Seattle Now & Then: The Spring Street Regrade, 1906-07

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THEN: The 1906-7 regrades on Seattle’s Second and Third Avenues required grade changes on the streets that crossed them as well. Here Spring Street is being lowered to fit the new grades at its intersections with the avenues. (Courtesy: Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The northwest corner of the Seattle Public Library’s post-modern block is partially hidden here behind the One-Way sign at the intersection of Second Avenue and Spring Street.

Penned across the bottom-right corner of this week’s featured photo, is its location: Second and Spring Streets.  The caption is easily confirmed by both landmarks and signs. For instance, the street name, ”Second,” is nailed to the power pole on the left.  This view looks east up Spring Street from Second Avenue.   (We have also posted below Jean’s “now” the flip-side of the featured subject,) which is kept in the Museum of History and Industry’s collection of historical photographs.)

Spring Street regrade looking west from the alley between Third and Fourth Avenues. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Looking north on Third Avenue from Spring Street, following the regrade of both Third Avenue and the front hump or summit of Denny Hill. It cannot be found here.   Circa 1909.
Lawton Gowey’s look south on Second Avenue and over its intersection with Spring Street, on April 16, 1967, and so not quite the “summer of love.”

Most historical photographs taken in the central business district record the relatively long avenues that run north and south along the western slope of First Hill.  The streets climbing the hill are wonderfully revealed from Elliott Bay but not up close.  With Seattle streets, pioneer photographers gave some interest to Mill Street (Yesler Way), Madison Street, and Pike Street.  The others were given less regard.

Detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate map with Seneca on the top, Madison at the bottom and Spring between them. The detail extends  west to east from Second Avenue on the left to Sixth Avenue on the right. You will find here the Seattle Public Library, Providence Hospital, Lincoln Hotel, the Elks Club Bldg, and upper-left all the structures facing Spring Street – most of them brick (red) – between Second and Third Avenues.
The Lincoln Hotel as seen looking northwest over the intersection of Fourth Avenue and Madison Street. The latter is bordered (still) by its poplars. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

The featured photograph’s  look up and through the regrade upheaval on Spring Street includes small parts of structures that in their time were proudly considered landmarks.  Also unsparingly revealed here, upper-right, is one big landmark: the Lincoln Hotel,  Covered with white bricks and stone, it stood for twenty years at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Madison Street. Opened in 1900, its inaugural name, the Knickenbacher, was later dropped for

reasons not explained in the boasting advertisements and press releases that described it as “Seattle’s first apartment hotel.”  For the generally upscale tenants it came with a lavish pleasure garden on the roof.  For its last tenants the Lincoln left with tragedy: a sudden fire that killed four including a father and daughter who jumped together from their sixth floor apartment to the alley.

The west facade of the Lincoln Hotel ruins with the Elks Club on the left and the Carnegie Library’s south side facing Madison Street beyond the right side of the ruins.

We will use the hotel to find parts to three more landmarks.  First Seattle’s central library, the largest of the Seattle libraries built with a Andrew Carnegie endowment.  We can find most of its roofline, but not much else, to the left of the Lincoln. Like today’s library it faces west from the east side of Fourth Avenue, between Madison and Spring Street. The Carnegie library was dedicated on December 19, 1906, where that public guardian of the vox populi still stands two plants later.  Its northwest corner shines near the center of Jean’s repeat.

The Carnegie Library during its late construction and so without the elaborate stairway that came with the Fourth Avenue Regrades. The view looks east from the southwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Spring Street. (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)
The Seattle Public Library fronting Fourth Avenue with its grand stairway.

After a half-century of wear the beau-arts structure was razed in the last 1950s for a modern one of mostly glass.
Providence Hospital on the east side of Fifthi Avenue as seen from (apparently from the roof or upper window of the new library. Madison Street, lined with its poplars, is on the far right.

