The day of Fraternity

Lomont_249

How stunning, what an emotion after this week of carnage, of hostage taking and murders perpetrated by three terrorists, and what a relief when the nightmare was over.

It was this Sunday, January 11th, the gathering of peace , compassion for all victims , for freedom of expression so dear to our republican culture, and humor …

Forty heads of State came to march with President Hollande, all French came to join the march, so many that we never were able to join the cortege of Republic to Nation. It was also impossible to count the huge crowd , at least a million and a half , the biggest march since the Liberation.

Le Jour de la Fraternité

Quelle sidération, quelle émotion après cette semaine de carnage, de prise d’otages et d’assassinats perpétrée par trois terroristes, et quel soulagement quand le cauchemar s’est terminé.

 C’était ce dimanche 11 janvier, le rassemblement en faveur de la paix, de la compassion pour toutes les victimes, de la liberté d’expression si chère à notre culture républicaine et de l’humour … Une quarantaine de chefs d’État s’étaient déplacés pour défiler avec le Président Hollande, tous les Français arrivaient de toutes parts, si bien que l’on n’est jamais parvenu à rejoindre le cortège de République à Nation. Impossible aussi de compter la foule immense, au moins un million et demi, c’est à dire le plus grand défilé depuis la Libération.

Lomont_039Lomont_012Lomont_018Lomont_044Lomont_074Lomont_149Lomont_208

Seattle Now & Then: The Terry House at 3rd & James

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: When it was built in 1864 Charles and Mary Terry’s home was considered the finest in Seattle.  (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: When it was built in 1864 Charles and Mary Terry’s home was considered the finest in Seattle. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The ornate home was razed early in the twentieth century, first for more business-friendly structures, and then in the early 1950s for the city’s Public Safety Building. This too was razed, and the “Civic Square” proposed to replace it abides now as a construction pit fenced behind fanciful walls at the sidewalk. The site waits upon financing for development as a “public-private” space.
NOW: The ornate home was razed early in the twentieth century, first for more business-friendly structures, and then in the early 1950s for the city’s Public Safety Building. This too was razed, and the “Civic Square” proposed to replace it abides now as a construction pit fenced behind fanciful walls at the sidewalk. The site waits upon financing for development as a “public-private” space.

Most likely the first “now and then” treatment this charming pioneer home received was in these pages seventy years ago on Sunday, November 10, 1944.  The author, Margaret Pitcairn Strachan, chose the Charles and Mary Terry home as the fifteenth weekly subject of her yearlong series on “Early Day Mansions.”  Strachan’s fifty-two well-packed and illustrated essays must be counted as one our richest resources for understanding Seattle’s history.  In 1944 many of the mansions built by the community’s nabobs were still standing, and sometimes the original families were still living in them and willing to talk with the reporter.   (We will attach the Strachan feature below.  Click TWICE to enlarge for reading.)

Times-12-10-44-p3-Terry-Mansion-WEB

In the Strachan feature the Terry home faced Third Avenue near its northeast corner with James Street.  We can learn something about the family’s history – especially about Charles – from the journalist’s reveries that came upon her as she stepped into the “now” after opening the door to a café near the northeast corner of Third Avenue and James Street.  She writes, “The Columbian Café is probably the place which is on the exact spot where the house stood.  Sitting at the maroon-colored counter, facing the huge mirror which runs the length of the room and reflects the booths in the background, I listened to the clatter coming from the kitchen and watched the waitresses in their spotless white dresses, as they hurried back and forth over the red tile floor, serving busy Seattle citizens who were unaware that this spot was once the home of the man who named Alki Point, owned its first store, was the instigator of the University of Washington, foresaw a great future for this ‘town of Seattle’ and drafted its first ordinances.”  (Next, we have attached an earlier photo of the Terry home before it was pivoted off of Third Avenue to face James Street.  Below the home we have added a snap of the 3rd Avenue front door to the Public Safety Building, and below that two photo that include the Columbian Cafe that Strachan visited for her research and/or edification or nutrition.  The two cafe photos are public works subjects and have their own captions with dates.)

The Terry Home on Third Avenue before its pivot for facing James Street.
The Terry Home on Third Avenue before its pivot for facing James Street.
The Public Safety Building facing Third Ave. about a dozen years ago (since destroyed) where once the Terry home revealed its lavish facade to both the village and the bay.
The Public Safety Building facing Third Ave. about a dozen years ago (since destroyed) where once the Terry home revealed its lavish facade to both the village and the bay.
The Columbian Cafe is signed just above the photo's center.  The view looks south on Third Avenue from near Cherry Street.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
The Columbian Cafe is signed just above the photo’s center. The view looks south on Third Avenue from near Cherry Street. (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Looking north on Third Avenue from James Street on November 13, 1928 during some road work.   The
Looking north on a closed Third Avenue from James Street also  on November 13, 1928 during some road work. The Columbian Cafe is far-right.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
An early 20th Century look up Third with the Webster and Stevens Studio photographer's back toward James Street.  Note the St.Elmo Hotel at the southeast corner of Third and Cherry, on the right.  It served the fire fighters and citizens during the city's Great Fire of June 6, 1889.   You can find it as well in the 1928 photo above it.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)
An early 20th Century look up Third with the Webster and Stevens Studio photographer’s back toward James Street. Note the St.Elmo Hotel at the southeast corner of Third and Cherry, on the right. It served the fire fighters and citizens during the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889 when the hotel was nearly new.. You can find it as well in the 1928 photo above it. [Below, Ron has included a link to the feature we did on the above W&S photograph – (Courtesy, MOHAI)
JEAN'S repeat from not so long ago.
JEAN’S repeat from not so long ago.

By purchases and trades with pioneers Carson Boren and Doc David Maynard, the Terrys owned most of the business district and were the wealthiest couple in town.   On the sweet side of their pioneer life, they opened Seattle’s first bakery in 1864, the year they also built this jolly home, the “ornament of the town.”  In 1867 the couple ran a large advertisement in the Pacific Coast Directory, which read, in part, “C. C. TERRY, Seattle, W.T. wholesale and retail dealer in Groceries, Provisions, Cigars, etc., manufacturer of crackers and cakes of all kinds. Unlimited supply of Ship Bread constantly on hand at San Francisco prices.”  Tragically, Charles died of tuberculosis, a mere thirty-nine years old, in 1867. On the day of his death his third daughter was born.

