Seattle Now & Then: A Protest in 1937

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Depression-era protestors climb Columbia Street sidewalk along-aside Seattle architect Harlan Thomas’s elegant Seattle landmark that opened in 1925 as home to the by then already forty-three year old Seattle Chamber of Commerce.  (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: Depression-era protestors climb Columbia Street sidewalk along-aside Seattle architect Harlan Thomas’s elegant Seattle landmark that opened in 1925 as home to the by then already forty-three year old Seattle Chamber of Commerce. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The Chamber moved from its landmark at 215 Columbia Street nearly a quarter-century ago.  Among it residents presently is SEIU Healthcare NW Training Partnership.
NOW: The Chamber moved from its landmark at 215 Columbia Street nearly a quarter-century ago. Among it residents presently is SEIU Healthcare NW Training Partnership.

The Seattle Chamber of Commerce building, its name signed with the luster of gold leaf lettering on each of the heftily-glassed dark doors on the left, is both physically and politically to the right of this cadre of about a dozen demonstrators marching east on Columbia Street up to Third Avenue.  Seven of the patrol are wrapped in professionally produced signs that resonate with depression-era concerns and commands.

As it turned out the Seattle Chamber of Commerce's full-page advertisement  for July 25, 1937 was premature.  The rise of the economy that was the trend in the beginning of July a month later began its moved in the other direction: down.
As it turned out the Seattle Chamber of Commerce’s full-page advertisement for July 25, 1937 was premature. The rise of the economy that was the trend in the beginning of July a month later began its moved in the other direction: down, which carried on for the  year of what is called the “Recession of 1937-1938″ in the Great Depression of 1929-1940.  BLOW THIS ONE UP with some clicks to read the Boomer’s optimism that rings in-with-and-under it  a a Real Presence of Commerce. 

The original negative is one of the great hoard of Post-Intelligencer photos that are protected by the white-gloved hands of Museum of History and Industry archivists.  It is numbered “PI22387” and, quoting MOHAI photographer Howard Giske, “It has a file date of July 15, 1937, on the old PI negative sleeve . . . good enough for me!”  Alas, with the help of skilled librarians in the Seattle Room of our central public library, we did not find it in the paper itself.

While it is not unusual for a busy daily to neglect a negative, we will hope that a Pacific reader might visit the central library, and after a more dogged microfilm search than ours, find that this subject of a silent and yet telling moment of protest on Columbia Street was also published and captioned on the pulp pages of the P-I during the summer of 1937.

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Meanwhile, for a better understanding of the subject, we recommend retired UW Archivist Richard Berner’s Seattle 1921-1940: From Boom to Bust, which covers local history during the bubbling 1920s up through the Great Depression of the 1930s. Berner notes (on page 409) that a recession, in the midst of the Great Depression, began in August 1937 when “Cutbacks in federal work relief funds coincided with unemployment levels that approached those of 1932-1933.” The timing is such that the event pictured in the ‘then’ photo, snapped in July by the P-I photographer, is prelude to the August recession.

The back cover with notable blurbs worth reading.
The back cover with notable blurbs worth reading.

The “red-baiting” that we usually associate with the Cold War was also commonplace during the Great Depression, when communists were thought to be behind every placard.  And here, far right, it seems they are.  We may have a “commie” in the picture!  Held like an umpire’s chest protector, a “newsboy” blandishes a copy of The Daily Worker, the Communist Party’s long-lived publication.  Unfortunately, the focus is too soft to read the front page, which by 1937 could have included the latest baseball scores. Might it be that this confrontation of the two dailies, the P-I and the Daily Worker, was reason enough for the former not to print this negative?  It is more likely that the bigger daily was distracted by the great mass of its own daily news.  Or that we have simply missed it.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Well, yes Jean, and we struggled over selections from past features of protest or those, again, of the neighborhood.   We get both in Ron Edge’s first link below.  The others keep to both for the most part, although we have included some of Berangere’s recent reports from Paris.  Following the eleven links attached below (and some of them will be very familiar to regular readers – like the Friends of the Market 1971 march in front of City Hall, which was the “top feature” here only two weeks past) we will continue with a few more neighborhood features.   Our ending this week will show Jean’s photos of the public art fixed to the front facade of the Chamber’s building on Columbia (although they have long since moved away).

CLICK TO OPEN

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971.  (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)

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THEN: Looking north from Columbia Street over the construction pit for the Central Building.  On the left is a rough section of the Third Avenue Regrade in the spring of 1907.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)

THEN: In this 1887 look up Columbia Street from the waterfront is the bell tower of the fire station, tucked into the hill on the right. It would soon fail to halt the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. The station and everything between it and Elliott Bay were reduced to ashes, smoldering bricks and offshore pilings shortened like cigars. (courtesy, Kurt Jackson)

THEN: An Emergency Relief Administration wood pile took temporary quarters on the southeast corner of S. Alaska Street and 32nd Ave. S. in 1934.   (Courtesy, Northwest Collection, University of Washington Libraries.)

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The photograph above and the text below first appeared in Pacific May 15th, 1983 when the Times was sometimes still giving two page to this feature.  (Courtesy, UW Libraries)
The photograph above and the text below first appeared in Pacific May 15th, 1983 when the Times was sometimes still giving two page to this feature. (Courtesy, UW Libraries)
Again, from the 5/15/1983 printing of Pacific.  Imagine, now more than 30 years ago.
Again, from the 5/15/1983 printing of Pacific. Imagine, now more than 30 years ago.  The recommendation that the reader “(See feature 80)” refers to another now-and-then printed in the first of three Seattle Now and Then books.  You can find it in the book folder on the front page of this blog.
Fire Hill and Columbia Street seen from the Hoge Building at Second and Cherry.  When it was completed in 1911, the Hoge was the tallest in Seattle, until it was soon surpassed by the Smith Tower.
Fire Hill and Columbia Street seen from the Hoge Building at Second and Cherry. When it was completed in 1911, the Hoge was the tallest in Seattle, until it was soon surpassed by the Smith Tower.  Although the Rainier Hotel is gone, leaving a block of scarred dirt, many other structures survive here from the featured Warner photo at the top of the text above.