The cross rising here (in the featured photo) seemingly from the roof of the library, topped Providence Hospital, another pioneer landmark. The construction began in 1882 on the east side of Fifth Avenue. Fifty-seven years later the site was fitted with the surviving Federal Court House.

The Federal Court-house on the east side of Fifth Avenue, between Spring and Madison Streets.

With some help from the what remains of the Third Avenue Theatre at the northeast corner of Third Avenue and Madison Street, we have pulled circa dates of late 1906 or early 1907 for the featured photograph. The barn-like rear of the theatre partially hides the west façade of the Lincoln Hotel.  The regrade’s deep cuts at Third and Madison left the theatre’s front door stranded high above the new grade.  Russel and Drew, the theatre’s managers explained in a caption to another photo of the threatened theatre that “The work (of razing the theatre) will be started at once, and in a few days a vacant lot will greet the eye where once stood one of the most popular and successful playhouses in all the West.”

THE THIRD AVENUE THEATER looking northeast thru the intersection of Third Avenue (on the left) and Madison Street, with the Lincoln HIotel still standing upper-right.
First published in The Times on December 12, 2004.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, goslings?

THEN: Looking north from Seneca Street on Third Avenue during its regrade in 1906. (Photo by Lewis Whittelsey, Courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Looking north from Columbia Street over the construction pit for the Central Building. On the left is a rough section of the Third Avenue Regrade in the spring of 1907. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

THEN: Seattle’s new – in 1910-11 – cluster-ball street lighting standards stand tall in this ca. 191l look north on Third Avenue from Seneca Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN: Looking south from the Schwabacher Wharf to the Baker Dock and along the Seattle waterfront rebuilt following the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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First appeared in The Times long ago – on December 12, 1984 with Ronald Regan in the high chair and the promise of an Orwellian Christmas for all faiths.  (CLICK TO ENLARGE)

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Seattle Now & Then: The Hamilton in Georgetown

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THEN: A stately side of Georgetown’s business district, ca. 1920. (Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Only the brick Hamilton Building survives, centered on the west side of 12th Avenue South between S. Vale (on the right) and S. Harney Streets

This week PacificNW readers are asked to figure on their own the date of this Georgetown street scene, perhaps from the motorcars that are parked on it.  Whatever the year, and I’m speculating ca. 1920, the spread of businesses in the three contiguous business blocks snugly grouped here on the west side of 12th Avenue South, south of Vale Street (on the far right) is downright inviting.

We have (as yet) not a date search for this Frasch real photo postcard, but he was very active between (about) 1907 and 1914. Somewhere on the Web a descendant has followed his career. Perhaps you can find it. (For me, it is now 4am.)

Starting at the sidewalk on the left, at the corner with S. Harney Street, are “Roma Imported,” mostly hiding behind the open delivery van, and a market of fresh produce sharing the first floor of the smallest of the three two-story buildings grouped here.  One can imagine vegetables in the boxes shining through the plate glass window. Most likely there are a few rented apartments upstairs.

Here on Jan 3, 1926 Georgetown got its coverage from The Times series on local neighborhood in the 1920s.   CLICK TO ENLARGE

The bigger building at the center is “The Hamilton.”  It is prominently and appropriately signed in relief with more bricks carefully set on its all-brick façade.  We have learned from John Bennett, one of Georgetown’s contemporary freeholders, that it is actually a concrete box covered on the street side with a layer of decorative brick.  More than a century of rains have seeped between the box and its covering, staining some of the latter. The construction date, 1907, has been artfully split to either side of the hotel’s name.

A Times clip from July 12, 1908.   (click to enlarge)

The structure’s three sidewalk shops are, left-to-right, first a shoe repair, neighbor next to the Working Man’s Store, which features both clothes and shoes.  (Perhaps one could purchase both new and used shoes here, although we will note that this glass negative was recorded by the Webster and Stevens Photography Studio years before the Great Depression when used shoes were in greater demand.)  The third of the merchants busy at the sidewalk is the White Front Restaurant.  It is neatly signed on the window.

