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Just a guy, ya know...

Seattle Now & Then: Return of the Homestead

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Included among the several detailed photos taken for the Bernards of their new and yet rustic Fir Lodge, was this one of the living room with its oversized fireplace and the piano on which Marie, their older daughter, learned to play well enough to concertize. (Courtesy Doris Nelson)
THEN: Included among the several detailed photos taken for the Bernards of their new and yet rustic Fir Lodge, was this one of the living room with its oversized fireplace and the piano on which Marie, their older daughter, learned to play well enough to concertize. (Courtesy Doris Nelson)
NOW: Southwest Seattle Historical Society supporters Annie Tigtig and Kippy Jo Alexander (seated) pose with director Clay Eals for Jean Sherrard beside the charred Homestead’s fireplace. One of the mysteries of Fir Lodge/Alki Homestead is why the original fireplace was enlarged with the rock crown added in the mid-1930s. One of the puzzles of landmark preservation, and for the new owner-restorer, is should the living room hearth be returned to its former glory or be kept with this dark rock corona?
NOW: Southwest Seattle Historical Society supporters Annie Tigtig and Kippy Jo Alexander (seated) pose with director Clay Eals for Jean Sherrard beside the charred Homestead’s fireplace. One of the mysteries of Fir Lodge/Alki Homestead is why the original fireplace was enlarged with the rock crown added in the mid-1930s. One of the puzzles of landmark preservation, and for the new owner-restorer, is should the living room hearth be returned to its former glory or be kept with this dark rock corona?

The well-connected Gladys Barnette and William Bernard started their thirty-two years of married life in the Olympia mansion of Washington state’s first governor, Elisha Ferry.  That is, they were married there in 1892. About ten years later the Seattle couple began spending part of their summers on Alki Point, when it still took a steamer or a ferry ride followed by a long walk to get there.  The first Midwestern farmers had landed there fifty years earlier, with enterprising intentions of building a city, although they soon fled Alki Point for Piners Point, known now as the Pioneer Square Historic District.   

While not the first Bernard communion with Alki Point, Driftwood Camp is a typical for the time creation at the Point, canvas stretch tight over a sturdy frame set on a plank foundation and facing the beach. This first appeared in Pacific on Jan. 9, 2000.
While not the first Bernard communion with Alki Point, Driftwood Camp is a typical for the time creation at the Point, canvas stretch tight over a sturdy frame set on a plank foundation and facing the beach. This first appeared in Pacific on Jan. 9, 2000.
The earliest clip about Fir Lodge, the Bernard home, published in The Times on Aug. 19, 1906.
The earliest clip about Fir Lodge, the Bernard home, published in The Times on Aug. 19, 1906.

When first vacationing on the Point, the Bernards rented one of the well-wrought and framed tents and furnished it first with Persian rugs spread on a carpentered frame.  They soon bought the block extending south from Alki Beach along the west side of Southwest 61st Street and hired Seattle architect Fred Fehren to design for them a rustic and yet baronial log lodge.  The couple who founded the Seattle Soap Company, the city’s first, was skilled at both real estate and manufacturing. The Bernards could afford their new Alki home, which they named Fir Lodge.

Something about Fred Fehren, pulled from "Shaping Seattle Architecture," the University Press history of local architecture, which has recently been republished with a second and enlarge edition.
Something about Fred Fehren, pulled from “Shaping Seattle Architecture,” the University Press history of local architecture, which has recently been republished with a second and enlarge edition. CLICK TO ENLARGE
Clip from The Times for Sept. 21, 1950.
Clip from The Times for Sept. 21, 1950.
The Stockade near Alki Point.
The Stockade near Alki Point.

Built in 1903-04, the lodge was one of the two largest structures on the then still sparsely settled Point.  The other, the nearby Stockade Hotel and chicken dinner resort, was built by their friends, Alfred and Lorena Smith.  It also was constructed of logs “harvested” off the Point, and both of these Arcadian creations had oversized fireplaces built of beach stones.  The Bermards bought their block from the Smiths, because Lorena’s parents, the Hansons, had purchased the entire Alki Point in the late 1860s from Doc Maynard, one of Seattle’s original pioneers.  This was, and is, historic ground.

First appeared in Pacific, July 24, 1988.
First appeared in Pacific, July 24, 1988.

For reasons that are still a mystery to Alki Point historians, the Bernards, after three years of hosting well-appointed parties on the open veranda of their log palace, sold it in 1907 to the then fledgling Seattle Auto Club. After the motorists decamped from the Point in 1911, the lodge served as a residence.  In 1950 it opened as a restaurant, the Alki Homestead, which brings us to its scorching and closure in 2009. (See the Log Cabin Museum links on all that, which Jean has attached below.)

Another helpful Times clip, this one from June 30, 1907.
Another helpful Times clip, this one from June 30, 1907.
A surviving log construction, Sea View Hall is off South Alki Beach. (First appeared in Pacific, Jan. 23, 2000)
A surviving log construction, Sea View Hall is off South Alki Beach. (First appeared in Pacific, Jan. 23, 2000)
We have excerpted the part about the Bernards from Margaret Pitcairn Strachan's feature on "Alki Point District, Seattle's Brithplace" published in The Seattle Times on June 14, 1946.
We have excerpted the part about the Bernards from Margaret Pitcairn Strachan’s feature on “Alki Point District, Seattle’s Birthplace” published in The Seattle Times on June 14, 1946.

This year Jean and I enjoyed the Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s 4th of July picnic on the patio beside the Society’s Log House Museum, a restored Carriage House that was part of the Bernards’ estate.  Following the potluck, Clay Eals, the spirited executive director of the Society, led us into the damaged Homestead.  He had the key and a light heart, too.  After the fire the Homestead was left haunted for six-plus years by fears that the log landmark might be razed.  Instead, it has been saved, and its new hands-on owner Dennis Schilling has begun the restoration. Now the Society has named its upcoming November 7th Gala, “Coming Home to Homestead.”

The West Seattle Herald's coverage of the Alki Homestead's opening, published on June 25, 1950. CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE
The West Seattle Herald’s coverage of the Alki Homestead’s opening, published on June 25, 1950. CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE
First appeared in Pacific, May 19, 1985.
First appeared in Pacific, May 19, 1985.
By Price who was also responsible for Price Photo on Roosevelt, a film processor and server for many years.
By Price who was also responsible for Price Photo on Roosevelt, a film processor and server for many years.  CLICK to ENLARGE.

WEB EXTRAS

Let me throw in a handful of photos that illustrate a few of our previous run-ins with Mr. Eals and his SW Seattle preservationists.

In 2010, a remarkable coalition of persevering preservationists collaborated to save the Homestead from demolition
In 2010, a remarkable coalition of persevering preservationists collaborated to save the Homestead from demolition
In June of this year, Clay assembled more than a thousand school kids to help celebrate the new beginning of the Homestead. I took this photo from atop a lift with a very wide angle lens.
In June of this year, Clay assembled more than a thousand school kids to help celebrate the new beginning of the Homestead. I took this photo from atop a lift with a very wide angle lens.
This past Fourth of July, we returned to mark the anniversary of 'This Place Matters'
This past Fourth of July, we returned to mark the anniversary of ‘This Place Matters’
Another interior from that same day; this one with Paul as grandee
Another interior from that same day; this one with Paul as grandee
First appeared in Pacific, April 10, 1994.
First appeared in Pacific, April 10, 1994.

Anything to add, kids?

YUP and sticking to form,  Ron Edge starts off with a few not-so-old features that are relevant to the Homestead and-or Alki.  [Now Jean, Ron calls to explain that his home sitting high on a knoll overlooking Lake Washington has been a victim of today’s (Saturday morning) storm.  So he is waiting for the electricity service to return, but has also learned that it will probably not be until 3 a.m.  Sunday morning that he should hope for it.  And so we will wait too on our Edge Links.  WHEN THEY COME he will position them at the very bottom.

This is the third time was have touched on that landmark for a story, although the first use was long enough ago that we have scaned the clipping and attach it just above.  There were five or more glossies of the Homestead from which that one was chosen.  Once the Edge Links are up you will find many of the others by exploring their fea tures.  Ron is also including at the bottom of this week’s eight chosen links  a feature titled “Travels with Jean,” which will, we hope, inspire Jean to share some of the photographs he took on his recent visit to Europe with a cadre of about twenty of his students at HILLSIDE SCHOOL (See the “button” link above right for more on the Bellevue School where Jean teaches.)  Berangere Lomont, who is, we hope you know, one of the principals behind this blog, helped out in France.   And Jean has responded!!!  And here, next, is BB.

Jean here. Let me hasten to add a couple of photos I took a couple weeks ago featuring our remarkable blog partner Berangere Lomont:

Berangere on the banks of the Dordogne in the town of Brantome
Berangere on the banks of the Dordogne in the town of Brantome
Here's Beranger with her husband Denis Christophe perched on Beynac's medieval castle walls high above the river
Beranger with her husband Denis Christophe – one of my favorite humans on the planet, incidently – perched on Beynac’s medieval castle walls high above the river

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FOUR TIMES CLIPPINGS of the BERNARDS’ TWO DAUGHTERS.  First on with a fashionable sketch of their oldest, Marie (the concertizing pianist), followed by three of Billie, their youngest.   (Billie was one of Ivar Haglund’s friends.  He used to pick her up in his Ford convertible with a heated brick on the floor board to warm her feet.)

