Category Archives: Seattle Now and Then

Seattle Now & Then: The Silvian Apartments

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THEN: An early portrait, circa 1911, of The Silvian Apartments, one of Capitol Hill’s abiding architectural jewels.  (Courtesy, Bill Burden)
THEN: An early portrait, circa 1911, of The Silvian Apartments, one of Capitol Hill’s abiding architectural jewels. (Courtesy, Bill Burden)
NOW: Now the beautiful brick apartment house, at the northwest corner of Harrison Street and 10th Avenue East, is home for low-income tenants with thirty-two affordable units.
NOW: Now the beautiful brick apartment house, at the northwest corner of Harrison Street and 10th Avenue East, is home for low-income tenants with thirty-two affordable units.
Evidence for my good intention to do a repeat for the Silvian as early as the 1980s.
Evidence for my good intention to do a now-and-then  for the Silvian as early as the 1980s.

Built in 1910, the Silvian has survived with its charms intact – most of them.  Sometime between ‘now and then,’ the graceful four-story apartment house lost its four projecting bays facing Harrison Street and the playful symmetry of its queenly cornice. The ‘then’ was most likely photographed in its first year when the apartment’s agent, John Davis & Co., listed it in this newspaper as “this new and strictly modern apartment building; every known convenience, rooms well arranged; select neighborhood; good car service; convenient to markets and stores.”  The “car” meant here is the trolley on Broadway, a half-block from the front door.  And the Silvian was also promoted as “within walking distance.” 

A TIMES classified for the nearly new Silvian from May 12, 1912.
A TIMES classified for the nearly new Silvian from May 12, 1912.
A detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map including here the red footprint for the brick Silvian Apartments.
A detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map including here the red footprint for the brick Silvian Apartments (near the center).  Note the Pilgrim Congregational Church on E. Republican, which can also be seen, in part, on the right of the featured “then” photo at the top.

The Times soon included a sizeable photograph of the Silvian as the newspaper’s forty-first example out of fifty selections of “Seattle’s Progress.” The text for this April 2, 1911, applause included a direct summary of the Silvian’s vital statistics.  “Recently completed on 10th Avenue and Harrison Street at a cost of $40,000, it occupies a ground space 56 x 96 feet in size, the lot being 60 by 100 feet . . . with a basement and twenty-eight apartments of two, three, four and five rooms.” 

A Times real estate promotion from April 2, 1911 featuring the Silvian as it 41st example
A Times real estate promotion from April 2, 1911 featuring the Silvian as it 41st example of 50 views revealing ” Seattle’s Progress.”    CLICK TO ENLARGE

Jacqueline Williams, author of “The Hill With A Future,” our best history of Capitol Hill, describes the Silvian as a “Very desirable place for people to live, with amenities that some smaller homes might lack.” As a testimony to its desirable qualities, G.W. Wallace, the building’s owner, lived there when it opened.  The Silvian also had a janitor (who perhaps also ran the building’s all night elevator service), public phones (probably in the lobby), rear entrances (historian Williams points out that such were useful for ice delivery), beds in the wall, and “many other attractive features.”  

A Seattle Times clipping from February 13, 1927, CLICK to ENLARGE for the text on the Silvian's sale for $85,000.
A Seattle Times clipping from February 13, 1927. CLICK to ENLARGE for the text on the Silvian’s sale for $85,000.

In 1927 the Silvian Apartments sold for $85,000, a sale illustrated by The Times with another photograph.  On September 8, 1929 – a few weeks before the Crash – a classified offered a “2-room attractive corner apartment; overstuffed (furniture), elevator, phone service for $40.  Just off Broadway.”  A decade later an “attractive” two-room apartment in the Silvian could be had for $22, a depression-era bargain.   

The Silvian's tax card for 1938.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue College branch)
The Silvian’s tax card for 1938. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue College branch) – CLICK TO ENLARGE

Today the Silvian is one of the many Seattle apartment houses owned and managed by Capitol Hill Housing, the organization that generates affordable housing, while also – and here the Silvian is an especially fine example – preserving neighborhood character. 

A TIMES Clip from March 6, 1960.   CLICK to ENLARGE
A TIMES Clip from March 6, 1960. CLICK to ENLARGE

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  SURELY Jean.   Ron Edge has pulled and put up ELEVEN past features, and they, as we know, are almost without excepted also holding other features and those features other features and so on and on.  Imagine what chains we might have in five years or ten – assuming a lot, like the blogs and our survival.  Ron’s last link below, which  when one opens it, has, I believe, the title “Street Photography,” begins with the snapshot of our friend Clay Eals’ mother walking on 4th Avenue a half block north of Pike Street, and ends with a few examples of the photographs I took in 1976-77 of the bus shelter at Marketime on Broadway and Republican.   I lived then in the second floor apartment of the corner structure showing immediately below, far-right in the photo with Pilgrim church and the road work on widening Broadway.

THEN:  Looking across Capitol Hill’s Broadway Avenue during its 1931adjustments. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: Both the grading on Belmont Avenue and the homes beside it are new in this “gift” to Capitol Hill taken from the family album of  Major John Millis. (Courtesy of the Major’s grandchild Walter Millis and his son, a Seattle musician, Robert Millis.)

THEN: We have by three years or four missed the centenary for this distinguished brick pile, the Littlefield Apartments on Capitol Hill.  (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

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THEN: The brand new N&K Packard dealership at Belmont and Pike in 1909.  Thanks to both antique car expert Fred Cruger for identifying as Packards the cars on show here, and to collector Ron Edge for finding them listed at this corner in a 1909 Post-Intelligencer. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)

Seattle Now & Then: Ye Olde Totem Place

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THEN: Totem Place, at 1750 Palm Ave. S.W., was home for Joseph Standley proprietor of Ye Old Curiosity Shop on Colman Dock. His death notice in The Seattle Times for Oct. 25, 1940 described the 86-year-old “Daddy” Standley as “almost as much a part of Seattle’s waterfront as the waves that dash again the seaweall.”
THEN: Totem Place, at 1750 Palm Ave. S.W., was home for Joseph Standley proprietor of Ye Old Curiosity Shop on Colman Dock. His death notice in The Seattle Times for Oct. 25, 1940 described the 86-year-old “Daddy” Standley as “almost as much a part of Seattle’s waterfront as the waves that dash against the seaweall.”
Joseph James, “Daddy” Standley’s grandson, will welcome visitors next Sunday to Totem Place for “If These Walls Could Talk” Southwest Seattle Histoircal Society’s popular yearly program of opening homes for inspection and story-telling.  The homes present owners Katy and Erik Walum will do some welcoming as well.
Joseph James, “Daddy” Standley’s grandson, will welcome visitors next Sunday to Totem Place for “If These Walls Could Talk” Southwest Seattle Histoircal Society’s popular yearly program of opening homes for inspection and story-telling. The homes present owners Katy and Erik Walum will do some welcoming as well.
A turned alternative photographed on the same sitting, it seems.
A turned alternative photographed AT the same sitting, it seems.