CC-Terry-adver-Pac-Coast-Bus-DirectoryWEB-

A Seattle Times announcement on Feb. 4, 1906 that the C.C. Terry house with its "peculiar Gothic design" was being demolished.
A Seattle Times announcement on Feb. 4, 1906 that the C.C. Terry house with its “peculiar Gothic design” was being demolished.

Sometime between the 1878 birdseye view drawing of Seattle and the 1883 Sanborn real estate map, the Terry home was pivoted 90-degrees counter-clockwise to face James Street.  At the same time the house was moved one lot east of its corner with Second Avenue, which is where we see it in the featured photo at the top. The home’s second footprint holds on in the 1904 Sanborn but not in 1908.  It was demolished in 1907.

This three-stack of Sanborn map details date from top-to-bottom, 1884, 1888 and 1893.
The above  three-stack of Sanborn map details date from, top-to-bottom, 1884, 1888 and 1893.  The Terry home sits at the bottom of block 22, to the left or west of what would have been the alley, had one been encouraged.  Note how the footprint changes for the home.  In 1884 the sun room attachment to the home’s south side when it still faced Third Avenue has been removed for good.  By 1888 the row houses at the northwest corner of Fourth Ave. and James have been added.  We can see the most westerly corner of those in the top featured photo.  Also in the 1888 Sanborn the Russell Hotel has been added to block 22’s northwest corner at the southeast corner of Third Avenue and Cherry Street.  In the photographs shared above, the Russell has had a name change to Elmo.
On the right side of this pair, the northeast quarter of C.D. Boren's Block 32 has been cleared of all, including the C.C. Terry home, by the time this 1908 Baist Real Estate map was assembled.  The row houses survive, however, at the northwest corner of James and 4th Avenue.   In the detail from the Baist map of 1912, the row is gone and the Terry home site filled with a rectangular shaped brick structure.
On the right side of this pair, the northeast quarter of C.D. Boren’s Block 32 has been cleared of all, including the C.C. Terry home, by the time this 1908 Baist Real Estate map was assembled. The row houses survive, however, at the northwest corner of James and 4th Avenue. In the detail, on the left,  from the Baist map of 1912, the row is gone and the Terry home site filled with a rectangular shaped brick structure.
The Public Safety Building took the block in 1951, one of downtown Seattle's earliest Modern Building. Here looking southwest thru the intersection of Fourth Ave. and Cherry Street, the City County building looks back, on the left, and the Smith Tower peeks over, upper-right.  The number "6." scrawled on the photo is not explained.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.)
The Public Safety Building took the block in 1951, one of downtown Seattle’s earliest Modern Buildings. Here looking southwest thru the intersection of Fourth Ave. and Cherry Street, the City County building looks back, on the left, and the Smith Tower looks or peeks down from above, upper-right. The number “6.” scrawled on the photo is not explained. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.)
The bottom subject of this pair is the oldest surviving photograph of any part of Seattle.  It is conventionally (and probably accurately too) dated 1859.  It looks east towards First Hill over the Yesler home at the northeast corner of Front Street (First Ave.) and James Street, on the left.  The mid-1860s subject above it includes the ornate west facade of the Terry home at 3rd and James.   Note that the timberline around Fifth Avenue if nearly the same between the two photographs.  This suggests that at some point before 1859 the clearing of the forest in this earliest neighborhood stopped - for a spell.
The bottom subject of this pair is the oldest surviving photograph of any part of Seattle. It is conventionally (and probably accurately too) dated 1859. It looks east towards First Hill over the Yesler home, on the left, at the northeast corner of Front Street (First Ave.) and James Street.  The mid-1860s subject above it includes the ornate west facade of the Terry home at 3rd and James. Note that the timberline around Fifth Avenue is nearly the same between the two photographs. This suggests that at some point before 1859 the clearing of the forest in this earliest neighborhood stopped – for a spell.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, boys?  Ron Edge begins by putting down a few links – often to the neighborhood.  We’ll conclude with the oft-used  couples portrait  of Charles and Mary, and another full-page feature on their home by Lucille McDonald, once-upon-a-time, The Seattle Times principle reporter on regional heritage.  Finally we will drop in a hide-and-seek in which the reader is encouraged to find the Terry home.

http://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/3rd-n-thru-cherry-ca1.jpg?w=715&h=900

=====

The-Charles-Terrys-WEB

Lucille McDonald Sept. 15, 1963 contribution to The Seattle Times.
Lucile McDonald Sept. 15, 1963 contribution to The Seattle Times. DOUBLE CLICK to Enlarge for Reading!
The Norwegian photograph Anders Wilse too this wide shot of Seattle ca. 1899 during the few years he lived in Seattle.   Can you find (part of) the Terry home here-in?  Clue 1:  The intersection of Jefferson Street and the alley between Fifth and Sixth Avenues is near the photograph's bottom-right corner.    Clue 2: The Yesler mansion, surrounded by Third, Fourth, James and Jefferson, is far left.
The Norwegian photograph Anders Wilse too this wide shot of Seattle ca. 1899 during the few years he lived in Seattle. Can you find (part of) the Terry home here-in? Clue 1: The intersection of Jefferson Street and the alley between Fifth and Sixth Avenues is near the photograph’s bottom-right corner. Clue 2: The Yesler mansion, surrounded by Third, Fourth, James and Jefferson, is far left.

I am Charlie

B_Lomont_014

Many thousand people gathered tonight Place de la République in Paris in the late afternoon to honor the 12 victims of the attack to the editor of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo . The premises of the magazine had already been burned in 2011 after publishing the Mohammed cartoons.
Twelve hours ago, the giants of newspaper cartoons Charb, Cabu, Wolinski, Tignous and  economist  Maris and seven other persons were murdered by two men armed with Kalashnikov wanting to “avenge the Prophet “.  It seems that the cartoons of our friends were terrible weapons.
In France, we have all learned to read, to think and laugh discovering the designs of these political satirists, who defended our freedom of expression at the peril of their lives.
Je suis Charlie
Plusieurs milliers de personnes se sont rassemblées ce soir place de la République à Paris en fin d’après-midi pour rendre hommage aux 12 victimes de l’attentat à la rédaction du magazine satirique Charlie Hebdo.  Les locaux du magazine avaient  déjà été incendiés en 2011 après avoir  publié des caricatures de Mahomet.