The caption identifying Marie Bernard is below the sketch. Pulled from The Seattle Times for Oct. 15, 1911.
The caption identifying Marie Bernard is below the sketch. Pulled from The Seattle Times for Oct. 15, 1911.   CLICK CLICK
Baby Billie Bernard in The Times for Aug. 20, 1911.
Baby Billie Bernard in The Times for Aug. 20, 1911.
Billie Bernard in New York preparing to tour Europe with her mother. Appeared in The Times for Oct. 10, 1929, and so close to the market crash.
Billie Bernard in New York preparing to tour Europe with her mother. Appeared in The Times for Oct. 10, 1929, and so close to the market crash.
Billie serving as the center base for a March 30, 1930 montage of Seattle Society women.
Billie serving as the center base for a March 30, 1930 montage of Seattle Society women.

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HERE FOLLOWS THOSE EDGE LINKS – WHEN THE POWER LINES ARE REPAIRED

THEN: Totem Place, at 1750 Palm Ave. S.W., was home for Joseph Standley proprietor of Ye Old Curiosity Shop on Colman Dock. His death notice in The Seattle Times for Oct. 25, 1940 described the 86-year-old “Daddy” Standley as “almost as much a part of Seattle’s waterfront as the waves that dash again the seaweall.”

Seattle Now & Then: The Frances Hotel (aka 5th Avenue regrade)

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Looking north from Yesler Way over the Fifth Avenue regrade in 1911. Note the Yesler Way Cable rails and slot at the bottom. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
THEN: Looking north from Yesler Way over the Fifth Avenue regrade in 1911. Note the Yesler Way Cable rails and slot at the bottom. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
NOW: The industrial parts of sculptor John Henry’s Songbird (2011) – a kind of blue bird, perhaps – unwittingly repeat some of the concrete and timber devices used to keep the three hotels on the east side of Fifth Avenue north of Yesler Way from sliding away in the summer of 1911.
NOW: The industrial parts of sculptor John Henry’s Songbird (2011) – a kind of blue bird, perhaps – unwittingly repeat some of the concrete and timber devices used to keep the three hotels on the east side of Fifth Avenue north of Yesler Way from sliding away in the summer of 1911.

We will concentrate first on Jean Sherrard’s ‘repeat’ that looks into the face of Songbird, by sculptor John Henry.  The Chattanooga artist visited Seattle twice to study this northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and Yesler Way.  He determined what we, perhaps, have not considered. “The work would have to interact with the sight lines available, yield to the physical demands of the Yesler overpass and still compliment the architectural design of the building. It would be an exercise of creating a piece with enough strength to command the site yet subtle enough not to overpower its surroundings.”

Looking through the odd intersection of 5th and Yesler Way before the slide and the overpass.

Jean's repeat from below the Yesler Way overpass.
Jean’s repeat from below the Yesler Way overpass.
Looking northwest across Yesler Way to an early look at the Francis and its entrance on Yesler Way, with part of the east facade of the new City Hall (and Jail) showing far left across 5th Avenue. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
Looking northwest across Yesler Way to an earlier recording of  the Francis and its entrance on Yesler Way, with part of the east facade of the new City Hall (and Jail) showing far left across 5th Avenue.   Our Lady of Good  Help Catholic Church at 5th and Jefferson shows her steeple  upper-right. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
Jean's repeat looking northwest across Yesler Way.
Jean’s repeat looking northwest across Yesler Way.

The historical photo featured at the top, one of several taken by a public works photographer in the summer of 1911, documents the troubles the regraders were having here at Fifth Avenue and Yesler Way.  The clipping directly below form the Times for February 28, 1899 reveals that the slipping here was an old  worry.

A clipping from The Seattle Times for Feb. 28, 1899 introduces C. P. Dose the owner of the building at the northeast corner of 5th Ave. and Yesler Way, and his fundamental concerns.
A clipping from The Seattle Times for Feb. 28, 1899 introduces C. P. Dose, the owner of the building at the northeast corner of 5th Ave. and Yesler Way, and his fundamental concerns.
(I Click this one TWICE to read it.) The Times report on the left for July 14, 1902, describes the elaborate public work undertaken in 1902 to stabilize the fluid dynamics of this "Profanity Hill" (or later "Goat Hill") part of First Hill that bulges west from it like a resting tourist.
(I Click this one TWICE to read it.) The Times report on the left for July 14, 1902, describes the elaborate public work undertaken that year to stabilize the fluid dynamics of this “Profanity Hill” (or later “Goat Hill”) part of First Hill that bulges west from it like a resting tourist.

The featured subject looks north over the regrade mess on Fifth from the work-in-progress on the Yesler Way overpass. Beginning with the Frances Hotel, seen here at the northeast corner, there are two more structures between Yesler and Terrace, the next street north.  All three are in trouble.  When the responsibilities were at last resolved in the courts, twenty-four structures on Yesler, Terrace, Fifth, and Sixth, were counted as damaged by slides triggered by the Fifth Avenue regrade.

One of Dose's proposals for securing the neighborhood by making it part of his solution for the growing traffic congestion on downtown streets. That The Seattle Times printed his plans is a sign of his influence.
One of Dose’s proposals for securing the neighborhood by making it part of his solution for the growing traffic congestion on downtown streets.  Note the Dose proposals a wall as part of his plan to stabilize the hill.   That The Seattle Times printed his plans is a sign of his influence.  Again CLICK CLICK!!!

Real estate speculator, C.P.Dose, the owner of The Frances, described himself and his neighbors as victims of City Engineer R.H. Thomson’s  “cutting off the toe off First Hill,” similar to the little Dutch boy pulling his finger from the hole in the dike.  Like others, Dose understood the hill’s abundant fluid dynamics. Those dynamics were high on the list of reasons that most of the original pioneers on Alki Point soon left that dry prominence to build a city on and beside this wet hill. After the cutting off of its toe, Dose concluded that most of the “so-called First Hill” should be carefully removed; otherwise, he advised, “It will all come sliding down.”

A Times clip from Feb. 14, 1907.
A Times clip from Feb. 14, 1907.
Times clip from Sept. 10, 1909 with radical proposals.
Times clip from Sept. 10, 1909 with radical proposals.
Desperate attempts to save the Allen, the Francis Hotel's first neighbor to the north on 5th Avenue.
Desperate and failed attempts to save the Allen, the Francis Hotel’s first neighbor to the north on 5th Avenue.
Times clip from August 24, 1911.
Times clip from August 24, 1911.
Times clip from August 23, 1911.
Times clip from August 23, 1911. The Francis is on the far right of the illustration.

If I have read the clues correctly, Dose built his Fifth Avenue Hotel, its first name, for $6,000 in the summer of 1900, soon after relocating his prospering real estate business from Chicago to Seattle.  With his son, C.C. Dose, he opened his real estate office in the clapboard hotel and soon became a leader among his neighbors in plotting what to do about their slippery situation.  A solution arrived on the 23rd of August, 1911, when all the windows in The Frances cracked as, The Seattle Times reported, it moved “one foot closer to the brink.”  The three hotels on Fifth Avenue were abruptly abandoned and soon razed.  Dose was comforted in the Mt. Baker Neighborhood.  He had been holding onto ten acres there since 1870, when he purchased the lakeside land sight unseen while still in Chicago.  In 1904 and 1907 he platted his “Dose’s Lake Washington Addition to the City of Seattle” and in 1912 built his home there, a colonial-style mansion with grand Corinthian columns at the front.  It still stands tall at 3211 S. Dose Terrace.

Dose's big home in his namesake addition appears here on the far left of the illustrations running below the feature's header. It dates from August 3, 1913. [Please CLICK CLICK]
Dose’s big home in his namesake addition appears here on the far left of the illustrations running below the feature’s header. It dates from August 3, 1913. [Please CLICK CLICK]
The Yesler Way slide was included in The Times four page chronology of the big local events of 1911 - although not on this page, which we have chosen for the cartoon.
The Yesler Way slide was included in The Times four page chronology of the big local events of 1911 – although not on this page, which we have chosen for the cartoon. CLICK CLICK
Alas, for Dose, The Seattle Times reports on March 25, 1914, that he lost to the city in his attempt to be paid for the loses of the 1911 slide.
Alas, for Dose, The Seattle Times reports on March 25, 1914, that he lost to the city in his attempt to be paid for the loses of the 1911 slide.
Looking north through Terrace Street on a muddy 5th Avenue from a soft spot between the new City Hall (the 400 Yesler Building) on the left and the Francis and its neighbors off camera on the right. Note Our Lady of Good Night's Sleep two blocks north at Jefferson. After putting up Jean's repeat for this, I'm off to bed, but will be back tomorrow with a few things to add.
Looking north to Terrace Street on a muddy 5th Avenue from a soft spot between the new City Hall (the 400 Yesler Building) on the left and the Francis and its neighbors off camera on the right. Note Our Lady of Good Help (and luck)  two blocks north at Jefferson.

FRANCIS-looking-N-on-5th-WEB

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  A few more Edge Clips from the neighborhood and then some more old features from the same.  We will get as far as we can, but then surrender at 2am for the latest climb to nighty bears.  (How should we spell it?  Bill.)