Here sits Joseph ”Daddy” Standley, one of the best-known self-promoters in Seattle history, relaxing in a real photo postcard beside his West Seattle home.  The caption pasted to the print on the right names the home Totem Place. The name also appears on the column to the left of the stairs decorated with potted plants and two large shells. 

Bill Speidel: reporter, promoter, publisher - before the Underground Tour.  (S. Times)
Bill Speidel: reporter, promoter, publisher – years before the Seattle Underground Tour. (S. Times)
A Presbyterian pastor and a Knights Templar too, ca. 1925.
A Presbyterian pastor and a Knights Templar too, ca. 1925
Ivar Haglund, the orientalist keeping cool.
Ivar Haglund, the orientalist keeping both clam and cool.
Daddy Standley standing with two of his totems and never once thinking "icons."
Daddy Standley standing with two of his totems and never once thinking “icons.”

Standley might be compared to three other local promotional players: Bill Speidel of the Underground Tours, Mark Mathews of First Presbyterian Church, and Ivar Haglund on Pier 54.  All were accomplished storytellers and created most of their own publicity, largely by making themselves the news.  “Daddy” Standley’s main stage, Ye Olde Curiosity Shop, was on the waterfront, where it remains in Ivar’s Pier 54 (soon to reopen, with a remodel and new seawall.)

On Colman Dock (Courtesy Waterfront Awareness)
On Colman Dock (Courtesy Waterfront Awareness)
Daddy Standley somewhat earlier, known as "Curio Joe."
Daddy Standley somewhat earlier, known as “Curio Joe.”

The curio merchant’s life-long passion for collecting aboriginal artifacts is testimony to the importance of children’s literature.  For having the “neatest desk” in his third grade class, young Joseph won a book about Indian life, lore, and crafts.  The tome enchanted him so that ultimately the youthful anthropologist, to quote his namesake grandson, Joseph James, “turned his hobby into his business.” 

I found this among prints left to me by an old friend, the sign painter Arthur Link Lingenbrink.  Link had other photos of his "girl friend" - some "figure studies included."  Here, accompanying Link on one of his celebrity searches, she posed with Daddy in the late 1930s.
I found this among prints left to me by an old friend, the sign painter Arthur Link Lingenbrink. Link had other photos of his “girl friend” – some arty figure studies included.  Here, accompanying Link on one of his celebrity searches, she posed with Daddy in the late 1930s outside his Shop.

In 1899, the 45-year-old curio collector arrived in Seattle from Colorado with his wife and four children. In Denver he had operated a grocery store, with as much shelf space given to collectibles as to fruits and vegetables.  After a few moves and name changes, Standley’s curious collections found a home on Colman Dock. In 1906 the family built a home in West Seattle on Duwamish Head with a clear view across Elliott Bay to Colman Dock with their shop, steamers and ferries. 

Daddy's grandson, Joseph James, posing at the former site of the  Shop's first home  on Madison Street, near Western Ave. (see below)
Daddy’s grandson, Joseph James, posing at the former site of the
Shop’s first home on Madison Street, near Western Ave. (see below)
The first location for Ye Old Curiosity, on Madison near Western, ca. 1899.  (Courtesy, the Shop and Joe James.)
The first location for Ye Old Curiosity, on Madison near Western, ca. 1899. (Courtesy, the Shop and Joe James.)

Joseph James has taken his grandfather’s place for Jean Sherrard’s repeat and also for the upkeep of Ye Old Curiosity Shop’s traditions, both commercial and cultural.  Joe grew up in Totem Place and remembers fondly how the house became a second museum for Standley’s collections.  Its wide lawn was a sanctuary for his second passion, gardening.  A sculpture garden for about fifteen large totem poles and a “six-foot high mound built with shells from the seven seas” were an attraction for both the children of the neighborhood and sight-seeing busses. 

The Rubydeaux, one of the attractions for his children and their friends, which Daddy built on the big lot of Totem Place.
The Rubydeaux, one of the attractions for his children and their friends, which Daddy built on the big lot of Totem Place.   The contemporary repeat (from 2006) is below.

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Next Sunday, June 28, Totem Place again becomes an attraction when the Southwest Seattle Historical Society assembles there its experts, exhibits – including “totems on loan” – for “Ye Olde Home of Joseph “Daddy” Standley. It is this year’s offering for the Society’s annual event, “If These Walls Could Talk.”  For details, call the Log House Museum at (206) 938-5293, or visit loghousemuseum.info.

We have superimposed Sylvester, one of the Shop s ancient stars,onto its stationary crom about 1940.  Note the list of services on the left.
We have superimposed Sylvester, one of the Shop’s ancient stars, onto Shop stationary from about 1940. Note the list of services/attractions on the left.   [CLICK to ENLARGE]
A wider view of Totem Place.  Although blasted by back light both Daddy Standley, near the center, and his tall sculpture made of shells, far right, are apparent.  (Courtesy John Cooper)
A wider view of Totem Place. Although blasted by back light both Daddy Standley, near the center, and his tall sculpture made of shells, far left, are apparent. (Courtesy John Cooper)

WEB EXTRAS

 Anything to add, boys (and that includes Clay Eals)?  BY GOLLY YES Jean, but not so timely, except if my excuse for being behind time might be found also in our subject: history.  No way that we can fill  in this blog by 3AM this Sunday morning.  I must  write the next Pacific feature for the Times by  then as well.  The research notes are abundant – too abundant, but what a delight to gather them.   So hopefully tomorrow I will return and add to this many neighborly features  that can be manufactured  with a little scanning of clips.

THEN: The Gatewood Craftsman Lodge was built on a road, in a neighborhood, and near a public school all named for the developer Carlisle Gatewood, who also lived in the neighborhood.  The three women posing in the third floor’s open windows are the Clark sisters, Jean, Dorothy and Peggy, members of the family that moved into the home in the late 1930s.

THEN: The Seattle Times in its lengthy coverage of the then new Seattle Steel in the paper’s Magazine Section for Sept. 10, 1905 – the year this photograph was recorded – noted that “the plant itself is a series of strong, substantial, cavernous sheds, built for use, not for beauty.”  (Courtesy, MOHAI, the Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: In 1852 many of Seattle’s first pioneers removed from Alki Point by dugout canoe for the deeper and safer harbor along the east shore of Elliott Bay (our central waterfront).  About a half-century later any hope or expectation that the few survivors among these pioneers could readily visit Alki Beach and Point by land were fulfilled with the timber quays and bridges along Spokane Street. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

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Scanned clips to follow – sooner than later, we hope.

