Seattle Now & Then: The Pike Place Corner Market Building

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building.  (Photo by Frank Shaw)
THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building. (Photo by Frank Shaw)
NOW: Jean Sherrard captured the agreeable exterior of the restored Corner Market Building on this spring’s sunny Easter Sunday.
NOW: Jean Sherrard captured the agreeable exterior of the restored Corner Market Building on this spring’s sunny Easter Sunday.
Frank Shaw's black and white negative of the same artists near the corner of Pike Place and Pike Street.  When we discover their names we will add  them.
Frank Shaw’s black and white negative of the same artists near the corner of Pike Place and Pike Street. When we discover their names we will add them.

Completed in 1912, five years after the opening of the Pike Place Market, the Corner Market Building is set like a keystone at the head of its landmark block bordered by First Avenue, Pike Street and Pike Place.  The architect, Seattle’s Harlan Thomas, wrapped elegance around the corner with contrasting brickwork, generous arching windows along the top floor, and at the sidewalk, open stalls for selling mostly fresh foodstuffs.

The corner before the Corner Market Building.  The view looks northeast from the "elbow" where Pike Street turns north (left) into Pike Place.
The corner before the Corner Market Building. The view looks northeast from the “elbow” where Pike Street turns north (left) into Pike Place.

The photographer Frank Shaw dated this, his 2×2 inch slide, April 12, 1975.  Joan Paulson disagrees, and in this I join her.  April 12th was the Saturday when the nearly week-long “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in and Historic Restoration” was fulfilled and celebrated.  That morning, before the awards, artists could apply their last brush strokes to their assigned 4×8 foot primed panels, which for the next seven months would serve as both an exhibit and as a construction fence to separate and protect laborers and shoppers from each other.

Another of Frank Shaw's recordings of the Market murals.  Might that be Victor Steinbrucke watching, far right?
Another of Frank Shaw’s recordings of the Market murals. Might that be another over the shoulder shot of Victor Steinbrueck watching, far right?
The same lads and the same Frank Shaw.
Moments later the same lads and the same Frank Shaw.
Moments later and with some help from Pop, perhaps.  (Frank Shaw)
Moments later and with some help from Pop, perhaps. (Frank Shaw)

It was Paulson who put the primed panels and about fifty painters together and, when needed, purchased the art supplies as well.  Paulson recalls, “They could start painting on Monday.  It rained on Tuesday. Most likely this is Wednesday or Thursday. There’s too much left to do with the panels and too few people for it to be the celebration on Saturday the twelfth.”

Frank Shaw recorded several shots of  the front facade looking north across Pike Street.
Frank Shaw recorded several shots of the front facade looking north across Pike Street.
Another
Another

As a chronicler of Pike Place Market History, Joan Paulson notes the unique “bottom-up” energies that made protecting the market a people’s project. connecting historic preservation with urban renewal and its federal funding.  Appropriately, a force named Friends of the Market fueled the victorious 1971 citizens’ initiative to “Save the Market.”  In most of this, U.W. professor of architecture Victor Steinbrueck was never out of the picture, and here (at the top) in Frank Shaw’s slide, Joan Paulson has found him as well.  Far right, in the shade of his straw hat, we may detect over his right shoulder, that the “savior of the market” is working on his own contributions to the “Paint-In.”  In Jean’s “now” photo, although thirty-nine years later, Joan Paulson stands at the corner holding up a rolled paper in her right hand.

Joan Paulson explains that the 4x8 mural panels made it possible to both open and move the fence when needed.  This, it seems, is later in the week of painting than the colored snap at the top.   (Frank Shaw)
Joan Paulson explains that the 4×8 mural panels made it possible to both open and move the fence when needed. This, it seems, is later in the week of painting than the colored snap at the top. (Frank Shaw)

On Saturday April 12, at the high noon lunchtime awards ceremony, Steinbrueck was one of the winners. The judges explained that to this special “paint-in artist we give the whole Market to do with as he pleases for the rest of the day, and Roger Downey (one of the judges) will wash his brushes.”  With work completed on the Corner Market Building’s exterior in late November, all the “unique-to-the-market masterpieces” came down, including the surviving half of Steinbrueck’s mural, the part not punctured by a beam during construction.

Looking east from the "elbow" in 1919 with the then seven-year-old Corner Market Building on the left.  (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)
Looking east from the “elbow” in 1919 with the then seven-year-old Corner Market Building on the left. (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)
A typically alert Lawton Gowey recorded this portrait of a worn market on Oct. 25, 1974, and so before the restoration.
A typically alert Lawton Gowey recorded this portrait of a worn market on Oct. 25, 1974, and so before the restoration.
Gowey returned on April 21,1976 to study the consequences.  (Lawton Gowey)
Gowey returned on April 21,1976 to study the consequences. (Lawton Gowey)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Yes Jean, a protracted attention to the Pike Place Public Market in 1975 with a selection of photographs scanned from volume 2 of the 5 volumes of Frank Shaw negatives huddled in 18 inches on a shelf to the side of me in this north end crypt.  We will attempt to get our choices up before climbing the steps to  join the bears, but we may not.   If not we  will finish it off after seven or eight hours sleep and a late breakfast.  The captions here will be minimal.  We will elaborate with them alter, and hope some of you may help.   (See above.  You can comment.)  Joan Paulson is also going study them and she, obviously, is the expert for such content as is in what follows.  Thanks again to Mike Veitenhauns, Frank Shaw’s nephew, whom I first met forty-plus years ago at Fairhaven College, he a student and I an artist-in-residence.   The Shaw snaps that follow will be arranged in no particular order – unless you notice one.

