Category Archives: Uncategorized

Seattle Now & Then: A Brooklyn Home Taken for the Cleaners

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: When it was built in 1902, this box home, with classic Ionic pillars at the porch, was set above the northwest corner of the freshly graded Brooklyn Avenue and 47th Street in the University District.  (Courtesy, John Cooper)
THEN: When it was built in 1902, this box home, with classic Ionic pillars at the porch, was set above the northwest corner of the freshly graded Brooklyn Avenue and 47th Street in the University District. (Courtesy, John Cooper)
NOW: For customer parking, the grade at the corner was lowered for Carson Cleaners, which has occupied the corner since 1962, almost as long as the residence it replaced.
NOW: For customer parking, the grade at the corner was lowered for Carson Cleaners, which has occupied the corner since 1962, almost as long as the residence it replaced.

The original print of this “real photo postcard” is bordered with the scribbled message that I have cropped away: “Remember me to any old class mates you happen to see.”  The postcard shows another message as well, one that is most helpful, while still mildly mutilating the postcard’s face. It appears in the gray sky between the two homes. Although barely readable, you may decipher “Brooklyn Ave” written there.  The postcard also shows a dimly drawn line leading to the street number 4703, nailed to the top of the front porch.

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A detail pulled from the 1908 Baist Real Estate map with the intersection of Brooklyn Ave. and 47th Street right-of-center.
A detail pulled from the 1908 Baist Real Estate map with the intersection of Brooklyn Ave. and 47th Street right-of-center.
"Void" from some other but us dear reader.  This is, of course, the tax card generated by the Works Progress Administration in the late 1930s for its inventory of every taxable property in King County.  Many unregistered structures were found in the tax-enriching process.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue branch)
“Void” for some others  but not us dear reader. This is, of course, one of the thousands of  tax cards generated by the Works Progress Administration in the late 1930s for its inventory of every taxable property in King County. Many unregistered structures were found in this tax-enriching process. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue branch)

This then is 4703 Brooklyn Avenue in the University District, an identification I corroborated with a photograph of the same house attached to its assessor’s “tax card,” held in the Puget Sound Branch of the Washington State Archives in Bellevue.  The tax records have the classic box built in 1902, a year in which the neighborhood was still as likely called Brooklyn as the University District.  Brooklyn was the name given to it in 1890 by super-developer James Moore. He chose the name because his addition “looked across the water” to Seattle proper like the New York borough of the same name that looks across the East River to Manhattan.  Brooklyn Avenue, its intended main street, was the first one graded in the addition, and it was at this intersection that Moore constructed a water tower.

A paid promotion for the then new Brooklyn addition placed in The Seattle Press for Dec. 1, 1890.
A paid promotion for the then new Brooklyn addition placed in The Seattle Press for Dec. 1, 1890.
Amos T. Winsor's obituary for Aug. 21, 1947
Amos T. Winsor’s obituary for Aug. 21, 1947

The owners of this classic box were Amos and Alice Winsor.  In his 1947 obituary (above) Amos is credited with having lived in the district for forty-four years and “built many of the early buildings on the University of Washington Campus, including Science (renamed Parrington) Hall.”  Included among the Winsor family’s many celebrations held in their home was their daughter Olivia Rachel’s marriage to a Brooklyn neighbor, Vilas Richard Rathbun, on April 16,

April 17,1913 Wedding report for
April 17,1913 Wedding report for Olive Rachel Winsor and Vilas Richard Rathbun, and another below for April twentieth.

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Olive and her husband Vilas have moved in with her parents at 4703 Brooklyn Avenue.
Olive and her new husband Vilas have moved in with her parents at 4703 Brooklyn Avenue.  The Seattle Time’s piece appears on December, 12, 1914.  Vilas’ parents live nearby on 15th Avenue.
By at most ten years more, part of the Winsor home has been divided into a rented apartment.
By at most ten years more, a sizable part of the Winsor home has been divided into a rented apartment.

