Category Archives: Seattle Now and Then

Seattle Now & Then: The Littlefield Apartments

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THEN: We have by three years or four missed the centenary for this distinguished brick pile, the Littlefield Apartments on Capitol Hill.  (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
THEN: We have by three years or four missed the centenary for this distinguished brick pile, the Littlefield Apartments on Capitol Hill. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
NOW: While preparing this Sunday’s feature, Jean and I wondered aloud if our shared affection for Seattle’s stock of surviving apartment houses - or “shared walls” to quote from the title again of Diana James’ history of local apartments – may find some of our readers wishing for more sensational subjects like trolley crashes and criminals brought to justice.  Please let us know.  We read all letters.  Use, if you will, the blog pauldorpat.com.
NOW: While preparing this Sunday’s feature, Jean and I wondered aloud if our shared affection for Seattle’s stock of surviving apartment houses – or “shared walls” to quote from the title again of Diana James’ history of local apartments – may find some of our readers wishing for more sensational subjects like trolley crashes and criminals brought to justice. Please let us know. We read all comments. Use, if you will, the blog pauldorpat.com.

The Capitol Hill neighborhood landmark, the Littlefield Apartments at the corner of 19th Avenue East and East John Street was timed as 58 years-old in a Times story about its 1968 sale to Arthur Kneifel.  For his $120,000 Kneifel got a classic brick apartment house with twenty-eight units.  Less than a year later, Kneifel got his cash back and $38,000 more when he sold the Littlefield to B. A. Nuetzmann.

Through the Littlefield’s early years of enticing renters, its classifieds in The Times used many of the stock descriptions for such a distinguished residence.  When West and Wheeler, one of the real estate gorillas of the time, announced in 1916 that “this pleasantly located, new brick veneer building has just been placed in our charge,” the unfurnished two-and three-room apartments rented for $18 to $27.50 a month. And in 1916 it was possible to see some light because of the neighborhood’s turn-of-the-century clear-cutting. One could then still rent a Littlefield unit with a “view of Lake Washington,” a gift from the sawyers.

Through the 1920s, West and Wheeler described this property as “quiet and homelike,” “beautifully furnished,” in “perfect condition,” “modern,” and “reasonable” to rent.  In the mid-20s the realtors promoted “overstuffed furniture” with coil springs in the apartment’s furnished flats.  In late 1931 a modern and “completely refinished” 3-room front corner apartment was offered for $37 a month.  It was a depression-time bargain – for the still employed.

The Littlefield’s more steadfast residents aged with it, and increasingly following World War Two. their names started appearing in The Times death notices.  For instance, on May 6, 1947, the Times noted that Mrs. Laura Price, 86 years old and a member of First Baptist Church, had died. Four years later Littlefield residents Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Leighton celebrated their golden wedding anniversary.

The Littlefield, of course, had its run of managers.  Perhaps the most unlucky among them was Robert Milender.  Twice in 1972 – in June and in July – visitors on the pretense of wanting to rent a unit, instead robbed and pummeled Milender in the manager’s, his own, apartment.

The heart of Capitol Hill looking north from on high on April 7, 1946, but without the Littlefield, which is out-of-frame to the right.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
[Double Click to Enlarge]  The heart of Capitol Hill looking north from on high on April 7, 1946, but without the Littlefield, which is out-of-frame to the right. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   Yes Jean with your help and a link to our feature on Capitol Hill’s Gable Apartments, which includes several additions – of its own – that will resonate with the Littlefield Apts. as well.

Capitol Hill's western border since the mid-1960's.
Capitol Hill’s western border since the mid-1960′s. [Click]
The central business district from Capitol Hill in 1968/9.  The SeaFirst Tower, on the left, opened in 1968, and the Washington Plaza Hotel, here not yet completed, in the mid-summer of 1960.  On the right, the view looks west in line with Stewart Street from the photographer Robert Bradley's apartment high in the Lamplighter on Belmont Avenue.
The central business district from Capitol Hill in 1968/9. The SeaFirst Tower, on the left, opened in 1968, and the Washington Plaza Hotel, here not yet completed, opened in the mid-summer of 1960. On the right, the view looks west in line with Stewart Street from the photographer Robert Bradley’s apartment high in the Lamplighter on Belmont Avenue. [Click]

Damaged snow shot of Capitol Hill from the Volunteer Park standpipe.  The Parker home at the southeast corner of E. Prospect Street and 14th Ave. E. fills the foreground.  With its early 20th Century creation by super-developer James Moore, 14th Ave. here south of the park was also known as "Millionaire Row."
Damaged snow shot of Capitol Hill from the Volunteer Park standpipe. The Parker home at the southeast corner of E. Prospect Street and 14th Ave. E. fills the foreground. With its early 20th Century creation by super-developer James Moore, 14th Ave. here south of the park was also known as “Millionaire Row.”

 

Seattle Now & Then: Two Views from the Needle (or, A Stitch in Time)

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THEN: The Seattle Central Business District in 1962.  I found this panorama mixed in with the Kodachrome slides photographed by Lawton Gowey.  It was most likely taken by my helpful friend Lawton, who died in 1983, or Robert Bradley, Lawton’s friend in the then active Seattle Camera Club.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
THEN: The Seattle Central Business District in 1962. I found this panorama mixed in with the Kodachrome slides photographed by Lawton Gowey. It was most likely taken by my helpful friend Lawton, who died in 1983, or Robert Bradley, Lawton’s friend in the then active Seattle Camera Club. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
NOW: Jean last visited the Space Needle in 2011.  Stirred by the changes, he makes note that “There are six cranes at work in mid-ground, say north of Stewart Street.  The old dip in the cityscape between the Smith Tower and the Space Needle is filling in.  We are spawning towers.”  For their “hide and seek,” readers may wish to visit Jean’s and my blog dorpatsherrardlomont to study enlarged copies of this week’s featured subjects and more Seattle cityscapes from the Needle.
NOW: Jean last visited the Space Needle in 2011. Stirred by the changes, he makes note that “There are six cranes at work in mid-ground, say north of Stewart Street. The old dip in the cityscape between the Smith Tower and the Space Needle is filling in. We are spawning towers.” For their “hide and seek,” readers may wish to visit Jean’s and my blog dorpatsherrardlomont to study enlarged copies of this week’s featured subjects and more Seattle cityscapes from the Needle.

Here is an opportunity for readers to enjoy our deeply human urge to play hide and seek. What is often made of bricks and tiles in the “then” panorama may still be discovered beside or behind the grand expanse of glass rising so high in the “now.”  You may wish to start with the Smith Tower. Only a slice of that 1914 landmark can be found far down Second Avenue on the right.  Both views, of course, were photographed from the Space Needle.  The historical photographer exposed his or her Kodachrome slide in 1962 when the Space Needle was new.  Jean Sherrard recorded his digital repeat late last February, on a perfect day for photography when that winter light with its soft shadows is so forgiving and revealing.

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In the upper-right corner of Jean’s repeat, a crisp Mt. Rainier reflects the afternoon sun so that the name, “The Mountain that was God,” seems most appropriate.  When Seattle and Tacoma were still arguing whether it should be named Mt. Rainier or Mt. Tacoma, this sublime substitute was used, in part, to transcend the promotional rancor bouncing back and forth between the two cities.

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For the more ancient among us, the 1962 panorama may reflect The Seattle Times now long-passed columnist Emmett Watson’s campaign for a “Lesser Seattle.” Watson, with the help of rain and this modest skyline, hoped to discourage Californians from visiting, or worse, staying in Seattle.  This was the Central Business District before major leagues, digital commerce, grunge, and acres of tinted glass curtains.  Seek and you may still find the Seattle Tower (1928), the Medical Dental Building (1925), and the Roosevelt Hotel (1929), but not the nearly new Horizon House (1961) on First Hill, here hidden behind many newer towers.

Some of the Century 21 parking in the Denny Regrade neighborhood.  Notes the fancy foot landscaping on the lower "wing" of the Grosvenor House.
Some of the Century 21 parking in the Denny Regrade neighborhood. Notes the fancy foot landscaping on the lower “wing” of the Grosvenor House, bottom-right.
Seattle Freeway construction below Capitol Hill.  Courtesy, Lawton Gowey
Seattle Freeway construction below Capitol Hill. Courtesy, Lawton Gowey
Lawton Gowey's ecstatic portrait of the bark Nippon Maru with the new Needle off its stern on June 20, 1962.
Lawton Gowey’s ecstatic portrait of the bark Nippon Maru with the new Needle off its stern on June 20, 1962.
Seattle Times photographer Josef Scaylea's contribution to the United States Information Agency's Russian Language periodical.
Seattle Times photographer Josef Scaylea’s contribution to the United States Information Agency’s Russian Language periodical.  The original is in color and may redeem it.
Ivar Haglund's Century 21 Fish Bar as foundation for the Space Needle.
Ivar Haglund’s Century 21 Fish Bar as foundation for the Space Needle.
For skyline supremacy, the Space Needle's first rival, the Seattle First National Bank, begins its crawl skyward at this 1967 look south from Queen Anne Hill.  Courtesy, Seattle Times
For skyline supremacy, the Space Needle’s first rival, the Seattle First National Bank, begins its crawl skyward in this 1967 look south from Queen Anne Hill. Courtesy, Seattle Times
Bob Hope diverted from reading about the fair and its splendid Space Needle.
Bob Hope diverted from reading about the fair and its splendid Space Needle in The Seattle Times special edition.
Jean resting with his Nikon at the top of the Space Needle.  This may have been taken by Boulangere during her last visit to Seattle.  Jean will correct me  if I am wrong.
Jean resting with his Nikon at the top of the Space Needle. This may have been taken by Berangere during her last visit to Seattle. Jean will correct me if I am wrong.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Assuredly Jean – and with your help: your’s and Ron’s.  First Ron’s.  Directly below are three links to landmarks that can still be found in our cityscape, and appear – in part – from the Space Needle.   Next, we will put up some examples of pans from favored Seattle prospects.  This will not be a surprise to you, because you have recorded repeats for most of them, and when you arise on Sunday morning – after breakfast – you may, we hope, pair these distinguish Seattle examples of panoramas with your own contemporary repeats.   As time allows this evening, following those “classic” now-thens, I’ll put up some other wide-angle shots from hither and thither, reaching as far as your family’s favored summer destination: LaPush on the Washington Coast.