Several self-portraits by Frank Shaw explained as in the "Seattle Center Kaleidoscope, 11:45 Am, Jan. 12, 1978."
Several self-portraits by Frank Shaw explained as in the “Seattle Center Kaleidoscope, 11:45 Am, Jan. 12, 1978.”
Two buskers at the elbow
Buskers at the elbow (better than blisters on the knee)
More buskers at the elbow, and the hint of some order.
More buskers at the elbow, and the hint of some order.
Looking north on Pike Place - again at the corner - with an early capture of Artist the Spoonman, in white right-of-center.
Looking north on Pike Place – again at the corner – with an early capture of Artis the Spoonman, in white right-of-center.
More Artist
More Artis
Spoonman, Wonder Bridge and She Who Stands Guard.
Spoonman, Wonder Bridge and She Who Stands Guard.
One way to the mens' room in 1975.
One way to the men’s’ room in 1975.
The steps to Lower Pike . . .
The steps to Lower Pike . . .
Ye Olde General Store
Ye Olde General Store
Rock-n-Roll - or perhaps the blues - on the roof of the Champion Building
Rock-n-Roll – or perhaps the blues – on the roof of the Champion Building
Coke and Good Will
Coke and Goodwill
Market stairway for saving space - and the curves.
Market stairway for saving space – and the curves.
The Liberty Malt Store and more . . .
The Liberty Malt Store and more . . .
Drum Circle
Drum Circle

 

A shop of pop shadows
A shop of pop shadows

 

Celebrating Valentines Day in a store nearby.
A variation on “I’d rather have a paper doll that I could call my own, that other fellows could not take or steal!” Celebrating Valentines Day in a store nearby.

 

Mary's corner, most likely in the basement or low-downs . . .
Mary’s corner, most likely in the basement or low-downs . . .
A juggler-busker or busker-juggler, depending upon the number of balls.
A juggler-busker or busker-juggler, depending upon the number of balls.

 

A Market cafe I do not remember.  I don't think that it is the Soup and Salad, which was running then.
A Market cafe I do not remember. I don’t think that it is the Soup and Salad, which was running then.
Looking to the north end curve of what the Market calls the "Lower Post Alley" to distinguished it, as Joan Paulson explains, from the Post Alley the runs north from Pike Place.
Looking to the north end curve of what the Market calls the “Lower Post Alley” to distinguished it,as Joan Paulson explains, from the Post Alley that runs north from Pike Place.
String band spread at the Elbow, again.
String band spread at the Elbow, again.

 

The ELBOW EXPOSED
The ELBOW EXPOSED
Stairs to the Market no longer stepped on.
Stairs to the Market no longer stepped on.

===

RETURNING SUNDAY NIGHT JUNE 1, 2014, AROUND MIDNIGHT

Plumbing fixture and Ten Cent paperbacks near the market - more Frank Shaw in 1975
Plumbing fixture and Ten Cent paperbacks near the market – more Frank Shaw in 1975
Somewhere near the market
Somewhere near the market
Market view west across Elliott Bay, with ladder
Market view west across Elliott Bay, with ladder
Waiting for the boxcar races on the lower Pike Alley.  There may have been more than one boxcar race at the Market in 1975.  Here it is raining.  In another record of racing limited to gravity motivation, the sun is shining on the Market.
Waiting for the boxcar races on the lower Pike Alley. There may have been more than one boxcar race at the Market in 1975. Here it is raining. In another record of racing limited to gravity motivation, the sun is shining on the Market.
Another busker at the Elbow.
Another busker at the Elbow.
Busker searching for open tuning.
Busker searching for open tuning.
Return to the Dexter Gallery
Return to the Dexter Gallery
Certainly Soup and Salad, a lower level nutritious dive with a view of Puget Sound, and visited often.
Certainly Soup and Salad, a lower level nutritious dive with a view of Puget Sound, and visited often.
The stools at Soup and Salad, after closing for the day.
The stools at Soup and Salad, after closing for the day or perhaps before opening.
Looking north on Western Avenue and thru the old Pike Hill Climb before its big changes in 1976.
Looking north on Western Avenue and thru the old Pike Hill Climb before its big changes in 1976.
Looking south on Western from near the foot of Stewart Street.
Looking south on Western from near the foot of Stewart Street.
Hot Bread and the Rotary Bakery
Hot Bread and the Rotary Bakery

 

More Soapbox fans looking into the curving pit of the lower Post Alley and the first curve.  Click your mouse.  Do you recognize anyone?
More Soapbox fans looking into the curving pit of the lower Post Alley at the first curve. Click your mouse. Do you recognize anyone?
On your mark
On your mark or just beyond it.
Return to the roof top band on the Champions Building.   Most likely it was entertainment for Soapbox day.  The negatives are neighbors in Shaw's album.
Return to the roof top band on the Champions Building. Most likely it was entertainment for Soapbox day. The negatives are neighbors in Shaw’s album.
Finally - for this feature although not for Frank's photos - note the
Finally – for this feature although not for Frank’s photos – note the Stage One Theatre sign hanging over (lower) Pike Alley.   Jean played there, a big role in his teens.  He began visiting the Public Market then after school.  He was already  a talented thespian with a mature baritone  and he was tall and so passed for someone older.  Jean got an important speaking roll in  Shakespeare’s Hamlet – one of Hamlet’s friends, the one who stabs him in the end – and the stories he tells of that production are wonderfully funny and deserving of their own theatre.  Perhaps he will share his stories of Hamlet here.  Jean is still tall and talented too.
Frank Shaw was a long-time member of the Mountaineers Club, and a great part of his collection records this "Charmed Land."  This dark self-portrait is fitting for his pantheon or pantheism.   Thank you Frank.  Again, these have been a few of the photographs he recorded of the Market in 1975.  There are many others for other years.
Frank Shaw was a long-time member of the Mountaineers Club, and a great part of his collection records this “Charmed Land.” Shaw’s  dark self-portrait fits his pantheon and/or  his pantheism. Thank you Frank. Again, these have been a few of the photographs he recorded of the Market in 1975. There are many others for other years.