1913.  They were, The Times reported, “Surrounded by about fifty relatives and intimate friends.”  The ceremony was conducted by Horace Mason, the progressive pastor of University Congregational Church.  From both the congregation’s and the addition’s beginnings in 1890, the Congregationalists were effective at promoting the Brooklyn Community Club, the principal campaigner for neighborhood improvements.

University Congregational Church at the northeast corner of Brooklyn Ave. and 43rd Street.
University Congregational Church at the northeast corner of Brooklyn Ave. and 43rd Street.

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Inside the Methodist sanctuary.
Inside the Congregationalist  sanctuary.
University Congregational's second sanctuary at the northeast corner of 43rd Street and Brooklyn Avenue appears bottom-right in this look southeast across the "Ave" and part of the UW campus from the Meany Hotel.
University Congregational’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of 43rd Street and Brooklyn Avenue appears bottom-right in this look southeast across the “Ave” (at the center) and part of the UW campus (on the left) from the Meany Hotel.   The Methodists are on the left and the Post Office to this side of them.

In the “now” photograph, the by now half-century old plant of Carson Cleaners replaced the Winsor home in 1962.  Bob Carson tells how his parents, Roy and Doris, were persuaded by the corner’s new owner, Helen Rickert, of Helen Rickert Gown Shop on the “Ave”, to open a cleaners at the corner.  Richert was a fan, consistently pleased with how the Carsons handled her gowns and dresses in the cleaners Lake City shop.  The Carsons agreed to the move and brought their modern corner sign with them. Bob half apologizes for the condition of the now also half-century old sign and reader board.  “It needs to be repainted, but our lease is up in December and I’m retiring.”  For Bob we add both our “congratulations” and a “whoopee.”

The property's tax card continued.
The property’s tax card extended to show the big changes of 1962.  .

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Surely Jean, with Ron’s help we have three links added that are well-appointed with University District features, although most of them stick to “The Ave.” or University Way, AKA, thru its now 124 years, as 14th Avenue and Columbus Street.   But then Brooklyn was first named Broadway.

[CLICK & DISCOVER]

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On Oct. 18, 1925 The Seattle Times reached University Way with its series on Seattle's neighborhood.
On Oct. 18, 1925 The Seattle Times reached University Way with its series on Seattle’s neighborhood. [CLICK to ENLARGE]
We have shared this north end map before.  This detail shows that in the late 1890s the neighborhoods north of Lake Union included Fremont, Edgewater, Latona, and Brooklyn.  The last was not abandoned until well into the 20th century.  Now it is always University District.   But then Latona, Edgewater and Ross, far left, as hardly heard either.
We have shared this north end detail from a Seattle map before.  It shows that in the late 1890s the neighborhoods on the north shore of Lake Union included Fremont, Edgewater, Latona, and Brooklyn. This last was not abandoned until well into the 20th century. Now it is always University District.  Latona, Edgewater and Ross, far left, are hardly heard either.

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NOW THEN & MAYBE

NOW it has come to what we sometimes affectionately call Nighty-Bears, the wee-morning hour when we climb the stairs to what this night after a few hot days will be an warm bed.   I am eager to retire, somewhat drained by a pursuit this afternoon of a few more sides for this week’s subject, the broad way of Brooklyn Ave.  THEN after a late breakfast I’ll return and put up the “other sides” we, again, have prepared but for now not plopped because we are pooped.   Nighty-Bears then, but  with something entirely different at the temporary bottom: an unidentified “painted lady.”  She is for me an exciting intimation of all the joyful work that is expected ahead while shaping MOFA: the Museum of Forsaken Art.   And this place, below, if not forsaken is, at least, forgotten.  I do not remember where or when I recorded it’s rhythms and tenderly abused symmetry, but almost certainly not on Brooklyn, not even MAYBE.

z. Northwest-Painted-Lady-WEB

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BROOKLYN AVE. CONTINUES after breakfast, SUNDAY JULY 13, 2014, 12:45 PM