The Seattle Times for January 3, 1908, reports that “The Georgetown post office and the Georgetown pharmacy have been moved into new quarters in The Hamilton Building, a brick structure.” These are nearly the building’s first tenants for the Hamilton was then barely a year old.  Also in 1908, The Hamilton welcomed as a tenant John Mueller, the manager of Georgetown’s new and huge Rainier Brewery.  Mueller opened an office in The Hamilton for his mayoral campaign, which he easily won.  The Times explained that George Brown, his opponent, “is not making an active fight.”

Marcus and Martha Hamilton and their family lived behind their namesake hotel and hall. They owned the block.  Marcus served many mostly uncontroversial years as a King County Commissioner.  When the first five floors of the City-County Building at 4th and Jefferson were dedicated on May 4, 1916, Marcus was the keynote speaker along with Hi Gill, Seattle’s exceedingly controversial mayor.

With its big room and high ceiling on the second floor, Hamilton Hall served a wealth of patrons for campaign rallies, dances, secret society meetings and such and such.  Its rooftop sign radiates like the sunrises it faced over Beacon Hill between 1903, the year of its construction, and 1972, the year of its tear-down.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Sure Jean, sometimes we aim to please.   Other times we need to sneeze.  It is one still step after another.  Keep on trucking.  Tragedy/Comedy.   Here’s more from the neighborhood widely conceived

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Tim O’Brian, Georgetown historian, on his stairway.

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King County Hospital in Georgetown

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Looking southwest from Walker Street to the burning ruins.

THEN: The Oregon and Washington Railroad Georgetown Depot was built in 1910 about two blocks north of the Seattle Lighting Company’s Gas Works, far-right. (Courtesy, Frank and Margaret Fickheisen)

THEN: As the caption at the bottom allows, the Juneau Street footbridge opened for pedestrians on March 26,1915. It crossed the main track lines – not spurs – of three railroads and reached east from the Georgetown business district to a sprawling neighborhood of workers’ homes on the gentle slope of the Beacon Hill ridge. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives.)

THEN: Sometime before her first move from this brewery courtyard in 1912, Lady Rainier was moved by a freeze to these sensational effects. She did not turn her fountain off.  (Courtesy of Frank & Margaret Fickeisen)

THEN: Extended thanks to Ron Edge and his maps and aerials for properly siting Braun’s Brewery, to collector Dan Kerlee for letting us use this company portrait, and to Gary Flynn, the Bellingham-based breweriana collector and brewery historian.

THEN: The work of filling the tidelands south of King Street began in 1853 with the chips from Yesler’s sawmill.   Here in the neighborhood of 9th Ave. S. (Airport Way) and Holgate Street, the tideland reclaiming and street regrading continue 70 years later in 1923.  (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)

THEN: Part of the pond that here in 1946 filled much of the long block between Massachusetts and Holgate Streets and 8th Avenue S. and Airport Way. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The Seattle Times in its lengthy coverage of the then new Seattle Steel in the paper’s Magazine Section for Sept. 10, 1905 – the year this photograph was recorded – noted that “the plant itself is a series of strong, substantial, cavernous sheds, built for use, not for beauty.”  (Courtesy, MOHAI, the Museum of History and Industry)

gn-depot-e-on-king-blog

THEN: Auburn’s Main Street decorated for its Aug. 14, 1909,  “Good Old Days” celebration.  Photo courtesy of the White River Valley Museum.