=====

And Here Follows, THREE APT LINKS Found and Posted by Ron Edge

pmarket-n-arcade-30s-then-mr

I have also added a panorama with the Hotel York, which was replaced by the Corner Market building.

Waterfront  Pike St 5k

Here is the area shown on the Sanborn map of 1905.

1905 Sanborn Pike Place

(courtesy of the Seattle Public Library)

 

 

VILLA APARTMENTS ADDENDUM

Hi Paul,

The Sunday Seattle Times article gave a nice overview of the history of the Villa Apartments.  It did not mention Capitol Hill Housing’s role in reviving the building.  While rooms may no longer rent for $2.50 a week, the Villa Apartments still stands because of the work of Capitol Hill Housing.  In the late 1990s, this affordable housing and community building organization purchased the Villa, which had fallen into disrepair. The commercial facades were restored, strong retail tenants were attracted, and a major extension was added on to the back side of the property.  The renovation was a key early act in helping transform Pike/Pike from a driving corridor to a destination. In a neighborhood where new studio apartments now rent for more than $2,000 a month, the Villa is an example of CHH’s efforts to strengthen the community and keep rents affordable for regular working people.

A few years ago, in collaboration with the Northwest School, CHH added a mural to the west side of the site. I’ll attach a photo of it. The muralist was Derek Wu working with NW School students.

Michael Seiwerath, Capitol Hill Housing

CHH-Villa-mural-WEB

 

Ballad in Contemporary Art

Lomont_023To celebrate the 10th  « European Night of Museums » free and opened until midnight on May 17, many museums have invited artists to set their dreamed world , such as Palais de Tokyo invested by the artist Thomas Hirschhorn with ” Eternal Flame ; Grand Palais  with russian artists Ilya and Emilia Kabakov to create a “strange city”  for Monumenta . The Cartier Foundation also celebrates thirty years of contemporary art and presented its major artists in the beautiful building of the architect Jean Nouvel.

A l’occasion de la 10eme nuit européenne des musées, ouverts et gratuits jusqu’à minuit le 17 mai,   beaucoup de musées ont invité des artistes  à installer les décors de leur monde rêvé, tels le Palais Tokyo investi par l’artiste Thomas Hirschhorn avec «Flamme éternelle” et le Grand Palais où les artistes russes Ilya et Emilia Kabakov  ont construit une «étrange cité» pour Monumenta. La Fondation Cartier célèbre aussi ses trente ans d’art contemporain et a convié ses artistes majeurs  dans le bel immeuble construit par Jean Nouvel.

Lomont_017-copy

Famous for its raw decor and for its exhibitions of contemporary art, the Palais de Tokyo becomes the artist Thomas Hirschhorn’s studio . The space is separated by walls of tires, barricades made of objects of consumption, plastered with character posters . Nothing aesthetic in this free space, we  experience energy, during the  wandering. It is nice to drink a beer and to swing on a tire ;  that ‘s all  ”  the Eternal flame  “
Célèbre pour son décor brut et pour ses expositions d’art contemporain, le Palais de Tokyo devient l’atelier de l’artiste  Thomas Hirschhorn.  L’espace est séparé par des murs de pneus, des barricades faites d’ objets de consommations, placardés de dazibao. L’espace est libre et gratuit,  rien d’esthétique, l’expérience est celle de l’énergie, et puis l’on se retrouve à prendre une bière et à faire de la balançoire sur un pneu. C’est «la flamme étenelle»

Lomont_063-copy

Monumenta is the 6th edition of Grand Palais which offers its nave to a contemporary artist. This year the couple Ilya and Emilia Kabakov have built their dreamed worlds .
Pour l’évènement Monumenta, le Grand Palais offre sa nef  à un artiste contemporain. Pour sa 6eme édition , le couple Ilya et Emilia Kabakov, a conçu une coupole et d’autres constructions “d’une autre réalité”.

Lomont_018

In the great hall of Cartier Foundation , Marc Newson presents his concept-jet , and Chéri Samba , his large blue  painting : ” I like the color ” …
Dans la grande salle de la Fondation Cartier, Marc Newson expose son Concept-Jet alors que Chéri Samba  présente son grand tableau bleu intitulé « j’aime la couleur »…

Lomont_017

Bodys Isek Kingelez : Project for the third millenium of Kinshasa Bodys Isek Kingelez  : Projet pour le 3eme millénaire de Kinshasa 

Lomont_024

Ron Mueck «In Bed»,  the man beside the thinking lady is an admirer and doesn’t belong to the oeuvre
Ron Muecck “In bed”, l’homme à côté de la femme pensive est un admirateur et ne fait pas partie de l’œuvre

Pantheon_Lomont_022

The dome of Pantheon is restored, covered with scaffolds, and a tarpaulin. Soon, the artist JR will recover the dome with portraits of great ordinary women and men.
The dôme du Panthéon  en restauration a été échafaudé  et recouvert d’une bâche.  Bientôt l’artiste JR va recouvrir complètement le Panthéon de portraits de tous les grandes femmes et hommes de la rue.