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If some smart readers still want a copy of "Washington Then and Now," the address has changed.  The new box is closer to home at the Wallingford  Post Office.  It is number 31636,  Seattle, WA 98103)
If some smart readers still want a copy of “Washington Then and Now,” the address has changed. The new box is closer to home at the Wallingford Post Office. It is number 31636, Seattle, WA 98103)
Looking back at Seattle from Elliot Bay early in 1887-88.  The Yesler Wharf that elbows thru the scene will be turned to a stubble of pilings by the Great Fire of June 6, 1889.  A year and a few week earlier Central School, the white box with tower on the left horizon at 6th and Madison, would by consumed by fire.  Columbia Street runs up to First Hill near the center of the panorama.
Looking back at Seattle from Elliot Bay  in 1887-88. Yesler Wharf that elbows thru the scene will be turned to a stubble of pilings by the Great Fire of June 6, 1889. A year and a few weeks earlier Central School, the white box with tower on the left horizon at 6th and Madison, would be consumed by fire. Columbia Street runs up First Hill near the center of the panorama. CLICK TO ENLARGE!
About ten years earlier, Peterson and Bros recorded this as part of a wide panorama of the city taken from the elbowed end of Yesler's Wharf. That's Yesler's log pond in the foreground.  First Hill has been recently logged off.  Columbia Street climbs it, right-of-center.  The log retaining wall holding Front Street (First Ave) above the tides was installed in 1876,
About ten years earlier, Peterson and Bros recorded this as part of a wide panorama of the city taken from the elbowed end of Yesler’s Wharf. That’s Yesler’s log pond in the foreground. First Hill has been recently logged off. Columbia Street climbs it, right-of-center. The log retaining wall holding Front Street (First Ave) above the tides was installed in 1876,

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If you hide-and-seek for this duplex in one of the Columbia Street revealing photos above it, you will find it.
If you hide-and-seek for this duplex in one of the Columbia Street revealing photos above it, you will find it.

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This subject appears as an extra with an essay in one of the eleven links offered near the top.
This subject appears as an extra with an essay in one of the eleven links offered near the top.  We show it here to also show the little Post Office, at the alley on the right.
Columbia Street, looking west thru Third Avenue during the latter's 1907 regrade.  The post office has moved on to First and University, and will soon be moving further into its headquarters at Third and Union.  The next photo is earlier and shows the P.O..
Columbia Street, looking west thru Third Avenue during the latter’s 1907 regrade. The post office has moved on to First and University, and will soon be moving further into its headquarters at Third and Union. The next photo is earlier and shows the P.O..
The Post Office is back, on the right beyond the alley.  The retail brick on the left was predecessor to the Chamber building.  The Boston Block just beyond it at the southeast corner of Columbia and Second Ave. , was built before the Great Fire of 1889 and after it packed with a great array of lawyers, salesmen, and the great array of desk duties involved in running a booming city.
The Post Office is back, on the right beyond the alley. The retail brick on the left was predecessor to the Chamber building. The Boston Block just beyond it at the southeast corner of Columbia and Second Ave. , was built before the Great Fire of 1889 and after it packed with a great array of lawyers, salesmen, and the great array of desk duties involved in running a booming city.
I took this repeat about a dozen years ago, which was two years or three before Jean took over the repeats.  Bless him.  Now we'll take a closer looks at those two sculptured panels that adorn the Columbia Street facade of architect Harlan Thomas' (with Thomas and Schack) Chamber of Commerce Building.
I took this repeat about a dozen years ago, which was two years or three before Jean took over the repeats. Bless him. Now we’ll take a closer looks at those two sculptured panels that adorn the Columbia Street facade of architect Harlan Thomas’ (with Thomas and Schack) Chamber of Commerce Building.
Jean's full-frontal of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce's facade facing Columbia Street, with fragments of its neighbor, the Central Building, reflecting in its windows on a sunny autumnal afternoon in 2014.  (Jean Sherrard)
Jean’s full-frontal of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce’s facade facing Columbia Street, with fragments of its neighbor, the Central Building, reflecting in its windows on a sunny autumnal afternoon in 2014. (Jean Sherrard)
The up-hill relief sculpture - to the east or left of the front door - by Moran Padelford, who designed and formed it for his masters degree in art at the UW.
The up-hill relief sculpture – to the east or left of the front door – by Moran Padelford, who designed and formed it for his masters degree in art at the UW.  It depicts indigenous crafts and so commerce too.
Sculptor Mildred Stumer's depiction of modern work - and so commerce.   (Jean Sherrard)
Sculptor Mildred Stumer’s depiction of modern work – and so commerce. (Jean Sherrard)

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Moveable Fiesta

 

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Sitting on a small triangle at the odd northwest corner of Third Avenue and the Second Ave. S. Extension, the Fiesta Coffee Shop was photographed and captioned, along with all taxable structures in King County, by Works Progress Administration photographers during the lingering Great Depression of the late 1930s.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive’s Puget Sound Branch)
THEN: Sitting on a small triangle at the odd northwest corner of Third Avenue and the Second Ave. S. Extension, the Fiesta Coffee Shop was photographed and captioned, along with all taxable structures in King County, by Works Progress Administration photographers during the lingering Great Depression of the late 1930s. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive’s Puget Sound Branch)
NOW: Jean Sherrard has followed the landmark adobe hut’s move of 1938 across the Second Ave. Extension.
NOW: Jean Sherrard has followed the landmark adobe hut’s move of 1938 across the Second Ave. Extension.

With this week’s “Now and Then” Jean and I have conspired, perhaps, to confuse you, although not for long.  On first glimpse it is evident that in the 76 years that separate our “then” from our “now,” their shared subject, an adobe hut at the corner of Main Street and the Second Ave. S. Extension, has endured.  However, on second glimpse, it is also certain that the hut’s milieu has pivoted.  We explain.