 

A FEW of SEATTLE’S HISTORICAL PROSPECTS Repeated by Jean Sherrard

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DENNY HILL

Frank LaRoche's ca. 1891 look south down Third Ave. from the Denny Hotel construction site on the south summit of Denny Hill.  On the left are the Methodists at the southeast corner of Pine Street and Third Avenue.
Frank LaRoche’s ca. 1891 look south down Third Ave. from the Denny Hotel construction site on the south summit of Denny Hill. On the left are the Methodists at the southeast corner of Pine Street and Third Avenue.
Jean's approximate repeat
Jean’s approximate repeat
The oldest pan of Seattle among the many taken from Denny Hill.  The date is 1871/2.  The summit of First  Hill, far left, is still forested.  The King Street Coal Wharf is still five or six years from construction.  Pike Street crosses beyond the fence.
The oldest pan of Seattle among the many taken from Denny Hill by Moore. The date is 1871/2. The summit of First Hill, far left, is still forested beyond the Territorial University campus. The King Street Coal Wharf is still five or six years from construction. Pike Street crosses left-right/east-west beyond the fence.  Beacon Hill marks most of the horizon. Second Avenue continues south beyond the shed’s roof.
Taken from the same location as the Moore pan above it, this 1878 panorama by Peterson & Bros. includes the King Street Coal Wharf, far right.
Taken from the same location as the Moore pan above it, this 1878 panorama by Peterson & Bros. includes the King Street Coal Wharf, far right.  Most of the old growth forest has been cleared from the summit of First Hill, far left.   [Courtesy, University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections.]
The title for his centerfold to a late 1880s book of Seattle scenes is evidence of Arthur Denny's intentions them to root the state capitol away from Olympia and plant in on the his hill that would after his kidnapping failure be named Denny Hill for him.
The title for his centerfold to a late 1880s book of Seattle scenes is evidence of Arthur Denny’s intentions them to root the state capitol away from Olympia and plant in on his hill that would, after his kidnapping failure, be named Denny Hill for him.

 

FIRST HILL

Webster and Stevens Studio three-part pan of First Hill from the nearly completed Smith Tower in 1913 or early 1914.  Courtesy, MOHAI.
Webster and Stevens Studio three-part pan of First Hill from the nearly completed Smith Tower in 1913 or early 1914. Courtesy, MOHAI.
A recent repeat
A recent repeat

BEACON HILL

Frame in one of pioneer historian Prosch's albums, Seattle in 1882 from Beacon Hill with Piner's Point (now the Pioneer Square Historic District) extending as far south as King Street.  (Courtesy University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections.)
Frame in one of pioneer historian Prosch’s albums, Seattle in 1882 from Beacon Hill with Piner’s Point (now the Pioneer Square Historic District) extending as far south as King Street. (Courtesy University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections.)

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A merging of Lawton Gowey's two-part pan of the tideflats taken from Beacon Hill in 1968.
A merging of Lawton Gowey’s two-part pan of the tideflats taken from Beacon Hill in 1968.  Note the rising SeaFirst tower on the far right.

Stitched from many parts, A. Curtis' pan of the tideflats to First Hill and a Beacon Hill cliff, far right, from Beacon Hill in the mid-teens.
Stitched from many parts, A. Curtis’ pan of the tideflats to First Hill, concluding with a Beacon Hill cliff, far right, photographed in the mid-teens. [Keep Clicking to Enlarge]
CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT from the New Washington Hotel

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From the Josephinum roof
From the Josephinum roof

GREEN LAKE, LOOKING WEST to Phinney Ridge & the Olympics

An A. Curtis 1903 pan looking west over Green Lake to Phinney Ridge with an Olympic Mountains horizon.  This is but two parts of a pan that continues for another third into Wallingford, here out-of-frame to the left.
An A. Curtis 1903 pan looking west over Green Lake to Phinney Ridge with an Olympic Mountains horizon. This is but two parts of a pan that continues for another third into Wallingford, here out-of-frame to the left.

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FROM WEST SEATTLE

A mock-up for Jean's and my book Washington Then and Now.  We once had and perhaps still have a webpage floating the the "cloud" that compared three early pans from the same Duwamish Head prospect that could be edifyingly compared to one of Jean's repeats.  We still do.  Open http://www.washingtonthenandnow.com/
A mock-up for Jean’s and my book Washington Then and Now. We once had and perhaps still have a webpage floating the the “cloud” that compared three early pans from the same Duwamish Head prospect that could be edifyingly compared to one of Jean’s repeats. We still do. Open http://www.washingtonthenandnow.com/
Readers interested in Seattle cityscapes, especially on and from the waterfront, may wish to visit Ivar's Acres of Clam and the gallery of historical prints hanging in the restaurant's long hall between the seating and the kitchen.  I mounted this in 1984 before Ivar's passing in '85.  The irritating flash in this example comes, of course, from my camera, a Nikkormat then, I believe.  The panorama on top of the city from West Seattle replaced my '84 "now."
Readers interested in Seattle cityscapes, especially on and from the waterfront, may wish to visit Ivar’s Acres of Clam and the gallery of historical prints hanging in the restaurant’s long hall between the seating and the kitchen. I mounted this in 1984 before Ivar’s passing in ’85. The irritating flash in this example comes, of course, from my camera, a Nikkormat then, I believe. The panorama on top of the city from West Seattle replaced my ’84 “now.”

FROM PIONEER SQUARE HISTORIC DISTRICT

SEATTLE'S FIRST PANORAMA, by Sammis.  Taken from the second floor of Snoqualmie Hall at the southwest corner of Main Street and Commercial Street, long since renamed First Avenue South.
SEATTLE’S FIRST PANORAMA, by Sammis. Taken from the second floor of Snoqualmie Hall at the southwest corner of Main Street and Commercial Street, long since renamed First Avenue South.
Taken from the rooftop of the Bread of Life Mission
Taken from the rooftop of the Bread of Life Mission

ABOVE THE ROOF OF TOWN HALL

Taken during the Christmas holidays from Mike and Donna James apartment
Taken during the Christmas holidays from Mike and Donna James apartment

From The KING STREET COAL WHARF

North along the waterfront before the city's "Great Fire of 1889," taken from the end of the King Street Coal Wharf.
North along the waterfront before the city’s “Great Fire of 1889,” taken from the end of the King Street Coal Wharf.

PETERSON & BROS. Pan From YESLER WHARF, 1878

Knit from three photographs of the Seattle Waterfront in 1878 taken from Yesler's Wharf.   The nearly fresh 1876 grading of Front Street (First Avenue) is apparent.
Knit from three photographs of the Seattle Waterfront in 1878 taken from Yesler’s Wharf. The nearly fresh 1876 grading of Front Street (First Avenue) is evident.  Denny Hill, with its two summits, is far left.   The broken ship Windward is anchored at the center.  Above it is the foot of Madison Street, and then on the horizon the Territorial University at 4th and Seneca.  Columbia Street reaches Front Street far right.   Yesler’s millpond is scattered about.

THE 1909 ALASKA YUKON PACIFIC EXPOSITION ACROSS PORTAGE BAY

"Look! Up in the Sky" the tethered balloon on the right.  Several aerials of the AYP campus and beyond were taken from its basket.
“Look! Up in the Sky” the tethered balloon on the right. Several aerials of the AYP captured campus and beyond were taken from its basket – like those below.
Looking south over Portage Bay to Capitol Hill.  Montlake is on the left.  The Latona Bridge is on the far right.
Looking south over Portage Bay to Capitol Hill. Montlake is on the left. The Latona Bridge is on the far right.
The AYP'S "ARCTIC CIRCLE" with part of the University District on the left.
The AYP’S “ARCTIC CIRCLE” with part of the University District on the left.

RETURNING TO THE NEEDLE – ANOTHER INFLATABLE.

A 200-foot long inflatable or soft sculpture commemorating a common feature in the art of several artists very loosely connected with the Shazzam Society in the late 1960s and here into the early 1970s.  (For the moment, I do not remember the year.  1971 or 1973, I think.  At the time I was preparing a film most of the footage of which was taken at the several music festivals hereabouts in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  Here I joined with the crafty help of the Land Truth Circus and its grandee, John Hillding, to raise this UNIVERSAL WORM (aka tiger's tale) to the rim of the Space Needle where a gust of spring air suddenly threw it again the Needle's concrete "ribbing" below the restaurant and it was punctured and returned to earth flapping.
A 200-foot long inflatable or soft sculpture commemorating a common feature in the art of several artists very loosely connected with the Shazzam Society in the late 1960s and here into the early 1970s. (For the moment, I do not remember the year. 1971 or 1973, I think.) At the time I was preparing a film, Sky River Rock Fire,  most of the footage for which was taken at the several music festivals hereabouts in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Here I joined with the crafty help of the Land Truth Circus and its grandee, John Hillding, to raise this UNIVERSAL WORM (aka tiger’s tale) to the rim of the Space Needle where a gust of spring air suddenly threw it below the restaurant where it was penetrated or punctured by the concrete “ribbing” (or spokes) there and returned to earth flapping.

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: Madison’s Lost Poplars

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THEN: Looking west on Madison Street from Seventh Avenue circa 1909.  (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
THEN: Looking west on Madison Street from Seventh Avenue circa 1909. (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
NOW: Aside from the Dover Apartments at 901 6th Avenue, that can be found above the trunk of the red sedan in the foreground, the skyline from the Seattle Tower on the left, to The Renaissance on the right, is new with high-rises that reach far above the frame of Jean’s repeat.
NOW: Aside from the Dover Apartments at 901 6th Avenue, that can be found above the trunk of the red sedan in the foreground, the skyline from the Seattle Tower on the left, to The Renaissance on the right, is new with high-rises that reach far above the frame of Jean’s repeat.

The Lombardy Poplars that once lined much of Madison Street from Fourth Avenue to Broadway made First Hill’s favorite arterial “the most attractive place in town.”  That is on the pioneer authority of Sophie Frye Bass, found in her delightful book of reminiscences, “Pig-Tail Days in Old Seattle.” Here the photographer A. Curtis looks west-southwest, through the intersection of Madison Street and Seventh Avenue to Central School, on the left, and the Knickerbocker Hotel, on the right.  Central School opened in 1889

Looking southwest thru the same intersection of 7th Avenue and Madison Street with younger winter-leafless poplars.
Looking southwest from the same intersection of 7th Avenue and Madison Street with younger winter-leafless poplars.

with Seattle’s first high school installed on its third floor.  Sixty years later the school’s landmark towers were prudently removed after Seattle’s 1949 earthquake.