THEN: This “real photo postcard” was sold on stands throughout the city. It was what it claimed to be; that is, its gray tones were real. If you studied them with magnification the grays did not turn into little black dots of varying sizes. (Courtesy, David Chapman and otfrasch.com)

THEN: The Sprague Hotel at 706 Yesler Way was one of many large structures –hotels, apartments and duplexes, built on First Hill to accommodate the housing needs of the city’s manic years of grown between its Great Fire in 1889 and the First World War. Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey

THEN: Sometime around 1890, George Moore, one of Seattle’s most prolific early photographers, recorded this portrait of the home of the architect (and Daniel Boone descendent) William E. Boone. In the recently published second edition of Shaping Seattle Architecture, the book’s editor, UW Professor of Architecture Jeffry Karl Ochsner, sketches William E. Boone’s life and career. Ochsner adds, “Boone was virtually the only pre-1889 Fire Seattle architect who continued to practice at a significant level through the 1890s and into the twentieth-century.” (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: On his visit to the Smith Tower around 1960, Wade Stevenson recorded the western slope of First Hill showing Harborview Hospital and part of Yesler Terrace at the top between 7th and 9th Avenue but still little development in the two blocks between 7th and 5th Avenues. Soon the Seattle Freeway would create a concrete ditch between 7th and 6th (the curving Avenue that runs left-to-right through the middle of the subject.) Much of the wild and spring fed landscape between 6th and 5th near the bottom of the revealing subject was cleared for parking. (Photo by Wade Stevenson, courtesy of Noel Holley)

THEN: A winter of 1918 inspection of some captured scales on Terrace Street. The view looks east from near 4th Avenue. (Courtesy City Municipal Archives)

THEN: 1934 was one of the worst years of the Great Depression. This look north on Third Avenue South through Main Street and the Second Avenue South Extension was recorded on Thursday, April 19th of that year. Business was generally dire, but especially here in this neighborhood south of Yesler Way where there were many storefront vacancies. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

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RETURNING to OUR LADY OF GOOD HELP – Looking Southeast across the intersection of 5th and Jefferson.

Our-Lady-of-Good-Help-web

Our Lade at the northeast corner of 3rd and Washington, its original location.
Our Lady at the northeast corner of 3rd and Washington, its original location.

OUR-LADY-of-GOOD-HELP-text-scanWEB

The Prefontaine Fountain at 3rd and Jefferson.
The Prefontaine Fountain at 3rd and Jefferson.
The Prefontaine Fountain, 1993.
The Prefontaine Fountain, 1993.

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Looking north on 5th Avenue from Terrace Street with the sidewalk face of Our Lady of Good Help on the right. 1939
Looking north on 5th Avenue from Terrace Street with the sidewalk face of Our Lady of Good Help on the right. 1939

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FOURTH AVE. REGRADE LOOKING NORTH FROM YESLER WAY

CLIP-4TH-AVE-regrad-n-fm-Yesler-web

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YESLER WAY CABLE’S LAST DAY

Yesler-Cable-at-Occidental-loading-may-be-last-ride-SNT-WEB

Yesler-Cable-Last-day-clippingWEB

"Safety Island" on Yesler Way, 1928.
“Safety Island” on Yesler Way, 1928.

yesler cable-Yesler-Way-cable-on-a-role-in-a-rr-car-web

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Looking west down Yesler Way and its overpass above 5th Avenue.
Looking west down Yesler Way and its overpass above 5th Avenue.

Yesler-fm-5th-overpass-ca.-1912-WEB

Yesler-lk-w-fm-5th-w-city-hall-WEB

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Yesler-Way-lk-w-fm-ca7,7-ca

First appeared in Pacific,
First appeared in Pacific, May 5, 2002

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Seattle City LIght-Yesler-Way-Transfer-station-web

First appeared in Pacific,
First appeared in Pacific, March 15, 1987.

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First appeared in Pacific, Dec. 26, 1999
First appeared in Pacific, Dec. 26, 1999

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First-Brick-home-in-Seattle-#1-WEB

 First appeared in Pacific Oct. 12, 2002.
First appeared in Pacific Oct. 12, 2002.
The first brick home is found in this look up First Hill below the towered Court House on the horizon. That is Terrace Street with the steep steps climbing to the top of "Profanity Hill.' Jefferson Street is on the left and Yesler Way cuts through the cityscape. City Hall is left of center, the bright facade with the centered tower. It faces Third Avenue.
The first brick home is found in this look up First Hill below the towered Court House on the horizon. That is Terrace Street with the steep steps climbing to the top of “Profanity Hill.’ Jefferson Street is on the left and Yesler Way cuts through the cityscape. City Hall, aka the Katzenjammer Castle,  is left of center, the bright facade with the centered tower. It faces Third Avenue.

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KATZENJAMMER FRONT DOOR on THIRD AVE.

MIaIAH-CITY-HALL-THEN-WEB

First appeared in Pacific,
First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 30, 1984

Mariah-Now-#2-City-Hall-Park-web2

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Knights-Templar-faux-fort-WEB

First appeared in Pacific
First appeared in Pacific.

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clip-Return-to-Fortson-Sq. WEB

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CITY HALL, 1886

cityhall-ca-1886-WEB

CITY-HALL-1886--TEXT-WEB-

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LATER – RETURN TO FIFTH AND YESLER WAY

On the horizon Harborview Hospital is under construction and the top of King County's abandoned courthouse has been removed in prelude to it razing. This 1930 look from the Smith Tower also shows off the barren or cleared acres top-center and behind the flat-iron shaped 400 Yesler Building at the center. Our Lade of Good Help is on the left.
On the horizon Harborview Hospital is under construction and the top of King County’s abandoned courthouse has been removed in prelude to it razing. This 1930 look from the Smith Tower also shows off the barren or cleared acres top-center behind the flat-iron shaped 400 Yesler Building at the center.  These, some will remember, were roughly developed into a steep parking lot.   (See what follows.)  Our Lady of Good Help is on the left.
March 12, 1957, looking north on Fifth Avenue from the Yesler Way overpass into part of the sprawling and steep parking lot developed on the shaky acres once home to the tenements on Fifth Avenue's east side. Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.
March 12, 1957, looking north on Fifth Avenue from the Yesler Way overpass into part of the sprawling and steep parking lot developed on the shaky acres once home to the tenements on Fifth Avenue’s east side. Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.
Also from March 12, 1957 looking southeast through the parking lot to Yesler Way with Fifth Avenue at the base. (Courtesy, Municipal Archives)
Also from March 12, 1957 looking southeast through the parking lot to Yesler Way with Fifth Avenue at the base. (Courtesy, Municipal Archives)
Two years later, grading the former lot of the Lady of Good Help. The Yesler Way overpass is on the right. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
Two years later, grading the former lot of the Lady of Good Help. The Yesler Way overpass is on the right. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

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Reaching from Elliott Bay on the far right to First Hill on the left, this pan from the Smith Tower includes the "forsaken" or undeveloped slide area of its "Profanity" or Goat" hill part directly above the dark mass of the 400 Yesler Building,
Reaching from Elliott Bay on the far right to First Hill on the left, this pan from the Smith Tower includes the “forsaken” or undeveloped slide area of First HIll’s  “Profanity” or Goat” part directly behind and above the dark mass of the 400 Yesler Building in the flat-iron block bordered by Terrace Street, Yesler Way and Fifth Avenue (behind it) on the bottom-left, about one-fifth of the way in from the pan’s left border,  CLICK TWICE to ENLARGE

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Seattle Now & Then: Virginia Mason

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: An early view of Virginia Mason Hospital, which opened in the fall of 1920 at the northwest corner of Terry Avenue and Spring Street. In 1980 for its anniversary, the clinic-hospital could make the proud statement that it had “spanned sixty years and four city blocks.” Courtesy Lawton Gowey
THEN: An early view of Virginia Mason Hospital, which opened in the fall of 1920 at the northwest corner of Terry Avenue and Spring Street. In 1980 for its anniversary, the clinic-hospital could make the proud statement that it had “spanned sixty years and four city blocks.” Courtesy Lawton Gowey
NOW: From it 80-bed capacity in 1920, the year of its founding, the Virginia Mason Hospital, now in its 95th year, has grown into a 336-bed teaching hospital, part of the Virginia Mason Hospital and Seattle Medical Center.
NOW: From it 80-bed capacity in 1920, the year of its founding, the Virginia Mason Hospital, now in its 95th year, has grown into a 336-bed teaching hospital, part of the Virginia Mason Hospital and Seattle Medical Center.

The rightly famous Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, was the inspiration for an enterprising cadre of Seattle physicians who organized to build a hospital that worked cooperatively with a clinic of specialty-trained doctors, including themselves.  Architects Bebb and Gould, prospering partners who garnered many architectural commissions, designed the Italianate-styled six-story Virginia Mason Hospital at the northwest corner of Terry Avenue and Spring Street.  The reinforced concrete structure was constructed so that it could be easily added to if the new institution’s intentions should flourish, or converted into another fine First Hill hotel or apartment house should they flop. 

A promotion for the hospital's bond, published in The Seattle Times, August 16, 1920.
A promotion for the hospital’s bonds, published in The Seattle Times, August 16, 1920.