Before the Second Ave. Extension, looking south from the Smith Tower on March 14, 1928.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Before the Second Ave. Extension, looking south from the Smith Tower on March 14, 1928. (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Fourteen months later, June 11, 1929.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
Fourteen months later, June 11, 1929. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

In 1928 the long, wide, and straight path of Seattle’s Second Avenue, between Stewart Street and Yesler Way, was cut through to Jackson Street as the Second Ave. S. Extension.  Thereby, it was explained, “Seattle’s Market Street” (a little used nickname) might make a grand beeline to the railroad stations on the south side of Jackson. Of the fifteen buildings sliced into along the new route, three were entirely destroyed, including a fire station with tower that sat at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Avenue.  (Station No. 10’s own feature is attached below.)  The Extension ran right through that station’s former location, except for its northeast and southwest corners, which became small triangular lots on either side of the Extension.  (Here you may wish to find a map.  There’s a good one on the blog listed at the bottom.  We’ll make it easier and put both a detail below from the 1912 Baist Map and another from the sky: a detail of the corner and more in Seattle’s city-wide 1936 aerial.)

Someone has drawn borders for the 1928 Second Ave. Extension through this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.  Yelser Way runs along the top, and Jackson Street the bottom.  Note, near the center, the Fire Department Headquarters, aka Fire Station No. 10. here at the northwest corner of Third Ave. South and Main Street.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
Someone has drawn borders for the 1928 Second Ave. Extension through this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map. Yesler Way runs along the top, and Jackson Street the bottom. Note, near the center, the Fire Department Headquarters, aka Fire Station No. 10. here at the northwest corner of Third Ave. South and Main Street. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
A detail from the 1936 aerial map-survey of Seattle.  Yesler Way is at the top, Jackson St. at the bottom, and the Second Avenue Extension clearly cuts between them.  The two triangles - east and west - are found just below the middle of the subject.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
A detail from the 1936 aerial map-survey of Seattle. Yesler Way is at the top, Jackson St. at the bottom, and the Second Avenue Extension clearly cuts between them. The two triangles – east and west – are found just below the middle of the subject. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
The Fiesta's original location...
The Fiesta’s original location. Third Avenue is on the right, and Main Street behind Jean..

In our “then,” the Fiesta Coffee Shop stands on the triangle on the east side of Second.  The buildings behind it are on Third Avenue.  In our “now,”  however, the adobe hut survives on the Extension’s west side as the Main Street Gyro, and the structures that surround it are mostly on Second Avenue and Main Street.  To record his “repeat,” Jean stood just off the curb on Main.

Another of the Foster and Kleiser billboard records, this one dated July 8, 1929, and so soon after the completion of the Second Ave. Extension.  The scene looks west on Main Street and across the freshly paved Extension.  As the company's caption makes clear, this negative we exposed for the billboard on the east facade of the Hotel Main advertising Westerman's Oversalls.
Another of the Foster and Kleiser billboard recordings, this one dated July 8, 1929, soon after the completion of the Second Ave. Extension. The scene looks west on Main Street and across the freshly paved Extension. As the company’s caption makes clear, this negative was exposed for the billboard on the east facade of the Hotel Main.  It advertises Westerman’s Lee Oversalls.
A tax photo from January 1, 1938, showing the Hotel Main and, on the right, the west triangle what appears to be a hut, connected, perphaps to Schneiderman's gas station, when it was still on this the west side of the Second Ave. Extension.
A tax photo from January 1, 1938, showing the Hotel Main and, on the right in the west triangle, appears to be a hut, connected, perhaps to Schneiderman’s gas station, when it was still on this the west side of the Second Ave. Extension.

Sometime during the warmer months of 1938, the small café was moved across the Second Ave. S. Extension as Betty’s Coffee Shop, in a trade of triangles between Harry Schneiderman and Betty. The small service station Schneiderman had built on the west triangle, he rebuilt on the east side as a modern Signal station with four pumps and two bays for repairs.  Under his name, which he signed below the station’s roofline, the one time center for the UW football team added, “I Ain’t Mad at Nobody.”

Harry "I ain't mad at nobody" Schneiderman's Signal Station snugged in the triangle on the east side of the Second Ave. Extension, on Oct. 4, 1938.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College branch)
Harry “I ain’t mad at nobody” Schneiderman’s Signal Station snuggled in the triangle on the east side of the Second Ave. Extension, on Oct. 4, 1938.  That is 3rd Ave. S. on the right. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College branch)

With the help of Bob Masin, the hut’s owner since 1980, we have figured that since the small café’s 1938 move across the Extension, it has had six names with six cuisines.  It began in 1938 as Betty’s Coffee Shop and continued so into the 1970s.  Masin remembers sitting as a child with his father and grandfather at the small counter watching Betty, always in her apron, serve the policemen standing in the aisle drinking coffee.  Following Betty’s came the Greek Villa, the Masada Café, the Penguin Café, the Main Street Teriyaki, and presently the Main Street Gyro.

The "east triangle" with the Boston Baked Beans log cabin in 1937.  Sometime soon after this tax photo was recorded the sides were flattened with plaster and the menu changed to Mexican.  The Ace Hotel at 312-318 Second Ave., was one of the buildings sliced thru with the 1928-29 Second Ave. S. extension. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, the branch on the Bellevue Community College campus.
The “east triangle” with the Boston Baked Beans log cabin in 1937. Sometime soon after this tax photo was recorded the sides were flattened with plaster and the menu changed to Mexican. The Ace Hotel at 312-318 Second Ave., was one of the buildings sliced thru with the 1928-29 Second Ave. S. extension. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, the branch on the Bellevue Community College campus.

Returning now to the hut’s origins, the earliest tax photo (above) from 1937 shows it as a log cabin for the short-lived sale of New England Baked Beans and Brown Bread, and the tax card accompanying the photo has it built in 1934.  And so we may confidently make note that without leaving the corner, the café’s earliest move was from Massachusetts to Mexico when the logs were covered with adobe and the roof with red tiles for the also short-lived Fiesta Coffee-Shop.

WEB EXTRAS

Additions galore this week, lads?  Jean, Ron has put up a healthy seven links, and the first one looks north and directly through the new intersection of Third Ave. S., the Second Ave. Extension and Main Street.  Look close and you will find the Fiesta in the “east triangle” before it was moved to the other (west) side of the Second Ave. Extension.   [If this triangle business is not clear by now, I’m wringing my hands!]  The links will be followed by three or four other features that are not so recent as The Seven Below, but still are either of the neighborhood or one of the this feature’s subjects that being fast food, and want of food fast.