This ordinarily busy intersection is oddly vacant in the feature subject, crossed by neither motorcar nor team. However, the pavement bricks – no doubt slippery – are layered with clues.  A combined mess of auto oil, horse droppings – and what else? – marks them.

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Above and below, looking east on Madison Street from Sixth Avenue.  Rising high at the center, the Knickerbocher is nearly new in the ca. 1909 photograph above by Arthur Churchill Warner.  The poplars are long since stripped away in Lawton Gowey’s recording from June 19, 1961.  Knowing Lawton, I’d say that he was capturing a last look thru the block before it was razed for the Seattle Freeway.

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A Seattle Times clipping from Jan 5, 1963 featuring a look north from the Knickerbocher roof to the advancing work of the freeway.
A Seattle Times clipping from Jan 5, 1963 featuring a look north from the Knickerbocher roof to the advancing work of the freeway.  CLICK TO ENLARGE
The Smith Tower's prospect into the neighborhood on June 21, 1961.   At the subject's center only the long auxiliary structure along Marion Street survives, here very near the scene's center.  From there to the left and beyond some parked cars the Knickerbocher still rises.
The Smith Tower’s prospect into the neighborhood on June 21, 1961.  Near the subject’s center only the long auxiliary structure along Marion Street survives. From there to the left and beyond parked cars covering the footprint of the destroyed school, the Knickerbocker still rises.  This is another Kodachrome slide by Lawton Gowey.
From Madison Street, Frank Shaw's 1963 look thru the rubble that was contributed by the hotels, including the Knickerbocher,  along the north side of Madison Street.
From Madison Street, Frank Shaw’s 1963 look thru the rubble that was contributed by the hotels, including the Knickerbocker, along the north side of Madison Street.   Lawton again.
The third of four First Presbyterian sanctuaries, and the first one built on the east side of Seventh Avenue, between Madison and Spring streets.  Lawton Gowey recorded this on Feb. 6, 1967, the year and winter season that the Seattle Freeway was dedicated.  Gleaming west facade of the Christian Scientists (now Town Hall) at the southwest corner of 8th and Seneca, appears far left.  Behind it is the Exeter House, at the northwest corner.
The third of four First Presbyterian sanctuaries, and the first one built on the east side of Seventh Avenue, between Madison and Spring streets. Lawton Gowey recorded this on Feb. 6, 1967, the year and winter season that the Seattle Freeway was dedicated. Gleaming west facade of the Christian Scientists (now Town Hall) at the southwest corner of 8th and Seneca, appears far left. Behind it is the Exeter House, at the northwest corner.

The Knickerbocker was built in time for Seattle’s first world’s fair, the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific-Exposition, held on the UW campus. Advertised as “strictly modern,” the hotel’s ninety rooms were for the most part taken as apartments.  In 1911 weekly rents were three dollars and up.  Included among its more sensationally newsworthy residents in the half-century before the hotel was razed for the Seattle Freeway, were a forger, a three-and-one-half year old boy deserted by his parents, and a Knickerbocker manager who – it seems – murdered his wife.  And the hotel’s visitors featured more than one robber.

A dated construction scene on Presbyterian's oversized sanctuary, looking here at the front door facing the corner of 7th Ave. and Spring Street.  (Courtesy Michael Maslan)
A dated construction scene on Presbyterian’s over-sized sanctuary, looking here at the front door facing the corner of 7th Ave. and Spring Street. (Courtesy Michael Maslan)
Nearly new
Nearly new and presently four Corinthian columns to the intersection of Seventh Avenue and Spring Street.
Lawton Gowey's look east on Spring Street to First Presbyterian on April 19, 1966.  Lawton was also a Presbyterian and for decades the organist at his church on Queen Anne Hill.  He died of a heart attack in 1983 while preparing for another Sunday service.
Lawton Gowey’s look east on Spring Street to First Presbyterian on April 19, 1966, and without its two original domes, one of which was home to the church’s radio station, another pulpit for any preacher, but most importantly its builder, Mark Matthews. Lawton was also a Presbyterian and for decades the organist at his church on Queen Anne Hill. He died of a heart attack in 1983 while preparing for another Sunday service.

On the brighter side, in a letter to the Times editor, Knickerbocker resident Carol Cornish expressed her thanks that living at 616 Madison put her “close-in” to downtown opera and concerts. In her letter from Oct. 28 1940, Ms. Cornish also included a culture-conscious complaint about concert audience behavior. “I hate to be stuffy, but the shallow, careless frivolities of the so-called smart set often fill us unaspiring social plebeians with a definite distaste.” During the Great Depression of the 1930s, the Times, awarded the Knickerbocker Hotel by including it in its “Business and Professional Ledger.” After the Second World War some hotel rooms were outfitted with dark rooms for rent to amateur photographers.  And through much of the 1950s, the Knickerbocker was home to the Seattle Chess Club.

West on Madison from 9th Avenue along a line of healthy, its seems, poplars.  Part of the Knickerbocker at 7th avenue appears on the far left.
West on Madison from 9th Avenue along a line of healthy, its seems, poplars. Part of the Knickerbocker at 7th avenue appears on the far left.

Writing her little classic “Pig-Tail Days” in 1937, Sophie Frye Bass, granddaughter of Arthur and Mary Denny, mourned the loss of both the poplars and the First Hill neighborhood of her childhood.  “The fine residences and stately poplars have given way protestingly to business.”

A news clipping from The Seattle Times on June 26, 1903, reports or claims that the Madison Street poplars are doomed to disease.  CLICK TO READ
A news clipping from The Seattle Times on June 26, 1903, reports or claims that the Madison Street poplars are doomed to disease. CLICK TO READ
The Northern Pacific Railroad's photographer F. Jay Haynes recorded this look up Madison Street from the waterfront most likely in 1890.  Central School at 6th and Madison is on the right, and no Poplars as yet run a line between the school and Madison.  The central tower of the McNaught mansion, facing Fourth Avenue near Spring Street and the more slender tower of Providence Hospital, left of center, escape the horizon.
The Northern Pacific Railroad’s photographer F. Jay Haynes recorded this look up Madison Street from the waterfront most likely in 1890. Central School at 6th and Madison is on the right, and no Poplars as yet run a line between the school and Madison. The central tower of the McNaught mansion, facing Fourth Avenue near Spring Street and the more slender tower of Providence Hospital, left of center, escape the horizon.
Most likely Robert Bradley took this look east on Madison from the Alaskan Way Viaduct before it was opened to traffic in the spring of 1953.  Here, as well, no poplars are showing above Madison's distant horizon.
Most likely Robert Bradley took this look east on Madison from the Alaskan Way Viaduct before it was opened to traffic in the spring of 1953. Here, as well, no poplars are showing above Madison’s distant horizon.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Sure Jean.  Between the two of us, Ron Edge and I have collected seven links to earlier features that relate to this subject with Central School and the Knickerbocher.  They may also include subjects in their own “Web Extras” that are far afield of Seventh and Madison, and there may be some repetitions between them.  But all are placed with good will while remembering still my own mother’s encouragement that “repetition is the mother of all learning.”

THEN: A close “read” of this concrete pile at 714 7th Ave. will reveal many lines of tiles decorating its gray facades.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

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THEN: A circa 1923 view looks south on Eighth Avenue over Pike Street, at bottom left.

THEN: The home at bottom right looks across Madison Street (out of frame) to Central School. The cleared intersection of Spring Street and Seventh Avenue shows on the right.

Seattle Now & Then: A Methodist Revival on Union Street

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THEN: The “then” photo looks southeast across Union Street to the old territorial university campus.  It was recorded in the Fall of 1907, briefly before the old park-like campus was transformed into a grand commercial property, whose rents still support the running of the University of Washington.  (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: The “then” photo looks southeast across Union Street to the old territorial university campus. It was recorded in the Fall of 1907, briefly before the old park-like campus was transformed into a grand commercial property, whose rents still support the running of the University of Washington. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: While civic leaders proposed that the abandoned territorial campus on Denny’s Knoll be converted into a central city park, the University’s regents wanted it developed into properties whose leases would support the school, which with the typically close-fisted legislature, often needed help. The regents won.
NOW: While civic leaders proposed that the abandoned territorial campus on Denny’s Knoll be converted into a central city park, the University’s regents wanted it developed into properties whose leases would support the school, which with the typically close-fisted legislature, often needed help. The regents won.

Two structures stand out in this 1907 look across Union Street into the old campus of the Territorial University.  Both seem incomplete.  The ornate one on top with the comely belfry is the Territorial University building itself, stripped of its columns while still awaiting its fate.

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Looking southeast at the Territorial University in its original location and with it columns too, and above it without those Ionic pillars.
Looking southeast at the Territorial University in its original location and with it columns too, and above it without those Ionic pillars and in the place off Union Street and straddling 5th Avenue, as it is in the feature photo..
An early portrait of the university with some of the old growth still to the sides.
An early portrait of the university with some of the old growth still to the sides.
Your investigating eye may - or surely will - find the university's pergola in this view as well.  It looks west on Union Street through its intersection with Sixth Avenue.
Your investigating eye may – or surely will – find the university’s pergola in this view as well. It looks west on Union Street through its intersection with Sixth Avenue.
First visiting Tacoma for a round of conversions, the dynamic Hart and Magann joined a local protest against the staging of
First visiting Tacoma for a round of conversions, the dynamic Hart and Magann joined a local protest against the staging of Salome at the Tacoma Theatre.
Later and not here but in
Later and not here but in West Virginia, it was revealed that even fervent worship may be offensive, when the farmer E.M.Snyder was arrested for crying “Amen, Amen” with too much zeal.

The lower structure, the palatial hut facing the sidewalk, resembles the warehouse set atop Noah’s ark in a Biblical illustration I remember.  In the Bible, all the “animals two by two” were given accommodations. In this shed, however, the critters were mostly Methodists, more than three-thousand could be fit inside, and apparently were. There they would sing and preach — reinvigorating the local congregations, their own faith, and also naming and chastising selected Seattle sinners.