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Hotel at Pike and Boren

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
NOW: The 1106 Pike Street address survives as the Villa, first during the Great Depression as a hotel, and since 1963 as the Villa Apartments.
NOW: The 1106 Pike Street address survives as the Villa, first during the Great Depression as a hotel, and since 1963 as the Villa Apartments.

What are now the Villa Apartments were first lifted above the busy intersection of Boren Avenue and Pike Street in 1909 for its then principal tenant, the Hotel Reynolds.  That year, a Seattle Times classified promised, “Everything new and up-to-date in every respect.  Rooms single or en suite, with private baths, electric lights and gas, rates reasonable.”

A Seattle Times clipping from June 20, 1909.
A Seattle Times clipping from June 20, 1909.

In addition to the hotel lobby and its namesake café, the storefronts facing Pike included, far left, a Singer Sewing Machine outlet on the corner with Boren, and on the far right at the alley, a purveyor of Paulhamus Pure Milk promised a “system of rigid cleanliness” beginning with the timely chilling of milk to fifty degrees at the dairy.  Next door was the Auction House, and next to Singer was the North Western Quick Shoe Repair Shop, which proposed to fix yours while you wait.  The classical entrance at the center of the Pike Street façade supported a tile frieze inscribed with the building name.  Fortunately, ‘Lyre Building’ was written there and not ‘Hotel Reynolds,’ for the hotel soon moved out and on.

Another Times clip.
Another Times clip.

By 1910 Pike Street was developing into “Auto Row.” That summer the Avondale Hotel moved in and stayed until well into the Great Depression of the 1930s, when rooms rented from $2.50 to $3.00 a week.  As late as 1958 rooms could be had for $7.00 a week, and for a dollar more, the by-then-renamed Villa Hotel offered room service.  In 1962, taking advantage of Seattle’s Worlds Fair real estate opportunities, the Villa’s rates may well have been inflated for the six-month run of Century 21. After the fair, the hotel became an apartment house, and it is as the Villa Apartments that it survives.

The
Left of center, the Villa Hotel in 1939, from a negative recorded for the a billboard company.  The picture’s own caption refers to the position of the billboard on the left, 60 feet west of Boren.

I thought it possible that the architect for this sturdy survivor was Walter Willcox.  In 1910 the Hotel Reynolds took possession of the new Willcox-designed Crouley Building on Fourth Avenue, one block north of Yesler Way.  Above the sidewalk, the hotel recycled the illuminated sign seen here on Pike.  I also noticed that above the windows of both the Lyre and Crouley buildings are similar cream-colored tile keystones that stand out like bakers’ caps.  I was wrong.  Diana James, the author of Shared Walls, a history of Seattle apartments, nominated William P. White, a prolific designer of built apartments here between about 1902 and 1917.  James then discovered that her “hunch” was supported by Michael House, State Architectural Historian, whose on-line essay on White’s career includes the Villa Apartments among his many accomplishments.  Thanks again to Diana James.

West across Boren from the
West across Boren from the Villa, the Prince Rupert was built mid-block north of Pike Street.  Here the hotel rest on a base of the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Yes Jean and again with Ron Edge’s help.  Ron has found six neighborhood links and placed six photographs at the bottom to introduce them.  As is our custom, they are often rich with allusions of many sorts, and as is also our way some of these may be have been used in other contexts.  We continue to embrace my mother’s lesson learned from her in the late 1940s when she served a term as President of the Spokane Women’s Club, which was a few blocks from our home (actually, the church’s home: a parsonage) on 9th Avenue, one of the many verdant avenues on Spokane’s shaded but rarely shady South Hill.    Mom – Cherry was her nickname –  advised in all caps, “Repetition is the Mother of All Learning.”  To some readers all six of these links will be familiar for they were all “top features” here within the last three years.   The Plymouth Pillars printed next are, we hope and expect, treated in one of the six.  They stand at the northwest corner of Boren and Pike, and so directly across Boren from our hotel.  Following the pillars is a shot I snapped with with the popular and fast emulsion Tri-X 35mm film in the early 1970s.  It looks south up Boren across Pike.

The enduring Plymouth Pillars at the northwest corner of Boren and Pike.
The enduring Plymouth Pillars at the northwest corner of Boren and Pike.
The columns, 2014
The columns, 2014
Camlyn through the columns
Camlyn through the columns
Pedestrians at the corner, 1972.
Pedestrians at the corner, 1972.

THEN: First dedicated in 1889 by Seattle’s Unitarians, the congregation soon needed a larger sanctuary and moved to Capitol Hill.   Here on 7th Avenue, their first home was next used for a great variety of events, including a temporary home for the Christian Church, a concert hall for the Ladies Musical Club, and a venue for political events like anarchist Emma Goldman’s visit to Seattle in 1910. (Compliments Lawton Gowey)

THEN: We are not told but perhaps it is Dora and Otto Ranke and their four children posing with their home at 5th and Pike for the pioneer photographer Theo. E. Peiser ca. 1884.  In the haze behind them looms Denny Hill.   (Courtesy Ron Edge)