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Seattle Now & Then: Sarah Baker’s Hotel

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THEN: A mix of workers, friends and guests pose together on the front porch of Sarah Frances Baker’s hotel at the northeast corner of Third Avenue and Marion Street in 1895.  Built ten years earlier by Martin and Elisabeth Stacy as their first mansion, the warring couple never lived in it.  Used in the early 1890s by the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, followed by Baker and her hotel, the Second Empire styled mansion’s last tenant was the Maison Blanc Restaurant, which was closed by fire in 1960.  (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: A mix of workers, friends and guests pose together on the front porch of Sarah Frances Baker’s hotel at the northeast corner of Third Avenue and Marion Street in 1895. Built ten years earlier by Martin and Elisabeth Stacy as their first mansion, the warring couple never lived in it. Used in the early 1890s by the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, followed by Baker and her hotel, the Second Empire styled mansion’s last tenant was the Maison Blanc Restaurant, which was closed by fire in 1960. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Employees of Northwest Bank stand in as contemporary posers for the spiffy group on the porch of the elegant hotel.
NOW: Employees of Northwest Bank stand in as contemporary posers for the spiffy group on the porch of the elegant hotel.

CAPTION-for-Stacy-Mansion-Hotel-June-25,-1895

A helpful caption pasted to the back of this pioneer print describes its subject as “workers and guests at hotel run by Mrs. Baker.”  Sarah Frances Baker sits near the scene’s center in a striped dress, holding a soft smile, (which is unusual for Victorian era photo posers, who were more often expressionless.)  By the authority of Clara Berg, the Collections Specialist for Costumes and Textiles at the Museum of History and Industry, “with its stripes and darker colors, Baker’s outstanding dress takes its cue from formal men’s wear,” although, she adds, “not from what these men are wearing on this occasion. Rather, they are dressed informally for the warmer season.” The caption agrees; the print is dated June 25, 1895.  Note that there are no stiff collars among them; they are all soft. And three of these men are topped with straw boaters, a jaunty hat fashion that was introduced about this time, and stayed popular well into the 1920s.

An early look to the northeast across the intersection of Marion and Third.  The First Presbyterian Church, at Madison, is on the far left.
An early look to the northeast across the intersection of Marion and Third. The First Presbyterian Church, at Madison, is on the far left.
The Stacy Mansion takes a quarter-block in this 1888 Sanborn map.  The Calvinists are on the left and the Methodists across Marion Street on the far right.
The Stacy Mansion takes a quarter-block in this 1888 Sanborn map. The Calvinists are on the left and the Methodists across Marion Street on the far right.
Looking south on Second Avenue through its intersection with Madison Street to the wooden row distinguished by the Presbyterians, the Stacy's and, one block south at Marion, the Methodists.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Looking south on Second Avenue through its intersection with Madison Street to the wooden row distinguished by the Presbyterians, the Stacy’s and, one block south at Marion, the Methodists. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
East along a planked Marion Street and thru its intersection with Third Avenue, with the Stacy Mansion on the left and the Methodists on the right, circa 1890.
East along a planked Marion Street and thru its intersection with Third Avenue, with the Stacy Mansion on the left and the Methodists on the right, circa 1891.

The quoted caption is a long one.  Besides the proprietor a few more of these posers are identified, some by role, like the dishwasher, far left, and a few by name, including William Talcott, the man top-center with a big moustache on a thin face.  With help from Ann Ferguson, the Curator of the Seattle Collections at the Seattle Public Library, we learn that in 1891 the then twenty-eight year old Talcott came to Seattle, hired as Chief Engineer for the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad.  In 1895 the Virginian was still with the SLSE, regularly riding the route that we know and enjoy now, in part, as the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail.

The Stacy mansion, ca. 1890.
The Stacy mansion, ca. 1890.

Sarah Baker rests her right hand on her married daughter Edith’s right shoulder, and the proprietor’s son-in-law, William Hickman Moore, stands on the left.  That he is holding or supporting the boy in stripes is evidence of the chumminess of this group.  The boy is not William and Edith’s only son.  Rather, their five-year-old son Vincent Moore is sitting under his firemen’s hat bottom-center, some distance from his parents.

The West Shore magazine's montage of four grand homes built locally in the 1880s.  Clockwise from upper-left they are the homes of Stacy, Yesler, Leary and McNaught.
The West Shore magazine’s montage of four grand homes built locally in the 1880s. Clockwise from upper-left they are the homes of Stacy, Yesler, Leary and McNaught.

CLIP-Church-Row-b-7-11-82a-WEB

First appeared in Pacific, December 16, 1984.
First appeared in Pacific, December 16, 1984. [CLICK to ENLARGE]

By 1921 Vincent would become Seattle City Light’s chief operating engineer for its Skagit River dam project. By then his father, William Hickman Moore, had already proved to be one of Seattle’s most steadfast politicians, first appointed to the King County Superior Court in 1897 and winning many elections as a state senator, city councilman, and between 1906 and 1908 as the mayor of Seattle.  For this last, Moore campaigned as an advocate of the public ownership of utilities.  With the split Republican Part fighting within itself, the progressive Democrat Moore won by a total of 15 votes.  A few months before his sudden death in March 1946 at the age of 84, the then Deputy Prosecutor for King County credited his enduring vitality to the maxim “Don’t worry and live long.”

A TIMES clip from May 24, 1945.
A TIMES clip from May 24, 1945.
From The Times, Jan. 9, 1916.
From The Times, Jan. 9, 1916.

Janitor-Protects-Mayor-ST-2-28-1907-grab-WEB

[A century ago and less some news reporting was open to friendly parody and both readers and editors encouraged it.  .
[A century ago and less some news reporting was open to friendly parody and both readers and editors encouraged it. .
WILLIAM HICKMAN MOORE DEATH & LECTURE NOTICES

A TIMES Clip from March 14, 1946.
A TIMES Clip from March 14, 1946.

 

A TIMES clip from Oct. 22, 1939.
A TIMES clip from Oct. 22, 1939.

THE SEATTLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE tenant in the STACY MANSION – Before SARAH BAKER and her HOTEL. 

[Please CLICK TWICE TO ENLARGE]

A clip from 1893
A clip from 1893 – CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Certainly Jean.  First within the five links that Ron Edge has pulled and placed directly below you will uncover more features from the neighborhood and or near it.   For instance, in the first link below we spy the Stacy Mansion on the far side of the construction pit made for the Central Building, which took the place – and more – of the First Methodist Church that used to rise from the southeast corner of Marion and Third, directly across Marion from the Stacy home and later Sarah Baker’s hotel.  The Edge link following that is another recent offering, one centering on a neighbor also form the mid-1880s, and showing a similar architectural urge.   Following that we’ll put up some more features, ones from the more distant Pacific past.   Those we will scan from their magazine clippings, as is our convenient way.