Another Seattle Times report.  This one from Sept. 20, 1907.
Another Seattle Times report. This one from Sept. 20, 1907.   CLICK TO ENLARGE!
Evangelists Hart and Magann confess when closing down their work in the tabernacle that Seattle's Methodists were something of a disappointment.
Evangelists Hart and Magann confess when closing down their work in the tabernacle that Seattle’s Methodists were something of a disappointment.  CLICK TO ENLARGE!!!

Apparently the tabernacle was pounded together in 1907 for the fall arrival of the evangelists Hart (the preacher) and Magann (the singer), noted on its signs.  By then the landmark behind it – the University Building – was serving as temporary quarters for the Seattle Public Library. Bo Kinney, the library’s new circulation services manager, shares with us that the decision to move (by skidding) the territorial university from its original foundation, near the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Seneca Street, and ultimately to this site near Fifth Avenue and University Street, was first announced on March 3, 1905.  The building was moved to lower the height of Denny’s Knoll and thereby allow for the extending of Fourth Avenue north from Seneca Street directly through the campus at the lower grade, and soon also on Fifth Avenue as seen in Jean’s repeat.

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Spring reportage from the The Times that "Seattle's Most Historic Building" was being prepared for removal to Seattle's most progressive creation, the Alaska Yukon and Pacific Expo. on the newer University Campus beside the Brooklyn Addition, now known as the University District.  The Times clipping is from May 17, 1908.
CLICK TO ENLARGE!  Spring reporting from the The Times that “Seattle’s Most Historic Building” was being prepared for removal to Seattle’s most progressive creation, the Alaska Yukon and Pacific Expo. on the newer University Campus beside the Brooklyn Addition, now known as the University District. The Times clipping is from May 17, 1908.

In early May of 1908 an appointed and, we imagine, enthused group of UW students started raising the ten-thousand dollars it was thought was needed to barge the original territorial university building to the new – since 1895 – campus north of Lake Union’s Portage Bay. There it was envisioned that Seattle’s grandest pioneer landmark would soon add its fame to the city’s first world’s fair, the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition. When this effort of preservation failed, some of the hardwood in the old school was turned into canes, which were sold as souvenirs, mostly to alums.  It was figured that through the thirty-plus years of the school’s stay on Denny Knoll, about 5,000 young scholars had crossed beneath the Ionic columns of its main hall.  The columns alone were saved and survive as the four white fluted landmarks that grace the University’s Sylvan Theatre.

What we might call the "backside" of the Columns, the side away from the Sylvan Theater, includes up the way U.W.'s Anderson Hall, which was donated by the lumbering Anderson family, a former subject of this blog.
What we might call the “backside” of the Columns, the side away from the Sylvan Theater, includes, up the way, U.W.’s Anderson Hall, which was donated by the lumbering Anderson family, a former subject of this blog.
. . . and the front side of the landmark columns, seen here rarely at night within the Sylvan Theater and with a few of its Attic goings-on rarely seen by the light of the sun.
. . . and the front side of the landmark columns, seen here at night within the Sylvan Theater with  Attic goings-on rarely seen by the light of the sun.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   With Ron Edge’s help, yes.   Below are some “Edge Links” and then below that some other photographs and more that relate to this old knoll – Denny’s Knoll – that after the carvings or regrades of 1906-1910 is gone.    I will also insert some “extras” into the week’s primary text, above.  But not much.  It is already thirty minutes past midnight, and my late start is, in part, your fault, or rather the delicious detraction of the marinated chicken with mushrooms, seasoned rice and those flowery green veggies that Nixon – or Regan – deplored.   Thanks again for dinner, and the time spent with you and Don, your dad, was a delight.

Three Edge Links to pasts post for the reader’s enjoyment.

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

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DENNY’S KNOLL, FIFTH AVENUE and UNION STREET from DENNY HILL

The greenbelt that swipes through the center of this ca. 1885 panorama from Denny Hill is the northern end of the University of Washington's first campus.   The campus stops at Union Street, or as seen from Denny Hill the bottom of the little forest.  The most evident avenue here is Third, which nearly reaches the bottom-center of the pan   Second Avenue nearly reaches the lower right corner of the pan.  From this calibration the reader may cautiously but confidently reach a likely approach for Fifth Avenue, here south to Union and the campus green.
The greenbelt that swipes through the center of this ca. 1885 panorama from Denny Hill is the northern end of the University of Washington’s first campus. The campus stops at Union Street, As seen here from Denny Hill, Union running left-right is at the bottom of the little forest. The most evident avenue here is Third, which nearly reaches the bottom-center of the pan, and Second Avenue nearly reaches the lower right corner.  From this calibration, the reader may cautiously but confidently find here  a likely approach for Fifth Avenue south to Union and the campus green. Beacon Hill is on the right horizon, and First Hill on the left.  DOUBLE CLICK TO ENLARGE   A close-up or detail follows below.

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Looking west down Seneca to the "rear" of Denny's Knoll.
Looking west down Seneca to the “rear” of Denny’s Knoll.   The rolling title “Knoll of Knowledge” was created by a Times header-specialist, who may have jumped when it first occurred to her or him.
Looking north across Virginia Street on (or near) Fifth Avenue.
Looking north across Virginia Street on (or near) Fifth Avenue.

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Copied from Seattle Now and Then Vol. 3, the 41st feature.
Copied from Seattle Now and Then Vol. 3, the 41st feature.

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Seattle Now & Then: The Minor/Collins Home on First Hill

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Built in 1887, the Minor-Collins Home at the northeast corner of Minor Avenue and Cherry Street was one of the grandest and longest surviving pioneer mansions on First Hill.  (Courtesy Historic Seattle)
THEN: Built in 1887, the Minor-Collins Home at the northeast corner of Minor Avenue and Cherry Street was one of the grandest and longest surviving pioneer mansions on First Hill. (Courtesy Historic Seattle)
NOW: After Bertrand Collins gave it a farewell party in 1951, the Minor-Collins home was razed, ultimately to become part of the Swedish Hospital campus.
NOW: After Bertrand Collins gave it a farewell party in 1951, the Minor-Collins home was razed, ultimately to become part of the Swedish Hospital campus.

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Built in 1887 by Sarah and Dr. Thomas Minor, it was one the earliest grand homes built on First Hill.  Painted a green so dark it was “almost black,” the red trim contrasted nicely. Interrupted by tragedy, the Minors’ stay there was brief.  Less than three years after the family moved into their mansion, the doctor drowned off Whidbey Island while hunting with two friends, who also perished.

 Minor
Minor

In 1891 when John and Angela Collins became the new residents, it was still addressed 702 12th Avenue, but the street was soon renamed Minor Avenue.   Both Thomas Minor and John Collins served as Seattle mayors: Collins first in 1873 as a dedicated Democrat, and Minor in 1887, a resolute Republican.  Earlier Minor had moved his family to Seattle from Port Townsend where he was also once mayor.

Overgrown and most likely late in the life of the Minor-Collins home.
Overgrown – late in the life of the Minor-Collins home.

If one’s attentions were devoted to this big home’s pioneer origins, then one may still wish to call it the Minor Home.  If, however, one concentrates on the roll of significant events that occurred here, then it is the Collins home, and perhaps even the Angela Collins home. Angela was the second wife of the bold Irishman John Collins.  They were married in 1877, after the locally famous widower of forty-two courted and won eighteen-year-old Angela Burdett Jackling.

Above and below: A feature from the Nov. 11, 1951 Seattle Times.
Above and below: A feature from the Nov. 11, 1951 Seattle Times. CLICK TWICE TO ENLARGE

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Widowed in 1903, Angela Collins gave her remaining forty-four years to nourishing Seattle society, the “higher” parts of it here on the summit of First Hill.  Her work was distinguished by programs and parties, some in the garden.  To name a few, Angela was a leader in the Garden Club, the Music and Art Foundation, and the Sunset Club, of which she and, later, her younger daughter Catherine, served as presidents.  Angela was an effective campaigner, raising funds for the Children’s Orthopedic Hospital and the Junior League. The League’s first meetings were held in the Collins home.

SEATTLE TIMES, July 28, 1929
SEATTLE TIMES, July 28, 1929 – Double Click to ENLARGE
Seattle Times, July 16, 1933
Seattle Times, July 16, 1933

John and Angela had four children and all of them excelled. For example, Bertrand, the younger son, was a popular novelist famous here for his exploring wit.  In 1946, daughter Catherine was given the title “Seattle’s First Lady of the Year,” mostly for her work with charities.  Within a year, her mother Angela died after eighty-eight productive years, most of them at this corner.  Her obituary, which appeared in the Seattle Times for September 21,1947, concluded, “From her childhood, Mrs. Collins was a brilliant figure in the social history of the city.”

As witness to her love of gardening and landscape,
As witness to her love of gardening and landscape, during the winter of 1931 Angela Collins rescued one of the horse chestnut trees cut down for street widening on “the University Way side of the University Heights School ground.”  CLICK TO ENLARGE
The MINOR-COLLINS Mansion in its last days
The MINOR-COLLINS Mansion in its last days

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   JEAN, First below with Ron Edge’s attentions are two links to related features that we return to again.  Following that a few local reminders of the Minor and Collins names.  Other extras were included above within this feature’s primary text.

THEN:

ON MINOR AVENUE

Building a retraining wall along the western border of the Cascade Playfield, depression-time work by the WPA in the 1930.  The view looks north on MINOR AVE. with Thomas Street behind the municipal photographer.
Building a retraining wall along the western border of the Cascade Playfield, depression-time work by the WPA in the 1930s. The view looks north on MINOR AVE. with Thomas Street behind the municipal photographer.  The view below from 1978 looks at a right angle directly east to this section of the completed wall.
Paul Kerby, left, and Bill Burden, right, trucking down Minor Avenue after the snow of Nov. 19, 1978.  Above them is the Cascade Playfield.
Paul Kerby, left, and Bill Burden, right, trucking down Minor Avenue after the snow of Nov. 19, 1978. Above them is the Cascade Playfield.
With no steps to the Cascade Playfield included in the WPA public work in the 1930s, another federal employee with CETA inserted these in the mid 1970s.
With no steps to the Cascade Playfield included in the WPA public work in the 1930s, another federal employee with CETA built these in the mid 1970s. “Watch Your Step”

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Sandbox stories at Collins Playfield, 1909.  (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)
Sandbox stories at Collins Playfield, 1909. (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)

COLLINS PLAYFIELD

Stories from the Collins Playground sandbox, 1909.