Il y a 12 heures,  les monstres sacrés du dessin de presse Charb, Cabu, Wolinski, Tignous ainsi que l’économiste Maris et sept autres personnes ont été assassinés par deux hommes armés de kalachnikov voulant « venger le prophète. » Il faut croire que les dessins de nos amis étaient des armes terribles.

Nous avons tous en France appris à lire, à penser et à rire en découvrant les dessins de ces satiristes politiques, qui ont défendu notre liberté d’expression au péril de leur vie.

Seattle Now & Then: The Bartell’s Motorcycle Courier

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: A motorcycle courier for Bartell Drugs poses before the chain’s Store No. 14, located in the Seaboard Building at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Pike Street, circa 1929.  (Courtesy Bartell Drugs)
THEN: A motorcycle courier for Bartell Drugs poses before the chain’s Store No. 14, located in the Seaboard Building at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pike Street, circa 1929. (Courtesy Bartell Drugs)
NOW: Motorcycle historian Tom Samuelsen explains that the “END” written on the starboard side of his Suzuki is half of a discarded street sign.  “DEAD,” the other half, hangs on the out-of-sight port side.
NOW: Motorcycle historian Tom Samuelsen explains that the “END” written on the starboard side of his Suzuki is half of a discarded street sign. “DEAD,” the other half, hangs on the out-of-sight port side.

By the authority of Northwest motorcycle historian and enthusiast Tom Samuelsen – standing by his Suzuki dirt bike in the now – the cyclist in the older photograph, wrapped in leather under a billed hat, is none other than Joe Williamson, one of the founders and first president of the Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society.

PSMHS-Founders-WEB

Tom, a fisherman, is also a lover of maritime history, but it as a motorcyclist that his name may be familiar.  Tom is one of the founders of the Pacific Northwest Museum of Motorcycling, and currently the curator of the museum’s thousands of motorcycle-related photographs, ephemera and gear.  With the help of others in the nonprofit, he has organized and mounted many exhibits, including “Fastest Corner in the Northwest,” at the Museum of History and Industry in 2002.  More than once I have asked for, and received, Tom’s help in historic motorcycle matters.

2.-MOTORCYCLE-at--Madison-Park-WEB

2.-MOTORCYCLE-RACE-at-Madison-Park-WEB

It was not, however, Tom Samuelsen who first shared this photograph with Jean and me.  Rather, it was Marie McCaffrey, the executive director of our state’s on-line encyclopedia, Historylink.  The photo appears on page forty-two of The Bartell Story (Historylink’s most recent book of now more than a dozen titles since its debut in the spring of 1998), in which local author Phil Dougherty and the Historylink staff recount Bartell’s “125 Years of Service” in 140 pages between hardcovers.

Left-to-right, historylink's Marie McCaffrey, Priscilla Long and Paula Becker.
Left-to-right, historylink’s Marie McCaffrey, Priscilla Long and Paula Becker.

On the awning above Williamson and his circa 1929 Indian Scout motorcycle, the “Seattle’s OWN Drug Stores” sign is especially true here on Pike Street.  In addition to this Bartell No. 14 in the Seaboard Building at Fourth Avenue, in the 1929 Polk City Directory, the drug store chain had three more stores nearby on Pike: No. 3 at First Avenue, No. 9 at Second Avenue, and No. 7 at Fifth Avenue.  Bartell Drugs, to read from the book’s protective dust jacket, is “The oldest family-owned drugstore chain in the country.”  It is celebrating its 125th birthday with the issuance of the Historylink book.

Also in the historylink book, Bartell Store Nol. 9 with the Olympic Oscilator, which may make you a champion, in the window nearby at Bartell Store No. 9 at Second Ave. and Pike Street.
Also in the historylink book, Bartell Store No. 9 with the Olympic Oscillator, which may turn you into a champion, in the window at Bartell Store No. 9 nearby at Second Ave. and Pike Street.

When Joe Williamson first showed this featured (at the top) photograph to Tom Samuelsen, he explained that he used his Indian Scout to deliver prescriptions for Bartell, and that they paid very well, good enough to help support his love of photography. Tom claims that Joe could “charm your sox off.”  I first met Joe in the early 1980s and was similarly taken by his generous ways.  Born in 1909, Joe died in 1994, age eighty-four.

11-SEABORD full Westlake face WEB

WEB EXTRAS

Let me mention what a gas it was taking Tom Samuelsen’s picture at Westlake. We couldn’t quite get to the exact prospect of the original photo because of existing street sculpture, but we got close. In the following shot, Tom waves goodbye headed east on Pike.

Tom Samuelsen rides away easy...
Tom Samuelsen rides away easy…

Anything to add, boys?   Sure Jean.  Ron is putting up five, I think, links.  The first one begins with the American Hotel on the east side of Westlake Avenue and looks back (to the south) at Westlake’s origins at Pike Street.   Again, there may be some repetition between them, but again and again we remember my Mother Eda Garena Christiansen Dorpat’s advice, “Boys (she had four sons) repetition is the mother of all learning.”   Jean did you know that the first feature we put up was about the aftermath of a parade through this five-star intersection, and we have returned often with looks in most directions through it.   We’ll attach that first feature from January 17, 1982 at the bottom of all this.  And Jean did you also know that the last feature that touched on this corner was featured hear a mere months ago, on Dec. 6, 2014.  Ron did not offer a link to it.  We figured you could just scroll down to get to it.  Please do.

THEN:  Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill.  Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner.  (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

http://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/max-loudons-girls-on-3rd-s-w-motorcycle-then-mr1.jpg?w=1095&h=734

=====

One of the most popular historical photos of Westalke Ave looking north from Pike Street.
One of the most popular historical photos of Westlake Ave looking north from Pike Street.
I took this "now" repeat for the "cop" picture in 2005 while on my way to a historylink staff meeting.   The link's office was then in the Joshua Green Building at the southwest corner of the intersection.
I took this “now” repeat for the “cop” picture in 2005 while on my way to a historylink staff meeting. The link’s office was then in the Joshua Green Building at the southwest corner of the intersection.
This Pacific feature first appeared in The Times on August 24, 2005.
This Pacific feature first appeared in The Times on August 24, 2005.