BOREN-&-University-Denny-&-Ainsworth-Homes-THEN-mr

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Ship Canal Bridge

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Long-time Wallingford resident Victor Lygdman looks south through the work-in-progress on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge during the summer of 1959.  Bottom-right are the remnants of the Latona business and industrial district, including the Wayland Mill and the Northlake Apartments, replaced now with Ivar’s Salmon House and its parking. (Photo by Victor Lygdman)
THEN: Long-time Wallingford resident Victor Lygdman looks south through the work-in-progress on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge during the summer of 1959. Bottom-right are the remnants of the Latona business and industrial district, including the Wayland Mill and the Northlake Apartments, replaced now with Ivar’s Salmon House and its parking. (Photo by Victor Lygdman)
NOW: Standing near where the bridge’s “express lane” reaches Wallingford, Jean’s repeat includes what appears to be the color-coordinated sleeping gear and sneakers of a truly tired homeless citizen using the shelter and perhaps “white noise” of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge for some slumber.
NOW: Standing near where the bridge’s “express lane” reaches Wallingford, Jean’s repeat includes what appears to be the color-coordinated sleeping gear and sneakers of a truly tired homeless citizen using the shelter and perhaps “white noise” of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge for some slumber.  [Below you will find that we are mistaken with this "now" caption.  We are one block of and a few feet down.  We will explain with the "anything to add" part of all this.]

In The Seattle Times classifieds for February 7, 1958, the state highway department advertised: “…men wanted…to do design work in connection with the Seattle Freeway… First project is the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge.”  Later that summer, local contractors Scheumann and Johnson’s low bid was awarded the contract to build the seven piers required to support the steel truss portion of the bridge, and the first concrete was poured on the 24th of September.

The Seattle Times caption for this reads in part . . .
From June 17, 1958, The Seattle Times caption for this reads in part . . .  “Two State Highway Department engineers, Art Kaiser and Pat O’Reilly, examine a model of a bridge which will carry the Seattle Freeway over the Lake Washington Ship Canal.  This view is looking toward Portage Bay, with the University Bridge in the center background.  The bridge, 4,400 feet long with its lower deck 135 feet above the water, is estimate to cost $15,000,000.”

At least parts of six of the seven piers can be found in this construction photo by Victor Lygdman, admiringly described in his Times obituary dated March 23, 2010, as the “unofficial Mayor of Wallingford.”  Born in 1927, Lygdman became an artist in several media, including watercolors, cartoons, fiction and sculpture.  (When my left knee complains, I carry a Lygdman cane, skillfully carved as a snake spiraling the shaft to the handle.)

VICTOR as a teen - or nearly - ca. 1950.
VICTOR as a teen – or nearly – ca. 1950.

Jean and I figure that Lygdman recorded the historical view from where the bridge meets the hill near 42nd Street and Pasadena Avenue.  [Reminder! We are off by one block.  See below, under "anything to add."]  Pasadena was a busy commercial street in the Latona neighborhood until 1919, when the Latona Bridge was replaced by the University Bridge.  The freeway bridge, with its 2,294 feet of steel trusses crossing the canal, conforms to what was the north-south line of the Latona Bridge, about 125 feet above it.

The I-5 bridge opened to traffic in December 1962, with only 2.2 miles of approaches. On December 18th, Times reporter Marshall Wilson reported on his test drive.  “For the time being commuters in both directions may find that it’s quicker traveling their old and accustomed routes.”  Wilson added, “The view is better on the freeway route. From high atop the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge, the old Aurora Bridge looks almost like a miniature. Even the Space Needle appears to be at eye level.”

Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI.  From their collection of Post-Intelligencer Negatives.
Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI. From their collection of Post-Intelligencer Negatives.

After the bridge was painted “Washington Green” with brushes, it sat idle for more than a year waiting for the freeway to catch up.  Plans to use it for Century 21 Worlds Fair parking were first approved and then dropped. As historian Genevieve McCoy remarks in her book “Building Washington,” published in 2000, “Today, frustrated motorists crawling across the span could surely advise future fair planners that you don’t need a world’s fair to turn a bridge into a parking lot.”

With the Space Needle up and waiting, the Ship Canal Bridge is able and willing to serve as a parking lot for Century 21 motorists.
With the Space Needle up and waiting, the Ship Canal Bridge is able and willing although not called to serve as a parking lot for Century 21 motorists.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Surely Jean, but first we must gathered it up.

Directly below are three picture links to other blog features that relate to our primary subject.   The second of these, about the Latona Bridge in its last days, we printed in Pacific only two weeks past.  It is still relevant.  The third link starts with a feature of the split in the path of Lake Washington Bike Trail and its repeat looks north on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge from the Roanoke Street overpass.  The first link we were surprised to discover with our own “key word” search.  It’s the same Victor Lygdman snapshot of the bridge supports printed on top, and it appeared first with two other relevant photos by Lygdman as an installment of a series we were running in 2011 called “Seattle Confidential.”  The title is apt, for now – if you open the top link – you will find our caption from then, and may compare it to the one near the top here.  But this requires another confession – now.   The “then” feature this week – on top – is not given good service with its “now.”   I may in the call of “team work” claim that WE – Jean and I – made a mistake.  But it was really I who was “most” responsible.  The “now” should have been taken one block further south where the bridge makes a big change to its center cantilever section.  And it should have been taken from the top of the bridge (dangerous), and not from the lower express lane, or beside it with a sleeping bag. ( When we first reflected on this feature, Jean remarked that the Lygdman photo seemed closer and higher to the canal than the prospects I was promoting.  And so once more, mea culpa.)   You will find some of the evidence for this change in one of the two other Lygdman bridge photos included in the link directly below.  It is a snapshot looking due east from the top of the bridge at that same time – 1959/60.    Here it is again.