The COLLINS PARK FIELD HOUSE opened in 1913 and closed in 1971.  Here members of the Japanese American Association pose beside it in the 1930s.  (Courtesy, Seattle's Japanese Buddhist Temple)
The COLLINS PARK FIELD HOUSE opened in 1913 and closed in 1971. Here members of the Japanese American Association pose beside it in the 1930s. (Courtesy, Seattle’s Japanese Buddhist Temple)
The COLLINS Building in the early 1890s, photographed by LaRoche.  Better known as the Seattle Hotel, it has been replaced since 1961 by the "Sinking Ship Parking Garage" in the flat-iron block bordered by Second Avenue, James Street and Yesler Way.  This view looks east from Pioneer Place, aka Pioneer Square.
The COLLINS Building in the early 1890s, photographed by LaRoche. Better known as the Seattle Hotel, it has been replaced since 1962 by the “Sinking Ship Parking Garage” in the flat-iron block bordered by Second Avenue, James Street and Yesler Way. This view looks east from Pioneer Place, aka Pioneer Square.
Lawton Gowey recorded this frontal portrait of the Sinking Ship Garage on March 20, 1974, about ten years after its construction.  The builders explained that with the curved backet-handle-shapred pipes running along the tops of the garage's walls, it would fit the neighborhood's windows, like those facing its from across Second Avenue and the top floor of the Collins building.
Lawton Gowey recorded this frontal portrait of the Sinking Ship Garage on March 20, 1974, about ten years after its construction. The builders explained that with the curved basket-handle-shaped pipes running along the tops of the garage walls, it would fit the neighborhood’s windows, like those facing it across Second Avenue from the top floor of the Collins building. BELOW.  Lawton Gowey returns on April 21, 1976 to shoot across the bow of the Sinking Ship to the Pioneer Building whose basket-handle windows were, the garage building’s architects claimed, their inspiration.

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Frank Shaws look across the habitat of the truncated - to two stories - Butler Hotel, to the nearly abandoned Collins Building on the southeast corner of Second Avenue and James Street, and the former homesite of John and Angela Collins, which was destroyed during the city's "Great Fire of 1889."  Note - if you will - the mid-block burlesque house between the Collins Building and the Smith Tower.
Frank Shaw’s look across the habitat of the truncated – to two stories – Butler Hotel, to the nearly abandoned Collins Building on the southeast corner of Second Avenue and James Street. It was the former homesite of John and Angela Collins, destroyed during the city’s “Great Fire of 1889.” Note – if you will – the mid-block burlesque house between the Collins Building and the Smith Tower.  Shaw dates this November 26, 1974.
Looking north on Occidental Avenue to John Collins' Occidental Hotel in the 1870s.
Looking north on Occidental Avenue to John Collins’ hand-colored Occidental Hotel in the 1870s.
The OCCIDENTAL  HOTEL's Thanksgiving menu for 1887.
The OCCIDENTAL HOTEL’s Thanksgiving menu for 1887.

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COLLINS’ CLOSE-CALL AT HOME

An EDGE CLIPPING 

the Daily Intelligencer

Nov. 13, 1878

Collins Nightmare Dintel 11:13:78

Seattle Now & Then: Unitarian Drama

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: First dedicated in 1889 by Seattle’s Unitarians, the congregation soon needed a larger sanctuary and moved to Capitol Hill.   Here on 7th Avenue, their first home was next used for a great variety of events, including a temporary home for the Christian Church, a concert hall for the Ladies Musical Club, and a venue for political events like anarchist Emma Goldman’s visit to Seattle in 1910. (Compliments Lawton Gowey)
THEN: First dedicated in 1889 by Seattle’s Unitarians, the congregation soon needed a larger sanctuary and moved to Capitol Hill. Here on 7th Avenue, their first home was next used for a great variety of events, including a temporary home for the Christian Church, a concert hall for the Ladies Musical Club, and a venue for political events like anarchist Emma Goldman’s visit to Seattle in 1910. (Compliments Lawton Gowey)
NOW: Both the church and its neighbor Dreamland were razed in 1923 for construction of the Eagle Auditorium, now home for Act Theatre and Kreielsheimer Place.  Both views look east across Seventh Avenue, mid-block between Union and Pike Streets.
NOW: Both the church and its neighbor Dreamland were razed in 1923 for construction of the Eagle Auditorium, now home for Act Theatre and Kreielsheimer Place. Both views look east across Seventh Avenue, mid-block between Union and Pike Streets.

The first Unitarian Church of Seattle was built in 1889, only two years after Samuel Eliot, the 25-year-old son of Charles Eliot, president of Harvard University and perhaps then the most famous educator in the Western Hemisphere, arrived in Seattle to help its Unitarians get organized and build this sanctuary.

A another helpful return to the 1912 Baist real estate map.
A another helpful return to the 1912 Baist real estate map.

Local architect Hermann Steinman presented the drawings as a gift to the new congregation.  Soon after the construction commenced mid-May 1889, the church’s rising belfry was easily visible around the city. The construction, here on the east side of Seventh Avenue between Union and Pike streets, was not affected when most of Seattle’s business district was consumed by the Great Fire of June 6, 1889.

First Unitarian early and far right in this look down from First Hill.  The intersection of 8th and Union is centered near the bottom of the subject.
First Unitarian early and far right in this look down from First Hill. The intersection of 8th and Union is centered near the bottom of the subject.

The photograph by Asahel Curtis was recorded about 20 years later — most likely 1909, by which time the Unitarians had moved on and turned the building over to other users. In the Curtis photo, the church building is squeezed on the right (south) by the popular Dreamland, a large hall built as a roller rink in 1908, but then soon given to dancing and a great variety of assemblies, many of them labor-related and politically liberal. These politics also fit the activism of the AOUW (Ancient Order of United Workmen), which used the old church for its Columbia Lodge soon after the popular Unitarians had moved to Capitol Hill. The Columbia name is signed on the steeple.

With a First Hill horizon this subject looks east from a prospect near Third and Pike.  The Unitarians have moved on but Fern Hall is sign on the steeple they left behind.
With a First Hill horizon this subject looks east from a prospect near Third and Pike. The Unitarians have moved on but Fern Hall is sign on the steeple they left behind.
A turn-of-the-century (19th to 20th) clipping.
A turn-of-the-century (19th to 20th) clipping.

The First Unitarians dedicated their new, larger church on Boylston Avenue in 1906. It had 800 seats, the better to stage the church’s productions, which included concerts of many sorts, adult Sunday schools led by University of Washington profs, classes in psychology and comparative religion, and plays by the Unitarian Dramatic Club.

The Sept. 20, 1908 Seattle Times caption for this reads in part, 'Looking forward forty years, the play 'Seattle in 1940,' to be given by the Unitarian Assembly Hall, corner of Boylston Avenue and olive Street will be woman's suffrage play in which women will occupy positions of trust and importance in business and men fill domestic positions.  The play was written by Sarah Pratt Carr, a local author, who is giving her time to the rehearsal and staging of the play.  The parts are taken by persons the author had in mind when she wrote the comedy.  The special music was composed by Clara Carr Moore.  The proceeds of the play will be used to removed the indebtedness against the new Unitarian Church organ.
The Sept. 20, 1908 Seattle Times caption for this reads in part, ‘Looking forward forty years, the play ‘Seattle in 1940,’ to be given by the Unitarian Assembly Hall, corner of Boylston Avenue and olive Street will be woman’s suffrage play in which women will occupy positions of trust and importance in business and men fill domestic positions. The play was written by Sarah Pratt Carr, a local author, who is giving her time to the rehearsal and staging of the play. The parts are taken by persons the author had in mind when she wrote the comedy. The special music was composed by Clara Carr Moore. The proceeds of the play will be used to remove the indebtedness against the new Unitarian Church organ.

Dramatic presentations continue on the original church site with ACT Theatre. Jean Sherrard used his recent benefit appearance on an ACT stage as an opportunity to pose the theater’s support staff at its Seventh Avenue side entrance for this week’s “Now.” To quote Sherrard, “I don’t know if any are Unitarians or not, but they are surely united in their vision for a transcendent theatrical experience.”

Another Seattle Times clipping.  This from May 23, 1910.
Another Seattle Times clipping. This from May 23, 1910.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   Certainly Jean and we will begin again with a few relevant LINKS that Ron has pulled from past features.  After all that I’ll put up some more mostly from the neighborhood.

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN:  Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards.  Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor.  (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

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CAPITOL HILL UNITARIANS

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NOV. 19, 1934, Seattle Times
NOV. 19, 1934, Seattle Times

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UNION Street From FIRST HILL

With her or his  back to Terry Avenue, the photographer looks west on Union Street during the "Big Snow" of 1916.  Note the switch-back path.
With her or his back to Terry Avenue, the photographer looks west on Union Street during the “Big Snow” of 1916. .
West on Union from First Hill.
West on Union from First Hill also in the mid-teens.  Note the Unitarians (their first sanctuary on 7th)  right of center.
East on Union to First Hill from 7th Avenue with an awning at the front entrance to the Eagles Auditorium, and an insert of the from the same corner during the construction of the Convention Center.
East on Union to First Hill from 7th Avenue with an awning at the front entrance to the Eagles Auditorium, and an insert of the from the same corner during the construction of the Convention Center.

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Eagle first home of their own at the southwest corner of 7th and Pine.
Eagle first home of their own at the southwest corner of 7th and Pine.

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EAGLES at SEVENTH & UNION

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         The Eagles Lodge took its name from a stuffed eagle displayed in the hallway of an early meeting hall. The founders, a handful of mostly good old theater boys, got their inspiration while sitting around Robert Moran’s Seattle shipyard in 1898.

            When new in 1925, their grand lodge at Seventh Avenue and Union Street was described as “a modification of Italian Renaissance, sufficiently ornamented to add to its beauty without being ostentatious.” The architect, Henry Bittman, was a primary contributor to the inventory of terra-cotta landmarks Seattle was blessed with in the teens and ’20s.

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            Although not dated, this view [the top view of this subject] of the auditorium/clubhouse was probably taken when the founding “Mother Aerie” hosted the 1926 convention of the by-then-sizable national lodge.

Poster for the first lightshow at Eagle Auditorium.  The Jan 14, 1967 event was a benefit for the Free University and got "busted" (but not shut down) by the police department's Dance Detail.
Poster for the first light  show at Eagle Auditorium. The Jan 14, 1967 event was a benefit for the Free University and got “busted” (but not shut down) by the police department’s Dance Detail.