Unlike most corners, the intersection of Brooklyn and 47th has kept its gas.  Here at the northeast corner and next kitty-corner too.  Both are late 1930s tax photos, dutifully labeled. (Courtesy, Wash Start Archives)
Unlike many corners, the intersection of Brooklyn and 47th has kept its gas – here at the northeast corner and next below kitty-corner too, and  now with an enlarged Baptist sanctuary behind the station.   Both are late 1930s tax photos, dutifully labeled. (Courtesy, Wash Start Archives)

1. Brookly-Ave-47TH-NEc-Chevron-now-July-12,2014-WEB

2. Brooklyn-&-47th-swC-Union-76-7-14-2004-WEB

2. Mobilgas-4557-Brooklyn--CA-1938

Along with Fringies and Hippies, Urban Renewal - or studies and plans for such - came to the University District.  This slide came to me from the district's then acting mayor, Cal McCune, a tall, broad-shouldered, thoughtful friend.  It was part of a survey of the district concerned primarily with its parking.  The view looks north on Brooklyn Ave. from the Meany  Hotel and shows in the foreground the "residents" to the sides of 47th and Brookllyn, including the cleaners, the two service stations and the Episcopalians.  University Heights school is above-center.
Along with Fringies and Hippies, Urban Renewal – or studies and plans for such – came to the University District in the 1960s. This slide came to me from the district’s then acting mayor, Calmar McCune, a tall, broad-shouldered, thoughtful friend. It was part of a survey of the district concerned primarily with its parking. The view looks north on Brooklyn Ave. from the Meany Hotel and shows in the foreground the “residents” to the sides of 47th and Brooklyn, including Carson Cleaners, the two service stations and the Christ parish Episcopalians. University Heights school is above-center.
University Heights, looking northwest from the intersection of 50th and University Way, then still named 14th Avenue.
University Heights, looking northwest from the intersection of 50th and University Way, then still named 14th Avenue.

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I snapped both the above and below records of the north facade of the Kincade Apartments and coin-op laundromat that has been there for as long as I remember the neighborhood.  The bottom record I made in the heat of yesterday's late afternoon, but I neither remember when I took the photo on top nor why.   The place was important to me and my bag of soiled clothes, and I got their in the Toyoto on the right.  And on top Safeco and the Meany Hotel look down like like chums.
I snapped both the above and below records of the north facade of the Kincade Apartments and coin-op laundromat that has been there for as long as I remember the neighborhood. The bottom record I made in the heat of yesterday’s late afternoon, but I neither remember when I took the photo on top nor why. The place was important to me and my bag of soiled clothes, and I got their in the Toyoto on the right.  On top Safeco and the Meany Hotel look down like like chums.

4. BOOKLYLN-AVE-Wash-N'-Shop-ca4520-Now-7-12-2014-web

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Mid-block on the east side of Brooklyn Ave. between 45th and 47th streets, the Kincade Apartments, circa 1925.
Mid-block on the east side of Brooklyn Ave. between 45th and 47th streets, the Kincade Apartments, circa 1925.

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The Evelyn Apartments north and across Brooklyn Ave. from the Kincade Apartments.
The Evelyn Apartments north of and across Brooklyn Ave. from the Kincade Apartments.

8. Evelyn Apts. Brooklyn-Brick-mid-block-ca-4523-now-WEB

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THE OUTRAGEOUS TACO CO., THEN & NOW

Another slide from Mayor Cal's district survey in the late 1960s.
Another slide from Mayor Cal’s district survey in the late 1960s.

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North on Brooklyn from the cleaners at 47rh.
North on Brooklyn from Carson Cleaners at 47rh.