=====

THE FIRST NOW AND THEN FEATURE- FROM JAN. 17, 1982

5-FIRST-SNT-Westlake-Mall-WEB-500x367

Westlake-1st-Feature-Jan-17,-1982-WEB

[Note: the “103” in the title at the top of the above text refers to its position in the book from which it was scanned,  Seattle Now and Then, Volume One.]

=====

THE WESTLAKE DEATH THERMOMETER: 1939-40

THE SEATTLE TIMES caption for the above reads, "Grim reminder of what might happen to reckless and drunken drivers in heavy traffic tonight, the above wrecked automobile, involved in a recent collision, was parked today at the base of the death termometer which has beenused by the seattle Traffic and Safety Council to record the city's traffic toll.  The thermometer is at Fourth an dWetlake Avenues. Perched atop the car is "Safety Pete," official mascot of the Safety Council."
THE SEATTLE TIMES Dec. 31, 1940 caption for the above reads, “Grim reminder of what might happen to reckless and drunken drivers in heavy traffic tonight, the above wrecked automobile, involved in a recent collision, was parked today at the base of the death thermometer which has been used by the Seattle Traffic and Safety Council to record the city’s traffic toll. The thermometer is at Fourth and Westlake Avenues. Perched atop the car is “Safety Pete,” official mascot of the Safety Council.”
Later it appears that 1940 has outdone 1939 and even borrowed a few deaths.
Later it appears that 1940 has outdone 1939 and even borrowed a few deaths.

======

SNOWSCAPE WITH THE TRIANGULAR BARTELL DRUGS

Readers with an interest in local snow may wish to visit the front page of this blog and find there a button for calling down a history of Seattle snows.  It is detailed enough that you may be able to figure out what snow this is with the help of the photographs dated subjects, like the automobiles.
Readers with an interest in local snow may wish to visit the front page of this blog and find there a button for calling down a history of Seattle snows. It is detailed enough that you may be able to figure out what snow this is with the help of the photograph’s dated subjects, especially the automobiles.

=====

WE STAND GUARD – DRIVERS OF THE BLACK OUT

Called-up following Pearl Harbor, Seattle's Blackout Patrol were on call for the few nights that the lights were all turned off.
Called-up following Pearl Harbor, Seattle’s Blackout Patrol were on call for the few nights that the lights were all turned off.

 

Seattle Now & Then: City Hall, 1908

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: This “real photo postcard” was sold on stands throughout the city.  It was what it claimed to be; that is, its gray tones were real.  If you studied them with magnification the grays did not turn into little black dots of varying sizes. (Courtesy, David Chapman and otfrasch.com)
THEN: This “real photo postcard” was sold on stands throughout the city. It was what it claimed to be; that is, its gray tones were real. If you studied them with magnification the grays did not turn into little black dots of varying sizes. (Courtesy, David Chapman and otfrasch.com)
NOW: After a rescue in the early 1970s, this former city hall survives as the 400 Yesler Building.  Behind it rises the Fifth and Yesler Building, a recent addition to the Pioneer Square Neighborhood skyline.
NOW: After a rescue in the early 1970s, this former city hall survives as the 400 Yesler Building. Behind it rises the Fifth and Yesler Building, a recent addition to the Pioneer Square Neighborhood skyline.
About thirty years ago, or more, I took the above shot of our subject for reasons I know longer remember (if I needed one.)  The prospect then was close to Jean's now, but not so colorful.
About thirty years ago, or more, I took the above shot of our subject for reasons I no longer remember (if I needed one.) The prospect then was close to Jean’s now, but not so colorful.  And there on the far right the Grand Union Hotel still stood on the east side of Fourth Avenue.
Here's a THEN of the same intersection, which moves closer to Jean's position, or reaches beyond it to the sidewalk for a look up Terrace Street, or rather an impression of it through the windows of the Yesler Way Cable car which in this ca. 1940 shot is about on its last cable.  (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
Here’s a THEN of the same intersection, which moves closer to Jean’s position, or reaches beyond it to the sidewalk for a look up Terrace Street, or rather an impression of it through the windows of the Yesler Way Cable car which in this ca. 1940 shot is handing on to its about last cable. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

Otto Theodore Frasch was one of boomtown Seattle’s most energetic postcard photographers in the early twentieth-century, when the public interest in sending and collecting postcards with “real” photographs on them was especially popular.  Local collectors generally cherish postcards with the “O.T. Frasch Seattle” credit and caption.

In this look east on Yesler Way, where it still crosses above Fourth Avenue, Frasch also printed the names of three of Seattle’s primary civic buildings on postcard No. 173.  First, left-of-center, is the triangular-shaped City Hall, the photographer’s primary subject.  It was the brick replacement for the comically named Katzenjammer frame city hall, nearby at Third and Yesler, located in what is now City Hall Park.  Earlier than No. 173, Frasch had made another postcard that included both municipal buildings on Yesler Way.  Its number, nineteen, is early for the Seattle-based photographer.

The Katzenjammer Castle (now City Hall Park) with the new City Hall, up Yesler on the far right, Frasch's No. Nineteen.  We will add his No. Eighteen next.
The Katzenjammer Castle (now City Hall Park) with the new City Hall, up Yesler on the far right, Frasch’s No. Nineteen. We will add his No. Eighteen next.
Otto Frasch's first record of City Hall (the 400 Yesler Building) near the end of its construction.
Apparently this is Otto Frasch’s first record of City Hall (the 400 Yesler Building) near the end of its construction.

Otto and Mary Frasch came here from Minnesota in 1906.  Elsie, their first daughter, was born on the way. A charming picture of the three is included on the Otto Frasch website otfrasch.com, which is web-mastered by Elsie’s great-grandson, David Chapman.  More than 500 images of Frasch’s Seattle and surrounds are featured, including the coverage of Luna Park (the family lived nearby on West Seattle’s Maryland Avenue), the Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exposition in 1909, the city’s Golden Potlatch parades from 1911 to 1913, and the 1908 visit of the Great White Fleet, all of which are worth a visit to the site. With Otto Frasch’s magnum opus of more than 1000 ascribed numbers, webmaster Chapman’s shepherding of the site continues with new discoveries.