            Much of the Eagles Auditorium modern history has been given to rock-n-roll, first in the 1950s with Little Richard and Fats Domino. A five-year run of light-show concerts began with a disruption in 1967. Police “busted” a concert featuring the Emergency Exit and the Union Light Company, suspecting that the film loops and liquid projections of the Union Light Company simulated psychedelic consciousness, which the visiting police Dance Detail figure was somehow in violation of a 1929 code prohibiting something called “shadow dancing.” Perhaps the reasoning was that is the lights are turned down there will be more shadows.

Frank Shaw's unique look to the Eagle Auditorium in 1978 thru the wreckage of southeast corner of 7th and Union.
Frank Shaw’s unique look to the Eagle Auditorium in 1978 thru the wreckage of southeast corner of 7th and Union.

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Now with daylight savings upon us so is nighty bears surprisingly and we must limb that stairs to a long winter’s night, but we will we return in the afternoon to finish this off with something about the Dreamland, which held the corner before the Eagles.

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The Dreamland dance hall at the northeast corner of Seventh Ave. and Union Street with the First Unitarians behind it.  Both were razed for the Eagles Auditorium.
The Dreamland dance hall at the northeast corner of Seventh Ave. and Union Street with the First Unitarians behind it. Both were razed for the Eagles Auditorium.

The DREAMLAND

            The northeast corner of Seattle’s Seventh Avenue and Union Street includes a history of one landmark replacing two.  In the older view the Dreamland Dance Pavilion and, partially hidden behind it to the left, the First Unitarian Church of Seattle were razed for construction of the Eagles Auditorium

            The Dreamland is last listed in the 1922 city directory.  The following ear the Seattle Eagles’ new aerie is recorded at its corner – a place it still fills, although not so much for Eagles.

A Dreamland
A Dreamland dress-up: the Second Annual Ball for the Washington Chauffeurs’ Club, Nov. 17, 1911.

            Constructed in 1908 as a roller rink, the Dreamland was soon converted into a dance hall capable of accommodating crowds of more than 3,000, it was also a popular venue for mass meetings.

            Perennial Socialist presidential candidate Eugene Debs spoke to an overflow crowd there in January 1915, and two years later Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, another celebrated socialist, packed the place.  Flynn appeared to raise money for the Wobblies – Industrial Workers of the World members – wrongfully accused of instigating the Everett massacres when Wobblies and members of Everett’s Commercial Club exchanged gunfire on the Everett waterfront.

Full-page from the Feb. 9, 1908 Seattle Times, featuring some book reviews of the time, as well as
Full-page from the Feb. 9, 1908 Seattle Times, featuring some book reviews of the time, and several showplace ads including one for Paderewski at what was then still named the Dreamland Rink.  [CLICK TWICE to enlarge.]

            The church as built in 1889 when the corner was still in the sticks.  At the sanctuary’s September dedication, Dr. Thomas l. Eliot from the Portland congregation made a spiritual point of the new church’s building materials. “Long ago the stones of its foundation were a part of an ancient glacial drift, the trees sprang up perhaps before we signed the Declaration of Independence.  The iron, maybe, was from Norway. Behold them brought together for shelter that man may look to something greater than the forest, rock and iron.”

Beautiful and free, from The Seattle Times, Nov. 22, 1925
Beautiful and free, from The Seattle Times, Nov. 22, 1925

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A LETTER from LARRY LOWRY

Larry Lowry kindly sent me this photograph of the Dreamland with the wagons of The Seattle Bakery posing before it on Union Street.  Below the photograph is its own caption and Larry’s letter introducing his grandmother Waverly Mairs who for many years operated the bakery’s ice cream machine.

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Seattle Now & Then: Seattle General Hospital

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Looking northwest to Seattle General Hospital at the northwest corner of Fifth Avenue and Marion Street, circa 1909. (Courtesy of Michael Maslan)
THEN: Looking northwest to Seattle General Hospital at the northwest corner of Fifth Avenue and Marion Street, circa 1909. (Courtesy of Michael Maslan)
NOW: In 1974, the Union Bank of California Center opened, filling the block once used in part by Seattle General Hospital.  After many name changes this skyscraper is now called the 901 Fifth Avenue Building
NOW: In 1974, the Union Bank of California Center opened, filling the block once used in part by Seattle General Hospital. After many name changes this skyscraper is now called the 901 Fifth Avenue Building
The feature cornering its closest neighbors in the 1912 Baist real estate map.
The feature cornering its closest neighbors in the 1912 Baist real estate map – remembering now that the hospital was on the northwest corner of Marion and 5th.

As I remember, the first question about local history that I was ever asked was. “What became of General Hospital?”  While I did not know, yet I answered, “Has it changed channels?”  I was, of course, alluding to the soap opera, General Hospital. The real Seattle General Hospital had its beginnings in 1895 when a group of women rallied for a second, and protestant, hospital for the city. After two earlier locations, the building in today’s photo opened in November of 1900.

Seattle General Hospital can be found in this 1930 look northwest from Harborview Hospital.  It is the darker architectural mass just above the center of the subject.  Above it and to the left of it is the Northern Life Tower (1928), far right the Washington Athletic Club (1930) and far left, the Exchange Building (1931).  Some of most rumpled housing here on Yesler Hill (this part of First Hill) is revealed bottom-center across James Street from Trinity Episcopal.  It was structures like these that rationalized the razing of the neighborhood - much of its otherwise filled with housing stock much better than this -
Seattle General Hospital can be found in this 1930 look northwest from Harborview Hospital. It is the darker architectural mass just above the center of the subject. Above and to the right of it is the Northern Life Tower (1928), far right the Washington Athletic Club (1930) and far left, the Exchange Building (1931). Some of most rumpled housing here on Yesler Hill (this part of First Hill) is revealed bottom-center across James Street from Trinity Episcopal. It was structures like these that soon rationalized the razing of the neighborhood for Yesler Terrace, while much of it was otherwise filled with housing stock much better than this.

In those early years of acting like a pubic historian, I was repeatedly asked questions about Seattle General. Someone in the enquirer’s family had been born there – or died there.  So what became of Seattle General?  Now I suspect that that commonplace curiosity was generated in part because after seventy years of serving on Fifth Avenue, directly across Marion Street from its spiritual and fiscal advisor, the First Methodist Church, this brick landmark was sold to the Bank of California for about one million dollars.  After the patients were moved to the former Maynard Hospital on First Hill, demolition began on April 29, 1971.  Soon the slender bank, which Jean shows in part with his repeat, took to the sky.  And the old brick landmark?  It was missed.

Doctors Hospital.  Sculptor Dudley Pratt's relief panels, to the side of the hospital's main entrance, were unveiled in 1944.
Doctors Hospital. Sculptor Dudley Pratt’s relief panels, above the hospital’s main entrance, were unveiled in 1944.

In October 1975 the governing boards of three Seattle hospitals – Doctors, Swedish and Seattle General – agreed to merge under the name Swedish Medical Center.  To me, a Dane, the Scandinavian choice was a wise one, with connotations of competence, compassion and surely for some, strong broad-shouldered nurses with hair that reflected the sun.  By now we know Swedish very well, but it seems, no one – or only a few – still ask about Seattle General.

It was once typical for local papers to report on the progress of patients, and through its many years, Seattle General garnered lots of news.  For instance, in the Seattle Times for March 26, 1905, we learn under “Society”, that “Mrs. George B. McCulloch, who underwent a successful operation for appendicitis Tuesday, is at the Seattle General Hospital, where she will remain until convalesant.”  News about celebrity appendectomies, like that on April 1, 1903, for Puget Mills owner E.G. Ames, were often headlined in bold type.

The producer asks . . .
The producer asks . . .

Concluding now with the other General Hospital, by now the oldest TV soap opera that is still breathing, perhaps due to its proximity to the latest in expensive life-support devices.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Surely

When Ron Edge gets up at his usual morning hour – around 5 – he will insert a few links that relate to the above feature on Seattle General.   I’ll add a few subjects now (after midnight) but this week they will, I expect, be more about hospitals than Seattle General’s historical neighbors, which, you may have noticed and/or know, included the Lincoln Hotel, the Seattle Public Library, the First Methodist Church, the Rainier Club, the Elks Club, First Presbyterian Church, and certainly many others.  I’ll work an hour or so but then pause to watch the last of 26 one hour episodes of the original and captioned Swedish serial Wallander.

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THEN: The Perry Apartments is nearly new in “postcard artist” M. L. Oakes look at them south on Boren to where it intersects with Madison Street. (Courtesy John Cooper)

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PERRY HOTEL as COLUMBUS HOSPITAL, Southwest corner of BOREN & MADISON: Crossroads of FIRST HILL

Columbus Hospital at the southwest corner of Madison Street and Boren Avenue.  Photo by the prolific postcard photographer, Ellis.
Columbus Hospital at the southwest corner of Madison Street and Boren Avenue. Photo by the prolific postcard photographer, Ellis.

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From IDAHO to WAYSIDE

A CLIP from The Times, PACIFIC MAG. , Dec. 8, 1991
A CLIP from The Times, PACIFIC MAG. , Dec. 8, 1991

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The Wayside abandoned
The Wayside abandoned
A page from the COMMENWEALTH, MAY 23, 1903
A page from the COMMONWEALTH, MAY 23, 1903 – CLICK TO ENLARGE!
CLICK TO ENLARGE - to read
CLICK TO ENLARGE – to read
Second Ave. North and Republican Street - keep reading below.  (courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Second Ave. North and Republican Street – keep reading below. (courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Clip from The Times, Pacific Mag.  click-click
Clip from The Times, Pacific Mag. click-click
The USS SOLACE, another hospital ship, this time visiting Seattle ca. 1905.  That seems to be "Seattle's battleship" the Nebraska to the stern.  The SOLACE was commissioned in 1898 in time for the Spanish-American War.  She was 377 feet long and cruised at 15 knots (17 mph).  The SOLACE was decommissioned in 1921 and sold for scrap to Boston Metals Co. in 1930 - cheap.
The USS SOLACE, another hospital ship, this time visiting Seattle ca. 1905. That seems to be “Seattle’s battleship” the Nebraska to the stern. The SOLACE was commissioned in 1898 in time for the Spanish-American War. She was 377 feet long and cruised at 15 knots (17 mph). The SOLACE was decommissioned in 1921 and sold for scrap to Boston Metals Co. in 1930 – cheap.