Obviously the doctors’ plans prevailed.  They managed with an issue of mortgage bonds for the $90,000 structure, and they contributed considerable self-help.  The staff, including the doctors, “were on their hands and knees scrubbing and sealing bare concrete floors, and painting walls” before the autumn 1920 opening. An advertisement in The Seattle Times for the bond sale assured potential stockholders that the seven Seattle physicians involved had a “combined net worth estimated conservatively at $375,000.” 

A intersection portrait of the founders in 1929.
A intersection portrait of the hospital’s physicians  in 1929. Founder James Tate Mason stands in the back row, second from the left.   Dr. John. M. Blackford stands to the left of Mason.
Virginia Mason Hospital, 1940.
Virginia Mason Hospital, 1940.

Chief among them, the founder, was the surgeon James Tate Mason, who in 1907 for a salary of one-hundred dollars hired on as ship’s doctor for his passage around the horn from Philadelphia to Seattle.  Mason also bought a return railroad ticket that he never used.  Arriving in Seattle with only fifty dollars in his pocket, the young physician was first employed as company doctor for the Pacific Coast Coal Company mines in Black Diamond and Franklin. That job was followed by stints as physician for the King County Jail, and, beginning in 1912, four years as county coroner.  Following his marriage in 1911 to Laura DeWolfe Wittlesey, the couple had two sons and one daughter.  The last was named Virginia, and by that issues the at once sentimental and extraordinary naming of the hospital. John M. Blackford, one of the hospital’s original partners, also had a young daughter named Virginia, and what’s more, Mason.  Virginia Blackford had been named after her aunt Virginia Mason.  The name for the hospital was agreed on by the wives of Mason and Blackford and simply announced to their husbands.      

A portrait of Dr. James Tate Mason painted by Neal Ordayne. The painting was given to the hospital by, its Seattle Times caption reads, "nurses of teh staff and graduates of the hospital's nursing school, was unveiled by Mrs. Virginia Mason Elliott, Dr. Mason's daughter, for whom the hospital was named. In the picture are Dr. George A. Dowling, Mrs. Elliott and Miss Anna J. Fraser, at right, superintendent of the hospital." ca. 1937
A portrait of Dr. James Tate Mason painted by Neal Ordayne. The painting was given to the hospital by, its Seattle Times caption reads, “nurses of the staff and graduates of the hospital’s nursing school, was unveiled by Mrs. Virginia Mason Elliott, Dr. Mason’s daughter, for whom the hospital was named. In the picture are Dr. George A. Dowling, Mrs. Elliott and Miss Anna J. Fraser, at right, superintendent of the hospital.” ca. 1937
The Seattle Times obituary
The Seattle Times March 31, 2002 obituary for the Virginia Mason Hospital’s namesake – one of them.

In 1922 the fledgling hospital expanded its maternity department, and throughout the 1920s The Times classifieds were replete with congratulatory birth announcements that included the name of the hospital.  Also in 1922 Virginia Mason added a school of nursing.  In 1925 interns were accepted in the first recognized training program for  doctors in the state.  Many other regional firsts followed, including the first electrocardiogram, the first use of insulin for diabetes treatment, the first use of intravenous anesthesia, and the first acceptance of fathers’ participation in births.  In 1934 Virginia Mason dissolved its private corporation in favor of operating on a nonprofit basis.

A Seattle Times clipping from Feb. 2, 1928.
A Seattle Times clipping from Feb. 2, 1928.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, fellas?  As is our habit, Ron and I will attached a few more features.  First Ron pulls from related – by neighborhood or subject – features that have shown here on the blog earlier including last week’s coverage of the nearby Sorrento Hotel.  I will also look for others that have been in  hiding because of their age – older.

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THEN: Looking northwest to Seattle General Hospital at the northwest corner of Fifth Avenue and Marion Street, circa 1909. (Courtesy of Michael Maslan)

THEN: This detail from the prolific local photographer Asahel Curtis’s photograph of the Smith/Rininger home at the northwest corner of Columbia Street and Summit Avenue dates from the early twentieth century when motorcars, rolling or parked, were still very rare on the streets of Seattle, including these on First Hill. (Courtesy, Historic Seattle)

THEN: The Perry Apartments is nearly new in “postcard artist” M. L. Oakes look at them south on Boren to where it intersects with Madison Street. (Courtesy John Cooper)

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THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN:

THEN: First Hill’s distinguished Old Colony Apartments at 615 Boren Avenue, 1910.

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FIVE EARLY HOSPITALS & TWO FIRST HILL HOMES, ONE LARGE AND ONE SMALL.

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Appeared first in Pacific for May 10, 1987
Appeared first in Pacific for May 10, 1987

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PROVIDENCE-and-Central-THEN-ca.-1887-WEB

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Providence-6-10-90-WEB2

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3. Wayside-Hospital-ship-S.S.-Idaho-Whittelsy-WEB

First appeared in Pacific - long ago.
First appeared in Pacific – long ago.

3. Idaho-sternwheeler-as-Wayside-Mission,-cracked-glass-neg.WEB

Click click CLICK to ENLARGE
Click click CLICK to ENLARGE

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4. Wayside Clarior color Yesler-Home-aka-Wayside-Hospital-at-Republican-&-2nd-ave-n.-corner-of-Repertoire-Theatre-now.by-Les-HamiltonWEB-

First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 30, 2001.
First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 30, 2001.

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Backus-Home-Boren-Univ-THEN-WEB

First appeared in Pacific August 10, 2003
First appeared in Pacific August 10, 2003

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Imogen Cunningham reflecting and shining on her First Hill porch - probably a self-portrait. (Courtesy, Frye Museum, U.W.)
Imogen Cunningham reflecting and shining on her First Hill porch – probably a self-portrait. (Courtesy, Frye Museum, U.W.)
Copied here from Seattle Now and Then, Vol. 1 - 1984.
Copied here from Seattle Now and Then, Vol. 1 – 1984.

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Seattle Now & Then: The Sorrento Hotel

(click to enlarge photos)

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THEN: Through its now long life as a local landmark, the Sorrento Hotel, at the northwest corner of Madison Street and Terry Avenue, has been variously referred to as Seattle’s “Honeymoon Hotel,” its “Most Romantic Hotel,” a “remnant of Seattle’s original cocktail culture,” and now, more often, “Seattle’s original boutique hotel.”  (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
THEN: Through its now long life as a local landmark, the Sorrento Hotel, at the northwest corner of Madison Street and Terry Avenue, has been variously referred to as Seattle’s “Honeymoon Hotel,” its “Most Romantic Hotel,” a “remnant of Seattle’s original cocktail culture,” and now, more often, “Seattle’s original boutique hotel.” (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
NOW: Among the Sorrento’s recent changes, a new courtyard area “for al fresco drinking and dining” has replaced the circular driveway at the entrance.
NOW: Among the Sorrento’s recent changes, a new courtyard area “for al fresco drinking and dining” has replaced the circular driveway at the entrance.

The first two listing in The Seattle Times for the Sorrento Hotel were published on February 7, 1909, soon after its opening.  One was for a bridge party arranged at the hotel by a Miss Louise Langford “in honor of Miss Ethel Amana” visiting from Oakland, California.  The second citation noted that Mrs. H.N. Richmond and her daughter Helen have “returned from California and are at the Hotel Sorrento for the winter.” Since none of the Sorrento’s seventy-six suitts had kitchens, most likely the Richmonds were often taking their meals in the hotel’s Dunbar Room, a name that the hotel has revived with its recent changes.  

A clipping from The Seattle Times for (or on) April 5, 1908.
A clipping from The Seattle Times for (or on) April 5, 1908.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

On April 5, 1908, the hotel printed its first illustration in The Times, an architectural drawing most likely by Harlan Thomas, the Sorrento’s architect.  The caption describes the elegant Italianate landmark as a “new tourist and family hotel now in the course of erection on the northwest corner of Madison and Terry by the Samuel Rosenberg Investment Company.”  In her chapter, “Apartment Living on First Hill,” included in Historic Seattle’s 40th Anniversary book history, Tradition and Change on Seattle First Hill, Jacqueline B. Williams quotes a 1940 newsletter : “The building of The Sorrento epitomized a change in the life of the city from the pioneer era, the time when men and women lived close to the soil was over and the building of a luxurious residential hotel was one of the first steps toward ‘the New York of the West.’”  

Like the featured photographs at the top, this too was taken by Asahel Curtis - perhaps on the same day, as one of the two on top.  As its own caption, lower-right, indicates this was taken from the hotel.  It looks northwest into the city's new and booming retail district.
Like the featured photographs at the top, this too was taken by Asahel Curtis – perhaps on the same day, as one of the two on top.  As its own caption, lower-right, indicates this was taken from the hotel. It looks northwest into the city’s new and booming retail district.  The big home on the far right looks down on 8th Avenue and across it to the future corner for first the Christian Scientists and then for Town Hall at Seneca.   CLICK TWICE
A detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map showing the Sorrento at the northwest corner of Madison and Terry (in Block 76).  Kitty-Korner is the Ranke Mansion and behind it the Perry Hotel at the southwest corner of Boren and Madison.
A detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map showing the Sorrento at the northwest corner of Madison and Terry (in Block 76). Kitty-corner is the Ranke Mansion and behind it the Perry Hotel at the southwest corner of Boren and Madison.
First appeared in Pacific.
First appeared in Pacific.
The Ranke Home with the Perry Hotel converted to the Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini Hospital behind it.
Kitty-corner from the Sorrento Hotel, the Ranke Home with the Perry Hotel converted to the Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini Hospital behind it.
The modern west wing of the Cabrini Hospital seen from the Sorrento's circus-drive near its front door, which is now a outdoor dining patio when the weather allows.
The modern west wing of the Cabrini Hospital seen from the Sorrento’s circus-drive near its front door, which is now a outdoor dining patio when the weather allows.

