, Robert, age 33, and his younger sister Julia continued to run the binding business, although Julia also gave 42 years to teaching in Seattle schools.  Thru their many years on 7th Ave. Robert Anthony had denied a parade of agents with cash offers for his property, explaining that it “suited” him as is. Robert died less than half a year after Robert Shaw’s visit.  The Anthony “compound” was soon razed in 1964, at first for more parking. Julia passed in 1970.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   As always – almost – a few more samples from the neighborhood, illustrations and, this time, also four past features.

The striped roofing of the Anthony Bindery appears here below the south rear facade of the Maxwell Apts., formerly the Jackson Apts.  A glimpse of 8th Ave. is far left.
The striped roofing of the Anthony Bindery appears here below the south rear facade of the Maxwell Apts., formerly the Jackson Apts. A glimpse of 8th Ave. is far left. (Frank Shaw)
With his back nearer the sidewalk on 7th, Shaw looks southeast around the Anthony home - in its last days - to the Maxwell Apts on the left and the Waldorf Hotel on the right.  (Frank Shaw)
With his back nearer the sidewalk on 7th, Shaw looks northeast around the Anthony home – in its last days – to the Maxwell Apts on the left and the Waldorf Hotel on the right. (Frank Shaw)

Looking southwest over the rear of the Anthony home to the northwest corner of the Waldorf Hotel.  (Frank Shaw)
Looking southwest over the rear of the Anthony home to the northwest corner of the Waldorf Hotel. (Frank Shaw)  [My first car was a Ford like that one!]
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Frank Shaw was an active member of the Mountaineers whose clubhouse was on Pike Street up the stairs from the sidewalk on Pike Street and above the Caballero.  The slides that follow are of the Pike Street scenes near 7th Avenue that were most likely photograph during one of his visits to the Mountaineers clubroom.
Frank Shaw was an active member of the Mountaineers whose clubhouse was on Pike Street up the stairs from the sidewalk above the Caballero. The slides that follow are of the Pike Street scenes near 7th Avenue that were most likely photographed during one of his visits to the Mountaineers clubroom.
East on Pike thru 7th Ave., Sunday Sept. 21, 1969.  (Frank Shaw)
West on Pike thru 7th Ave., Sunday Sept. 21, 1969. (Frank Shaw)
Same date, same prospect but with a little more of the
Same date, same prospect but with a little more of the Navarre Hotel on the right.   West across Sixth Avenue is Ernst Hardware (marked by its typical sterile corporate corner sign) back-to-back with the Coliseum Theatre.  It is possible the Shaw has arrived to join a group early on Sunday Morning for a hike somewhere into Seattle’s surrounding “Charmed Land?” (Frank Shaw)
Still looking south on Pike thru 7th Ave. early on Sunday Sept. 21, 1969.  (Frank Shaw)
Still looking west on Pike thru 7th Ave. early on Sunday Sept. 21, 1969. (Frank Shaw)

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2. JacksonCrosby-home--(i-think)-8-&-Pine-swCor-WEB

DANIEL & MARY JACKSON’S BIG HOME

(First printed in Pacific, July 17, 1988.)

 

            The history of Seattle’s big homes began in earnest during the 1880s boom. Moneyed families, including the Yeslers, began building oversized homes right in town next door to smaller bungalows. As the town quickly grew into a city, First Hill developed as an almost exclusive neighborhood of mansions.

            Later, the dispersal of First Hill society proceeded in many directions, including Lake Washington, Capitol Hill and walled-in enclaves such as Broadmoor and the Highlands. Today, there only a few surviving big homes on First Hill.  Its transformation to apartments and clinics is long since completed.

            The D.B. Jackson home was an exception to the practice of the rich gathering in plutocratic enclaves. It was neither in town nor on the hill. Sited at the southwest corner of Pine Street and Eighth Avenue, its construction in 1888 placed it at the expanding northern border of the city in a neighborhood lightly settled with workers’ homes and duplexes.

            Captain Jackson was a lumberman, working through the 1870s as manager of the Puget Mill Company’s fleet of tug boats. The Jackson family home at Port Gamble is preserved there.

            In 1882, Jackson formed the Washington Steamboat and Transportation Co. and won the mail contract for Puget Sound ports. This enlarged the so-called “Mosquito Fleet” of small steamers buzzing about the Sound. In 1889, Jackson expanded his operations into the very successful Puget Sound and Alaska Steamship Co.

The Jackson  big home a the southwest corner of 8th and Pine.
The Jackson big home a the southwest corner of 8th and Pine.

            The Jackson big home was begun by Fred E. Sander, a local trolley promoter, in 1888, but it was the Jacksons that finished it.  The Mansion was lavishly appointed with stained glass, hardwoods, plush carpets and frescoed ceilings.  It had 14 rooms, and each with its own fireplace, but the captain had little time to enjoy it. He died in 1895. His wife, Mary, lived on in the big home for another 20 years before moving to Captiol Hill in about 1914. Nearly back-to-back, she was neighbors with the Anthony family for a quarter-century.  Mary Rowell Jackson died in 1927 at the age of 92, leaving 20 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren, including Sen. Dan Evans.