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GENERAL HOSPITAL AMBITIONS of 1925

Looking east across 5th Avenue from the First Methodist Church to the open block where the church's medical arm indicated its intention of filling the block with a new hospital, and so kitty-korner across the intersection of 5th and Marion from their 1900 plant.
Looking east across 5th Avenue from the First Methodist Church to the open block where the church’s medical arm indicated its intention of filling the block with a new hospital, and so kitty corner from their 1900 plant across the intersection of 5th and Marion. [Click to enlarge and read the Times report below.]
The Seattle Times long report on Seattle General's intentions in 1925 tells us that the hospital was getting a late start after postponing their own campaign for the benefit of Children Orthopedics health-wealth "hustle" then.
The Seattle Times long report on Seattle General’s intentions in 1925 tells us that the hospital was getting a late start after postponing their own campaign for the benefit of Children Orthopedics health-wealth “hustle” then.
Children's Orthopedic on Queen Anne.
Children’s Orthopedic on Queen Anne.
Another look east over 5th Avenue to the block planned for the new and larger Seattle General Hospital.  Note Central School with the towers, the McNaught home, top-center at the southeast corner of Sixth Avenue and Marion Street and the here brand new Central Seattle Gas Station on the east side of 6th Avenue.  A key word search will reveal it featured here (in this blog.)
Another look east over 5th Avenue to the block planned for the new and larger Seattle General Hospital. Note Central School with the towers, St. James Cathedral, also with towers, the McNaught home, top-center at the southeast corner of Sixth Avenue and Marion Street and the here brand new Central Seattle Gas Station on the east side of 6th Avenue – a key word search will reveal it featured here. (In this blog.) – and here on Fifth Avenue, on the left and watched over by the Red Cross symbol, someone with their hood up working on their motorcar.   And don’t miss the two tennis courts – perhaps for nurses – one with a net and the other, it seems, abandoned.   The dater her is also 1925.   (Thanks to Ron Edge – again)

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Now I’ll retreat from the blog and prepare for nighty-bears with the prelude of a Swedish mystery.  Tomorrow I will return and add a few more health-related subjects.   Thanks for your patience and other’s patients.  (pause)  Up at noon and here come the marines.

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MARINE HOSPITAL (First)

5.  - Social Service, Marine Hospital 19338_24_52_img0001641A

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Published in The Times, July, 28, 1935
Published in The Times, July, 28, 1935
Appeared first in PACIFIC on Oct. 13, 1994.
Appeared first in PACIFIC on Oct. 13, 1994 and so years before Amazon.
Taken from Airport Way on August 17, 1934.
Taken from Airport Way on August 17, 1934.
Artist Myra A. Wiggins impression of the new Marine Hospital looming above the Beacon Hill greenbelt.
Artist Myra A. Wiggins impression of the new Marine Hospital looming above the Beacon Hill greenbelt, although given artistic free expression  it could be mistaken for Harborview. (Copied by Horace Sykes and courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

Vol 2

SEATTLE: 1921-1940 From BOOM to BUST

By RICH BERNER

Here is a link to “Boom to Bust,” Volume 2 of Rich Berner’s grand trilogy, SEATTLE IN THE 20TH CENTURY. Volume 1 covers Seattle history from 1900 to 1920, and Volume 3 treats of Seattle in the 1940s.  Earlier we posted on this blog Volume 1’s second edition, enriched with many additional illustrations.  A similar treatment for Volume 2 is a work-in-progress.  The link below thru the books’ cover is, however, a Ron Edge scanned facsimile of Boom to Bust in its original pagination as first published by Berner’s own Charles Press in 1992.  Sometime this year (2014) we hope to start opening here, page-by-page, the grand illustrated edition of Volume 2.  (We will let you know, of course.)  For now, here is the Charles Press version, in time for the reader to study one of its primary figures, Seattle Mayor John Dore, nor featured below with the few photos following.

The fresh Mayor John Dore at his flower bedecked desk after winning the 1932 election.
The fresh Mayor John Dore at his flower bedecked desk after winning the 1932 election.

MAYOR JOHN DORE – HIGH (ABOVE) & LOW (BELOW)

The often gregarious and pugnacious Mayor John Dore was nearly always brilliant – or very smart.   Mayor twice, first elected with Roosevelt in 1932, defeated by Charles L. Smith in 1934, then elected again in 1936, only to die in office in the spring of 1938, late in is term.

The sick mayor flashed thru the coach's window by a press photographer with a self-portrait with camera reflected in the far window.
The sick mayor flashed thru the coach’s window by a press photographer with a self-portrait with camera reflected in the far window.
1935 press collage of defense lawyer John Dore, left, facing prosecutor   , right.
1935 press collage of defense lawyer John Dore, left, facing prosecutor , right.

CITIZEN JOHN DORE: on the level.

In between his mayoral terms Dore returned to his vigorous lawyering.  Here (above) he is featured in a Seattle Times collage acting as defense attorney for Margaret Waley, the 19-year old kidnap suspect, charged in the regionally sensational case of the baby Weyerhaeuser abduction.  Facing him is assistant U.S. attorney Owen Hughes.  To prepare for the assembly of this collage, almost certainly both lawyers were asked to pose twice, one with and once without demonstrative gestures.  Hughes was given the gesture, and as it turned out won the case, to the relief of the accused, Mrs. Waley, who Dore described as tricked into the kidnapping by her husband, whom she, however, loved.  The wife, however, feared that if she was found innocent, the case might be appealed by a federal prosecutor under a federal crime that might have demanded her execution.   She was pleased with the guilty verdict, and also given a short sentence.

Dore takes his turn at pointing, perhaps in the court hallway.
Dore takes his turn at pointing, perhaps in the court hallway.   Awe but he seems to be smiling, healthy sunshine for all.
The mayor takes a photo opportunity with seductive evangelist and gospel monger who prefered to be known as Sister Aimee (McPherson).  During their meeting the Evangelist criticized the mayor for not using prayer during his campaign for reelection.  The Times clip dates from Jan. 15, 1934.
The mayor takes a photo opportunity with seductive evangelist and the gospel monger who preferred to be known as Sister Aimee (McPherson). During their meeting the popular Los Angeles-based  evangelist criticized the mayor for not using prayer during his campaign for reelection. The Times clip dates from Jan. 15, 1934.  Dore lost.

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GOVERNOR MARTIN signs on for SOAP LAKE and BUERGER’S DISEASE

To the joy of WW1 veterans, Gov. Clarence D. Martin signs House Bill No.70 reserving land at Soap Lake for a hospital treating Buerger's disease, "a mysterious malady" the Times captions reads, "that can be treated with Soap Lake water.   Martin was governor from 1932 to 1940.
To the joy of WW1 veterans, Gov. Clarence D. Martin signs House Bill No.70 reserving land at Soap Lake for a hospital treating Buerger’s disease, “a mysterious malady” the Times captions reads, “that can be treated with Soap Lake water.” Martin was governor from 1932 to 1940.

A nurse - or angel - with Buerger's disease victim on the here rocky shore of Soap Lake with a hospital on the horizon.
A nurse – or angel – guiding a Buerger’s disease victim onto the here rocky shore of Soap Lake with a hospital on the horizon. [click to enlarge]
A dummy page from Jean's and my book "Washington Then and Now."
A dummy page from Jean’s and my book “Washington Then and Now.” [click to enlarge]

The soap of Soap Lake - itself.
The soap of Soap Lake – itself – God’s Gift to the West.
Soap Lake's salts for bathing.  Geology's gift too.
Soap Lake’s salts for bathing. Geology’s gift too health hucksters.
One can still bathe in these salts and behind these stones.
One can still bathe in these salts and behind these stones.

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8. Three-Power-Nurses-WEB

Selected from a Times caption in 1934:  Three of the most prominent women of medicine in the Pacific Northwest met yesterday at the conference of the Northwest Hospital Association in Seattle. They are, left to right, Miss Carolyn Davis, first woman elected trustee of the American Hospital Association, and now superintendent of Good Samaritan Hospital, Portland: Miss May Loomis, for many years in charge of the Seattle City Hospital and now superintendent of the emergency department at Harborview: and Miss Evelyn Hall, now serving as nurses’ counselor at Harbor view after scores of years as superintendent of Seattle General Hospital.

Seattle Now & Then: Polk’s Potlatch Parade, 1911

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: A float for the 1911 Potlatch parade carries piggyback a smaller 1897 version of a Polk City Directory on a much bigger 1911 copy.  The fourteen years between them is meant to symbolize the growth of the city since the Alaskan/Yukon gold rush of 1897 that the Golden Potlatch of 1911 was created to commemorate.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
THEN: A float for the 1911 Potlatch parade carries piggyback a smaller 1897 version of a Polk City Directory on a much bigger 1911 copy. The fourteen years between them is meant to symbolize the growth of the city since the Alaskan/Yukon gold rush of 1897 that the Golden Potlatch of 1911 was created to commemorate. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
NOW: With his back close to Stewart Street, Jean Sherrard looks across Fourth Avenue to the front facade of the Thirty-story Escala Condos.
NOW: With his back close to Stewart Street, Jean Sherrard looks across Fourth Avenue to the front facade of the Thirty-story Escala Condos.

Riding its own float south on Fourth Avenue is, perhaps, the largest Polk City Directory ever assembled, although not published.  It is dated 1911, the year of this “Industrial Parade” for what was Seattle’s first Golden Potlatch, a summer celebration staged intermittently until World War Two.

Polk Directory The Idea

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Fourth Ave. has been freshly flattened here for the Denny Regrade, a public work that by this year reached Fifth Avenue and then stopped, leaving on its east side a steep grade – in some places a cliff.  On the far left horizon, the belfry for Sacred Heart Church still stands high above Sixth Avenue and Bell Street.  Both were razed in 1929, along with what remained of Denny Hill east of Fifth Avenue.