In architect Norman J. Johnson’s essay on Harlan Thomas, included in the University Press’ often-helpful Shaping Seattle Architecture, Johnson notes that the Sorrento “offered Seattle its first rooftop restaurant and brought a new sophistication in residential accommodations for locals and visitors alike.”  Like his hotel, Thomas also became a local treasure, and was head of the U.W. Architecture Department between 1924 and 1940.  The Sorrento has been through a few remodels during its now 108 years, but with little injury to its landmark charms.  For its 1933 remodel, The Times then noted, “From top to bottom the hotel has been completely gone over, the only part of it remaining the same being the distinguished exterior, which has attracted favorable comments from tourists for a number of years.”

The top half of The Seattle Times Oct. 17, 1933 coverage of the Sorrento's remodel and its re-opening.,
The top half of The Seattle Times Oct. 17, 1933 coverage of the Sorrento’s remodel and its re-opening., CLICK TWICE to READ.
From the same October issue, the hotel's own announcement of its re-opening.  "Special Opening Dinners With Orchestra" are advertised within the ad.  Directly below is a front door photo fo the popular Carey Band, which  was not necessarily the band playing there in the fall of 1933.
From the same October issue, the hotel’s own announcement of its re-opening. “Special Opening Dinners With Orchestra” are advertised within the ad. Directly below is a front door photo of the popular Carey Band, which may have also played the Sorrento in the fall of 1933.
The Carey band - members all of the local musicians union - at the Sorrento front door.
The Carey band – members all of the local musicians union – at the Sorrento front door.

Of the several reviews I have read of the Sorrento’s recent changes, I recommend one from The Seattle Times food writer, Bethany Jean Clement.  It was published here on April 22nd, last.  You can easily find Clement’s generous and insightful wit with your Seattle Public Library card.  Ask a librarian for help; they like to give it.  While visiting the archive you may also be pleased to find that in the April 13, 1909, issue, The Times reported “Mr. and Mrs. Richmond have removed from the Sorrento Hotel to their summer home at Laurelhurst.”  We are not told what became of Helen. This citation and about 3400 others that name the Sorrento – most of them brief asides – are there for exploring. 

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, guys?  Naturally, but first a note to our readers.  At this moment Jean and Karen and Don may flying over Greenland (the southern tip) on their return from weeks in Europe, or they may already have returned to their beds beside Puget Sound in retreat from jet lag.  We have not heard.    With what follows first Ron Edge will put up a fairly long list of the more recent relevant – to the neighborhood or subject – that he can pull from the blog itself.  Following that, as is by now our custom, I’ll add some past relevant features that we published sometimes in the many earlier years of the feature as it appeared (since 1982) in Pacific Northwest Magazine.

BOREN-&-University-Denny-&-Ainsworth-Homes-THEN-mr

THEN: The Perry Apartments is nearly new in “postcard artist” M. L. Oakes look at them south on Boren to where it intersects with Madison Street. (Courtesy John Cooper)

THEN: Looking north-northeast from a low knoll at the southwest corner of Seneca Street and Seventh Avenue, circa 1916.  By 1925, a commercial automobile garage filled the vacant lot in the foreground.  [Courtesy, Ron Edge]

THEN: Looking west on Madison Street from Seventh Avenue circa 1909.  (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)

THEN: On his visit to the Smith Tower around 1960, Wade Stevenson recorded the western slope of First Hill showing Harborview Hospital and part of Yesler Terrace at the top between 7th and 9th Avenue but still little development in the two blocks between 7th and 5th Avenues.  Soon the Seattle Freeway would create a concrete ditch between 7th and 6th (the curving Avenue that runs left-to-right through the middle of the subject.)  Much of the wild and spring fed landscape between 6th and 5th near the bottom of the revealing subject was cleared for parking.  (Photo by Wade Stevenson, courtesy of Noel Holley)

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/1-future-courthouse-site-1937-web1.jpg?w=830&h=536

THEN: First Hill’s distinguished Old Colony Apartments at 615 Boren Avenue, 1910.

THEN: Looking west on Madison Street from Seventh Avenue circa 1909.  (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)

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BLOOD BANK SOUTHWEST CORNER, TERRY & MADISON

First appeared in Pacific, Sept., 2, 2001.
First appeared in Pacific, Sept., 2, 2001.

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COXEY’S ARMY

COXEY'S ARMY encamped on what is now the St. James corner.  First appeared in Pacific, Feb. 28, 1988.
COXEY’S ARMY encamped on what is now the St. James corner. First appeared in Pacific, Feb. 28, 1988.

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LINCOLN HOTEL, ROOFTOP GARDEN

A decade earlier than the Sorrento, and at Fourth Avenue six blocks west of it, the Lincoln Hotel also had a roofgarden.   Frist appeared in Pacific, June 30, 1985.
A decade earlier than the Sorrento, and at Fourth Avenue six blocks west of it, the Lincoln Hotel also had a roofgarden. Frist appeared in Pacific, June 30, 1985.

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We will return to proof the above – after a late Sunday breakfast.

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Bagley Mansion

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Constructed in 1885, the Alice and Clarence Bagley mansion was the first big home built on the south slope of Queen Anne Hill.  (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
THEN: Constructed in 1885, the Alice and Clarence Bagley mansion was the first big home built on the south slope of Queen Anne Hill. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
NOW: Gus Holmberg built the first floor of his apartment house at 200 Aloha Street in 1945 and added the second floor in 1959. Since their use as a home-site in the 1993 ‘buried alive’ horror film, “The Vanishing,” the apartments have figured in local movie lore.
NOW: Gus Holmberg built the first floor of his apartment house at 200 Aloha Street in 1945 and added the second floor in 1959. Since their use as a home-site in the 1993 ‘buried alive’ horror film, “The Vanishing,” the apartments have figured in local movie lore.

This is the tower in which Seattle’s most prolific pioneer historian, Clarence Bagley, may have written his many-volume histories of Seattle and King County. I assume he used it so, for why else would such a writer-publisher-printer build such a tower with a full panorama of the city, if not for inspiration?   The Bagley mansion, designed by an eastern architect, was built in 1885 on the south slope of Queen Anne Hill on a block-sized lot now bordered by Second and Third Avenues North, and Aloha and Ward Streets.  One of the earliest homes on the Hill, and certainly the first oversized one, the mansion’s rooms had twelve-and-a-half foot tall ceilings, and a furnace and five fireplaces to warm them.  The tower was Clarence’s idea, and “he loved it.”  It was decorated with Bagley’s collection of rifles and muskets.

The neighborhood in  1908 with block 24, upper-right, still reserved for Bagley's big home.
The neighborhood in 1908 with block 24, upper-right, still reserved for Bagley’s big home.

The big home was used for collecting and entertaining, perhaps as much as for raising a family of four daughters and one son. The Bagley library included what was at one time considered the largest collection of regional history. Clarence was generous with its uses, as when this newspaper, The Seattle Times, lost much of its library to a fire in 1913, he replaced its lost editions with his own. 

A clipping from The Times for Dec. 27, 1925.  CLICK AND CLICK to Englare
A clipping from The Times for Dec. 27, 1925. CLICK AND CLICK to Engarge

Clarence Bagley was sixteen-years-old when he and his parents arrived on the first wagon to roll into Seattle in 1860. With a few stops to visit friends along the way, the Bagleys’ jostled drive from Salem, Oregon, had taken fifteen days. Thomas Mercer’s wagon was the first to reach Seattle, in 1853, but he and his wagon had traveled from Steilacoom by boat. In 1852 the Bagleys and the Mercers had journeyed west together from their native Illinois. As part of a pioneer Oregon Trail wagon train, it took five months to reach Salem, Oregon.

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Time's columnist John Reddin's feature on Cecil Clarence Bagley, hie parents and the family home, printed on March 8, 1967.
Time’s columnist John Reddin’s feature on Cecil Clarence Bagley, hie parents and the family home, printed on March 8, 1967.   The long feature continues below.

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On Christmas Eve 1865, Mercer’s youngest daughter, Alice, married Clarence in Seattle’s first church wedding. Friends since their childhood in Illinois, he was twenty-two and she seventeen. The Methodist church was white and so was the town, then under two feet of snow.  Their four daughters were married in the Queen Anne mansion’s front parlor with the bay window.  On Christmas Day in 1925 their children and friends filled the mansion for the celebration of the couple’s 60th Anniversary.

A Seattle Times clip from Oct. 13, 1945.
A Seattle Times clip from Oct. 13, 1945.

Alice Mercer Bagley died in 1926, and “Pop” Clarence lived on in their mansion until 1938, when he, too, died after nearly a half-century in his tower.  The big home was torn down early in 1944 to make way for apartments.