THEN: Looking north from Columbia Street over the construction pit for the Central Building.  On the left is a rough section of the Third Avenue Regrade in the spring of 1907.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)

THEN:

THEN:  Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards.  Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor.  (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

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First in Pacific, Dec. 16, 1984.
First in Pacific, Dec. 16, 1984.

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The Stacy mansion - as Maison Blanc Restaurant - after its 90 degree turn to face Marion Street.
The Stacy mansion – as the La Maison Blanc Restaurant – after its 90 degree turn to face Marion Street.

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First in Pacific, May 2, 2004
First in Pacific, May 2, 2004
Appeared first in The Times on May 11, 2003.
Appeared first in The Times on May 11, 2003.

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LA MAISON BLANC BEFORE & AFTER THE FIRST OF APRIL 30 FIRE, 1960.

Stacy-Mansion-as-Maison-Blanc-WEB

Maison-Blanc-after-fire,-May-1,-1960-WEB

Seattle Now & Then: Gethsemane Lutheran

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THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist.  (Courtesy, Swedish Club)
THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)
NOW: A cross high on the west façade of Gethsemane Lutheran Church’s new home, stands atop five floors of low-income housing and three for the church, including the Rainbow Chapel, the stained-glass lighted chapel at the corner.
NOW: A cross high on the west façade of Gethsemane Lutheran Church’s new home, stands atop five floors of low-income housing and three for the church, including the Rainbow Chapel, the stained-glass lighted chapel at the corner.

Now one hundred and thirty years old, the oldest Lutheran congregation in Seattle has moved only once, and that only eight blocks. It has, however, had four sanctuaries, and in Jean Sherrard’s kitty-corner recording we can see the latest of these with the first three floors serving the congregation and the top five affordable housing. Abutting to the south (right) is the surviving chancel of the third sanctuary, which was dedicated in 1954. The prospect looks east across the intersection of 9th Avenue and Stewart Street. 

Near the lower- left corner the first sanctuary of Swedish Lutheran sits two lots north of the northeast corner of Third Avenue and Pike Street.  The Territorial University sits on Denny Knoll, upper-left, and the extended ridge of Beacon Hill holds most of the horizon.
Near the lower- left corner the first sanctuary of Swedish Lutheran sits two lots north of the northeast corner of Third Avenue and Pike Street. The Territorial University sits on Denny Knoll, upper-left, and the extended ridge of Beacon Hill holds most of the horizon, ca. 1885.

The Swedish Lutherans dedicated their first church in 1885 on the east side of Third Avenue, one lot north of Pike Street.   It was the southern slope of Denny Hill and the neighborhood was then decidedly residential. By 1901, when the congregation moved those eight blocks to this corner, their first location was rapidly turning commercial, and the sale of that property helped finance the changes.

Gethsemane Lutheran on June 4, 1933.
Gethsemane Lutheran on June 4, 1933.

With its first and only move the church avoided the many years of confusion wrought by the Denny Hill Regrade. It did not, however, escape the regrading of Stewart Street. In 1910 the city instructed the church to lower their Gothic sanctuary fourteen feet.  The results of that cutting are shown here (in the featured photo at the top) on both the far right, with an exposed hill, and far left, with the long steep stairway to the front door of the church’s parsonage, home of its then pastor, Martin L. Larson. 

A Times clip from June 8, 1907.
A Times clip from June 8, 1907.

The Steward Street regrade put the growing congregation more emphatically “on the map” when the improved Stewart was linked to Eastlake Avenue, making a joined arterial that was one of the city’s primary routes to the north.  (On a 1916 map of the city’s auto routes, both Stewart and Eastlake are emphasized with a widened dark line and bold lettering.)  The building in 1927 of the city’s Central Stage Terminal (Greyhound Depot), across 9th Avenue from the church, also emphasized the centrality of Gethsemane’s location.  [See the links below and Jean’s added photos there as well for photographs and stories featuring the depot.]

Detail from a 1916 Seattle map.
Detail from a 1916 Seattle map.
A Seattle Times clipping from Oct. 26, 1935 describing Gethsemane's golden anniversary.
A Seattle Times clipping from Oct. 26, 1935 describing Gethsemane’s golden anniversary with a little pastoral counseling to the side.  CLICK TWICE to ENLARGE!

 The 1921 dedication of Gethsemane’s Lutheran Hospice for Girls on Capitol Hill prefigured Mary’s Place, the day shelter for women and children that are also tenants of the new sanctuary. Other “open and affirming” Gethsemane services include the meals programs of Hope Center,   

From May 1, 1928
From May 1, 1928
The Sundsten Trio
The Sundsten Trio
A Seattle Times clip from Nov. 13, 1932, which names the members of the family trio. (Courtesy, John Sundsten)
A Seattle Times clip from Nov. 13, 1932, which names the members of the family trio. (Courtesy, John Sundsten)

The featured photograph of Gethsemane’s second sanctuary at the top was copied from an album of photos taken by Klaes Lindquist, and shared with us by the Swedish Club. It dates from about 1920, a year in which the city directory lists twenty-two Lutheran churches, six of them in Ballard and five, including Gethsemane, here in the greater and then quite Scandi-Cascade Neighborhood.  

Cover to the congregation's centennial histoy.
Cover to the congregation’s centennial history.

WEB EXTRAS

Let me add a few snaps here which illustrate a few of the vast changes underway around 9th and Stewart:

Gethsemane Lutheran on the distant right looking down the 9th Avenue canyon.
Gethsemane Lutheran on the distant left looking down the 9th Avenue canyon.
Jesus of the downtown corridor
Jesus of the downtown corridor
Funny story: about 10 years ago, before its newest structure, Gethsemane Lutheran's statue of Jesus was made of crumbling concrete. My son Noel and his cousin Kalan were climbing around the statue and broke off Jesus's finger! After confessing to the church secretary, they glued it back on with eternal epoxy...
Funny story: about 10 years ago, before its newest structural incarnation, Gethsemane Lutheran’s statue of Jesus was made of crumbling concrete. My son Noel and his cousin Kalan, not numbered amongst the faithful, were clambering around the statue and accidentally broke off Jesus’s finger! After confessing to the church secretary, they glued it back on with eternal epoxy…
Farewell to the Stewart Street Grayhound Station - soon to be replaced with canyon walls.
Farewell to the Stewart Street Greyhound Station – soon to be replaced with canyon walls.
The last 'Bus'
The last ‘Bus’

Anything to add, boys?   Certainly.  More links from Ron Edge and pixs and clips from our robust archives, and all in sympathy to this week’s primary subjects:  Swedes (some of them Lutherans), and this interstitial neighborhood on the fringe of downtown.   First, eleven links to past features, which will include their own links and those theirs . . .  [Nifty “now” Jean.]