Luna Park and Duwamish Head seen from one of its rides.
Luna Park and Duwamish Head seen from one of its thrilling and/or amusing rides.
A two-card panorama of the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition's fitting on the UW campus in 1909, photographed by Otto Frasch from the Capitol Hill side of Portage Bay.
A two-card panorama of the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition’s fitting on the UW campus in 1909, photographed by Otto Frasch from the Capitol Hill side of Portage Bay.

This “real photo postcard” No. 173 (the featured photo at the top) most likely dates from 1908.  Although barely visible in this printing, a monumental “welcome” sign for the Fleet stands high on First Hill to the left of the King County Court House dome, which resembles a wedding cake.  City Light is the third landmark noted in the caption.  With its own rooftop sign and two ornate towers, the citizen-owned utility stands above the northwest corner of Seventh Avenue and Yesler Way.  From Frasch’s prospect they escape the horizon behind a screen of power poles beyond, and to the right of City Hall.

City Light's sub-station on the north side of Yesler Way at the west side of 7th Ave. (now over the freeway pit) in a photo not by Frasch but by a city photographer who has dated it Jan. 20, 1914 at the bottom right corner.  In the City Light link included below, you will find an attached feature on this sub-station with an earlier photo of it.
City Light’s sub-station on the north side of Yesler Way at the west side of 7th Ave. (now over the freeway pit) in a photo not by Frasch but by a city photographer who has dated it Jan. 20, 1914 at the bottom right corner. In the City Light link included by Ron Edge below, you will find an attached feature with short essay on this sub-station with an earlier photo of it.
Frank Shaw recorded this look across Yesler to the
Frank Shaw recorded this look across Yesler to the Grand Union Hotel on March 7, 1963, or still eighteen years before the structure was razed on a city order.    To this side of hotel is  the Cadillac and ironic addition or a radical juxtaposition, both once popular art-crit terms?
Verily, the Grand Union Hotel's destruction as recorded in The Seattle Times for May 15, 1983.
Verily, the Grand Union Hotel’s destruction as recorded in The Seattle Times for May 15, 1983.

Otto Frasch did not include in his caption the private Grand Union Hotel, on the far right of the featured photograph on top.  Opened in the fall of 1902, it survived for eighty-one years. The May 15, 1983, issue of this newspaper includes a photograph of the hotel’s destruction under the caption, “Going Going Gone.” The Grand Union “came down without a whimper, ending years of anxiety by the city over the lack of stability in the turn-of-the-century building.”

The Desert Magazine of February 1941 reveals that years after leaving his real photo postcard business in Seattle Otto Fransch was still busy dealing, only now "desert colored glass" out of Los Angeles.  (Note the third miscellaneous down.)
The Desert Magazine of February 1941 reveals that years after leaving his real photo postcard business in Seattle Otto Frasch was still busy dealing, only then  “desert colored glass” out of Los Angeles. (Note the third miscellaneous down.)

WEB EXTRAS

Hey Paul, where’s the beef?

Jean we will answer your beef question at the bottom (the last) of the LINKS LIST that Ron Edge is putting up of subjects that are, again, mostly relevant to this week’s feature.  We encourage readers to start clicking and keep at it as long as they can – at least until they reach the beef.   Here we also note that our beloved mentor Richard Berner is having his 95th birthday this December 31, aka New Years Eve.  May we remind readers that we have on the front page of this blog Berner’s first of three books that make up his trilogy of Seattle in the first 50 years of the 20th Century.  It is included in the books button.  Appropriately, at least for his birthday,  that takes Vol. 1 up to 1920, the year that Rich was born – on its last day.   We have also pulled the little biography we wrote about Rich a few years back and copy it to the bottom of whatever else we come up with before climbing the stairs early this morning to again join the bears.  If my copy attempts fail, you will find that vital Richard (his vita) on this blog with a key word search.   Good luck to all of us.

THEN: On his visit to the Smith Tower around 1960, Wade Stevenson recorded the western slope of First Hill showing Harborview Hospital and part of Yesler Terrace at the top between 7th and 9th Avenue but still little development in the two blocks between 7th and 5th Avenues.  Soon the Seattle Freeway would create a concrete ditch between 7th and 6th (the curving Avenue that runs left-to-right through the middle of the subject.)  Much of the wild and spring fed landscape between 6th and 5th near the bottom of the revealing subject was cleared for parking.  (Photo by Wade Stevenson, courtesy of Noel Holley)

THEN: The Sprague Hotel at 706 Yesler Way was one of many large structures –hotels, apartments and duplexes, built on First Hill to accommodate the housing needs of the city’s manic years of grown between its Great Fire in 1889 and the First World War. Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey

========

BERNER’S BOOMTOWN

(click to enlarge photos)

We are pleased now to introduce Seattle 1900-1920: From Boomtown, Urban Turbulence to Restoration, the first of Richard C. Berner’s three books named together Seattle in the 20th Century. When the details, stories, and insights are explored with a close reading, Berner’s accomplishment is by far our widest opening into Seattle’s twentieth century, the first half of it, from the 1900 to 1950.  Those fifty years were also the second half of Seattle’s first hundred years, if we begin our counting with the footsteps of mid-western farmers settling here in the early 1850s.

Richard Berner, a recent portrait
Richard Berner, a recent portrait

Volume one was first published in 1991 by Charles Press, and the publisher – “Rich” Berner himself – made a modest list of its contents on the back cover. We will repeat it. “Politics of Seattle’s urbanization: dynamics of reform, public ownership movement, turbulent industrial relations, effects of wartime hysteria upon newfound civil liberties – all responding to the huge influx of aspiring recruits to the middle class & organized labor as they confronted the established elite. Includes outlines of the economy, cultural scene, public education, population characteristics & ethnic history.”

For this “printing” we have added many captioned illustrations, some of them copied from news reports of the events Berner examines, and we have almost always succeeded in placing each next to the text it illustrates. On-line illustrated editions of Volume 2: Seattle 1921-1940, From Boom to Bust and Volume 3: Seattle Transformed, World War 2 to Cold War will follow – but not at the moment.The collecting of illustrations and putting them in revealing order with the narratives for Volume 2 and 3 is still a work in progress.Readers who want to “skip ahead” of our illustrated presentations of Berner’s three books here on dorpatsherrardlomont can find the complete set of his history as originally published in local libraries or through interlibrary loans.