THEN: 1934 was one of the worst years of the Great Depression.  This look north on Third Avenue South through Main Street and the Second Avenue South Extension was recorded on Thursday, April 19th of that year.  Business was generally dire, but especially here in this neighborhood south of Yesler Way where there were many storefront vacancies.  (Courtesy Ron Edge)

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THEN: The Dog House at 714 Denny Way was strategically placed at the southern terminus for the Aurora Speedway when it was new in the mid-1930s.  (Photo courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College Branch.)

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A FIVE BALL CLUSTER at THIRD AVE. S. AND MAIN STREET, CA. 1911

(Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
(Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)   A corner of Fire House No. 10 shows across  Main Street on the left.  This appeared first in Pacific, October, 9, 1994.

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FIREHOUSE NO. 10

Both the Great Northern (with the tower) and Union Pacific Depots, are found on the far side of Jackson Street in this ca. 1913 look down from the new Smith Tower.  A second tower, appearing on the bottom-right, is part of Firehouse No. 10 at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Ave. South.  There is, of course, as yet no Second Ave. Extension.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Both the Great Northern (with the tower) and Union Pacific Depots, are found here on the far side of Jackson Street in this ca. 1913 look down from the new Smith Tower. A second tower, appearing on the bottom-right, is part of Firehouse No. 10 at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Ave. South. There is, of course, as yet no Second Ave. Extension. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Firehouse No.10 - and its tower - under construction in 1903.  Looking northwest to the northwest corner of Third Ave. and Main Street.
Firehouse No.10 – and its tower – under construction in 1903. Looking northwest to the northwest corner of Third Ave. and Main Street.

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Above and below, page 32 & 33 from Jim Stevenson's 1972 published sketchbook of Seattle firehouse with thumbnail  histories.  (Thanks to Jim!)
Above and below, pages 32 & 33 from Jim Stevenson’s 1972 published sketchbook of Seattle firehouses with thumbnail histories. (Thanks to Jim!)

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EAST ON MAIN FROM FIRST AVENUE

(Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
(Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
First appeared in Pacific, January 1, 2005.
First appeared in Pacific, January 1, 2005.

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Bricks, stripes and lids copied from Main Street near Second Avenue and multiplied.
Bricks, stripes and lids found on  Main Street near Second Avenue and multiplied.

Seattle Now & Then: ‘Friends of the Market’ Protest at City Hall

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971.  (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)
THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971. (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)
NOW: A new city hall was completed in 2003.  Since most of the municipal departments were housed nearby in the 66-floor Seattle Municipal Tower, the new and smaller City Hall serves primarily the mayor, city council, and the city’s law department.
NOW: A new city hall was completed in 2003. Since most of the municipal departments were housed nearby in the 66-floor Seattle Municipal Tower, the new and smaller City Hall serves primarily the mayor, city council, and the city’s law department.

Friends of the Market president and UW architect Victor Steinbrueck, holding the placard  asking, “Is Phyllis Lamphere a Friend of the Market?”, marches ahead of his conserving coterie past the front door of City Hall. This protest, one of several City Hall pickets staged by the Friends in February and March of 1971, was most likely performed on Thursday, March 18. Other signs keep to the message: “Urban Renewal Unfair to Pike Place Market” and “City Hall + Investment Syndicate = Urban Removal.” Fittingly, whether intended or not, the style of the signs’ calligraphy resembles the brushwork listing the prices of produce on the cards still regularly seen in the Market’s stalls .

An earlier photo of Friends marching in front of the Seattle Municipal Building - A Seattle Times clipping from Feb. 5, 1971.
An earlier photo of Friends marching in front of the Seattle Municipal Building – a Seattle Times clipping from Feb. 5, 1971.

On the first Saturday following this parade, its prime target, councilperson Phyllis Lamphere, protested in The Times that she was indeed “a friend of the (Pike Place) market” and then went on to suggest that, as The Times reporter put it, her “Renewal opponents may themselves be the real enemies of the public market, because without rehabilitation, ‘the market will be unable to meet conditions of Seattle’s (building) code.’”  Other signs carried in front of City Hall those contesting days of 1971 advised, “Don’t subsidize luxury apartments,” “Removal is not Renewal,” and “The Pike Place Market is Seattle’s History.”

The Seattle Municipal Building looking east on Cherry Street from above 3rd Avenue.  It was constructed from 1959 to 1961 from plans created by a Dallas-based firm named McCammon Associates.  As at least the story goes it was a variation on the firm's earlier designs for a hotel.  For someone who can imagine the pun, the Dalles firm also worked on the plans in association with Damm, Daum and Associates.
The Seattle Municipal Building looking east on Cherry Street from above 3rd Avenue. It was constructed from 1959 to 1961 using plans created by a Dallas-based firm named McCammon Associates. As at least the story goes, it was a variation on the firm’s earlier designs for a hotel. For someone who can hear the pun, the Dalles firm also worked on the plans in association with Damm, Daum and Associates.   The building replacement by the new City Hall showing in detail with Jean’s “now” photos was, for many, an admired development
A circa 1960 aerial of the Municipal Building Construction with its parking lot to the rear.
A circa 1960 aerial of the Municipal Building Construction with its parking lot to the rear.
A fountain that runs beside the stairway off 4th Avenue into the new city hall.
A fountain that runs beside the stairway off 4th Avenue into the new city hall.

Post-Intelligencer photographer Tom Brownell took the protest photo at the top.  We chose it because it also shows the Fourth Avenue façade of the City Hall (1961) that was by then widely understood to be modeled on the cheap after a Texas hotel.  Among the prudent fears of the Friends was that the then expected millions from federal sources for urban renewal would be used to replace the funky charms of the Pike Place Market with modern hotel-motel reminders like City Hall.  The federal funding was announced on May 15th, and the next day the Friends announced their plans to gather citizen signatures for a proposal to designate most the Market for preservation.  Fifteen-thousand legal signatures were needed to get it on the November ballot.  The disciplined campaigners gathered more than 25,000 in three weeks.  The November 1971 election was won just as readily, with a landslide 76,369 yesses over 53,264 nos.

Seattle Times clipping from November 15, 1964
Seattle Times clipping from November 15, 1964  CLICK TO ENLARGE

When the Friends of the Market was first formed in 1964, it was an arts movement intent on saving the Pike Place Public Market from “sterile progress.”  Mark Tobey, one of Seattle’s best-known artists, was a member.  Proceeds from his then new book, The World of the Market, benefited the Friends.  When the picketing began in the winter of 1971, Tobey was quoted in The Times: “I hope (the market) will only be restored, and not improved through progressive planners.”