Then Caption:  Amateur photographer George Brown most likely took this view of Portland’s 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition from the north porch of the Washington State Building.  Brown also played clarinet in Wagner’s popular concert and marching band, which was probably performing at the Expo.   (pic courtesy of Bill Greer)

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Seattle Seven On the Courthouse Steps

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THEN: At the Federal Courthouse on February 17, 1970. By and Courtesy of Doyal Gudgel Sr. and Jr.
THEN: Still at the Courthouse, on April 17, 1970. By and Courtesy of Gudgel Sr. and Jr.
NOW: Some combination of Jean’s quick wit and good fortune allow us to repeat the ecstatic protester with his arms raised with a pigeon preparing to either land or take off from the Courthouse’s top step. Jean’s and my friend, the author Clay Eals, reminds us that “The pigeon is the dove of the street.”
A few Freeway protest shapshots by Doyal Gudgel Sr. mixed in with Federal Courthouse scenex, also by Gudgel, looking east across 5th Avenue from the rear of the Seattle Public Library.  CLICK TO ENLARGE
A Times clipping from April 18, 1970.

I first read Kit Bakke’s ‘Protest on Trial’ as a work-in-progress. The book’s publisher, Washington State University Press, shared a copy of the manuscript with me for comment, and as I read through it I increasingly responded with recommendations.  This week’s edited excerpt of the book’s brilliant late chapter on courtroom mayhem should, I hope, inspire many PacificNW readers to read it all.

Doyal Gudgel Sr. snapped the two “more” historical photographs printed here in 1970 at the front door of the Federal Court House, directly across Fifth Avenue from the Seattle Public Library.  The oldest one, with the phalanx of helmeted Seattle police guarding the courthouse’s broken front door, was photographed on Feb. 17, 1970.  That was TDA or “The Day After”, a one Winter day of protest.  (Again, I’m confident that readers will be enlivened to learn more about the TDA and the many political shenanigans surrounding it by reading the book.)  Besides smashing the front door, angrier TDA protesters also threw paint, and some of it can be seen in long drippings above the front door.

The caption for this Times clipping of April 18, 1970 reads, “S.L.F. in COURTHOUSE PROTEST, Members of the Seattle Liberation Front gathered on the steps of the United States Courthouse yesterday to denounce the Justice Department for wht they called an attempt ‘to crush our organization.’  The accusation was made after eight S.L.F. leaders were indicted by a federal grand jury for inciting violence in a demonstration at the courthouse February 17. – Times staff photo by Pete Liddell.”

It seems (at least) that in the second Gudgel snapshot (at the top) the running paint survives as a smear above the same door on April 17, 1970 when it was time for another organized protest.  (Read the book, OK?) As a “stringer” providing both still shots like these and 16mm film for media clients and law enforcement investigations, Gudgel responded to opportunities he first discovered on the police radio reports he listened to while tending his store, Burien Radio and Television.

A 5th Avenue sit-in related to the TDA of 1970. The Federal Courthouse it off-camera to the right and the public library to the left, both out-of-frame.

The photographer most likely arrived somewhat late for the April recording at the Courthouse.  The day started with a protest march in morning rain, while here the afternoon sun casts long afternoon shadows.  To these eyes Gudgel’s April recording resembles a designed tableau.  The man on the far left seems to be drawn, at least in profile, from a central casting for tough investigators.

A comparison with the righ half a detail clipped from the second photo from the top and the left half also showing Seattle Seven member Jeff Down on the far left. That the two Doyal Gudgel photos were shot on the same day can be figured from some of the clothes shared between them. 

The sunlit April photograph is aiming at one of the Seattle Seven: Jeffrey Alan Dowd, who at 20-years-old carried a mop of curly hair above a still cherubic face.  Now decades later Dowd, living in Southern California, is better known as “The Dude” an eccentric pop creation from Hollywood.  Here the pre-dude Dowd is cradled by admirers of his political courage, some of them showing fists and one of them slim arms reaching, it seems, in reverence.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, troublemakers?  Yes Jean we will stir a few more column inches below with more features.

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THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction.  (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

Then: The Pacific House, behind the line-up of white-gloved soldiers, might have survived well into the 20th Century were it not destroyed during Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889. Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry

THEN: With feet nearly touching the Madison Street Cable Railway’s cable slot, five “happy workers” squeeze on to the front bumper of an improvised Armistice Day float.  (Photo courtesy Grace McAdams)

THEN: When the Oregon Cadets raised their tents on the Denny Hall lawn in 1909 they were almost venerable.  Founded in 1873, the Cadets survive today as Oregon State University’s ROTC. Geneticist Linus C. Pauling, twice Nobel laureate, is surely the school’s most famous cadet corporal.  (courtesy, University of Washington Libraries)

Looking southwest from Walker Street to the burning ruins.

