Seattle Now & Then: The Graystone on First Hill

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN:
THEN: Covered with cut stone the row house facing Marion Street on First Hill was intended to begin a local trend for elegant townhouse construction until such plans and much else were interrupted by the financial Panic of 1893. (Courtesy Washington State Archive, Bellevue Branch)
NOW: The last Times report I could find for 1200 Marion before it joined the Swedish Hospital campus in the early 1970s, concerned a City Hall hearing set for its owner, A.M. Bernhard’s alleged violation of minimum housing codes.  The announcement is dated Sept. 19, 1971.
NOW: The last Times report I could find for 1200 Marion before it joined the Swedish Hospital campus in the early 1970s, concerned a City Hall hearing set for its owner, A.M. Bernhard’s alleged violation of minimum housing codes. The announcement is dated Sept. 19, 1971.

The bold white writing on this stone-clad row house at the northeast corner of Marion Street and Minor Avenue confesses that this is a tax photo.  As many Pacific readers no doubt know by now, during the Great Depression the Works Progress Administration (WPA) made work for photographers with its ambitious and ultimately completed project to strike a picture of every taxable structure in King County.

Open and voided the folder that once held - with tape - the printed inventory photo from 1937.
Open and voided the folder that once held – with tape – the printed inventory photo from 1937.
A page (another) from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map - this one mutilated by wear and tear - means other than the penmanship of the photographer.  The Graystone's block 121 can be found upper-right.
A page (another) from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map – this one mutilated by wear and tear – means other than the penmanship of the photographer. The Graystone’s block 121 can be found upper-right.

Even without the captioned address, 1200 Marion St., we could find these seven attached townhouses by their legal description, here also hand-written on the negative by, we presume, the unnamed photographer.  Reading backwards this corner real estate is lot 8, of block 121 in A.A. Denny’s Broadway Addition.  Jeffrey Karl Ochsner, U.W. professor of architecture, first shared this subject with me, hoping that I might know of an earlier intimate “portrait” of this The Stone Row, its name when Architect John Parkinson designed and developed it in the early 1890s. Alas, I didn’t.

Across Marion St. from the Graystone, another 1937 WPA snapshot, this of a residence that has been (I believe) converted into a nurses dorm.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue branch)
Across Marion St. from the Graystone, another 1937 WPA snapshot, this of a residence that has been (I believe) converted into a nurses dorm. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue branch)
A Times clip for the address 1205 Marion from April 3, 1947 suggest that the old dorm (?) is being liquidated.
A Times clip for the address 1205 Marion from April 3, 1947 suggest that the old dorm (?) is being liquidated.  (True, the “lattice fence” cannot be found in the 1937 look at 1205 Marion above the clip.)

The WPA photo and the professor’s reflections on it are shared on page 243 of his and Dennis Andersen’s book, “Distant Corner, Seattle Architects and the Legacy of H.H. Richardson.”  Published by the U.W. Press in 2003 it has not, of course, grown old, and deserves to be read by persons interested in those architecturally zestful years of recovery and mostly rampant growth following Seattle’s “Great Fire” of 1889.

A Seattle Times clip from Feb. 21, 1906.
A Seattle Times clip from Feb. 21, 1906.
A Times classified from Oct. 15, 1906.
A Times classified from Oct. 15, 1906.
The Graystone - one of its enchanted events.  From the Seattle Times for Nov. 6, 1907.
The Graystone – one of its enchanted events. From the Seattle Times for Nov. 6, 1907.

In 1900 – or thereabouts – The Stone Row was named anew The Graystone, and promoted variously as a residential hotel (with waitresses and chambermaids and music room) and as an apartment house in the “choicest residence neighborhood, between the Madison and James St. car lines.”  With the boisterous arrival of the Graystone Athletic Club on the scene in 1910 – the men’s club staged smokers with boxing – the name “Graystone” and its connotations fell from favor.  Its elegant Tenino “bluestone” finish may have seemed tarnished, although it looks fine here in 1937.

Latter days for the Graystone.
Latter days for the Graystone.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?   Yes Jean, some ephemera from the Times and some photographs too.

We must, however, begin with a confessional response to Brandon and Steve, both of whom correctly instructed that I was wrong with last week’s feature on the Four Winds aka Surfside 9.   Rather I should have “confused” the Golden Anchor, another and earlier dinner-boat, with both the Winds’ and the Surfside’.  They are the same vessel – originally the City of Everett – although with elaborate changes for different services.  Long ago I believed a much and only recently abandoned that Anchors part of it.  The reason is Margaret Pitcairn Strachan’s 1946 feature that had the Golden Anchor converted out of the Lake Washington Ferry, Lincoln.  I should have known better, and did.  I’d written about the Lincoln often enough and knew that it’s last service continued after WW2 both on the big lake and on the Sound, and not as a restaurant.  I supposed it was in part my haste but more my respect for the heritage writing of Pitcairn Strachan that fogged my watch.  I’ve used the Marine Digest often enough but missed the contradicting history offered there.  It is also curious that I found so little in my maritime library about the Golden  Anchor.  The Pitcairn Strachan history was found – you are correct to assume – with another key-word search of the Seattle Times through the Seattle Pubic Library.  As many of you know the addition of this resource makes such a difference in doing/research on regional history – it is suddenly like taking a trip to Mars when earlier you were only carried to Ballard.  But that comparison is misleading.  I would always prefer a visit to Ballard over any of the known planets.   Directly below is a cut from the Pitcairn Strachan feature of 1946.  She is best known for a year-long weekly feature on Seattle’s grand homes and their families, which she researched and authored in 1944-45.  That was earlier enough to involve direct contact with informants that were also pioneers – often the persons who built the homes.