7a. Brooklyn-Ave.-outrageous-taco-w.a.-now-WEB

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Organized in 1890 the First Church of Brooklyn, with help from its "mother" Plymouth Congregational Church, built this chapel on the west side of Brooklyn Avenue, mid-block between 41st and 42nd Streets.  Thru its first years it was both a church and civic center, and much of  the first neighborhood activism was conspired within it.  In 1910 the congregation moved into its new sanctuary at 43rd and Brooklyn - featured above - with its new name, the University Congregational Church.
Organized in 1890 the first Church of Brooklyn, with help from its “mother” Plymouth Congregational Church, built this chapel on the west side of Brooklyn Avenue, mid-block between 41st and 42nd Streets. Thru its first years it was both a church and civic center, and much of the first neighborhood activism was conspired within it. In 1910 the congregation moved into its new sanctuary at 43rd and Brooklyn – featured above – with its new name, the University Congregational Church.  Queen Anne Hill is on the left horizon.
The embarrassingly plain and sensationally named - for hormone-driven students - Maverick Apartments take the place and more of the community's first church.
The embarrassingly plain and sensationally named – for the more impetuous and hormone-driven students? – Maverick Apartments take the place and more of the community’s first church.

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The Super AP Market the east side of Brooklyn Ave. and north of the Congregationalist's 1910 sanctuary, were not so super, but still long-lived, that is, I remember it.   This view looks to the northwest and shows, top-center, the General Insurance Building - formally the Brooklyn Building, and later the Safeco Building with the big sign on the roof, and since 1973 the home of its 22 story tower and now embraced in the University of Washington's neighborhood hegemony.  The depression-time tax photo also gives a glimpse of the Meany Hotel, upper-right, at the northwest corner of 45th Street and Brooklyn Avenue.
The Super AP Market on the east side of Brooklyn Ave. and north of the Congregationalist’s 1910 sanctuary, were not so super, but still long-lived, that is, I remember it. This view looks to the northwest and shows, top-center, the General Insurance Building – formally the Brooklyn Building, and later the Safeco Building with the big reader-board sign on the roof (see below), and since 1973 the home of its 22 story tower, a tower now embraced in the University of Washington’s neighborhood hegemony. The depression-time tax photo also gives a glimpse of the Meany Hotel, upper-right, at the northwest corner of 45th Street and Brooklyn Avenue.
Work-in-progress on the district's station for the underground rapid transit.
Work-in-progress on the district’s station for the underground rapid transit.
The back of the Safeco roof-top sign seen from the Meany Hotel, ca. 1969.  I remember the message of its reader-board, "Big Brother is Watching."
The back of the Safeco roof-top sign seen from the Meany Hotel, ca. 1969. I remember a message on its reader-board, “Big Brother is Watching.”
The Meany Hotel in 2002.
The Meany Hotel in 2002 with its then and short-lived new name, University Tower.
Handsome, statuesque, professorial, and a good poser, Ed Meany was often painted ad photographed.  The artist here is unknown - by me, at least.  Nor do I remember the painting.
Handsome, statuesque, professorial, and a good poser, the hotel’s namesake  Ed Meany was often painted ad photographed. The artist here is unknown – by me, at least. Nor do I remember the painting. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Edmond Meany at the 1931 inauguration banquet for the opening of his namesake hotel.   (Courtesy, U.W.Libraries)
Edmond Meany at the 1931 inauguration banquet for the opening of his namesake hotel. (Courtesy, U.W.Libraries)
By comparison, it is the Golden Anniversary of my 1964 visit to the Meany Hotel with Joyce Gammel.   On our first date after dinner at the Space Needle ($10 dollars we spent on dinner and wine!) we stopped at the Meany  and improvised a photography studio with a table lamp in the lobby.  That evening was encouraging.  We spent the next seven months together, until her death from a blood cancer in June of 1965.  Ten years more and she may have survived with chemo.  Although Joyce had some of that cocktail in '64 it was crude by comparison and considerably more painful too.  Below is a charcoal of Joyce drawn by my painting mentor then, Herman Keys.
By comparison, here are two portraits of Joyce Gammel.  it is the Golden Anniversary of my 1964 visit to the Meany Hotel with Joyce  on our first date. After dinner at the Space Needle ($10 dollars we spent on dinner and wine!) we stopped at the Meany and improvised a photography studio with a table lamp in the lobby. That evening was encouraging. We spent the next seven months together, until Joyce’s death from a blood cancer in June of 1965. Ten years more and she may have survived with chemo. Although Joyce had some of that cocktail even in ’64 it was crude by comparison and considerably more painful too. Below is a charcoal of Joyce drawn by my painting mentor then, Herman Keys.