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The first Eagles Hall, at the southeast corner of 7th and Pine.  (Courtesy MOHAI)
The first Eagles Hall, at the southwest corner of 7th and Pine. (Courtesy MOHAI)

The FIRST AERIE – EAGLES at 7TH & PINE

(First appeared in Pacific, 8-25-2002)

            In 1904, after renting space from the Masons, the burgeoning Eagles moved into their own hall at the southwest corner of Seventh Avenue and Pine Street. In the less than five years since their founding, they had added more than 1,000 members and enough cash to purchase the comely hall and crown Aerie No.1 with an eagle.

            The Eagles were organized as an afterthought at a secret meeting of Seattle theater impresarios, John Considine and John Cort included. The group had met to plot ways of breaking the Musician’s Union strike against their houses. After deciding to fire their bands and use pianists alone to accompany variety acts, the founders then formed The Independent Order of Good Things and selected for a motto “Skin Em.”

            At the founders’ second meeting they settled on “Eagles” for their name and dropped the bellicose motto for a merely secular maxim: “Not God, heaven, hereafter, but man, earth, now.” By one critic’s description, about a third of the original management “were the toughest crowd that could be dug up in Seattle.” At the Eagles’ 50th-anniversary celebration, William A. Fisher recalled, “When they initiated me, I almost resigned. The ceremonies were so rough I was on the shelf for three days.”

            Part of the reason the Eagles grew at a record rate was because so many of them were entertainers who were always on the move. They also dropped the hazing. John Cort, the first president, explained: “We want to make life more desirable by lessening its evils and promoting peace, prosperity, gladness and hope.” Theirs was a politics of populism and patriotism. At one time or another the order promoted workers compensation, Mothers Day, old-age pensions and, briefly, a guaranteed annual income.

            Twenty-two years after the Eagles in 1903 settle into their first permanent hall at Pine and Seventh, the club then moved two blocks south on Seventh to a much larger terracotta tile clad home at the northeast corner of Union and 7ths. That they sold the old hall for $231,000 was noted in a 1925 by a Seattle Times business reporter as an “outstanding example of the increase of real estate values in the district north of Pike Street.”  They originally paid $11,500 for it.  Another Bartells Drugs became the primary tenant of the converted hall for “man, earth, now.” 

Eagles after its conversion into primarily another Bartells.
Eagles after its conversion into another Bartells.

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The flatiron block bordered by Olive on the right, Howell on the left, 9th Ave. to the rear, and 8th to the rear of the municipal photographer. (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)
The flatiron block bordered by Olive on the right, Howell on the left, 9th Ave. to the rear of the subject, and 8th to the rear of the municipal photographer. (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)

THE ‘Y’ OF HOWELL AND OLIVE LOOKING EAST FROM 8TH AVENUE.

 (First printed in Pacific, June 23 1996)

            Little block 28 of Sara Bell’s Second Addition is one of those pie-shaped oddities that offer relief from the predictable space of the American urban grid.  The buildings on them seem to put on a show – sometimes, like here, pushing their faces into the flow of traffic.

            Like the others of this flatiron class, what this three-story clapboard gives up in space it makes up in facades.  Surely every room within is well-lit.  Photographed here Nov. 18, 1910, this building also shows up in panorama recorded from the summit of Denny Hill 20 years earlier. (We will include it – when we find it.)

            This mixed-class (retail and apartment) structure thrusts its forehead into the five-star corner of Olive Square.  Here Howell Street, on the right, originates from the intersection of Eight Avenue and Olive Way.  After Yesler Way running west from Broadway, Olive is the second odd tangent that enlivens the otherwise monotonous street configuration of Seattle’s central Business district.

            The scene was probably recorded by the Public Works Department’s photographer, James Lee, which may explain the photograph’s enigmatic purpose as a record of something having to do with public use rather than private or architectural glory.  Still this vain little clapboard is a pleasure – although it may be an idle one.  The bright sign taped to the front door is a real-estate broker’s inquiry card.  The only other sign showing is hung on the left over the sidewalk on Olive way.  It is for the Angelo, the residential rooms upstairs.

Looking north on 8th thru Olive
Looking north on 8th thru Olive on March 8, 1932 (Courtesy, Municipal Archives)

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Appeared first in Pacific on July 8, 2001.
Appeared first in Pacific on July 8, 2001.

5. Waldorf-Building-card-WEB

5. Waldorf-Buildng-adver-in-Prosperous-Washington-WEB

5. Waldorf-Towers-Aparments-(remodel-of-Waldorf-hotel)WEB

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ALL BUT 2 of the 7 SUBJECTS that FOLLOW, INCLUDE AT LEAST A GLIMPSE of the WEST FAÇADE of the ANTHONY FAMILY HOME mid-block on the East Side of Seventh Avenue Between PIKE & PINE STREETS.  This is a TEST – WITHOUT THE ANSWERS.  FAMILIAR as you are by now with the ANTHONY HOME, we are confident that if you SEEK YOU WILL FIND!

 

5. North-End-pan-fm-WAC-ca.-1930-WEB

x. DYPT-lk-e.-fm-fm-Denny-Hill-pineolive-WEB

x. Pine-and-First-Hill-fm-New-Washington-Hotel-WEB

x. Pike-Street-from-roof-of-someting-near-second-north-sideWEB

x. Pine-Street-looking-east-fm-upper-floor-building-at-3rd,-maslan-WEB

4.-El-Goucho-7-&-Olive-1961-Werner-WEB

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