This one is closer to 5th Avenue than to 4th, although both the Denny School, far left, and the church belfry are easily found.  The cliff running across the photograph was groomed and worn through the next nearly 20 years, but still held during those years as the eastern border of the Denny Regrade until the lowering of the whole hill continued in 1929 to the east of 5th Avenue. (Courtesy Mike Maslan)
This one is closer to 5th Avenue than to 4th, although both the Denny School, far left, and the church belfry are easily found. The cliff running across the photograph was groomed and worn through the next nearly 20 years, but still held during those years as the eastern border of the Denny Regrade until the lowering of the whole hill continued in 1929 to the east of 5th Avenue. (Courtesy Mike Maslan)

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Potlatch-stump-house-WEB

Those are not helpful monks from the neighborhood parish guiding the horse-drawn float, but volunteers dressed in cowls of the Potlatch pageant’s own design.  When first delivered fresh from their Chicago factory and unveiled early in July (the Potlatch month), a Seattle Times reporter described them alternately as “insuring a brilliant or gorgeous display.”

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Across Fourth Avenue, the covered VIP reviewing stand below the Welcome sign was the first of many sections of bleachers constructed to the sides of both Third and Fourth Avenues. With thousands of seats offered for week-long rent to anyone with a dollar to spare, they helped pay for Potlatch, a celebration that this paper explained would “be first, last and all the times a joy session.  Seattle is going to pull the top off the town and let the folks see what it looks like when it is really going some.”

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To anyone who has pursued a study of local history, Polk directories are downright endearing.  First published in Seattle in 1887, they grew with the city until the company abandoned them in 1996 for “digits” – disks, that is, and on-line services.  Over forty years I have managed to collect about forty Polks; most of them recycled copies bought from the Friends of the Seattle Public Library’s annual book sales.  All are big, and all were worn when I first got them.  A few I have bound with sturdy rubber bands. They surround my desk, because I keep using them.

Potlatch-CommercialClubWEBb

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Certainly Jean, and we will start with Ron’s harvest of appropriate links, this time all from the neighborhood.  I’ll follow that with a few more Potlatch Parade pics.  We have, you know, inserted above other 1911 Potlatch parade photos with more floats and most of them on Fourth Avenue north of Stewart.  (By the way Jean, we expected that you would include this weekend some snaps from your and Karen’s trip to Southern California.   Any chance for adding the same soon?)

POTLATCH-BUG-WEB

THEN: The Moose float heads south on First Avenue at Columbia Street during the 1912 Potlatch parade of fraternal and secret societies. Behind them are Julius Redelsheimer's clothing store and the National Hotel, where daily room rates ran from 50 cents to a dollar.

THEN: Before this the first shovel of the last of Denny Hill was ceremonially dropped to the conveyor belt at Battery Street, an “initial bite of 30,000 cubic yards of material” was carved from the cliff along the east side of 5th Avenue to make room for both the steam shovel and several moveable belts that extended like fingers across the hill.  It was here that they met the elevated and fixed last leg of the conveyor system that ran west on Battery Street to the waterfront.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

2nd-and-Blanchard-THEN

Great railroad signs, theatre signs and ranks of neon were still the greatest contributors to night light at 4th and Westlake in 1949. (Photo by Robert Bradley compliment of Lawton and Jean Gowey)

Seattle Now & Then: Lady Rainier

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Sometime before her first move from this brewery courtyard in 1912, Lady Rainier was moved by a freeze to these sensational effects. She did not turn her fountain off.  (Courtesy of Frank & Margaret Fickeisen)
THEN: Sometime before her first move from this brewery courtyard in 1912, Lady Rainier was moved by a freeze to these sensational effects. She did not turn her fountain off. (Courtesy of Frank & Margaret Fickeisen)
NOW: Much later Lady Rainier was moved to South Seattle to the ground of what was Rainier Beer’s first brewery. Now many hear her yearning for a safe return to Georgetown.
NOW: Much later Lady Rainier was moved to South Seattle to the ground of what was Rainier Beer’s first brewery. Now many hear her yearning for a safe return to Georgetown.

Here is Lady Rainier, bronzed and ten-feet tall, holding her glass high while standing in the brewery courtyard.  She first appeared in the Seattle Times on February 7, 1904, for this paper’s “industrial review” of The Seattle Brewing and Malting Company.  Within an elaborate montage of mostly brewery interiors, the Times included the fountain. The paper explained, that it had been “made especially for the Rainier Brewery and imported from Germany (and) is a work of art and would grace any of the city’s parks.  When the water is turned on, it sprays over the glass giving the effect of foam flowing from the side.”  In this undated portrait of the Lady in her courtyard, the flowing foam effect has been “interpreted” with ice.

Part of the facade along Airport Way, ca. 1990
Part of the facade along Airport Way, ca. 1990

Georgetown historian Tim O’Brian, now deceased, liked to compare his early twentieth century brewery town – before prohibition – to a medieval community where crowded in the shadow of its cathedral was everyone and everything.  Here in place of a narthex, nave and chancel were a line up of Malt House, Brew House, and offices extending along Georgetown’s Snohomish Way (now Airport Way).  Tim boasted, “At 885 feet it was a few feet longer than St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome – although not as wide.” When completed in 1903 and fitted with its fountain, the “Georgetown Cathedral” could readily claim devotional status as “the largest brewery in the west.”

over the tracks
over the tracks

1. litho-Rainier-plant-wEB

By 1906 Rainier brewery was producing 300,000 barrels of beer – or spirits – a year.  It required twenty-five horse teams to handle deliveries consumed daily in Seattle alone.  But the Golden Gate State statistics were the most impressive. In 1911 if you were drinking beer – or shampooing your hair with it – most likely it was with Rainier. On average twenty-five carloads of Rainier Beer were delivered daily by rail to California.

Books-Rainier-Beer-etching-WEB

When the expanding brewery needed the Lady Rainier’s courtyard for a machine shop, she began her pilgrimage to several locations in and even atop the brewery. Too soon, however, Georgetown’s “only employer” was turned off as was its fountain – first for statewide prohibition in 1916, when the company moved to San Francisco.  National prohibition followed in 1920.

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In this week’s repeat, Lady Rainier looks down from her perch beside the “other” Rainier Brewery, also on Airport Way, but in South Seattle, less then two miles north of the remnants of the Georgetown Brewery.  In recent years the Georgetown Community Council has hoped to bring the Lady home to Georgetown’s Oxbow Park to stand beside another restored and protected Georgetown landmark, the Hat ‘n’ Boots.

MOVING LADY RAINIER

Georgetown historian Tim O’Brian thought that 1959 was the likely date for this moving of Lady Rainier.

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WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  YUP!  Ron Edge first.  Ron will attached to images that will link to two former Features that relate.  I’ll follow that with a few Georgtown photos – and Rainier Beer too.

THEN: The work of filling the tidelands south of King Street began in 1853 with the chips from Yesler’s sawmill.   Here in the neighborhood of 9th Ave. S. (Airport Way) and Holgate Street, the tideland reclaiming and street regrading continue 70 years later in 1923.  (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)

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CLICK-CLICK TO ENLARGE

HOW TO BE SICK

Last week’s stay in the University of Washington Hospital answered many years of wondering what it would be like to be put in a bed there.  The irritation of being awakened thru the night for samples and tests is softened by the generally good humor of those – nurses mostly – who are poking you awake.  And when my appetite returned I was hoping to stay longer, for the menu is quite good and the preparation too.  Rather I was encourage to get out during my 5th day, and so with Jean and Genny’s help I left with my four drugs and a long list of appointments for more tests and a variety of acts called procedures.  Now to confirm for Marc Cutler – of both the Old Fools and the Not Dead Yet societies, I am, indeed, not dead yet.

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Paul, just before going home with color back in his cheeks
Paul, just before going home with color back in his cheeks

Seattle Now & Then: Roosevelt Way, 1946

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Roosevelt Way bustling after the war.  This subject first appeared in The Seattle Times on July 7, 1946.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
THEN: Roosevelt Way bustling after the war. This subject first appeared in The Seattle Times on July 7, 1946. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
NOW: Nearly 70 years later, it seems that none of the businesses in this first block of Roosevelt Way north of 64th Stree survives.
NOW: Nearly 70 years later, it seems that none of the businesses in this first block of Roosevelt Way north of 64th Street survives.

This low-rise commercial avenue with diverse signs, street awnings, and poled power is Roosevelt Way looking north through 64th Street on Sunday May 7, 1946. It is a typical mid-century American hodgepodge, by now nostalgic. Similar to a few other local intersections then, this one displays one commanding eccentricity, a Van de Kamp bakery’s landmark windmill.

At this northeast corner everything within and without was, to quote the company’s promotion, “artistically decorated in delft blue and white,” except, of course, the baked goods. There were 150 of these, including the “17 kinds of old Dutch coffee cakes,” noted on the sign above the awning. All were “guaranteed fresh every day.” Inside the windmill were the “Dutch Girl” hostesses, who wore flamboyant hats that resembled the wings of a plumpish swan extended for a landing. For the formal opening on August 7, 1929, the company invited all Seattle to visit its “fifteen beautiful stores.” Less that four months later Van de Kamp’s claimed nineteen locations, with an ambitious ad that included a photograph of this Roosevelt store. The company continued to grow during the Great Depression and promoted products into the 1980s, but by then within supermarkets. That is how I remember them, with windmills limited to in-store signs and on logos for its products, many of them by then frozen.

One door north is Brehm’s, a pickle fancier’s deli that got its modest Pike Place Market start in the teens, and like its neighbor the baker, kept growing, reaching “fourteen convenient locations” in 1941. At the north end of this block is Sears, which opened at the corner of 65th street in 1929 and kept selling there for half a century, closing early in 1980. A Seattle City Light neighborhood service center at the northwest corner of Roosevelt Way and 64th Street, on the left at 6401 Roosevelt Way, also opened in 1929. The state later stocked one of its first post-prohibition liquor stores next door at 6403 Roosevelt Way.

The current occupant at the old City light and state liquor corner is the Sunlight Café. Its longevity is impressive. When it took occupancy in 1980 the Sunlight was one of merely three vegetarian restaurants in Seattle. Now there are dozens. I confess to having been routinely comforted by its menu since it first opened. Although he is no landmark windmill, Joe Noone, one of the Sunlight’s worker-owners, is mildly eccentric. Joe is a classics scholar who might be found reading ancient Latin or Greek after creating a generous vegetable tofu sauté or a Sunlight Nutburger.

WEB EXTRAS

Our extras may be sparse this week, but perhaps Ron Edge will add a few links….Ron?

Just a couple related post this week Jean.

THEN:The early evening dazzle of the Roosevelt Theatre at 515 Pike Street, probably in 1941. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)