Looking up the steps of City Hall
Looking up the steps of City Hall
The City Hall tower from 4th Avenue
The City Hall tower from 4th Avenue
The view NW from the plaza below City Hall
The view NW from the plaza below City Hall
A view from Smith Tower
A view from Smith Tower

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?   Yes Jean a few links arranged by Ron and an excuse.   This “Saturday-before” has been filled with other events and entertainments and so we (I) did not pull up more neighborhood links to past features that have not here-to-fore appeared in the blog.  But Jean this excuse is righteous, for, as you know, the afternoon we spent in the SeaTac city hall delivering a lecture on the history of Highline and more was often enough delightful.   Before passing on to Ron’s links, here is an feature that first appeared in The Times on March 6, 1983, about fourteen months after these weekly  now-and-thens first appeared in Pacific.

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THE FIRST BAPTIST FACING THE FATEFUL FOURTH AVE. REGRADE

Looking thru the upheaval of regrades on both Fourth Avenue and James Street
Looking thru the upheaval of regrades on both Fourth Avenue and James Street

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Lawton Gowey's look up Fourth and over James Street on May 19, 1982, with City Hall on the right.
Lawton Gowey’s look up Fourth and over James Street on May 19, 1982, with City Hall on the right.

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CITY HALL CIRCA 1886

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THEN: The clerk in the city's old Engineering Vault attends to its records. Now one of many thousands of images in the Seattle Municipal Archives, this negative is dated Jan. 30, 1936. (Check out www.cityofseattle.net/cityarchives/ to see more.)

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THEN: A winter of 1918 inspection of some captured scales on Terrace Street.  The view looks east from near 4th Avenue.  (Courtesy City Municipal Archives)

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Home on ‘The Ave’

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: First designated Columbus Street in the 1890 platting of the Brooklyn Addition, and next as 14th Avenue to conform with the Seattle grid, ‘The Ave,’ still its most popular moniker, was renamed University Way by contest in 1919. This trim bungalow at 3711 University Way sat a few lots north of Lake Union’s Portage Bay.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Archive)
THEN: First designated Columbus Street in the 1890 platting of the Brooklyn Addition, and next as 14th Avenue to conform with the Seattle grid, ‘The Ave,’ still its most popular moniker, was renamed University Way by contest in 1919. This trim bungalow at 3711 University Way sat a few lots north of Lake Union’s Portage Bay. (Courtesy, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Archive)
NOW: Both University Way and 15th Ave. E. were redirected for the UW’s expanding Health Sciences and Fisheries Departments.  Here Jean Sherrard stands with his back to the 265,000 square William H. Foege Building, the new home of the UW’s Department of Genome Sciences.
NOW: Both University Way and 15th Ave. E. were redirected for the UW’s expanding Health Sciences and Fisheries Departments. Here Jean Sherrard stands with his back to the 265,000 square William H. Foege Building, the new home of the UW’s Department of Genome Sciences.

If, for a moment, one squints the eyes and suspends disbelief, this little home on ‘The Ave’ may seem palatial, with guarding turrets, left and right, and a sunlit dome at the rear.  Alas, as well arranged as they are for illusions, those accouterments belong to mills near the north shore of Portage Bay, which most likely are closed down. This is a scene from 1937, set in the unwanted languor of the Great Depression.

Page one (of two)  of the W.P.A. tax card summarizing the qualities of 3711 University Way in 1937.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archives)
Page one (of two) of the W.P.A. tax card summarizing the qualities of 3711 University Way in 1937. (Courtesy, Washington State Archives  CLICK TO ENLARGE)
Remembering first that University Way is still named 14th Avenue in 1912, and remembering also that the W.P.A. tax card information is sometimes mistaken about any structure's construction date, then it seems that the footprint printed here on Block 35 Lot 25 & 26 of the Brooklyn Addition may be our featured home at 3711 14th Avenue, and in 1912, still three years before the date of origin given to it by the tax card.  It has the rough shape of the house itself, and on tax cards rough is all one needs.
Remembering first that University Way is still named 14th Avenue in 1912, and remembering also that the W.P.A. tax card information is sometimes mistaken about any structure’s construction date, then it seems that the footprint printed here on Block 35 Lot 25 & 26 of the Brooklyn Addition may be our featured home at 3711 14th Avenue, and in 1912, still three years before the date of origin given to it by the tax card. This  foot print (a half dozen narrow lots north of North Lake Ave.) has the rough shape of the house itself, and on tax cards rough is all one needs to make bold claims.

The subject is pulled from the Works Progress Administration’s photographic survey of every taxable structure in King County. With help only from these property record cards, city directories, and The Seattle Times archives, we can deduce that Clara and Ferdinand Krummel lived here in 1937 with their teenager Paul, and perhaps one or both of their daughters.  Paul was among the 586 seniors graduating from Roosevelt High School in 1938, and the ceremony was nearby in the UW’s Hec Edmundson Pavilion.  Four years more and the enlisted Paul would be completing a course in aviation mechanics in Texas.  In the spring of 1944, the intentions of the eighteen-year-old Gertrude A Nerdig to marry the soldier were published by The Times.

This somewhat soft panorama of the University District was photographed in 1915-16 when the bungalow at 3722 University Way (then still named 14th Ave. NE) was either being constructed or the first resident were moving in.
This somewhat soft panorama of the University District was photographed in 1915-16 when the bungalow at 3711 University Way (then still named 14th Ave. NE) was either being constructed or the first residents were moving in.   The photographer’s prospect above Portage Bay puts her or him in line with the backyard of the home, which is at least part hidden in the trees that stand about one-fourth of the way into the subject from its left border.  To help out, 15th Ave., the western border of the campus climbs from the bay eventually along the left side of the  campus grove, which have been considerably pruned since then.  Fifteenth seems to be heaving for that single tall tree on the horizon.   The “Ave.” or 14th Avenue then, is one block to the west (left) of 15th Avenue.  On the far right the ditch that will be the Montlake Cut is being prepared behind the coffer dam, which was opened or severed in October of 1916 to allow the waters of Lake Union to fill the cut before Lake Washington was lowered through a dam at the east end of the cut to the level of Lake Union.  CLICK TWICE to ENLARGE.