Looking east on N.E. 40th Street to the U.W.Campus from the top of the bridge. By Victor Lygdman
Looking east on N.E. 40th Street to the U.W.Campus from the top of the bridge. By Victor Lygdman

Another revealing photograph – a panorama over Wallingford to the Cascades – by our old friend, Lawton Gowey, looks west from near the south end of the Aurora Bridge.  It is dated  Jan. 1, 1960 and shows the “stub” of the Ship Canal Bridge  when the top lane is a work-in-progress and aside from the concrete piers the cantilever work for the center span has not begun.  It is from there – high and open on that south end – that Victor took the photograph that we feature at the very top and directly below.  But first here is Lawton’s distant look at one high bridge from another, or near another: the Aurora Bridge.  [CLICK to ENLARGE]

A detail of Lawton Gowey's Jan. 17, 1960 look east from Queen Anne Hill over Grandmas Cookies in Wallingford and further to construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge, the University and its district, and the Cascades on a clear winter day.  (By Lawton Gowey)
A detail of Lawton Gowey’s Jan. 17, 1960 look east from Queen Anne Hill over Grandmas Cookies in Wallingford and further to construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge, the University and its district, and the Cascades on a clear winter day. (By Lawton Gowey)

 

THEN: The historical view looks directly south into the Latona addition’s business district on Sixth Ave. NE. from the Northern Pacific’s railroad bridge, now part of the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

 MORE TO COME

We have other extras from the neighborhood to insert tomorrow Sunday Morning after a late breakfast.

Latona School, "Class, Jan. 22, 1900."
Latona School, “Class, Jan. 22, 1900.”
The Latona campus on Sept. 6, 2006.
The Latona campus on Sept. 6, 2006 with a glimpse of the Lake Washington Canal Bridge.

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Taken on Sept. 6, 2006, during the first year of my Wallingford Walks.
Taken on Sept. 6, 2006, during the first year of my Wallingford Walks.
The first Latona School
The first Latona School
Latona School - the 1917 brick addition looking east on 42nd Street through 4th Avenue Northeast.
Latona School – the 1917 brick addition looking east on 42nd Street through 4th Avenue Northeast.  The south end of the 1906 addition is seen far-right.

 

Looking across 42nd Street at the razing of the 1917 brick addition and revealing behind it the 1906 frame school house, 1998.
Looking across 42nd Street at the 1998 razing of the 1917 brick addition and revealing behind it the 1906 frame school house.

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Above: May Day festivities, like these at Latona School, were once a regular feature on the calender of many Seattle schools.  Below: Latona graduates Dorothy Lunde and her youngest sister, Marcella Fetterly, far right, stand beside a moving football formation of Latona students in 1993, with a glimpse of the ship canal bridge to the east.

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THE DAHLS at HOME on EASTERN

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The Dahl home under a snow of 1985.
The Dahl home, on the left,  under a snow of 1985.
Recent verdure about the Dahl home
Recent verdure about the Dahl home
Peruvian Lilies in the front yard, four times.
Peruvian Lilies from the McCoy Garden in the front yard, four times.

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Another  - that is, not the one directly below - group of Latona School kids pose with their school and their report cards.
Another – that is, not the one directly below – group of Latona School kids posing with their school and their report cards.   Who is the child marked with an “x” we do not know.   Perhaps he does not look forward to going  home with his report.
Clipping from The Times Pacific Magazine for Dec. 29, 1991.
Clipping from The Times Pacific Magazine for Dec. 29, 1991.

 

Frank DeBruyn with wagon in front of the family home at 4123 Eastern Ave. N..
Frank DeBruyn with wagon in front of the family home at 4123 Eastern Ave. N..
Pacific clipping from Nov. 15, 1992.
Pacific clipping from Nov. 15, 1992.

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Jean's alternative to the sleeping bag scene (Here he stands above the sleeper.), taken on the same afternoon, but still a block too far north on my misguidance.
Jean’s alternative to the sleeping bag scene (Here he stands above the sleeper.), taken on the same afternoon, but still a block too far north on my misguidance.
Work-in-progress on the express land access off of 42nd Street and 7th Avenue. E.
Work-in-progress on the express land access off of 42nd Street and 7th Avenue. E.. The ramp on the left passes above Pasadena Avenue, once an important commercial street in Latona. (by Victor Lygdman)

Marking the I-5 freeway route.  Note that both the Wayland Mill - future site of Ivar's Salmon House - and the Northlake Hotel - future site of the Salmon House parking - can be found above the "Lake Union" tag, bottom left.
Marking the I-5 freeway route. Note that both the Wayland Mill – future site of Ivar’s Salmon House – and the Northlake Apartments – future site of the Salmon House parking – can be found above the “Lake Union” tag, bottom left. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)  [CLICK TO ENLARGE]
A tax photo of the Northlake Apartment at the northwest corner of Northlake and 5th Avenue N.E.
A tax photo of the Northlake Apartment at the northwest corner of Northlake and 5th Avenue N.E. [Courtesy Washington State Archive, Bellevue Branch]