THEN: Looking west on Madison Street from Seventh Avenue circa 1909.  (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)

THEN: This “real photo postcard” was sold on stands throughout the city.  It was what it claimed to be; that is, its gray tones were real.  If you studied them with magnification the grays did not turn into little black dots of varying sizes. (Courtesy, David Chapman and otfrasch.com)

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971.  (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)

THEN: Depression-era protestors climb Columbia Street sidewalk along-aside Seattle architect Harlan Thomas’s elegant Seattle landmark that opened in 1925 as home to the by then already forty-three year old Seattle Chamber of Commerce.  (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Local candy-maker A.W. Piper was celebrated here for his crème cakes and wedding cakes and also his cartoons.  This sketch is of the 1882 lynching from the Maple trees beside Henry and Sara Yesler’s home on James Street.  Piper’s bakery was nearby (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

 

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: Second and Columbia, 1886

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THEN: Both of this week’s featured photographs were recorded from the same elevated prospect, but by different professional photographers: T. E. Peiser and D.R. Judkins. The latter’s can be identified by the studio sign that rises high, far left on a post at the southwest corner of Second Avenue and Columbia Street. Both photos date from 1886, and include different cues: the one of uniformed Knights of Pythias member-musicians marching south on Second and the other for the most part of primary students posing on the boardwalk. Both photographs also include, right-of-center, the home built by J.T. Jordon, Seattle’s second mayor, at the northeast corner of Second and Columbia, and left-of-center at the northeast corner of Second and Marion, the Stetson-Post Terrace, Seattle’s first swank apartments designed for its first ‘1 percent.’
NOW: Jean Sherrard has used his extension pole to approach the elevation exploited by the two pioneer photographers on the second floor of a neighbor’s home on the west side of Second Avenue.

Pioneer photographs of any Seattle street other than Mill Street (Yesler Way), Commercial Street (First Ave. S.), and Front Street (First Ave. north of Mill Street) are rare.  Here are two exceptions.  Both are on Second Avenue and both were recorded from the same prospect – within inches of one another.

In the 1880s pioneer photographers Theodore E. Peiser and David Judkins set up studios a block apart on the west side of Second Avenue.  They were competitors and almost certainly did not plan this propinquity.   Peiser’s studio was on the second lot south of Marion Street and Judkins’ on the southwest corner with Columbia Street.  The two professionals photographed parades of different sorts near their studios on Second Avenue, and only about six weeks apart.

I am long familiar with Peiser’s May 13, 1886 record of parading members of the secret society Knights of Pythias pausing for his professional snap. As a pioneer classic it has appeared often in publications and exhibits.  We used it for its own “now and then” in PacificNW on January 17, 1999. (see above)  Judkin’s photo, (2nd from the top) however, I had never seen before last week.  I was thrilled.

Nearly the same prospect looking north on Second from between Cherry and Columbia Streets, although recorded a quarter-century later during the 1912 Golden Potlatch Celebraton.

The alert Ron Edge discovered it while helping the Museum of History and Industry scan some of its oldest prints. The print of Judkins’ line-up of primary school children – about 200 of them on the east side of Second Avenue filling the block between Columbia and Marion Streets, and more – is dated June 23, 1886.

Handwriting on the back makes a claim for Emma Blocksom.  It is her “school picture” and Emma is probably one of the posing 200 or so.  The Blocksoms are listed once in the 1886 city directory, below,  living on Washington Street.  The promising family lead stops there. (And for us, now, as well.)