Two years later, in 1946, The Times printed a short obituary for Ferdinand, the then 76-year-old father, describing him as a German immigrant and a retired baker.  In the 1930 Polk City Directory the Krummels were living in Ballard and proprietors of the American Girl Bakery at 5431 Ballard Avenue.  Most likely the Krummel’s closing of their bakery and move to this modest home in the University District had something to do with both the Great Depression and their age.

An earlier view of "town and gown" - the University District and the University - from 1909 showing off part of the campus remade for the Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exposition.  Continuing our brief custom of showing distant looks at our featured home hidden in the trees, in this 1909 look we might have found it behind the first tree rising here from the center,
An earlier view of “town and gown” – the University District and the University – from 1909 showing off part of the campus remade for the Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exposition. Continuing our brief custom of showing distant looks at our featured home hidden in the trees, in this 1909 look we might have found it behind the first tree rising here from the center, or hidden, in part, behind the smoke of the lumber mill’s burner,  the same mill (but open) that features in the WPA subject as a faux sun room attached, it seems, to the rear of 3711 The Ave.
This keyed map (but not the keys of a computer) speculates on when the empty lots and worn residences in the University District would be developed with what it does not indicated.  But note that the purple blocks, which include our home site, are expected to go first and be "renewed" in ten years of the map's drawing, which was about 1963.  The map came to me through Cal, the one-time "Mayor of the University District."
This keyed map (but not by the keys of a computer) speculates on when the empty lots and worn residences (“properties obsolete or blighted”) in the University District would be developed, but with what is not indicated. Note that the purple blocks, which include our home site in the “lower district,” are expected to be “renewed” in ten years of the map’s decidedly circa 1963 drawing. The map came to me through Calmar McCune, the one-time “Mayor of the University District.”    And now in a half-century later many of the black blocks are getting their working-over too.

The WPA card describes this bungalow as built on a footprint of 875 square feet and divided into five rooms.  The card has University Way made of bricks, and the neighborhood’s “use” as “residential-industrial,” as this photo’s melding of mill and domicile is a clear witness.  Like almost everywhere then, the neighborhood’s “status” is listed as “static.”  This stasis was disrupted in the 1960s when the UW began buying up much of the “lower district.”

Five blocks up the Ave, from our featured home, and two years later on September 29, 1939, there are a few bricks to be seen here south of 42nd Avenue, those protecting the trolley rails.  The intended subject is - again - the Foster and Keiser billboard on the left.
Five blocks up the Ave, from our featured home, and two years later on September 29, 1939, there are a few bricks to be seen here south of 42nd Avenue, those protecting the trolley rails. The intended subject is – again – the Foster and Keiser billboard on the left.

The tidy accommodations of the home at the top were built in 1915 (or so claims the tax card), but demolished in 1962 or 1963, and so did not reach their golden anniversary.  Paul Krummel, however, kept on until March 3, 2014. In his obituary in The Times, one of his grandchildren describes him as “a loving husband who was often seen holding his wife’s hand.”  Another adds that he “loved to dance and had a great sense of humor.”

THE KRUMMEL’S NEIGHBORS IN THE 3700 BLOCK IN 1937

Next door at 3709 University Way.  Note the "sun room" on the right.
Next door at 3709 University Way. Note the “sun room” on the right.
3737 University Way
3737 University Way
3764 University Way
3764 University Way
Reaching the corner and 3772 University Way in 1937.  (Courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Puget Sound Branch - like the rest.)
Reaching the corner and 3772 University Way in 1937. (Courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Puget Sound Branch – like the rest.)
3731 University way in 1937, and below also 3721 but in 1955 after eighteen years of wear.
3731 University way in 1937, and below also 3721 but in 1955 after eighteen years of wear.
3731 University Way, May 31, 1955
3731 University Way, May 31, 1955

WEB EXTRAS

I have to comment, Paul, it’s rare to capture you in one of these photos, but there you are in this week’s ‘Now’ whistling your happy tune! Anything to add?  Yes Jean, beginning with a question in return.  Can you name the tune?   Otherwise, as is our way, Ron Edge starts our response with several CLICKABLE links to other features from the past that treat on “The Ave,” and all of them have subjects within them that elaborate on your and my long-lived interest in, to repeat, both “Town and Gown” north of Portage Bay (and extending south of the bay to include the now razed Red Robin Tavern.)  At the bottom, if time allows before our climb to  “Night-Bears” (The copyright is guarded with pillows.) we will include more on The Ave.

THEN: For the four-plus months of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the center of commerce and pedestrian energy on University Way moved two blocks south from University Station on Northeast 42nd Street to here, Northeast 40th Street, at left.

http://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/wash-state-bldg-then-mr1.jpg?w=1075&h=614

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VARSITY INN

The Varsity Inn and trolley platform at the northeast corner of University Way and 42nd Avenue.
The Varsity Inn and trolley platform at the northeast corner of University Way and 42nd Avenue.
First appeared in Pacific, July 30, 1995.
First appeared in Pacific, July 30, 1995.

Varsity-Howards-WEB

Circa 1994
Circa 1994
From one of those street fairs - probably in the 1980s.  I'll know but later.  As one of my last rites I am now organizing my 55 years of collecting: my archive.  Peace to me and my dust.
From one of those street fairs – probably in the 1980s. I’ll know later. As one of my last rites I am now organizing my 55 years of collecting: my archive. Peace to me and my dust.   Good night Jean – ah but you are long gone to bed.  Good night Berangere – ah but you are long up for a Sunday morning in Paris. 

The day of Fraternity

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How stunning, what an emotion after this week of carnage, of hostage taking and murders perpetrated by three terrorists, and what a relief when the nightmare was over.

It was this Sunday, January 11th, the gathering of peace , compassion for all victims , for freedom of expression so dear to our republican culture, and humor …

Forty heads of State came to march with President Hollande, all French came to join the march, so many that we never were able to join the cortege of Republic to Nation. It was also impossible to count the huge crowd , at least a million and a half , the biggest march since the Liberation.