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The Bagley home from nearer the top of Queen Anne Hill, looking southeast to a Capitol Hill horizon.  First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 27, 1998.
The Bagley home from nearer the top of Queen Anne Hill, looking southeast to a Capitol Hill horizon. First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 27, 1998.

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WEB EXTRAS

I’ll drop in a couple of alternate views of the apartment building on Aloha.

Looking south towards downtown
Looking south towards downtown
A pleasant view into the courtyard
A pleasant view into the courtyard

Anything to add, boys?

Sure Jean, while hoping your vacation south from Paris into the verdure of a Perigord summer with plenty of castles and vinyards for your pleasure and Berangere and her family and much of yours too, is being enjoyed with some prudence and sobriety at the bottom and belt line.   First, before moving on to Ron Edge’s links, we will answer your “extras” on the surviving apartment there at 2nd Ave. N. and Aloha Street with two of the same taken by Lawton Gowey in 1981.   Lawton, you know, lived nearby and he took his photos as repeats for the historical landmark – the Bagley Mansion – he knew and may have remembered from his adolescence living on the hill.  Then after the Edge Links we will keep to the neighborhood with a few more older features we’ve accumulated through the years and finish by leaving Queen Anne for a small portfolio of snapshots taken on Bagley Avenue  in Wallingford.

Lawton Gowey dated this Kodachrome Nov. 2, 1981.
Lawton Gowey dated this Kodachrome and the slide that follows Nov. 2, 1981.

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EDGE LINKS – CLICK TO ENTER

THEN:Carolyn Marr, Museum of History and Industry librarian and Anders Wilse expert, answers the joking caption on Councilman Reinhard’s pant leg with another example. “Wilse had a wry sense of humor. In one photo he took during the Great Northern Railroad construction project, a group of 4 men sit around a table playing cards with revolvers and glasses of liquid. He wrote on the photo ‘A Merry Christmas.’”  (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/crockett-7-w-row-then-mr1.jpg?w=1053&h=684

THEN: Long thought to be an early footprint for West Seattle’s Admiral Theatre, this charming brick corner was actually far away on another Seattle Hill.  Courtesy, Southwest Seattle Historical Society.

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First appeared in Pacific, May 3, 1992.
First appeared in Pacific, May 3, 1992.

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Counterbalance-p.1  WEB .

Click Click to Enlarge
Click Click to Enlarge
Looking north up the Queen Anne Avenue Counterbalance from Mercer Street.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Looking north up the Queen Anne Avenue Counterbalance from Mercer Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
First appeared in Pacific, January 11, 1998.
First appeared in Pacific, January 11, 1998.

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First appeared in Pacific, March 10, 1991.
First appeared in Pacific, March 10, 1991.

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First appeared in Pacific, November 26, 1995.
First appeared in Pacific, November 26, 1995.

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First appeared in Pacific, May 18, 2003.
First appeared in Pacific, May 18, 2003.

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First appeared in Pacific, January 4, 1987.
First appeared in Pacific, January 4, 1987.

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First appeared in Pacific, April 27, 1986.
First appeared in Pacific, April 27, 1986.

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First appeared in Pacific, May 21, 2000
First appeared in Pacific, May 21, 2000

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First appeared in Pacific, Sept 7, 1986.
First appeared in Pacific, Sept 7, 1986.
CLICK CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE The still isolated Bagley home can be found in this three-part panorama taken from the back porch of the Bell Hotel at the southeast corner of Battery Street and Front Street (First Ave.).  It stands alone and yet tell below the what remains of the forest on the Queen Anne Hill horizon, and very near the center of the pan when measured from left (west) to right (east).
CLICK CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE
The still isolated Bagley home can be found in this three-part panorama taken from the back porch of the Bell Hotel at the southeast corner of Battery Street and Front Street (First Ave.). It stands alone and yet tell below what remains of the forest on the Queen Anne Hill horizon, and very near the center of the pan when measured from left (west) to right (east).

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BAGLEY IN WALLINGFORD ca. 2008

A high chair at the northeast corner of Bagley and 45th Street.
A high chair at the northeast corner of Bagley and 45th Street.

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Still at the northeast corner of Bagley and 45th.
Still at the northeast corner of Bagley and 45th.

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The family dog inspects he painting job in progress on the family home, east side of Bagley, mid-block north of 45th Street.  This  one is dated Sept. 27, 2006.
The family dog inspects he painting job in progress on the family home, east side of Bagley, mid-block north of 45th Street. This one is dated Sept. 27, 2006.

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Sunset, Nov. 20, 2008, looking west from Bagley about ten yards or twelve north of 45th Street.
Sunset, Nov. 20, 2008, looking west from Bagley about ten yards or twelve north of 45th Street.

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It’s the off to bed hour (aka nighty bears time), and so we will do one of our minimal proofs in the morning – late.

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Pontius Home

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The Cascade neighborhood, named for its public grade school (1894), now long gone, might have been better named for the Pontius family.  Immigrants from Ohio, they purchased many of the forested acres north of Denny Way and east of Fairview Avenue.
THEN: The Cascade neighborhood, named for its public grade school (1894), now long gone, might have been better named for the Pontius family. Immigrants from Ohio, they purchased many of the forested acres north of Denny Way and east of Fairview Avenue.
NOW: The Colwell Building at the northwest corner of Denny Way and Stewart Street opened in 2000.  It was named for Rev. David Colwell, the Congregational minister who is credited with starting the Plymouth Housing Group, which and builds affordable housing in Seattle for the homeless and working poor.
NOW: The Colwell Building at the northwest corner of Denny Way and Stewart Street opened in 2000. It was named for Rev. David Colwell, the Congregational minister who is credited with starting the Plymouth Housing Group, which and builds affordable housing in Seattle for the homeless and working poor.

This is the farmhouse where Margaret and Rezin Pontius raised their five children: three boys, Frank, Albert and Lincoln, and two girls, Mary and Emma.  The photographer was the prolific Theodore Peiser, whose pioneer studio was one lot south of the southeast corner of Marion Street and Second Avenue, or was until the Great Fire of 1889 destroyed it and most of his negatives. Either this print escaped the flames, or the undated subject was recorded after the fire. 

The Photographer Theo Peiser's advertisement in the 1887 Polk City Directory presents his case with wit which it is somewhat stretched is still a sincere exception to the  facile fun had with much contemporary huckstering.  It is also a good - if implied - recommendation from his primary teacher and the thousands of poems that were once regularly printed in the nation's periodicals.  It seems to me.
The Photographer Theo Peiser’s advertisement in the 1887 Polk City Directory presents his case with wit which if somewhat stretched is still a sincere exception to the facile fun now had with our merciless huckstering. It is also a good – if implied – recommendation from his primary school teacher and the thousands of poems that were once regularly printed in the nation’s periodicals. It seems to me.  CLICK CLICK TO ENLARGE

That’s Margaret posing near the front porch.  By this time the three sons were all grown and working in town.  Lincoln, the youngest, was a machinist, Albert a blacksmith, and Frank, the oldest, a druggist and for the  years 1887-88, King County Treasurer. The year for Peiser’s visit was, I’ll speculate, about 1890.  There are several homes climbing the Capitol Hill ridge on the horizon behind Margaret.  All of them were built on land that she, with her sons, had sold.  First settled by Rezin in the late 1860s and platted in 1880 as the Pontius Addition, north of Denny Way it extends east from Minor Avenue up Capitol Hill as far as 14th Avenue.

A detail from the 1908 Baist Real Estate Map showing some of the reach of the Pontius additions.  CLICK-CLICK to ENLARGE.
A detail from the 1908 Baist Real Estate Map showing some of the reach of the Pontius additions.   North is at the top.  CLICK-CLICK to ENLARGE.

In the 1879 Pitt’s Directory for Seattle, Margaret is listed as a “farmeress” on the “Lake Union Road.”  By 1890, the Pontius farmhouse was also a real estate office, and the family’s fortune multiplied with an influx of neighbors, of which there was a growing swarm following the fire.  By then, Rezin was long gone, having disappeared after an argument with Margaret.  Thereafter, by Margaret’s authority, he was a forbidden subject.  When needed, she listed herself as a widow.  After Margaret’s death, Rezin was reunited with his children, living out his life with Frank in Bothell.

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ABOVE:  With some of Mother Rhyther’s children on the porch and front steps and BELOW without them.