THEN: The scene looks north through a skyline of steeples toward the Cascade neighborhood and Lake Union, ca. 1923.

THEN: The home at bottom right looks across Madison Street (out of frame) to Central School. The cleared intersection of Spring Street and Seventh Avenue shows on the right.

THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898.   Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Werner Lenggenhager's recording of the old St. Vinnie's on Lake Union's southwest shore in the 1950s should remind a few readers of the joys that once were theirs while searching and picking in that exceedingly irregular place.

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

5th-ave-car-barns-then-mr

THEN:  Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards.  Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor.  (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN:  This detail from the prolific local photographer Asahel Curtis’s photograph of the Smith/Rininger home at the northwest corner of Columbia Street and Summit Avenue dates from the early twentieth century when motorcars, rolling or parked, were still very rare on the streets of Seattle, including these on First Hill.  (Courtesy, Historic Seattle)

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FOLLOWS – A FEW PAST FEATURES SCANNED FROM CLIPPINGS

First appeared in Pacific, April 12, 1987.
First appeared in Pacific, April 12, 1987.

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Looking east up Stewart and Olive from the New Washington Hotel at 2nd and Steward, ca. 1909.   Gethsemane Lutheran can be found left-of-center.
Looking east up Stewart and Olive from the New Washington Hotel at 2nd and Steward, ca. 1909. Gethsemane Lutheran, washed in white, can be found left-of-center.
First appeared in Pacific, March 24, 1985 - gosh thirty years ago!
First appeared in Pacific, March 24, 1985 – gosh thirty years ago!  Click to Enlarge.  Note that Gethsemane can be found here as well, but no Westlake as yet cutting through the grid.

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Another of other depot.  This first appeared in Pacific on July 30, 1998.  Rail fans will find Warren Wing posing in the "now."
Another of the depot. This first appeared in Pacific on July 30, 1998. Rail fans will find Warren Wing posing in the “now.”

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CONCLUDING WITH MORE LUTHERANS – German ones.

Appeared in Pacific on August 21, 1994.
Zion and Gethsemane, back-to-back.  Appeared in Pacific on August 21, 1994.

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Seattle Now & Then: Norway Hall

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day.  (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)
THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)
NOW: Since the Sons and Daughters moved on to larger clubhouses, their first Norway Hall has given shelter to the Painter’s Union and dance clubs, including the City Beat Disco in the 1980s and the Timberline in the 1990s, and now as Cornish School’s Raisbeck Hall.
NOW: Since the Sons and Daughters moved on to larger clubhouses, their first Norway Hall has given shelter to the Painter’s Union and dance clubs, including the City Beat Disco in the 1980s and the Timberline in the 1990s, and now as Cornish School’s Raisbeck Hall.

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Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI
Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI
Daughters of Norway at Norway all with some Sons or suitors in suits or uniforms.
Daughters of Norway at Norway Hall with some Sons or suitors in suits or uniforms.

Once upon a time dragons wagged their long tongues from open jaws on the roof of Norway Hall in Seattle’s Cascade Neighborhood.  The hall’s sponsors, the Daughters and Sons of Norway, respectively the Valkyrien and Leif Erikson Lodges, dedicated their new hall in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Constitution Day.  

Dennis Andersen, one of our distinguished historians of Northwest architecture, and himself of Norwegian descent, notes that the hall’s architect, the native Norwegian Englehart Sonnichsen, “knew the revival modes of his country very well.” Andersen continues, “In the 1880s and 1890s, as Norway was working toward independence from Sweden, art and architecture trends lifted up traditional folk art forms — some of it rather fanciful.  The dragon-shaped eaves of Sonnichsen’s Norway Hall recall this so-called ‘dragon style’ (dragestil).  It was commonly used on resort hotels, pavilions, and restaurants.”  (And, Andersen notes, on the Andersen family silver.)

For example, on a visit to Norway Christine Anderson photographed an example of traditional stave construction, above.  Below, she has complimented (or repeated) the old with the "new" from 1915.
For example, on a visit to Norway Christine Anderson photographed the traditional stave construction, above. Below, she has complimented (or repeated) the old with the “new” from 1915.
Norway Hall now, a detail photographed by Christine Anderson, Historian for the Leif Erikson Lodge 2-001, Sons of Norway.
Norway Hall now, a detail photographed by Christine Anderson, Historian for the Leif Erikson Lodge 2-001, Sons of Norway.

Here (at the top) on an early photograph of the hall, an unnamed retouch artist has enhanced its surrounds with lawns sown with grass in place of a clutter of other structures (aside from the roof of a modest home across Denny Way behind the trees on the far right). The national flags of Norway and the United States have been rendered to flutter artfully, lifted by a southeasterly breeze.  The painted stones beside the sidewalk, far left, resemble stacks of Norwegian rye bread more than river rocks. 

Although the timing for this portrait of Norway Hall must be estimated from the motorcar park in front of it, in 1915 the hall's location was already surrounded by a developed Cascade Neighborhood, like this one.
Although the timing for this portrait of Norway Hall may be estimated from the motorcar park in front of it – perhaps in the 1920s -, in 1915 the hall’s location was already surrounded by a developed Cascade Neighborhood, like this one.

The architect’s brother, Yngvar, adorned the interior of Norway Hall with murals depicting several sagas of Norse history, including the discovery of Vinland – North America – by the lodge’s namesake, Leif Erikson, nearly 500 years before Christopher Columbus reached The Bahamas.  The U.S. Postal System agreed, issuing a six-cent stamp in 1968, commemorating the Icelandic explorer’s Newfoundland (it is thought) landing.    

While we hope to include the enduring murals as an addendum to this blog, here is one of the "missing murals," also on Norwegian subjects and styles.  Here the artist had leaned his work again the outside wall of, perhaps, his studio for a recording before delivering the mural to the hall.  If he did.  These "missing murals" are also, it seems, mysterious.
While we hope to include later the moved and yet  enduring murals as an addendum to this blog, here is one of the “missing murals,” also on Norwegian subjects and styles. Here the artist leaned his work against the outside wall of, perhaps, his studio for a recording before delivering the art to the hall. If he did. These “missing murals” are also, it seems, mysterious.
Another of the missing murals.
Another of the missing murals.
And another with the same temporary supporting wall.
And another with the same temporary supporting wall.
May these have been for another hall?
We wonder, may these have been for another hall?