Le Jour de la Fraternité

Quelle sidération, quelle émotion après cette semaine de carnage, de prise d’otages et d’assassinats perpétrée par trois terroristes, et quel soulagement quand le cauchemar s’est terminé.

 C’était ce dimanche 11 janvier, le rassemblement en faveur de la paix, de la compassion pour toutes les victimes, de la liberté d’expression si chère à notre culture républicaine et de l’humour … Une quarantaine de chefs d’État s’étaient déplacés pour défiler avec le Président Hollande, tous les Français arrivaient de toutes parts, si bien que l’on n’est jamais parvenu à rejoindre le cortège de République à Nation. Impossible aussi de compter la foule immense, au moins un million et demi, c’est à dire le plus grand défilé depuis la Libération.

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Seattle Now & Then: The Terry House at 3rd & James

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: When it was built in 1864 Charles and Mary Terry’s home was considered the finest in Seattle.  (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: When it was built in 1864 Charles and Mary Terry’s home was considered the finest in Seattle. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The ornate home was razed early in the twentieth century, first for more business-friendly structures, and then in the early 1950s for the city’s Public Safety Building. This too was razed, and the “Civic Square” proposed to replace it abides now as a construction pit fenced behind fanciful walls at the sidewalk. The site waits upon financing for development as a “public-private” space.
NOW: The ornate home was razed early in the twentieth century, first for more business-friendly structures, and then in the early 1950s for the city’s Public Safety Building. This too was razed, and the “Civic Square” proposed to replace it abides now as a construction pit fenced behind fanciful walls at the sidewalk. The site waits upon financing for development as a “public-private” space.

Most likely the first “now and then” treatment this charming pioneer home received was in these pages seventy years ago on Sunday, November 10, 1944.  The author, Margaret Pitcairn Strachan, chose the Charles and Mary Terry home as the fifteenth weekly subject of her yearlong series on “Early Day Mansions.”  Strachan’s fifty-two well-packed and illustrated essays must be counted as one our richest resources for understanding Seattle’s history.  In 1944 many of the mansions built by the community’s nabobs were still standing, and sometimes the original families were still living in them and willing to talk with the reporter.   (We will attach the Strachan feature below.  Click TWICE to enlarge for reading.)

Times-12-10-44-p3-Terry-Mansion-WEB

In the Strachan feature the Terry home faced Third Avenue near its northeast corner with James Street.  We can learn something about the family’s history – especially about Charles – from the journalist’s reveries that came upon her as she stepped into the “now” after opening the door to a café near the northeast corner of Third Avenue and James Street.  She writes, “The Columbian Café is probably the place which is on the exact spot where the house stood.  Sitting at the maroon-colored counter, facing the huge mirror which runs the length of the room and reflects the booths in the background, I listened to the clatter coming from the kitchen and watched the waitresses in their spotless white dresses, as they hurried back and forth over the red tile floor, serving busy Seattle citizens who were unaware that this spot was once the home of the man who named Alki Point, owned its first store, was the instigator of the University of Washington, foresaw a great future for this ‘town of Seattle’ and drafted its first ordinances.”  (Next, we have attached an earlier photo of the Terry home before it was pivoted off of Third Avenue to face James Street.  Below the home we have added a snap of the 3rd Avenue front door to the Public Safety Building, and below that two photo that include the Columbian Cafe that Strachan visited for her research and/or edification or nutrition.  The two cafe photos are public works subjects and have their own captions with dates.)

The Terry Home on Third Avenue before its pivot for facing James Street.
The Terry Home on Third Avenue before its pivot for facing James Street.
The Public Safety Building facing Third Ave. about a dozen years ago (since destroyed) where once the Terry home revealed its lavish facade to both the village and the bay.
The Public Safety Building facing Third Ave. about a dozen years ago (since destroyed) where once the Terry home revealed its lavish facade to both the village and the bay.
The Columbian Cafe is signed just above the photo's center.  The view looks south on Third Avenue from near Cherry Street.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
The Columbian Cafe is signed just above the photo’s center. The view looks south on Third Avenue from near Cherry Street. (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Looking north on Third Avenue from James Street on November 13, 1928 during some road work.   The
Looking north on a closed Third Avenue from James Street also  on November 13, 1928 during some road work. The Columbian Cafe is far-right.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
An early 20th Century look up Third with the Webster and Stevens Studio photographer's back toward James Street.  Note the St.Elmo Hotel at the southeast corner of Third and Cherry, on the right.  It served the fire fighters and citizens during the city's Great Fire of June 6, 1889.   You can find it as well in the 1928 photo above it.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)
An early 20th Century look up Third with the Webster and Stevens Studio photographer’s back toward James Street. Note the St.Elmo Hotel at the southeast corner of Third and Cherry, on the right. It served the fire fighters and citizens during the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889 when the hotel was nearly new.. You can find it as well in the 1928 photo above it. [Below, Ron has included a link to the feature we did on the above W&S photograph – (Courtesy, MOHAI)
JEAN'S repeat from not so long ago.
JEAN’S repeat from not so long ago.

By purchases and trades with pioneers Carson Boren and Doc David Maynard, the Terrys owned most of the business district and were the wealthiest couple in town.   On the sweet side of their pioneer life, they opened Seattle’s first bakery in 1864, the year they also built this jolly home, the “ornament of the town.”  In 1867 the couple ran a large advertisement in the Pacific Coast Directory, which read, in part, “C. C. TERRY, Seattle, W.T. wholesale and retail dealer in Groceries, Provisions, Cigars, etc., manufacturer of crackers and cakes of all kinds. Unlimited supply of Ship Bread constantly on hand at San Francisco prices.”  Tragically, Charles died of tuberculosis, a mere thirty-nine years old, in 1867. On the day of his death his third daughter was born.

CC-Terry-adver-Pac-Coast-Bus-DirectoryWEB-

A Seattle Times announcement on Feb. 4, 1906 that the C.C. Terry house with its "peculiar Gothic design" was being demolished.
A Seattle Times announcement on Feb. 4, 1906 that the C.C. Terry house with its “peculiar Gothic design” was being demolished.

Sometime between the 1878 birdseye view drawing of Seattle and the 1883 Sanborn real estate map, the Terry home was pivoted 90-degrees counter-clockwise to face James Street.  At the same time the house was moved one lot east of its corner with Second Avenue, which is where we see it in the featured photo at the top. The home’s second footprint holds on in the 1904 Sanborn but not in 1908.  It was demolished in 1907.