How Rich Berner managed it is a charmed story. He undertook what developed into his magnus opus after retiring in 1984 from his position as founder and head of the University of Washington Archives and Manuscripts Division. Between the division’s origin in 1958 and his retirement Rich not only built the collection but also studied it. Berner worked closely with Bob Burke, the U.W. History professor most associated with the study of regional history who first recommended Berner, a University of California, Berkeley graduate in history and library science, for the U.W. position. Together, the resourceful professor and the nurturing archivist shepherded scores of students in their use of the archive. Rich Berner is the first to acknowledge that he also learned from the students as they explored and measured the collection for dissertations and other publications. By now their collected publications can be imagined as its own “shelf” of Northwest History.

News clipping showing Rich C. Berner “as curator of manuscripts for the University of Washington Library.”
News clipping showing Rich C. Berner “as curator of manuscripts for the University of Washington Library.”

Rich Berner showed himself also a good explicator of his profession. His influential book, Archival Theory and Practice in the United States: A Historical Analysis was published by the University of Washington Press in 1983 and was awarded the Waldo Gifford Leland Prize by the Society of American Archivists. Composing this historical study on top of establishing and nourishing the University’s Archive and Manuscripts Division may be fairly considered a life’s achievement, but, with his 1984 retirement Berner continue to work in the archive at writing his three-volume history. He published Volume Three in 1999, and so, continuing the charm of this entire production, he completed Seattle in the 20th Century before the century (and millennium) was over.

Rich & Thelma
Rich & Thelma

(Lest we imagine this scholar chained to his archive we know that with his wife Thelma, a professor of Physiology and Biophysics in the U.W. Medical School and the first woman appointed Associate Dean of the UW graduate school, this famously zestful couple managed to often take to the hills and mountains.)

Rich was born in Seattle in 1920- the last year explored in this his first volume.His father worked on the docks as a machinist, and for a time was “blacklisted” by employers because of his union advocacy.During the depression, while Rich was attending classes at Garfield High School, his mother ran a waterfront café on the Grand Trunk Pacific’s pier at the foot of Madison Street.

Rich in uniform
Rich in uniform

During the war Rich served with the Army’s 10th Mountain Division.Following it with help from the GI Bill he matriculated at Cal-Berkeley with degrees in both history and library science.It was also in Berkeley that he first met Robert Burke, then Director of the Manuscript Collection of the Bancroft Library. Rich worked part time there.

For Seattle, as for any city of size, there is a “canon” of publications that are necessary reading for anyone wanting to get a grip on local history. The first half of the Seattle Canon may be said to begin with Pioneer Arthur Denny’s Pioneer Reminiscences of 1888. The pioneer canon receives its own magnus opus with the combined works – multi-volume histories of Seattle and King County – of Clarence Bagley, himself a pioneer. That Berner was already attending Seattle’s T.T. Minor grade school in 1926 when Bagley was still three years away from publishing his History of King County is evidence of the “Boomtown” included in the title of this Berner’s first of three books on Seattle history.

With rare exceptions the books included in this first part of the Seattle Canon were published by their subjects, like Denny’s still revealing Reminiscences, or under the direction and/or support of their subjects, like Bagley’s still helpful volumes.They are generally “picturesque histories” written to make their subjects seem more appealing than they often were.The stock of motives for “doing heritage” are there generally supportive or positive, showing concern for the community, admiration for its builders, the chance to tell good stories, and often also the desire to learn about one’s forebears although primarily those truths that are not upsetting.Not surprisingly, and again with rare exceptions, these booster-historians and their heritage consumers were members of a minority of citizens defined by their wealth, race and even religion.It would be a surprise to find any poor socialists, animists or even affluent Catholics among them.

Part Two of the Seattle Canon may be said to have popularly begun with Skid Road, historian-journalist Murray Morgan’s charming and yet still raking history of Seattle. Published in 1951, the year of Seattle’s centennial, it is still in print, and has never been out of it. Richard Berner has dedicated Seattle 1900-1920: From Boomtown, Urban Turbulence to Restoration to Morgan.The post-war canon is often corrective of the sins of the pioneers.The works of Morgan and many others, certainly including Berner, are not generally clothed in the pious harmonies of their predecessors, the ordinarily stress-free narratives expected of those who were writing under the “pioneer code.”

In our opinion Rich Berner’s three-volume Seattle in the 20th Century is the greatest single achievement of our Seattle Canon – “part two.”It has the scope and details required.It is profoundly instructive and filled with the characters and turns of fate that any storyteller might admire and wisely exploit.Within Berner’s three books are the wonders of what they did, the touchstones of their devotions and deceptions, their courage and hypocrisy, meanness and compassion.Certainly, it has been our pleasure to help illustrate this the first volume and to also continue on now with volumes two and three.

Paul Dorpat 10/1/2009

Archivist-Antiquarian as Young-Equestrian posing in front of the Berner family home on Seattle’s Cherry Street.
Archivist-Antiquarian as Young-Equestrian posing in front of the Berner family home on Seattle’s Cherry Street.
Student at Seattle’s Garfield High School
Student at Seattle’s Garfield High School
Rich Berner’s father, top-center: machinist on the Seattle waterfront.
Rich Berner’s father, top-center: machinist on the Seattle waterfront.
“High school or college, I’m no longer sure.” - Rich Berner
“High school or college, I’m no longer sure.” – Rich Berner
Rich Berner, second row third from left, posing for a group portrait of the U.S. Army’s 10th Mountain Division at a Colorado camp during the Second World War.
Rich Berner, second row third from left, posing for a group portrait of the U.S. Army’s 10th Mountain Division at a Colorado camp during the Second World War.
With Thelma on Mt. Stuart
With Thelma on Mt. Stuart
Thelma
Thelma & Rich
The Robert Gray Award from the Washington State Historical Society
The Robert Gray Award from the Washington State Historical Society

==========

FOUR MORE of the 400 YESLER WAY Building

A Webster and Stevens Studio photo of City Hall from the same (or about the same) time as the Frasch photographs on top.  (Courtesy, the Museum of History and Industry)
A Webster and Stevens Studio photo of City Hall from the same (or about the same) time as the Frasch photographs on top. (Courtesy, the Museum of History and Industry)
Lawton Gowey dated this slide May 24, 1970.
Lawton Gowey dated this slide May 24, 1970.
Gowey shows up on the eve of restoration with the sidewalk barriers and protection in place along the north side of Yesler Way.  Gowey dates this February 7, 1977.
Gowey shows up on the eve of restoration with the sidewalk barriers and protection in place along the north side of Yesler Way. Gowey dates this February 7, 1977.