5,-Joyce-Gammel-painting-WEB

5. meany-main-then-WEB

First appeared in Pacific, April 20, 2003.
First appeared in Pacific, April 20, 2003.

5. Meany-Hall-Now-WEB

The Safeco Tower newly signed with the University's glowing banner snapped from the car window on Roosevelt after leaving Trader Joes on Dec. 6, 2008.
The Safeco Tower renewed or transformed with the University’s glowing banner snapped from the car window on Roosevelt after leaving Trader Joes on Dec. 6, 2008.
Forty-Fifth Street as the "Gateway to Wallingford . . . and Ballard" seen looking west from Brooklyn Avenue on Dec. 22, 1948, photographed either by Lawton Gowey or Robert Bradley.   The latter's slides are often mixed in with the former's collection.
Forty-Fifth Street as the “Gateway to Wallingford . . . and Ballard” seen looking west from Brooklyn Avenue on Dec. 22, 1948, photographed either by Horace Sykes, or Lawton Gowey or Robert Bradley. The last’s  slides are often mixed in with the Syke’s collection, which were inherited by Gowey and then given to me.

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ANOTHER BROOKLYN

3. Brooklyn-bldg-University-&-3rd-then-WEB

Lawton Gowey's glowing record of the Brooklyn Building on August 25, 1976.
Lawton Gowey’s glowing record of the Brooklyn Building at the southeast corner of University Street ad Second Avenue on August 25, 1976.

 

 

VILLA APARTMENTS ADDENDUM

Hi Paul,

The Sunday Seattle Times article gave a nice overview of the history of the Villa Apartments.  It did not mention Capitol Hill Housing’s role in reviving the building.  While rooms may no longer rent for $2.50 a week, the Villa Apartments still stands because of the work of Capitol Hill Housing.  In the late 1990s, this affordable housing and community building organization purchased the Villa, which had fallen into disrepair. The commercial facades were restored, strong retail tenants were attracted, and a major extension was added on to the back side of the property.  The renovation was a key early act in helping transform Pike/Pike from a driving corridor to a destination. In a neighborhood where new studio apartments now rent for more than $2,000 a month, the Villa is an example of CHH’s efforts to strengthen the community and keep rents affordable for regular working people.

A few years ago, in collaboration with the Northwest School, CHH added a mural to the west side of the site. I’ll attach a photo of it. The muralist was Derek Wu working with NW School students.

Michael Seiwerath, Capitol Hill Housing

CHH-Villa-mural-WEB

 

NAMU ADDENDUM

We received a fine comment from the mildly anonymous Phil D. today in response to a blog post we made some time ago about the killer whale Namu’s time at Pier 56.  The link is http://pauldorpat.com/ivar/pier-56-aquarium-in-the-1960s-very-big-sharks-and-namu/

That intrepid Boeing retiree Werner Lengenhager's capture of the Namu's sidewalk sign.  (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)
That intrepid Boeing retiree Werner Lengenhager’s capture of the Namu’s sidewalk sign. (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)

Phil’s comment follows.

“2013, and 1966 was a long time ago…but what an outstanding experience in my life.  I was privileged to be hired by Ted Griffin to work with Namu at Smith Cove in the early part of 1966 until Namu was brought to Seattle.  Then, I was given a wireless microphone and said to present demonstrations of Namu to the public…which I did many times that summer.

“I really came to love Namu with the closeness of feeding, petting, scratching his back, sides and belly.  Many times I was able to get very close to Namu while feeding him with a slice of salmon.  I was 21 at the time, and really enjoyed the people who came to see the show.