Today at 2015 Boren Avenue the Norwegians and their dragons are long gone.  After selling their hall in the late 1940s, the growing Sons and Daughters twice moved to new quarters, first to Lower Queen Anne in 1951 and later in 1986 to Ballard, both times carrying their murals with them.  In the early 1970s the old Norway Hall barely

A TIMES clipping from Nov. 12, 1972 most likely helped save the Hall.
This TIMES clipping from Nov. 12, 1972 most likely helped save the Hall. (Click to ENLARGE)

escaped being razed by a developer, who explained “there is pressure for more parking in the area.”  It was saved, however, and is now Raisbeck Hall, the performing arts venue on Cornish School of the Arts’ main campus.

CLICK TO ENLARGE
CLICK TO ENLARGE

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ABOVE AND BELOW: complimenting clippings from the Oct. 19, 1975 issue of The Seattle Times.
ABOVE:  complimenting clippings from the Oct. 19, 1975 issue of The Seattle Times.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

WEB EXTRAS

Noe å legge til, gutter ? (Anything to add, boys?)

Ja Jean. Med hjelp igjen (og igjen) fra Ron Edge og mer hjelp fra Christine Anderson, historiker for Leiv Eiriksson Lodge 2-001, Sønner av Norge, og også fra Fred Poyner IV, samlinger manager på Nordic Heritage Museum. Vi har lagt ved et par linker og tidligere funksjoner som liksom er knyttet til kjennetegnet Norge Hus første dedikerte i Seattles Cascade Neighborhood 100 år siden, noe som sikkert har noe å gjøre med at vi viser det seg nå. Vi kaster også i noen dansker, men ingen svensker, med vilje. Vi lagrer dem til senere. Vi må også takke Google Translate, for selv om både du og jeg er velfylt med Scandi-gener, verken vi lese eller snakke norsk til godt. Vel, du kan bli med igjen, “Snakk for deg selv Paul.” La de som er kjent med norsk dommer kapasiteten til Googles innsats.

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Yes Jean. With help again (and again) from Ron Edge and more help from Christine Anderson, historian for Leif Erikson Lodge 2-001, Sons of Norway, and also from Fred Poyner IV, Collections manager at the Nordic Heritage Museum.   We have attached a few links and past features that somehow relate to the featured Norway House first dedicated in Seattle’s Cascade Neighborhood 100 years ago, which surely has something to do with why we are showing it off now.   We also throw in a few Danes but no Swedes, intentionally. We are saving them for later. We also need to thank Google Translate, for although both you, Jean,  and I are well-stocked with Scandi-genes, we neither read nor speak Norwegian so well.  You might rejoin, “Speak for yourself Paul.” Let those familiar with Norwegian judge the capacities of Google’s efforts.

THEN:  Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill.  Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner.  (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

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Then: Photographed from an upper story of the Ford Factory at Fairview Avenue and Valley Street, the evidence of Seattle's explosive boom years can be seen on every shore of Lake Union, ca. 1920. Courtesy of MOHAI

THEN: The scene looks north through a skyline of steeples toward the Cascade neighborhood and Lake Union, ca. 1923.

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First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 11, 1988.
First appeared in Pacific, Sept. 11, 1988. CLICK TO ENLARGE

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FIRST  appeared in Pacific on May 26, 1991.
FIRST appeared in Pacific on May 26, 1991.
Lawton Gowey took this sometime in the 1970s - or I did.  I don't know for sure.  I remember a new paint job on the nine domes and the rest when I lived in the neighborhood in 1977 to 1980.
Lawton Gowey took this sometime in the 1970s – or I did. I don’t know for sure. I remember a new paint job on the nine domes and the rest when I lived in the neighborhood in 1977 to 1980.

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CAPITOL HILL & The CASCADE PLATEAU from  DENNY HILL

Courtesy, Lawton Gowey, who did not record it, but collected it.
Courtesy, Lawton Gowey, who did not record it, but collected it.
N.P.Railroad photographer, Jay Haynes look northeast from Denny Hill to Capitol Hill with the Cascade Neighborhood plateau below it.   Lenora Street descends on the left from Denny Way.   A decade later Norway Hall was built near where the larger home stands to the right of the pump house.
N.P.Railroad photographer, Jay Haynes looks northeast from Denny Hill to Capitol Hill with the Cascade Neighborhood plateau below it. Lenora Street descends on the left from Denny Way. A decade later Norway Hall was built near where the larger home stands to the right of the pump house.
Another pan from Denny Hill to the northeast.  Stewart Street is on the right and Fourth Avenue at the bottom of the frame.   Lenora Street can be found in this A. Curtis shot as well.  It is left of center, again heading down the hill from the Cascade Plateau to Terry Avenue.   Wallingford is on the far left horizon. (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
Another pan from Denny Hill to the northeast. Stewart Street is on the right and Fourth Avenue at the bottom of the frame. Lenora Street can be found in this A. Curtis shot as well. It is left of center, again heading down the hill from the Cascade Plateau to Terry Avenue. Wallingford is on the far left horizon. (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
The dark cedar roof of Norway Hall can be found here very near the center of this ca. 1940 aerial. (We have cropped  it to put it there.)  Westlake is on the left and Fairview, also heading north to the north shore of Lake Union, is right-of-center.
The dark cedar roof of Norway Hall can be found very near the center of this ca. 1940 aerial. (We have cropped it to put it there.) Westlake is on the left and Fairview, also heading north to the north shore of Lake Union, is right-of-center.  Thanks to Ron Edge and his collection of aerials for this one.

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Finally, for now, Whitewalls somewhere in the Cascade Neighborhood, ca. 1950.  (Courtesy, University of Washington Architectural Library)
Finally, for now, Whitewalls somewhere in the Cascade Neighborhood, ca. 1950. (Courtesy, University of Washington Architectural Library)

Seattle Now & Then: The Louch Grocery on First Avenue

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Charles Louch’s grocery on First Avenue, north of Union Street, opened in the mid-1880s and soon prospered.  It is possible – perhaps probable – that one of the six characters posing here is Louch – more likely one of the two suited ones on the right than the aproned workers on the left.  (Courtesy RON EDGE)
THEN: Charles Louch’s grocery on First Avenue, north of Union Street, opened in the mid-1880s and soon prospered. It is possible – perhaps probable – that one of the six characters posing here is Louch – more likely one of the two suited ones on the right than the aproned workers on the left. (Courtesy RON EDGE)
NOW: The sidewalk sites of Charles Louch’s storefronts are now held by tenants of the Harold Poll building, which was built in 1910 as the Hancock Building.
NOW: The sidewalk sites of Charles Louch’s storefronts are now held by tenants of the Harold Poll building, which was built in 1910 as the Hancock Building.