Seattle Now & Then: Poetry and Prose at 1st and Madison

(click to enlarge photos) 

THEN: Looking south on First Avenue from its northwest corner with Madison Street, circa 1905.  (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: Looking south on First Avenue from its northwest corner with Madison Street, circa 1905. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The entire block bordered by First and Second Avenues and Marion and Madison Streets was cleared in the late 1960s for the construction of architect Fred Bassetti’s Henry M. Jackson Federal Office Building, which opened in 1974.
NOW: The entire block bordered by First and Second Avenues and Marion and Madison Streets was cleared in the late 1960s for the construction of architect Fred Bassetti’s Henry M. Jackson Federal Office Building, which opened in 1974.

Through the late 1880s this east side of First Avenue – its was still called Front Street then — was distinguished by George Frye’s Opera House (1884-85).  This grand pioneer landmark filled the southern half of the block until June 6, 1889, when Seattle’s Great Fire reduced it to ashes.  While these were still cooling, Frye hired John Nestor, an Irish-born architect who had designed his Opera House, to prepare drawings for the Stevens Hotel, which we see here also at the south end of the block, which is the northeast corner of First Avenue and Marion Street.

Frye's Opera House is about to be engulfed by the Great First of June 6, 1889 in this look south on First Ave. (then still Front Street) from Spring Street.  The opera house, the tallest building on Front,  is left-of-center.
Frye’s Opera House is about to be engulfed by the Great First of June 6, 1889 in this look south on First Ave. (then still Front Street) from Spring Street. The opera house, the tallest building on First/Front, is left-of-center.
The Northern Pacific Railroad's official photographer, F. Jay Haynes, most likely 1890 visit to Seattle.  Hayes climbed to the trestle built across Railroad Ave. to carry to coal to the waterfront bunkers build where Ivar's Pier 3 now stands on new steel pilings.
The above was most likely recorded during the Northern Pacific Railroad’s official photographer, F. Jay Haynes, 1890 visit to Seattle. Hayes climbed to the trestle built across Railroad Ave. to carry coal to the waterfront bunkers built where Ivar’s Pier 3 now stands on its brand new steel pilings.  Center-right in the block below the temporary tents, vestiges of the commercial needs following the fire of 1889, a single story structure at the southeast corner of First and Madison will be short-lived.  The changes made there for a long life of stage performances required much higher ceilings and added floors for the show girls to robe to disrobe.  Central School on the south side of Madison between Sixth and Seventh Avenues tops the horizon at the center.
With the Burke Building behind it at Second and Marion, the Stevens Hotel fills half of the block on First Ave., between Marion and Madison, far-left.
With the Burke Building behind it at Second and Marion, the Stevens Hotel fills half of the block on First Ave., between Marion and Madison, far-left.
Like the Wesbster and Stevens studio subject above it, Lawton Gowey's record looks thru the intersection of First and Marion and the ruins of both the Stevens Hotel and the Burke Building.  Less than ten years old, the SeaFirst tower
Like the Wesbster and Stevens studio subject above it, Lawton Gowey’s record looks thru the intersection of First and Marion and the ruins of both the Stevens Hotel and the Burke Building. Less than ten years old, the SeaFirst tower ascends above the Empire Building with its rooftop Olympic National Life neon sign.   The Empire/Olympic later provided Seattle’s first great thrill of implosion.

Next door to the north, the Palace Hotel, with 125 guest rooms, opened on the Fourteenth of April, 1903.  The owners announced that it was “Artistically decorated and comfortably furnished, and equipped with every modern convenience.”  They listed “elevators, electric lights, call bells and rooms with baths.”  The owners boasted that their hotel had the “finest commercial sample rooms in the city, which makes it an ideal hotel for commercial travelers.”  In the spring of 1905, the most northerly of the hotel’s three storefronts was taken by Burt and Packard’s “Korrect Shape” shoe store.  For $3.50 one could purchase a pair of what the partnering cobblers advertised as “the only patent leather shoe that’s warranted.” Also that year, the New German Bakery moved in next door beneath the Star Theatre, which had recently changed its name from Alcazar to Star.

Early construction on the Henry Jackson "Federal" Building that replaced everything on the block except for a few ornaments saved from the Burke Building.  The older Federal Building appears here across First Avenue, and sits there still.
Early construction on the Henry Jackson “Federal” Building that replaced everything on the block except for a few ornaments saved from the Burke Building. The older Federal Building appears here across First Avenue, and sits there still.
The Seattle Times Feb. 26, 1905 review of the Star Theatre.
(Above) The Seattle Times Feb. 26, 1905 review of the Star Theatre.

On February 21, 1905, The Seattle Times printed “Vaudeville at the Star,” a wonderfully revealing review of the Star’s opening. “Vaudeville as given at the 10-cent theatre may not be high art, but it is certainly popular art . . . The performance started exactly at the appointed time, but long before that a squad of policeman had to make passage ways through the crowd of people on Madison Street.”

The Star Theatre with the Palace Hotel beside it.
The Star Theatre with the Palace Hotel beside it.

The hour-and-a-half performance consisted of nine acts, and The Times named them all.  “Claude Rampf led off with some juggling on the slack wire.  Richard Burton followed with illustrated songs. Third came the Margesons in a comedy sketch, a little boy proving a clever dancer.  Fourth were the dwarfs, Washer Brothers, who boxed four rounds. They were followed by Daisy Vernon, who sang in Japanese costume, followed by Handsen and Draw, a comedy sketch team, followed by Wilson and Wilson, consisting of a baritone singer and a negro comedian, and then by the lead liner, Mme Ziska, the fire dancer.  The performance concluded with several sets of moving pictures.”