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“At times, Namu, when demonstrating a high jump, would go back into the water without hardly a splash.  Other times, however, he would come down  kinda falling over so as to completely soak the ones in the way of the huge wave & spray!  One incident in the evening took place with no one there, but two men and a lady who were dressed to the hilt for a night on the town.  For them, I’m sure it was as memorable an evening as it was for me.   When I cautioned them they’d be safer from getting wet if they went up the ramp and observed from there, they decided to take a chance and see at float level.   You guessed it…it was the greatest of Namu’s jokes on the crowd…the got entirely drenched.  Their reaction???  They all, after catching their breath from the cold water drench, broke out laughing, and even grateful for this fantastic memory…seeing the huge body of Namu nearly leap completely out of the water (after having carefully popped his head out of the water prior to the jump, scoped out the situation…including the three observers and the ball held out high above the water by yours truly).  Then, with no time to react, they saw Namu falling toward them!  You can well imagine the rest…as I see it still clearly in my minds eye.

“Thanks for the memories, Namu and Seattle”

This appeared in part first in the Seattle Times for August 23, 1970.
This appeared in part first in the Seattle Times for August 23, 1970.

 

HELIX – Vol. 4, No. 8, (late September, 1968)

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We learn in this issue that it is the last of our bi-weekly offerings.  After this we went weekly until the end.  We surely felt confident.  Here again, although thousands of miles apart, Bill White and I read an issue together with the generous help of Skype.  These edited versions are shorter than the time we took and recorded, but still even with Bill’s pruning we do ramble and sometimes stumble.  Each trip (issue) we discuss is, however, certainly instructive, and considerably more than smoldering nostalgia for our lost youth.  Well I should speak for myself, for Bill, much my junior, is still living lucky and in his prime.  Thanks – repeated – to Ron Edge for doing the scanning.   It certainly suites his assiduous side, and boundless love for old publications.  [If you have any old regional papers - really old - please consider sharing them with Ron.  He'll make a disk for you, Id' bet.]

B.White and P. Dorpat

04-08 Cover

SUBS EXPLAINED – Letters from BILL HOELLER

In our last Sunday feature I shared with Berangere and Jean the hope that some reader would respond with explanations for the largely mysterious – for us – submarines that we included there.  We were blessed with just such from Bill Hoeller.  Now we will print out his explanations beneath the subs they apply to.  And we will introduce this with the introduction to his first letter to us.  Thanks much Bill.

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Dear Paul,

Having been born and raised in Seattle I always look forward to your Seattle Now & Then feature every Sunday.  In 1940 when I was born I lived in the Rainier Valley.  My wife and I currently live in Wallingford.  I saw you had some questions concerning submarines, which I know a little about, so I thought I would respond.  I’m also anxious to see additional posts about submarines.

All the best,

Bill Hoeller

This submarine is the H-Class submarine H-1 (SS-28).  She was commissioned as the Seawolf, but was renamed the H-1.  The H-3, built here at the Moran shipyard, was named the Garfish (SS-30).
This submarine is the H-Class submarine H-1 (SS-28). She was commissioned as the Seawolf, but was renamed the H-1. The H-3, built here at the Moran shipyard, was named the Garfish (SS-30).
I’m still trying to find the name of this submarine.  She’s a Balao or Tench class submarine that underwent a Guppy conversion.  The shark fin looking thing up near the bow and just aft of the sail are two of the three sonar arrays for the PUFFS passive underwater fire control BQG-4 system that would give the range and bearing of a target.  The third array would be well aft on the submarine.  The high sail was added to the original configuration of the boat to provide more protection for those on the bridge from heavy seas, and was referred to as a North Atlantic Sail.  These sails were also made partially of plastics to reduce weight and reduce corrosion.  The boat may very well have been a foreign submarine when this photo was taken, one of the many Guppy boats we gave away.
I’m still trying to find the name of this submarine. She’s a Balao or Tench class submarine that underwent a Guppy conversion. The shark fin looking thing up near the bow and just aft of the sail are two of the three sonar arrays for the PUFFS passive underwater fire control BQG-4 system that would give the range and bearing of a target. The third array would be well aft on the submarine. The high sail was added to the original configuration of the boat to provide more protection for those on the bridge from heavy seas, and was referred to as a North Atlantic Sail. These sails were also made partially of plastics to reduce weight and reduce corrosion. The boat may very well have been a foreign submarine when this photo was taken, one of the many Guppy boats we gave away. LATER . . .  Thank you very much for asking Paul.  You’re more than welcome to quote me.
 