Excerpt from Times feature, March 10, 1946.
Excerpt from Times feature, March 10, 1946.

Below and in order, the progression implied from the Times clips on the Anchor’s “experienced waitress” search in 1945, to attempts to sell the – get this – “Nationally known boat” early in 1947, do not bode well for the Anchor’s chances of staying golden.  The crude illustration of the City of Everett aka Ferry Ballard aka diner-ship Golden Anchor tied to a bank on the Duwamish River near the old highway to SeaTac on the freezing afternoon of Jan. 15, 1950, reveal a moment in its new metamorphosis as quarters for the West Seattle Athletic Club.  The Four Winds followed and the old mosquito fleet steamer turned ferry went terminal with the Surfside 9.

Goden Anchor 2 clips GRAB

 

The converted Ferry Ballard, aka the Golden Anchor, parked on the Duwamish as home for the West Settle Athletic Club in 1950.
The converted Ferry Ballard, aka the Golden Anchor, parked on the Duwamish as home for the West Seattle Athletic Club in 1950.

========== RETURN to FIRST HILL

 The PATHETIC or PITIFUL STORY of the German immigrant girl BERTHA HOPKINS

As told – nearly – by the CLIPS ALONE!

The Seattle Times April 23, 1905, Front Page
The Seattle Times April 23, 1905, Front Page
Seattle Times, April 19, 1905
Seattle Times, April 19, 1905
The Seattle Times, May 23, 1905
The Seattle Times, May 23, 1905
A Times clip from June 6, 1905.
A Times clip from June 6, 1905. (Click once and then twice to enlarge)
Six  months for Bertha at Walla Walla.  Times 12-2-1905
Six months for Bertha at Walla Walla. Times 12-2-1905  (Click TWICE to enlarge)
Looking northwest thru the intersection of Summit and Marion.  The Graystone appears, in part, on the far left, and the Adrian Court apartments (at the southwest corner of Madison and Summit) on the far right.
Looking northwest thru the intersection of Summit and Marion. The Graystone appears, in part, on the far left, and the Adrian Court apartments (at the southwest corner of Madison and Summit) on the far right.
Looking northeast from some prospect connected to the then nearly new St. James Cathedral.  On the left is the Ranke home at the southeast corner of Terry and Madison.  Far right is the west facade of the Adrian Court, and a high corner at the rear of the Graystone shows far right.  The horizon is Capitol Hill's.
Looking northeast from some prospect connected to the then nearly new St. James Cathedral. On the left is the Ranke home at the southeast corner of Terry and Madison. Far right is the west facade of the Adrian Court, and a high corner at the rear of the Graystone shows farther right. The horizon is Capitol Hill’s.
A 1905 Aerial of much of the First Hill neighborhood south of Madison Street.  Left of center is St. James Cathedral at the southeast corner of Marion and 9th Avenue.
A 1905 Aerial of much of the First Hill neighborhood south of Madison Street. Left of center is St. James Cathedral at the southeast corner of Marion and 9th Avenue.  The Ranke mansion is still around, far left, a home for nurses at Cabrini/Columbia Hospital at the southwest corner of Madison and Boren. The white facades of Swedish Hospital in 1950 appear upper-left.  Trinity Episcopal Church is bottom-right, at the northwest corner of 7th and James.  There is, of course, much more to discover here – if you CLICK TWICE to “blow it up real good.”  Can you, for instance, find the Graystone?
An early 20th Century peek from, I believe, the south facade of the Hotel Stetson (see the 1912 Map) east along Marion Street to the Otis Hotel Row on Summit between Seneca and Marion.  The question returns - can you find the Graystone . . . part of it?
An early 20th Century peek from, I believe, the south facade of the Hotel Stetson (see the 1912 Map) east along Marion Street to the Otis Hotel Row on Summit between Columbia and Marion. The question returns – can you find the Graystone – part of it?
The Otis Hotel on the right - looking south on Summit.  Dr. Rininger's home on the left, the then future site for Rininger's own hospital and then in 1913 Swedish Hospital.  (see the clips soon below.)
The Otis Hotel on the right – looking south on Summit. Dr. Rininger’s home on the left, the then future site for Rininger’s own hospital and then in 1913 Swedish Hospital. (see the clips soon below.)
Part of the now-and-then feature from Pacific, March 28, 2001.  For a "then" it used the photo printed above the map above.
Part of the now-and-then feature from Pacific, March 28, 2001. For a “then” it used the photo printed above the map above.
Another Tax photo, this one showing Swedish Hospital across the intersection of Summit and Columbia - looking northwest.
Another Tax photo, this one showing Swedish Hospital across the intersection of Summit and Columbia – looking northwest.
The neighborhood, looking northwest from Harborview Hospital in 1956.
The neighborhood, looking northwest from Harborview Hospital in 1956.  James Street runs from lower left east to upper-right and Boren Ave. left-right thru the middle.

GIVE CLIPS for SWEDISH HOSPITAL

S.TIMES, March 2, 1913.
S.TIMES, March 2, 1913.
The Seattle Times Feb. 16, 1913
The Seattle Times Feb. 16, 1913

Swede Grab 11-1-37 over 12-26-37

Seattle Times clips from Nov. 1, 1937, above, and Dec. 26, 1937, below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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