Pontius-mansion,-Denny-Way-SEPIA

First appeared in The Times on Feb. 5, 1995.
First appeared in The Times on Feb. 5, 1995.  CLICK-CLICK to ENLARGE
Until the Amazon and Vulcan developments accelerated throughout the neighborhood, both the Pontius Farmhouse and its nearby mansion were on blocks thirteen and 24 of the Pontius 4th Addition just north of Denny Way.  The footstep of the mansion shows in the lower-left quarter of the Baist map on lots 8 & 9 of its 13th Block.  By 1908 the farmhouse was gone.
Long before the Amazon and Vulcan developments rocketed through the Westlake and Cascade neighborhoods, both the Pontius Farmhouse and the nearby mansion were on blocks thirteen and 24 of the Pontius 4th Addition just north of Denny Way. The footprint of the mansion shows in the lower-left quarter of the Baist map printed above on lots 8 & 9 of its 13th Block. By 1908 the farmhouse was long gone.  The mansion was later razed for the Greyhound garage, which is now no more.  When I photographed the “now” I was, I turns out, about one lot east of the proper prospect.  Note the alley crossing north and south  through block 13 between John and Denny Way in the map.   Most likely that is the alley figuring in the above look at Greyhound across Denny Way.  The “now” shot dates from the mid 1990’s when it was used in The Times for the feature on the big home, which is printed again immediately above this “now” shot.  Immediately below this caption we’ve inserted the thirty-first of the Times feature writer Margaret  Pitcairn Strachan’s well-wrought study of fifty-two Seattle mansions.  Some were still standing when she produced her weekly series in 1944-45.  I have covered many of these same big homes in the last 34 years and confess to having often borrowed from Strachan.
Margaret   feature on the Pontius family, their homes, enterprise and often stressed family life.  CLICK CLICK CLICK THIS and there is at least a chance that you can read it.)
Margaret Strachan’s feature on the Pontius family, their homes, enterprise and often stressed family life. CLICK CLICK CLICK THIS and there is at least a chance that you can read it.)

In 1889 Margaret built the family a Gothic mansion with a landmark tower about a hundred feet west of the farmhouse.  Margaret was known for her conflicting passions of great charm and violent temper, which were conditioned by her charities.  She gave much of her steadily increasing wealth to the care of children.  After her death in 1902, the Pontius Mansion became the Mother Rhyther Home for Orphans in 1905 and continued so until 1919. 

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Above a Dec. 1, 1899 adver for Pontius lots and below it a Dec. 30, 1910 notice regarding the removal of a house in the way of extending Stewart Street to Eastlake Avenue and so at least in part through the site of the Pontius farm house and garden.

A Dec. 30, 1910 clip from The Times.
A Dec. 30, 1910 clip from The Times.
An investiment opportunity that leans on the salesman's understanding that the expected "extending of Stewart Street making a  boulevard from Westlake to Eastlake" will double the values of lots nearby.
An investment opportunity that leans on the salesman’s understanding that the expected “extending of Stewart Street making a boulevard from Westlake to Eastlake” will double the values of lots nearby.

If I have figured correctly, with the help of other photographs and real estate maps, the Pontius farmhouse originally rested both beneath and beside the footprint for the Colwell Building, a six-story apartment with 124 units for low-income tenants, seen in the “now.”  Opened in 2000, it was named for Reverend David Griffith Colwell, the Congregational minister who helped found the Plymouth Housing Group in 1980, which now manages one thousand units of low-income housing in twelve structures.  With his death in 2001, Colwell left a legacy of good works, including twenty years of helping the homeless in Seattle.

David Colwell in The Seattle Times report of September 7, 1967 on his first sermon before his then new - to him - Plymouth Congregational congregation.
David Colwell in The Seattle Times report of September 7, 1967 on his first sermon before the  Plymouth Congregational congregation.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, boys?  Surely Jean.  Ron Edge has found a half-dozen links from the neighborhood, much of it  the Pontius domain, which climbed up Capitol Hill to its summit on 14th Avenue.  We used only a few of the stories we have told from that real estate kingdom.   Below these links I’ll introduce a few earlier ones and three McDonald panoramas from the early 1890s that include the Cascade neighborhood – and much else.  In all three the Pontius mansion can be found and in one of them their farm house as well.  Their quite close to each other.  Ron also appears below – in the second link- if our readers open it.  It is a Peterson & Bros pioneer photo Ron found of another farm in the neighborhood.  Jean posed Ron in the “now.” Together we, Ron, Jean and I,  figured out the farm’s location a few blocks north of the Pontius farm.

THEN: An early portrait, circa 1911, of The Silvian Apartments, one of Capitol Hill’s abiding architectural jewels.  (Courtesy, Bill Burden)

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day.  (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist.  (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: Photographed in the late 1950s, the floating restaurant’s huge on deck hooligan got no competition as yet from the Space Needle (1962) in breaking the horizon.

THEN: We have by three years or four missed the centenary for this distinguished brick pile, the Littlefield Apartments on Capitol Hill.  (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

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THREE OLD MCDONALDS

1. From FIRST HILL

This early 1890's McDonald pan looks north from near Union Street and Terry Avenue on First Hill.   Wallingford is on the far shore of Lake Union. Above the center of the subject and a little to the left, the Pontius mansion tower breaks the horizon.  About two large lots to the east you can also find the farm house that is feature at the top of all this.   It was this pan that solved the frustrating problem for me of locating the earlier Pontius home.  There it is!  And just below is a detail of that telling part of McDonald's helpful pan.
This early 1890’s McDonald pan looks north from near Union Street and Terry Avenue on First Hill. Wallingford is on the far shore of Lake Union. Above the center of the subject and a little to the left, the Pontius mansion tower is seen with the lake. About two large lots to the east you can also find the farm house that is featured at the top of all this. It was this pan that solved the long abiding and frustrating problem for me of locating the earlier Pontius home. There it is! And just below is a detail of that telling part of McDonald’s helpful pan.  CLICKCLICKCLICK to enlarge.

 

A detail that shows the Pontius mansion, on the left, and the Pontius farm house on the right.  (Courtesy, MOAHI aka The Museum of History and Industry.)
A detail that shows the Pontius mansion, on the left, and the Pontius farm house on the right. (Courtesy, MOAHI aka The Museum of History and Industry.)

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2. From DENNY HILL  (This McDonald pan was given its own feature on June 29, 2003.)

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One can fine the Pontius mansion on the far left of this detail taken from the above McDonald pan from Denny  Hill.   But not, I think, the farm house.
One can fine the Pontius mansion on the far left of this detail taken from the above McDonald pan from Denny Hill. But not, I think, the farm house.  The grading beyond and up Capitol Hill follows, I believe, the line of John Street.

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3. From QUEEN ANNE HILL  (It is more difficult to find the Pontius big home in this McDonald pan to the southeast from Queen Anne Hill, but it is there on the far right if you click-click-click.)

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FOLLOW A FEW FEATURES FROM THE NEIGHBORHOOD (Or Near It)

First appeared in Pacific, April 14, 2002.
First appeared in Pacific, April 14, 2002.

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First appeared in Pacific, March 21, 2002.
First appeared in Pacific, March 21, 2002.

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First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 11, 1988.
First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 11, 1988.

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Gethsemane Lutheran, nearby at 9th and Stewart.
Gethsemane Lutheran, nearby at 9th and Stewart.

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Zion Lutheran (German) at Stewart and Terry, and back-to-back with the Swedes.
Zion Lutheran (German) at Stewart and Terry, and back-to-back with the Swedes.

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The Greyhound depot, nearby at 8th and Stewart.
The Greyhound depot, nearby at 8th and Stewart.

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The WARD home at Boren and Pike.  First appeared in Pacific, January 3, 1999.
The WARD home at Boren and Pike. First appeared in Pacific, January 3, 1999.

7. WARD-HOUSE-boren-and-PikeTHEN-WEB===

Fini: THE WAY OF ALL FLESH – AND PROPERTY

A March 30,  1902 Times report on the Margaret Pontius funeral.
A March 30, 1902 Times report on the Margaret Pontius funeral.
Her son Albert follows in the spring of 1914, leaving his portion of the family wealth to his oldest brother Frank, who was once the city treasurer.   Which may suggest to some of us that it is time to think of giving our stuff up while we can still describe it, and give much of it outside the family, that is  with love, which is philanthropically.
Her son Albert follows in the spring of 1914, leaving his portion of the family wealth to his oldest brother Frank, who was once the city treasurer. Which may suggest to some of us that it is time to think of giving our stuff up while we can still describe it, and give much of it with love outside the family, that is philanthropically.

Seattle Now & Then: Fire Below the Market

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market.  It had already been scheduled for demolition.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market. It had already been scheduled for demolition. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
NOW: Jean Sherrard describes this as “about the easiest repeat I have taken.” Both views look north on Western Avenue towards Virginia Street.
NOW: Jean Sherrard describes this as “about the easiest repeat I have taken.” Both views look north on Western Avenue towards Virginia Street.

For a half century, the Municipal Market Building sat at the northwest corner of the Pike Place Market.  Perhaps you do not remember it, although the shoe-box shaped structure with its crenelated roof somewhat resembled a fort. Here the effect is made sensational with a fire and enveloping smoke.  The alarm was rung mid-afternoon on Wednesday, September 25, 1974.  The fire was started by a cutting torch used with abandon by a lone worker salvaging steel tracks in the by then condemned and abandoned building.

A Seattle Times clipping from Sept. 26, 1974.
A Seattle Times clipping from Sept. 26, 1974.
Not the same fire! And earlier one and another Times clip, this from Nov. 11, 1961.
Not the same fire! And earlier one on Western Ave. –  and another Times clip, this from Nov. 11, 1961.

The Municipal Market Building was constructed on the west side of Western Avenue in the 1920s as a way to keep the market in the market. We explain. Combined traffic from north and south, Elliott and Western Avenues, respectively, reached Pike Place at Virginia Street.  Already crowded with farmers’ stalls, the Market’s namesake Pike Place was increasingly used as a short cut to and from the business district.  In this protracted battle between farmers and motorists, the city’s traffic engineers wanted to move the market to another uptown site, but Kitsap and King County farmers and their customers protested.  They wanted it to stay on the scenic bluff.