This three-stack of Sanborn map details date from top-to-bottom, 1884, 1888 and 1893.
The above  three-stack of Sanborn map details date from, top-to-bottom, 1884, 1888 and 1893.  The Terry home sits at the bottom of block 22, to the left or west of what would have been the alley, had one been encouraged.  Note how the footprint changes for the home.  In 1884 the sun room attachment to the home’s south side when it still faced Third Avenue has been removed for good.  By 1888 the row houses at the northwest corner of Fourth Ave. and James have been added.  We can see the most westerly corner of those in the top featured photo.  Also in the 1888 Sanborn the Russell Hotel has been added to block 22’s northwest corner at the southeast corner of Third Avenue and Cherry Street.  In the photographs shared above, the Russell has had a name change to Elmo.
On the right side of this pair, the northeast quarter of C.D. Boren's Block 32 has been cleared of all, including the C.C. Terry home, by the time this 1908 Baist Real Estate map was assembled.  The row houses survive, however, at the northwest corner of James and 4th Avenue.   In the detail from the Baist map of 1912, the row is gone and the Terry home site filled with a rectangular shaped brick structure.
On the right side of this pair, the northeast quarter of C.D. Boren’s Block 32 has been cleared of all, including the C.C. Terry home, by the time this 1908 Baist Real Estate map was assembled. The row houses survive, however, at the northwest corner of James and 4th Avenue. In the detail, on the left,  from the Baist map of 1912, the row is gone and the Terry home site filled with a rectangular shaped brick structure.
The Public Safety Building took the block in 1951, one of downtown Seattle's earliest Modern Building. Here looking southwest thru the intersection of Fourth Ave. and Cherry Street, the City County building looks back, on the left, and the Smith Tower peeks over, upper-right.  The number "6." scrawled on the photo is not explained.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.)
The Public Safety Building took the block in 1951, one of downtown Seattle’s earliest Modern Buildings. Here looking southwest thru the intersection of Fourth Ave. and Cherry Street, the City County building looks back, on the left, and the Smith Tower looks or peeks down from above, upper-right. The number “6.” scrawled on the photo is not explained. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.)
The bottom subject of this pair is the oldest surviving photograph of any part of Seattle.  It is conventionally (and probably accurately too) dated 1859.  It looks east towards First Hill over the Yesler home at the northeast corner of Front Street (First Ave.) and James Street, on the left.  The mid-1860s subject above it includes the ornate west facade of the Terry home at 3rd and James.   Note that the timberline around Fifth Avenue if nearly the same between the two photographs.  This suggests that at some point before 1859 the clearing of the forest in this earliest neighborhood stopped - for a spell.
The bottom subject of this pair is the oldest surviving photograph of any part of Seattle. It is conventionally (and probably accurately too) dated 1859. It looks east towards First Hill over the Yesler home, on the left, at the northeast corner of Front Street (First Ave.) and James Street.  The mid-1860s subject above it includes the ornate west facade of the Terry home at 3rd and James. Note that the timberline around Fifth Avenue is nearly the same between the two photographs. This suggests that at some point before 1859 the clearing of the forest in this earliest neighborhood stopped – for a spell.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, boys?  Ron Edge begins by putting down a few links – often to the neighborhood.  We’ll conclude with the oft-used  couples portrait  of Charles and Mary, and another full-page feature on their home by Lucille McDonald, once-upon-a-time, The Seattle Times principle reporter on regional heritage.  Finally we will drop in a hide-and-seek in which the reader is encouraged to find the Terry home.

http://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/3rd-n-thru-cherry-ca1.jpg?w=715&h=900

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Lucille McDonald Sept. 15, 1963 contribution to The Seattle Times.
Lucile McDonald Sept. 15, 1963 contribution to The Seattle Times. DOUBLE CLICK to Enlarge for Reading!
The Norwegian photograph Anders Wilse too this wide shot of Seattle ca. 1899 during the few years he lived in Seattle.   Can you find (part of) the Terry home here-in?  Clue 1:  The intersection of Jefferson Street and the alley between Fifth and Sixth Avenues is near the photograph's bottom-right corner.    Clue 2: The Yesler mansion, surrounded by Third, Fourth, James and Jefferson, is far left.
The Norwegian photograph Anders Wilse too this wide shot of Seattle ca. 1899 during the few years he lived in Seattle. Can you find (part of) the Terry home here-in? Clue 1: The intersection of Jefferson Street and the alley between Fifth and Sixth Avenues is near the photograph’s bottom-right corner. Clue 2: The Yesler mansion, surrounded by Third, Fourth, James and Jefferson, is far left.

I am Charlie

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Many thousand people gathered tonight Place de la République in Paris in the late afternoon to honor the 12 victims of the attack to the editor of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo . The premises of the magazine had already been burned in 2011 after publishing the Mohammed cartoons.
Twelve hours ago, the giants of newspaper cartoons Charb, Cabu, Wolinski, Tignous and  economist  Maris and seven other persons were murdered by two men armed with Kalashnikov wanting to “avenge the Prophet “.  It seems that the cartoons of our friends were terrible weapons.
In France, we have all learned to read, to think and laugh discovering the designs of these political satirists, who defended our freedom of expression at the peril of their lives.
Je suis Charlie
Plusieurs milliers de personnes se sont rassemblées ce soir place de la République à Paris en fin d’après-midi pour rendre hommage aux 12 victimes de l’attentat à la rédaction du magazine satirique Charlie Hebdo.  Les locaux du magazine avaient  déjà été incendiés en 2011 après avoir  publié des caricatures de Mahomet.

Il y a 12 heures,  les monstres sacrés du dessin de presse Charb, Cabu, Wolinski, Tignous ainsi que l’économiste Maris et sept autres personnes ont été assassinés par deux hommes armés de kalachnikov voulant « venger le prophète. » Il faut croire que les dessins de nos amis étaient des armes terribles.

Nous avons tous en France appris à lire, à penser et à rire en découvrant les dessins de ces satiristes politiques, qui ont défendu notre liberté d’expression au péril de leur vie.

Now & Then here and now

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