Regarding the mystery boat moored across from the Continental Can Company, I belong to the United State Submarine Veterans, Inc. (USSVI) so I asked a friend of mine, Patrick Householder, who lives here and who once was the National Commander of the organization.  The USSVI has over 13, 000 members, so the pool of knowledge within the group about U.S. submarines is infinite.  Patrick knows more than most about U.S. diesel submarines.
 
Patrick said the boat was either the USS Salmon (SS-573) or the USS Sailfish (SS-572), and now that he said it I agree.  Since the Salmon was a west coast boat and the Sailfish was an east coast boat, the boat in the picture is the undoubtedly the Salmon.  I should have thought of Salmon because she was in our flotilla in San Diego when I was on Sea Devil (SS-400).  
 
Salmon and Sailfish were purpose built as radar picket boats and both were 350’ long, which at the time was huge.  The standard Gato, Balao and Tench class fleet submarines at the time were 312’ long.  The boats carried a huge radar antenna on deck aft of the sail, and another huge antenna on top of the sail when they operated as picket boats, but when they were re-classified as regular diesel attack submarines their huge radar antennas were removed.   [Here I asked Bill Hoeller to explain the meaning of "picket boats" in his passage above.  His answer follows.]  Don’t hold my feet to the fire on this, but the term “picket” would be likened to a picket fence around a house to act as a barrier to keep dogs in the yard (or perhaps outside the yard.)  During the battle for Okinawa destroyers formed a picket barrier away from the main battle fleet to give early warning of Japanese aircraft Kamikaze attacks, and although the destroyers performed their job well many of them naturally became targets of the Kamikaze and many were sunk.  The notion came up that perhaps a submarine could better do the job by submerging before the aircraft attacked, but nothing was done until shortly after the war.  Perhaps eight or so conventional fleet diesel submarines were configured with huge search radars that allowed them to determine the range, distance and altitude of an aircraft.  Here on the west coast I remember there were the Spinax, the Rock, the Raton and the Rasher.  The Salmon and the Sailfish were purpose built as radar picket boats, as was the nuclear powered submarine USS Triton (SSRN-586).  She was the boat that sailed around the world submerged.  The whole program of using submarines as radar picket boats didn’t last long, perhaps for a year or a bit longer.  Radars on long range aircraft performed the job much better.
Here’s a photo of Salmon in San Francisco Bay that I found on the Internet.  I think it’s rather cool.
Here’s a photo of Salmon in San Francisco Bay that I found on the Internet. I think it’s rather cool.
These two boats are the Bass (SS-164) and the Bonita (SS165).  They were V-Class boats.
These two boats are the Bass (SS-164) and the Bonita (SS165). They were V-Class boats.
Here’s the Bass again.  Inboard of the Bass is probably the Barracuda (SS-163).  The outboard boat is the Dolphin (SS-169).  When she operated out of the old Coco Solo submarine base in Panama she was the D-1.  Like the Bass and Barracuda the Dolphin was a V-Class boat.
Here’s the Bass again. Inboard of the Bass is probably the Barracuda (SS-163). The outboard boat is the Dolphin (SS-169). When she operated out of the old Coco Solo submarine base in Panama she was the D-1. Like the Bass and Barracuda the Dolphin was a V-Class boat.
Below as you know is the USS Carp (SS-338).  She was a Balao class boat, commissioned in February 1945, and made one war patrol before the war ended.  She was sold for scrap in 1973.
Below as you know is the USS Carp (SS-338). She was a Balao class boat, commissioned in February 1945, and made one war patrol before the war ended. She was sold for scrap in 1973.
The USS Puffer (SS-268), a Gato class submarine, had a stellar career in WWII.  She sustained one of the longest depth charging of any submarine, over 31 hours.  She was submerged for 38 hours before coming back to the surface.   Puffer holds a special place for me.  I enlisted in the Navy aboard her in 1957 when she was the training boat for Submarine Reserve Division 13-16 here in Seattle at the Naval Armory.  I spent a lot of time aboard her, and spent a lot of time marching around inside the Armory.   You mentioned you lived for a time in a houseboat along Fairview, and told the story of the Puffer going adrift.  When I was fourteen I worked for a commercial diver as his tender.  He had a moorage for his diving barge at the north end of Lake Union, just east of the Gas Works.  He managed to corral a lot of galvanized barrels.  We filled the barrels with water, placed them under houseboats between the cedar logs upon which the houses were built, and blew the water out using compressed air, which helped to raise the houseboat up a bit.  The cedar logs over the years would become waterlogged and slowly sink.  We worked on houseboats all around Lake Union and Portage Bay.
The USS Puffer (SS-268), a Gato class submarine, had a stellar career in WWII. She sustained one of the longest depth charging of any submarine, over 31 hours. She was submerged for 38 hours before coming back to the surface.
Puffer holds a special place for me. I enlisted in the Navy aboard her in 1957 when she was the training boat for Submarine Reserve Division 13-16 here in Seattle at the Naval Armory. I spent a lot of time aboard her, and spent a lot of time marching around inside the Armory.
You mentioned you lived for a time in a houseboat along Fairview, and told the story of the Puffer going adrift. When I was fourteen I worked for a commercial diver as his tender. He had a moorage for his diving barge at the north end of Lake Union, just east of the Gas Works. He managed to corral a lot of galvanized barrels. We filled the barrels with water, placed them under houseboats between the cedar logs upon which the houses were built, and blew the water out using compressed air, which helped to raise the houseboat up a bit. The cedar logs over the years would become waterlogged and slowly sink. We worked on houseboats all around Lake Union and Portage Bay.