Seattle opened Central School in 1883 four blocks up First Hill from here. Central School was big enough to handle as many scholars, and more, as those lined up. Perhaps this late June day is the last before summer vacation for these students, and taking one school picture is certainly more efficient than several.  (In 1886 Seattle’s population of school-age citizens between four and twenty-one years old was 2,591.)

Central School, the impressive white box with a tower seen here, sat on the south side of Madison Street, between Sixth and Seventh avenues. This view of it was recorded ca. 1886 from near the corner of Ninth Avenue and Columbia Street. It shows how to the east of 6th Avenue First Hill nearly leveled off, pausing in its climb. Later in the 1960s this interruption became a more convenient topography for building the Seattle Freeway [Interstate-5).
Central School looking north from near Mill Street (Yesler Way) in the mid-1880s.  Apparent here, again, is the pause in First Hill’s climb east of Sixth Avenue. Seventh Avenue is on the right.

What is not explained for either of these pros is how did they lift or carry their heavy cameras so high above the boardwalk?  Here I am again thankful for help from Ron Edge. In the MOHAI collection off older prints, Ron found an 1887 panoramic look from Denny Hill that includes an unobstructed sighting down Second Avenue. While it is soft on focus, it still shows many of the landmarks included here.  Most importantly, the leafy tree near the northwest corner of Second and Columbia, on the left in both of the featured photos, is standing in the panorama, a welcomed help for our ‘hide-and-seek’ after the photographer’s prospect.  About a third-of-a-block south of Columbia Street a two-story residence stands at the curb and over the sidewalk that uniquely runs below it. The residence, we suspect, was constructed before Second Avenue was developed from a path into a street.  Most likely both photographers were invited by this neighbor to shoot their parades from the this second floor veranda.

BEST IF YOU ENLARGE THIS NOW.  Putting our heads and pictures together, Ron Edge and I have found what we think – but cannot yet prove — is the likely perch for the two photographers. It is, as noted in the text,  a few yards south of Columbia Street on the west side of Second Avenue.   The young tree that stands here above the center of the photograph is on the west side of Second Avenue and to the left of the two story clapboard that shines brilliantly in the late afternoon sun sometime in 1886.  It is the same tree that shows next to the sidewalk at the left border of the Judkins photograph, second down from the top.   Now you best pay attention.  Under the tree and a few yards beyond it up the west side of Second Avenue is a shadow caste by a structure which is not seen except for two well-lighted (by the same sun) posts.  We hope to determine later if these support a balcony over the sidewalk or an enclosed second floor in the here  otherwise hidden structure.   It is from there, we suggest and nearly believe, that the two photographers took their two similarly elevated recordings of Second Avenue  north of Columbia Street.  This detail was pulled from  a panorama taken from Denny Hill and reveals much else including  the Plymouth Congregation Church steeple, which appears in both of the neighbors’ photographs on the east (left) side of Second Avenue.   The large ornamented structure beyond and to the right of our intersection is the Occidental Hotel before its 1887 additions.  When destroyed by the city’s Great Fire of 1889 the hotel (its rubble) filled the flatiron block of Mill Street (Yesler Way), James Street, Second Avenue and Pioneer Place. 

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, cherubs?

THEN:

THEN: The west side of Second Avenue between Columbia and Marion Streets was typical of the commercial district that was quick to develop after the city’s Great Fire of 1889. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The Big Snow of 1916 trims two jewelers’ clocks on the west side of Second Avenue, north of Marion Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The Moose float heads south on First Avenue at Columbia Street during the 1912 Potlatch parade of fraternal and secret societies. Behind them are Julius Redelsheimer's clothing store and the National Hotel, where daily room rates ran from 50 cents to a dollar.