The Salmon House parking, former site of the Northlake Apartments.
The Salmon House parking, former site of the Northlake Apartments.
A detail pulled from the late 1950s aerial printed above shows close-up the Wayland Mill, future Salmon House, and the Northlake Apartments at the northwest corner of Northlake and 5th Ave. N.E..
A detail pulled from the late 1950s aerial printed above shows close-up the Wayland Mill, future Salmon House, and the Northlake Apartments at the northwest corner of Northlake and 5th Ave. N.E.. [Courtesy Ron Edge]
With the help of the 1936 aerial mapping survey on the right, and a ca. 2012 satellite shot of the same acres, we can compae the changes to the Salmon House - and its parking - site and its neighbors.  The freeway bridge is far-right in the ca.2012 view.
With the help of the 1936 aerial mapping survey on the right, and a ca. 2012 Goggle Earth (courtesy of)  satellite shot of the same acres, we can compare the changes to the Salmon House – and its parking – site and its neighbors. The freeway bridge is far-right in the ca.2012 view.  The red dot marks the spot of the Wayland mill’s burning silo on the right, and the same spot, appropriately new the fire place, in the Salmon House bar, on the left.
A Feb. 4, 1953 tax photo looking east thru the Wayland mill site from the foot of 4th Avenue n.e. on Northlake.  The mill's burning tower is obvious center-right and beyond it to the east the open bascules of the University Bridge.
A Feb. 4, 1953 tax photo looking east thru the Wayland mill site from the foot of 4th Avenue n.e. on Northlake. The mill’s burning tower is obvious center-right and beyond it to the east the open bascules of the University Bridge.

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Post-Fire Post-Intelligencer

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: In the late afternoon and evening of Seattle’s Great Fire day, June 6, 1889, Leigh and Lizzie Hunt’s home at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Columbia Street was, within a few hours, arranged to accommodate the family’s business, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper.   (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
THEN: In the late afternoon and evening of Seattle’s Great Fire day, June 6, 1889, Leigh and Lizzie Hunt’s home at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Columbia Street was, within a few hours, arranged to accommodate the family’s business, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
NOW: The parking garage, at what was the Hunt’s corner, was built in 1923 and survives as an unheated shelter for a few dozen cars.  This Central Business District corner is valued by the taxman at more than four-and-one-half thousand times the value of this reinforced concrete “improvement.”  The Rainier Club, its neighbor across Four Avenue, can be glimpsed on the right.
NOW: The parking garage, at what was the Hunt’s corner, was built in 1923 and survives as an unheated shelter for a few dozen cars. This Central Business District corner is valued by the taxman at more than four-and-one-half thousand times the value of this reinforced concrete “improvement.” The Rainier Club, its neighbor across Fourth Avenue, can be glimpsed on the right. The figure making his way down Columbia is production tech/designer/inventor/wunderkind David Verkade.

One of the five men posing beside The Seattle Post-Intelligencer’s office may well be Leigh Hunt, who with his wife Lizzie was the owner of both the newspaper and the house. The latter became the P-I’s temporary quarters after the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, destroyed the paper’s office and plant at the corner of Mill Street (Yesler Way) and Post Avenue (aka Post Alley). Before the sign was even in place, the P-I began publishing, here at the northwest corner of Columbia Street and Fourth Avenue.

The worst part of the rip in this clip reads, "Two little job presses worked by foot power."
The worst part of the rip in this clip reads, “Two little job presses worked by foot power.”  The clip is also a LINK that will take you to the full two-page edition of Hunt’s Post-Intelligencer, the first following the June 6 “Great Fire,” and the one composed in part by foot power. [CLICK to open.]

In 1886, at age 33, Hunt had given up his presidency of the Agricultural College of Iowa at Ames for the exhilarating, if risky, enterprise of running his own newspaper, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer. The paper had begun in 1873 as the Seattle Gazette, a one-sheet weekly and Seattle’s first newspaper, and carried on with a variety of names and owners. Hunt’s stay lasted little more than six years, ended in bankruptcy triggered by the nation-wide economic panic of 1893.”

Although deep in debt, Hunt’s powers of persuasion soon moved the Great Northern Railroad to help pay his way to Korea, where he founded the Oriental Consolidated Mines and quickly made millions extracting gold.  After he returned to Seattle, Hunt opened an office announcing that he was prepared to “meet all his debtors and pay in full.”

Leigh Hunt began the 20th century with a safari to Egypt’s upper Nile “for his health,” but “like the wide-awake American everywhere,” soon developed his trip into a scheme to get richer by growing cotton in the Sudan with British cooperation and the labor of American Negroes.  Hunt’s characterization of his plan to give the colonizing blacks opportunities to acquire homes and skills got him no help from the black educator Booker T. Washington, who while in Paris, announced that “I am here merely to study the best known French manual training schools and have no intention of proceeding to Cairo to meet Leigh Hunt.”

In the summer of 1932 the 75-year-old Hunt’s planned visit to Seattle was cancelled when he fell from a twenty-foot ladder while examining a mine near Las Vegas, Nevada, his last hometown.  His Seattle Times obituary of October 5, 1933, made claims on him. “It was here that Mr. Hunt entered his business career, which eventually took him all over the world, and it was here that he left the imprint of his genius for organization, promotion and development.”  Hunt’s Times obit. is attached immediately below in a context of a few other stories that day.

[CLICK to ENLARGE]

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WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

The best addition is from Ron Edge.  It is the clipping from the P-I’s first issue following the fire.  It is an extra you have already encountered – we have embedded it in the story above.  We will also include a link from 2012, the feature about the Burnett Home across Fourth Avenue from Hunts, at the northeast corner of 4th and Columbia.  Include within its link are other features from the neighborhood, including one on the Meydenbauer Home, which was also on Columbia and near by at its northeast corner with Third Avenue.

The worst part of the rip in this clip reads, "Two little job presses worked by foot power."