The Municipal Market building can be found in this early 1930s aerial by first finding the armory building near the lower-left corner (just above the "Wn." in the photo's own caption) and moving from the armory up and to the right.  There's the show-box shaped Municipal Market Building and its bridge over Western Ave. to the long row of Market stalls on the west side of Pike Place.   Note the long gaps parallel to the bay in Railroad Avenue.  The 1934-36 seawall construction has not started.  Harborview hospital, 1930, is on the First Hill horizon.
The Municipal Market building can be found in this early 1930s aerial by first finding the armory building near the lower-left corner (just above the “Wn.” in the photo’s own caption) and moving from the armory up and to the right. There’s the show-box shaped Municipal Market Building and its bridge over Western Ave. to the long row of Market stalls on the west side of Pike Place. Note the long gaps parallel to the bay in Railroad Avenue. The 1934-36 seawall construction has not started. Harborview hospital, 1930, is on the First Hill horizon. [We recommend DOUBLE-CLICKING to enlarge.]

The political balance was tipped in favor of Pike Place, in part because of the addition of the Municipal Market Building.  Parking on the roof enlarged its service, and the lot was reached directly from Pike Place over Western Avenue via the Desimone Bridge, seen here (at the top) in both the ‘now’ and ‘then.’

The Armory seen from near the entrance to the RR tunnel.
The Armory seen from near the entrance to the RR tunnel.

This mid-20s addition to the Market was given its modest military design to compliment the fortress-like Washington State National Guard Armory (1909-1968), its neighbor to the north across Virginia Street.  In a Seattle Times advertisement from October 9,

From the Oct. 9, 1923 issue of The Times.
From the Oct. 9, 1923 issue of The Times.

1923, the new Municipal Market was not ‘up in arms’ but umbrellas, “a thousand or two” of them.  Seattle’s street railway was holding a “Going, Going, Gone” auction for six months worth of unclaimed items left on the trolleys. Also in its first decade, visitors were lured over the Desimone Bridge with vaudeville performances staged in the Municipal Market Building.  A 1946 feature in The Times noted “the eternal rummage sales in the Municipal Building.” 

I took this roughly merged 360 degree pan from the Desimone Bridge ca. 1980, and so about five years after the razing of the Municipal Market Building. (Dorpat)
I took this roughly merged 360 degree pan from the Desimone Bridge ca. 1980, and so about five years after the razing of the Municipal Market Building. CLICK TWICE!!  (Dorpat)
The Muncipal Market Building can be found here just above the Alaskan Way Viaduct and left-of-center.  A few cars are parked on the roof.  Work on the First National Bank building, far-right, is approaching its topping off, ca. 1967-8.
The Muncipal Market Building can be found here just above the Alaskan Way Viaduct and left-of-center. A few cars are parked on the roof. Work on the First National Bank building, far-right, is approaching its topping off, ca. 1967-8.  CLICK-CLICK.

What the fire of 1974 could not consume, which was most of it, demolition crews soon took. The site was then groomed for parking – steep parking.  After forty years of oil-stained pavement, the Public Market is now enlivened with new visions for the old Municipal Market space.  It will be joined with land freed by the razing of the Alaskan Way Viaduct.  Some of Seattle’s usual progressive choices will be involved in the about three-fourths of an acre development, including a promenade or walkway to the waterfront, more market shops, more senior housing, a new public plaza on top and more covered parking below.

A Market full-page ad from the Seattle Times for nov. 19, 1953.
A Market full-page ad from the Seattle Times for Nov. 19, 1953.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, boys?  Jean we figure it is about time now for you to wake-up in London, perhaps in that charming little Youth Hostel two blocks of three above the north bank of the Thames and two or three blocks more to St. Paul’s – if memory serves me from 2005.  Ron has put up directly below a few of our by now usual suspect, past features from the neighborhood around the Pike Place Market.  For the space below those links, I’ll find a few more distant features and scan their clips.

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Montana-Horse-Meat-MR-THEN

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building.  (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: In 1910, a circa date for this look north on First Avenue across Virginia Street, the two corners on the east side of the intersection were still undeveloped – except for signs.  The Terminal Sales Building, seen far right in Jean Sherrard’s repeat, did not replace the billboards that crowd the sidewalk in the “then” until 1923.  (Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: The Hotel York at the northwest corner of Pike Street and First Avenue supplied beds on the American Plan for travelers and rooms for traveling hucksters. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

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Left of center - or right of the left border - the Hotel York shows why it was advertized as a "scenic hotel."  This pan - courtesy of Ron Edge, again - was taken in the late 1890s so all of what shows in the way of waterfront docks are short-lived contributions from the 1890s.  This includes the Ainsworth Pier at the foot of Pike Street.  It was replace ca. 1900 with the pier we have now, the one that anchors the Waterfront Park and is home to the aquarium.
Left of center – or right of the left border – the Hotel York shows why it was advertized as a “scenic hotel.” This pan – courtesy of Ron Edge, again – was taken in the late 1890s so all of what shows in the way of waterfront docks are short-lived contributions from the 1890s. This includes the Ainsworth Pier at the foot of Pike Street. It was replace ca. 1900 with the pier we have now, the one that anchors the Waterfront Park and is home to the aquarium.  [CKICK-CLICK]
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This 1907 look north up Pike Place must be considered the market classic.  The stalls are yet to be built, so most of the commerce is done from the farmer's wagons.  The Hotel York, victim of the railroad tunnel below it, has left a hole on the right - behind the billboards.  (Courtesy, Oregon Historical Society)
This 1907 look north up Pike Place must be considered the market classic. The stalls are yet to be built, so most of the commerce is done from the farmer’s wagons. The Hotel York, victim of the railroad tunnel below it, has left a hole on the right – behind the billboards. (Courtesy, Oregon Historical Society)
First appears in Pacific on April 25, 1982.
First appears in Pacific on April 25, 1982.  CLICK-CLICK

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First appeared in Pacific, May 24, 1987.
First appeared in Pacific, May 24, 1987. CLICK-CLICK

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First appeared in Pacific, June 3, 2007.
First appeared in Pacific, June 3, 2007.
The featured photo in the insertion just above was photographed from the Standard Furniture Co. building, which can be found in the accompanying 1904-5 Sanborn map on the west side of Western Avenue, second lot north of Pike Street.  Some of the "cheap cabins' sketched north of the furniture co. building match - with some imagination - the modest dwelling showing in the featured photo between Standard Furniture and the Seamen's Institute.
The featured photo in the insertion just above was photographed from the Standard Furniture Co. building, which can be found in the accompanying 1904-5 Sanborn map on the west side of Western Avenue, second lot north of Pike Street. Some of the “cheap cabins’ sketched north of the furniture co. building match – with some imagination – the modest dwelling showing in the featured photo between Standard Furniture and the Seamen’s Institute.  CLICK-CLICK
It should look familiar.  Western Avenue, and the Pike Street pedestrian crossing, 1975. [Photo by Frank Shaw]
It should look familiar. Western Avenue, and the Pike Street pedestrian crossing, 1975. [Photo by Frank Shaw]
Pike Place to the right and Western Ave. to the left of the parkets long shelter for its stalls. The Seamen's Hall is in the shadows far left, and the typical armory profile is center-horizon.  Compare to the 1912 Baist map directly below.
Pike Place to the right and Western Ave. to the left of the parkets long shelter for its stalls. The Seamen’s Hall is in the shadows far left, and the typical armory profile is center-horizon. Compare to the 1912 Baist map directly below.   CLICK-CLICK
A detail of the Pike Place Market neighborhood lifted from the 1912 Baist Map.  Note the furniture warehouse, bottom-center, from which the look up Western showing three photos of it was captured.
A detail of the Pike Place Market neighborhood lifted from the 1912 Baist Map. Note the furniture warehouse, bottom-center, from which the look up Western showing three (and five) photos of it was captured.
A portrait of the Seamen's Institute across Western Ave. from the Market.
A portrait of the Seamen’s Institute across Western Ave. from the Market.

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1903 excavation of the bluff below Virginia Street for the north rortal of the railroad tunnel.
1903 excavation of the bluff below Virginia Street for the north rortal of the railroad tunnel.
First appeared in Pacific January 30, 2000.
First appeared in Pacific January 30, 2000.
The tunnel's north portal ca. 1904, when still a work-in-progress.
The tunnel’s north portal ca. 1904, when still a work-in-progress.
Work at the north portal, ca. 1903-4.  The tunnel workers' dormitories are lined up above the opening.  Later the Municipal Market Building would nestle on that ledge.
Work at the north portal, ca. 1903-4. The tunnel workers’ dormitories are lined up above the opening. Later the Municipal Market Building would nestle on that ledge.

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First appeared in Pacific, May 6, 1990.
First appeared in Pacific, May 6, 1990.

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clip-pliny-Pike-Place-lk-s-fm-Virginian-nowWEB

First appeared in Pacific, August 17, 2003
First appeared in Pacific, August 17, 2003

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First appeared in Pacific, Nov. 17, 1991.
First appeared in Pacific, Nov. 17, 1991.