Lawton Gowey's recording of the end - and rear end - of the Rivoli, recorded on January 21, 1971.
Lawton Gowey’s recording of the end – and rear end – of the Rivoli, recorded on January 21, 1971.

Until it went dark in 1967, the venue at the southeast corner of First and Madison had many names. In addition to the Alcazar and the Star, it had been called the State Ritz, the Gaiety, the Oak, the State, the Olympic, the Tivoli, and in its last incarnation as a home for burlesque and sometimes experimental films, the Rivoli.

James Stevens standing by his tales.
James Stevens standing by his tales.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Yup and again with help from Ron Edge who has attached the links below for readers’ ready clicking.   The four chosen are, for the most part, from the neighborhood.  Following those we will put up three or four other relevant features and conclude with a small array of other state landmarks or “icons” (and how I dislike using that by now tired term, but I’m in a hurry) including James Stevens, the wit who revived and put to good order the Paul Bunyan tales.   We like him so much, we have put Stevens next above, on top of Ron’s links.

=====

Looking north on First thru Madison Street with a cable car intersecting on the right.  Note the sidewalk awning of the German Bakery, far right.  The Globe Building is on the left at the northwest corner.
Looking north on First thru Madison Street with a cable car intersecting on the right. Note the sidewalk awning of the German Bakery, far right. The Globe Building is on the left at the northwest corner.   DOUBLE CLICK the text BELOW
FIRST APPEARED in PACIFIC, JUNE 22, 1986.   CLICK TWICE - PLEASE
FIRST APPEARED in PACIFIC, JUNE 22, 1986.
CLICK TWICE – PLEASE

=====

Clock on the southwest corner of First Ave. and Madison Street.
Clock on the southwest corner of First Ave. and Madison Street.
First Appeared in PACIFIC , SEPT. 17, 1995.
First Appeared in PACIFIC , SEPT. 17, 1995.
The Globe when nearly new.
The Globe when nearly new.
Lawton Gowey's capture of the Globe on Sept. 16, 2981 preparing for its restoration as a swank hotel.
Lawton Gowey’s capture of the Globe on Sept. 16, 1981 preparing for its restoration as a swank hotel.

=====

Post Alley, looking north from Marion Street.  The buildings on the right face the west side of First Avenue between Marion and Madison and so look across First Avenue and the featured block.
Post Alley, looking north from Marion Street. The buildings on the right face the west side of First Avenue between Marion and Madison and so look across First Avenue at or into the featured block.
CLICK to ENLARGE.  First appeared in Pacific, December 6, 1987.
CLICK to ENLARGE. First appeared in Pacific, December 6, 1987.
The west side of First Avenue between Madison Street (in the foreground) and Marion.  The dark-brick Rainier-Grand Hotel holds the center of the block.
The west side of First Avenue between Madison Street (in the foreground) and Marion. The dark-brick Rainier-Grand Hotel holds the center of the block.

==========

OTHER STEVENS

We might have begun this little photo essay with a portrait of the namesake, Washington Territory’s first governor,  Isaac Stevens, but chose instead a landmark on Stevens Pass (named for the Gov), the Wayside Chapel.  Lawton Gowey, again, took this slide.  We do not know if the chapel has  survived the wages of sin and elements.

z-Stevens-pass-HS-Wayside-Chapel-WEB

===

Z Pickett-Stevens-Pass-GasX--THEN-WEB

ABOVE, Pickett’s record of  the Stevens Pass summit with Cowboy Mountain on the horizon, and BELOW, Jean Sherrard’s repeat, which appeared first in our book WASHINGTON THEN AND NOW.

z Stevens-Pass-gas-ski-NOW-WEB

Another Stevens Pass ski lodge.   Photo by Ellis
Another Stevens Pass ski lodge. Photo by Ellis

===

Z  Lake-Stevens,-maslan-WEB

===

z Stevens-School-Wenatchee-THEN-WEB

ABOVE and BELOW:  Stevens School in Wenatchee.   In the “now” the school has been replaced by a federal building.  (This too appears in WASHINGTON THEN and NOW)

z Wenathee-Stevens-School-NOW-2-WEB

===

Z  Alki-Cabin-Tent-across-Stevens-fm-Museum-WEB

On Alki Point, we’ve been told, across Stevens Street from what is now the Log Cabin Museum,  a fitted tent for summer recreations at the beach, and now a street of modest homes.

Z  ALKI-sw-Stevens-Alki-Point-ca1999-WEB

===

A rail-fan's CASEY  JONES SPECIAL heading east on the future Burke Gilman Recreation trail and over the Stevens Way overpass.   It was under this little bridge that those attending the 1909 Alaksa Yukon Pacific Exposition on the U.W. Campus entered the Pay Streak, the carnival side of the AYP.   Pacific Street runs by here, and it just out frame at the bottom.  Photo - again - by Lawton Gowey.  Lawton was one of the area's most learned Rail Fans.
A rail-fan’s CASEY JONES SPECIAL heading east on the future Burke Gilman Recreation trail and over the Stevens Way overpass. It was under this little bridge that those attending the 1909 Alaksa Yukon Pacific Exposition on the U.W. Campus entered the Pay Streak, the carnival side of the AYP. Pacific Street runs by here  just out frame at the bottom. Photo – again – by Lawton Gowey. Lawton was one of the area’s most learned Rail Fans.

===

BY REMINDER

x Stevens-Hotel-WEB

 

 

In Memory of Dawn Sears

DawnSears290_290

John Owen of Pineola, who gave a stellar performance at yesterday’s Rogue’s Christmas show at Town Hall, remembers the great Dawn Sears:

“On December 11, 2014 one of the greatest singers who ever set foot on this planet left us. Dawn Sears was an unassuming, humble person who you could easily walk past without even noticing…unless she was singing. If she was singing, you couldn’t notice anything else. She could make every person in the room feel like she was singing directly to them and them alone. Dawn was best known as a member of The Time Jumpers and as a backup singer for Vince Gill.

“Here is a link to a YouTube clip of her performing Sweet Memories with Time Jumpers. This clip pairs Dawn with another great who passed on not long ago – John Hughey on pedal steel. Both Dawn and John left an amazing amount of beauty behind. Live fully.”

Now & Then here and now

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 81 other followers