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Late Latona Bridge

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The historical view looks directly south into the Latona addition’s business district on Sixth Ave. NE. from the Northern Pacific’s railroad bridge, now part of the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
THEN: The historical view looks directly south into the Latona addition’s business district on Sixth Ave. NE. from the Northern Pacific’s railroad bridge, now part of the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
NOW: The Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge, constructed in the early 1960s, scattered whatever appeal the old strip on Sixth Ave. NE. might have still had for business.
NOW: The Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge, constructed in the early 1960s, scattered whatever appeal the old strip on Sixth Ave. NE. might have still had for business.

While I have not yet found a date for this look into the Latona business district, I think it was recorded, perhaps by a municipal photographer, to show off the closely packed collection of three bridges that in their last days were fittingly called by one name, Latona.

Perhaps it (may be) likely that this record of the bridge was taken by the same Municipal photographer on the same day from the Paysee Hardware Store.  The trio of bridges are used the same as in the featured photograph, and the line-up of motorcars behind the truck may be compared by, for instance, the size of their rooftops.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Perhaps it is (or merely may be) likely that this record of the bridge was taken by the same Municipal photographer on the same day but here from the Paysee Hardware Store. The trio of bridges are used the same as in the featured photograph, and the line-up of motorcars behind the truck may be compared by, for instance, the size of their rooftops. The wagon also appears in the photograph at the top.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)

Out-of-frame to the left – about 150 feet east from the center of this bridge – the University Bridge also crossed the narrows into Portage Bay. With an almost obligatory speech by Edmond Meany, the University Bridge was dedicated on July 1, 1919.  Meany was by then the oldest and easily most professing of the University of Washington’s history professors.  With his wife Lizzie, Edmond also lived, appropriately, on 10th Ave. E. at the north end of the bridge. A living landmark, Meany was a brand name with both the University District’s art deco hotel, the Meany, (since renamed the Deco) and the University’s largest auditorium named for him.  Exceptionally, both names were pinned to him before his death in 1935.

One of many renderings of the handsome history professor, the artist here is (and I am mildly speculating) Herbert P. Muehlenbeck, who was also responsible for painting portraits of the U.W. figureheads.
One of many renderings of the handsome history professor, the artist here is (and I am mildly speculating) Herbert P. Muehlenbeck, who was also responsible for painting portraits of other U.W. figureheads, which most likely still hang on-campus. .

The professor had also attended the dedication of the Latona Bridge, exactly twenty-eights years earlier, on July 1, 1891.  A boy’s choir from nearby Fremont serenaded the ceremony.  (Both Fremont and Latona, north lake neighborhoods, were incorporated into Seattle on April 3, 1891, an annexation that added about seventeen, at the time, remote square miles to Seattle but very few citizens.)  Most likely Seattle Pioneer David Denny was also at the ’91 dedication, for it was Denny who built the bridge as part of an agreement with the City Council, which gave him the right of franchise to build his trolley line over the bridge to the newly annexed Latona and the future University District, then still called Brooklyn.

Here (at top) with trolley tracks leading to it, the lift-span trolley bridge is on the right.  Curiously, at the subject’s center, the right southbound side of the swing bridge made for vehicles is crowded with them.  Perhaps they are headed for the 1919 dedication of the new bridge that was then still variously called the 10th Avenue Bridge, the Eastlake Bridge, and sometimes even the Latona Bridge.

The Latona Bridge (or bridges) photographed from the University Bridge.  Although no date cam with it, perhaps it too was photographed on the same day as the others.
The Latona Bridge (or bridges) photographed from the University Bridge.  Here we see that both a swinging span and a lift span were used to open the bridge to vessels.  Although no date came with it, perhaps it too was photographed on the same day as the others.
Found on the Municipal Archives web site, this revealing subject comes with a confident date, July 26, 1919, or 22 days after the dedication of the new University Bridge.  The west facade of the Diamond Tires warehouse, which sat on the west side of Eastlake.  With persistent inspection Diamond's big shed can also be found in the feature's "then" at the top.
Found on the Municipal Archives web site, this revealing subject comes with a confident date, July 26, 1919, or 22 days after the dedication of the new University Bridge.  South side access to the Latona Bride on Fuhrman Street  has be barricaded. The west facade of the Diamond Tires warehouse, sat on the west side of Eastlake. With persistent inspection Diamond’s big shed can also be found in the feature’s “then” at the top.    This relatively steep decent with a curve to reach the bridge was long considered a hazard, and locals like the Brooklyn Community Club lobbied for its correction.   (Brooklyn was an early name for the University District.) Here’s a news report of the Community Club’s concerns,  including the approach to the bridge, dated from March 25, 1902. 

CLICK TO ENLARGE

The Brooklyn Community Club's news from March 25, 1902.
The Brooklyn Community Club’s news from March 25, 1902.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Yes Jean and starting with Ron Edge’s selection of four past features from this blog that stay – for the most part – in the neighborhood.   In this regard we gently remind readers that we treat our subjects and their parts as like themes in musical compositions, by which we mean that we can use then over and over again, but in different contexts.   For instance is the first feature that Ron links below, we will come upon image(s) that appear again in this feature.  This “The Latona Bridge”  is not so old either.  It was first published less than a year ago on June 29.   We figure some readers will remember it still.

THEN: The Latona Bridge was constructed in 1891 along the future line of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge.  The photo was taken from the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway right-of-way, now the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. The Northlake Apartment/Hotel on the right survived and struggled into the 1960s.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

The bust of R.H. Thomson looks down at the Headworks, which is the dam, for the city's gravity system.  It is still being constructed here.  The date is Nov. 14,1999 and A. Wilse was the photographer, as we was for many of the subjects included below.  His negative number for this is "48x".