Englishman Charles Louch first crossed the Seattle waterfront, it seems, in 1885, and for many reasons, including the “bag of money” he reportedly carried, prospered and stayed for eighteen years.  He returned to England in 1903 with enough American assets to purchase an estate near Southhampton, which he shared with his two single sisters. 

A look directly across Front Street (First Ave.) and the Front Street tracks.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)
A look directly across Front Street (First Ave.) and the Front Street tracks. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
The Louch offerings seen from the front door.  (Courtesy MOHAI)
The Louch offerings seen from the front door. (Courtesy MOHAI)

Louch first opened a stand for “fancy fruits” on the east side of Front Street (First Avenue) but soon expanded his fare to the “cigars, tobacco, groceries and provisions” that are indicated on the sign above his front door located on the third lot north of Union Street. It is these “groceries and provisions” that are first noted in the 1885-86 Polk City Directory, where Louch is listed as one of twenty-two Seattle grocers. 

In the Polk’s citizen section, Louch is recorded as living at the same address, almost surely in the back of the store.  Based on the evidence provided by the 1888 Sanborn real estate map, Louch later installed both a “Sausage Room” and a “Smoke House” in his former living quarters.  Louch’s ‘1888 Brand’ smoked hams were a long-time favorite and not just locally.  During the Alaska Gold Rush, beginning in the late 1890s, many of the hams were shipped north. 

A rare look at the waterfront ca. 1897 with the Hotel York escaping the horizon on the right, at the northwest corner of Pike and Front/First Ave.   The Augustine
A rare look at the waterfront ca. 1897 with the Hotel York escaping the horizon on the right, at the northwest corner of Pike and Front/First Ave. The Louch Augustine & Company waterfront warehouse is on the left.   Pike Street climbs the hill as an irregular path.   (Courtesy Ron Edge) CLICK TO ENLARGE

In 1888 Louch began promoting his hams by distributing to his customers a mounted photograph of his store, as seen from an upper window of a nearby building at Front and Pike.  This second photo featured a panorama of Seattle rising above a roof top  sign reading “Chas Louch” and running at a right angle to Front Street.  Set on the crest of the roof, the corner of that sign is barely seen here above the “cigars and tobacco” sign that faces the street. 

The store's larger rooftop sign and much of the First Hill horizon from a prospect south of Pike and overlooking Front Street in 1888-9.
The store’s larger rooftop sign and much of the First Hill horizon from a prospect south of Pike and overlooking Front Street in 1888-9.  Rolland Denny’s home is at the northeast corner of Front and Union, lower-right.   This first appeared in Pacific on Oct. 4, 1987 and was later included in one of the three “Seattle Now and Then” books, all of them collections of the features.
The Louch credit can be carefully read in the sign above the ham-burdened wagon.  The original print was poorly fixed.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)
The Louch credit can be carefully read in the sign above the ham-burdened wagon.  The Louch wagon is either in a local parade or making a very big delivery of 1888 hams.  Someday some bright young scholar will figure out what corner this is.  The original print was poorly fixed. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

The city’s great fire of 1889 was also good to Louch and his hams and sausages.   As the fire moved north up the waterfront and Front Street it was stopped less than two blocks south of Louch’s grocery.  About one-half of the 36 groceries listed in the year’s city directory we consumed. Also in 1889 Louch moved into a mansion-sized Beacon Hill home he had built on Othello Avenue overlooking Rainier Valley. 

The Colman building at the southwest corner of Marion and Columbia with the Augustine and Kyer storefront near the middle  of the block and the store's delivery buggies posing in front.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)
The Colman building at the southwest corner of Marion and Columbia with the Augustine and Kyer storefront near the middle of the block and the store’s delivery buggies posing in front. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
The Colman Bldg first appear in Pacific on March 1, 1987.
The Colman Bldg first appear in Pacific on March 1, 1987.  CLICK TO ENLARGE & READ

After partnering in 1889 with M.B. Augustine, a traveling food salesman from Nevada, the ambitious pair moved into the much grander post-fire quarters of the Colman Building, (still at First Avenue and Columbia Street.)  There they became famous for their “upscale” specialty foods and the dozen wagons needed to make free deliveries throughout the city.  After Louch returned to England, Augustine took on a new partner and the company was renamed Augustine and Kyer.  It grew to five locations, with the last one, in the University District, holding on through the Great Depression of the 1930s.    

Christmas inside Augustine & Kyer.  (Courtesy MOHAI)
Christmas inside Augustine & Kyer. (Courtesy MOHAI)
Care for a cookie from Augustine and Kyle's formidable display topped by a happy boy and a happy girl.  (Courtesy MOHAI)
Care for a cookie from Augustine and Kyle’s formidable display topped by a happy boy and a happy girl? (Courtesy MOHAI)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, boys?  Yes Jean, more of the neighborhood and also a look up Front Street from Pioneer Square, which is the second Edge-Link that Ron has put in place immediately below.   After Ron’s links we’ll pull a few clips from past “now and then” features.  They are also from the neighborhood.  Well Jean, you know this well, for this week it was you who did the scanning of the clips having nearly completed your inventory of all 1700-plus features on the way to publishing later this year another collection – which might even be permitted the cheesy title “100 Best.”

THEN: The driver, lower left, leads his team towards First Avenue up a planked incline on Madison Street.  (Courtesy MOHAI)

Then: Looking north from Pioneer Place (square) into the uptown of what was easily the largest town in Washington Territory. This is judged by the 3218 votes cast in the November election of 1884, about one fourth of them by the newly but temporarily enfranchised women.Tacoma, in spite of being then into its second year as the terminus for the transcontinental Northern Pacific Railroad, cast 1663 votes, which took third place behind Walla Walla's 1950 registered votes.

THEN: During the few years of the Klondike Gold Rush, the streets of Seattle’s business district were crowded with outfitters selling well-packed foods and gear to thousands of traveling men heading north to strike it rich – they imagined.  (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The ruins left by Seattle’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, included a large neighborhood of warehouses and factories built on timber quays over the tides.  Following the fire the quays were soon restored with new capping and planking.  A close look on the far-right will reveal some of this construction on the quays underway.  (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building.  (Photo by Frank Shaw)

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The home next door to the south, the Rolland Denny home at the northeast corner of First and Union.  First appeared in Pacific December 30, 2001.
The home next door to the south, the Rolland Denny home at the northeast corner of First and Union. First appeared in Pacific December 30, 2001.

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Across Union Street from Rolland, his parents, Arthur and Mary Denny's home at the southeast corner of Front (First) and Union.
Across Union Street from Rolland, his parents, Arthur and Mary Denny’s home at the southeast corner of Front (First) and Union.