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HOPEFULLY – if we can find it – we intend to return to this SUBMARINE SECTION of our blog with something on THE PRINCESS ANGELINE, the “first atomic submarine built for Puget Sound commuter service.”  We doubt that it was ever built.  Were we not quoting we would have preferred to write “planned for Puget Sound commuter service.” Please check for it later.

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEXLIX Vol. 4, No. 7, (early September, 1968)

Helix Banner 2k red blue

We were not very good about getting every issue of Helix properly noted for its number and date.  This was the first issue printed after the first (of 3) Sky River Rock Festivals gathered together over Labor Day.  So this is from 1968.   Without any confidence in the internal evidence of this tabloid itself, we have dated it above “early September, 1968.  It occurs to me that this negligence or uncertainly is, in part or from one prospect, a sign that we were then living in eternity.  (This week – for the next Helix and hopefully within a week or two – we will look for other photos taken at the first Sky River.  An google search will certainly show others.)

B.White and P. Dorpat

04-07 Cover

A NIGHT IN OLD MASONIC TEMPLE ADDENDUM – Jef Jaisun Pixs and Reports

Our old friend (who yet does not seem to age), rock-n-roller, bluesman, front-stage photographer, party-thrower, columnist, incessant wit and politico, Jef Jaisun sends this press-photo and clipping – his creations from a 1979 concert at the Capitol Hill Masonic Temple on Pine Street, the site of the Link Lingenbrink’s Artist League balls covered here earlier this week.  Thanks to Jef.

Butterfield-WEB

ButterfieldDankoStory2-WEB