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Looking north on First across Union Street,
Looking north on First across Union Street,  The Rolland Denny home is behind the stylish couple and the Louch storefront up the way.  First appeared in Pacific, April 18, 1993.

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 First appeared in Pacific, March 13, 2005.
Princess Angeline resting and/or posing on the boardwalk west of Front and Pike.  First appeared in Pacific, March 13, 2005.

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EIGHT PAGES from the AUGUSTINE & KYER BULLETIN, from 1912.  click to enlarge

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Seattle Now & Then: The Sinking Ship

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN:  In Lawton Gowey’s 1961 pairing, the Smith Tower (1914) was the tallest building in Seattle, and the Pioneer Square landmark Seattle Hotel (1890) had lost most of its top floor.  (by Lawton Gowey)
THEN: In Lawton Gowey’s 1961 pairing, the Smith Tower (1914) was the tallest building in Seattle, and the Pioneer Square landmark Seattle Hotel (1890) had lost most of its top floor. (by Lawton Gowey)
NOW:  The mockingly named “Sinking Ship Garage” replaced the ornate brick Seattle Hotel with a concrete garage capped by a railing of bent pipes that resemble a row of basket handles.
NOW: The mockingly named “Sinking Ship Garage” replaced the ornate brick Seattle Hotel with a concrete garage capped by a railing of bent pipes that resemble a row of basket handles.

Lawton Gowey was a regular visitor to the demolition scene of the Seattle Hotel. His collection of Kodachrome slides records nearly the entire process of the destruction of the 1890 landmark. Gowey dated this slide June 8, 1961. The demolition work began with the interior on the third of April, and here, two months later, most of the top floor is gone.

Rubble dropped from the roof of the Seattle Hotel during the 1949 earthquake.  (Courtesy, Seattle Post-Intelligencer)
Rubble dropped from the roof of the Seattle Hotel during the 1949 earthquake. (Courtesy, Seattle Post-Intelligencer)

The removal of the ornate cornice at the top of the five and one-half story landmark got an early start with the city’s 1949 earthquake. For safety, and probably for economy too, much of it was removed following the quake. Still, the hotel stayed opened until the spring of 1960, when its closure was announced. It was widely assumed that it would soon be razed – not renovated. The same was expected for its then still on the skids Pioneer Square, the city’s most historic neighborhood.

When new in 1890  the future Occidental and finally Seattle Hotel was named the Collins Building for its owner.    Here James Street is to the left and Mill Street (Yesler Way) to the right.
When new in 1890 the future Occidental and finally Seattle Hotel was named the Collins Building for its owner. Here, and in the four photos below,  James Street is to the left and Mill Street (Yesler Way) to the right.

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Lawton Gowey's record of the garage and a few of its neighbors on March 20, 1974.
Lawton Gowey’s record of the garage and a few of its neighbors on March 20, 1974.

Citizen response, however, was surprising. In an attempt to save the hotel, a local cadre of preservationists quickly formed. Although that battle was lost, the enthusiasts for local heritage won the war by saving the neighborhood. The city’s new Department of Community Development, the DCD, formed the Pioneer Square Historic District in 1970.

The Logan Building at the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and Union Street.
The Logan Building at the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and Union Street.  Seattle’s first Glass Curtain modern.
A model for a National Bank of Commerce designed by Mandeville and Berge, architects for the "Sinking Ship Garage."
A model for a National Bank of Commerce designed by Mandeville and Berge, architects for the “Sinking Ship Garage.”  Pulled from the Seattle Times for Feb. 26, 1967.

By this time the four-floor parking lot that was built on the hotel’s flatiron footprint was commonly called the “Sinking Ship Garage.” It is still one of our best local jokes. The garage’s architect-engineers, Gilbert Mandeville and Gudmund Berge, were fresh off their 1959 success as local consultants for the Logan Building at Fifth Avenue and Union Street, the city’s first glass curtain box. Here, in Pioneer Square, they added what they and its owners considered a compliment to the historic neighborhood: a basket-handle shaped railing made of pipe, a kind of undulating cornice, that ran along the top of the concrete garage.

The garage's basket handles aligned with those on the Interurban Building at the southeast corner of Yesler Way and Occidental Avenue.
The garage’s basket handles aligned with those on the Interurban Building at the southeast corner of Yesler Way and Occidental Avenue.
Two more sympathies for the bent pipes on top of the Sinking Ship: the windows in the Mutual Life Building, left-center, and the Pioneer Building, upper -right.  Courtesy Lawton Gowey, April 21, 1976
Two more sympathies for the bent pipes on top of the Sinking Ship: the windows in the Mutual Life Building, left-center, and the Pioneer Building, upper -right. Courtesy Lawton Gowey, April 21, 1976

Lawton Gowey loved the Smith Tower. His juxtaposition of the well-wrought tower, the injured hotel, and the wrecker’s crane is at once elegant and ambivalent.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Golly Jean, yes.  Ron Edge has put up two links to past features.  Both are rich with references to this triangle.  Following that are few more relevant clips cut from past Pacifics.

THEN: Seen here in 1887 through the intersection of Second Avenue and Yesler Way, the Occidental Hotel was then easily the most distinguished in Seattle.  (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Local candy-maker A.W. Piper was celebrated here for his crème cakes and wedding cakes and also his cartoons.  This sketch is of the 1882 lynching from the Maple trees beside Henry and Sara Yesler’s home on James Street.  Piper’s bakery was nearby (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

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Appeared first in Pacific for Sept. 26, 1982
Appeared first in Pacific for Sept. 26, 1982  [Click TWICE to ENLARGE]
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Appeared in Pacific first on November 20, 1983.
Appeared in Pacific first on November 20, 1983.  [Click TWICE  to enlarge]
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First appeared in Pacific on July 13, 1986.
First appeared in Pacific on July 13, 1986.

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Appeared first as a Historylink demonstration in Pacific on July 19, 1998.  I will add that the founding of Historylink still feels novel to me, and the notion or evidence again that we first did all that in the late 1990s has an uncanny edge for me.  And nostalgic.
Appeared first as a Historylink demonstration in Pacific on July 19, 1998. I will add that the founding of Historylink still feels novel, and the notion or evidence again that we first started all that in the late 1990s has an uncanny edge for me. And nostalgic.  [Click twice to enlarge]
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First appeared in Pacific, Oct. 31, 1999
First appeared in Pacific, Oct. 31, 1999

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First appeared in Pacific, June 6, 2004
First appeared in Pacific, June 6, 2004

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Circa 1984, looking west from near Second Ave. along the south facade of the Pioneer Square Garage, AKA the "Sinking Ship."  That's all folks!
Circa 1984, looking west from near Second Ave. along the south facade of the Pioneer Square Garage, AKA the “Sinking Ship.” That’s all folks!