THEN: With feet nearly touching the Madison Street Cable Railway’s cable slot, five “happy workers” squeeze on to the front bumper of an improvised Armistice Day float. (Photo courtesy Grace McAdams)

THEN: Looking south from Pine Street down the wide Second Avenue in 1911, then Seattle’s growing retail strip and parade promenade. (courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: In this 1887 look up Columbia Street from the waterfront is the bell tower of the fire station, tucked into the hill on the right. It would soon fail to halt the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. The station and everything between it and Elliott Bay were reduced to ashes, smoldering bricks and offshore pilings shortened like cigars. (courtesy, Kurt Jackson)

THEN: A float for the 1911 Potlatch parade carries piggyback a smaller 1897 version of a Polk City Directory on a much bigger 1911 copy. The fourteen years between them is meant to symbolize the growth of the city since the Alaskan/Yukon gold rush of 1897 that the Golden Potlatch of 1911 was created to commemorate. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971. (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)

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Seattle Now & Then: Savery Cherries

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THEN: The southwest end of the University of Washington’s Savery Hall, still under construction, on the left, was completed in 1920, also a likely year for the photograph. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The dependable March blooming of the Quad’s Yoshino cherry trees, is compliments of the University’s Arboretum and the Washington State Department of Transportation. The trees were moved from the Arboretum and transplanted in the Quad during construction of the Evergreen Point Bridge and SR-520. Thereafter, as revealed by Jean’s repeat from his 21-foot pole, the Quad has become a favored setting for wedding photos.

When classes first began Sept. 4, 1895, on the University of Washington’s new Interlaken campus, the students were greeted by  the school bell, carried from the old campus to the new, but hanging in the Denny Hall belfry.  Denny Hall is out-of-frame up the paved path that runs through the columns to the right.  The bell soon became annoyingly familiar after sunrise when the bell ringer took, it seemed, cruel pleasures in waking not only students but also the citizens of Brooklyn. (Brooklyn was the University District’s first popular name.) If the weather were right, the bell could be heard in Renton.

The twenty-foot tall hand-carved columns were examples of the Greek Ionic order. Inevitably, perhaps, they also became iconic, and for some the University’s most representative symbol. Each weighing about one-thousand pounds, they were originally grouped along the façade of the school’s first structure on the original 1861 campus, near what is long since the northeast corner of Seneca

Here, in 1907, the first campus main hall has been pivoted 90 degrees clockwise from its original footprint near the northwest corner of Fourth Ave. and Seneca Street and moved north to face Union Street, while its fate was still not decided. The four columns have been kidnapped to the new campus. The view looks southeast from near Union Street and Fifth Avenue, before the latter was cut through the campus soon after this photo was recorded.

Street and Fourth Avenue.  When the classic quartet was detached and moved to the new campus, student preservation activists continued to hope that the entire building would follow them to be reunited in time for the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition.  It was not to be.  Instead, selected remains of the University’s first home were carved into commemorative canes. The four surviving columns were consigned to this position in the then still future Quad. They were named, “Loyalty”, “Industry”, “Faith”, and “Efficiency.”  Neither Jean nor I know which is which.

The blooming Quad in the Spring of 1996 with members of the Volunteer Park Conservatory Orchestra  posing with David Mahler, their director, far left.

In 1915 the school’s Board of Regents embraced architect Carl F. Gould’s “Revised General Plan of the University of Washington,” which included the Quad and prescribed that the architectural style to be used in its several buildings should be Collegiate Gothic.  Commerce Hall, the brick and tile example on the right of the featured photo at the top, was completed in 1917.  Work on Philosophy Hall, on the left, was delayed by the material needs of the First World War, and completed late in the fall of 1920. By 1972 the names of both halls were changed to Savery, in honor of William Savery, the head of the University’s Department of Philosophy for more than forty years.

Icon inspects icon: history professor Edmund Meany in a Feb. 21, 1930 clipping from The Seattle Times.
Loyalty, Industry, Faith and  Efficiency get a cleaning, from a Seattle Times clipping for May 12m 1942,

The columns see from the rear of the Sylvan Theatre with Anderson Hall around the corner.
The Sylvan Theatre in late November, 1993.

With the completion of Commerce and Philosophy Halls, the quartet of columns was moved in 1921 to the Sylvan Theatre, which had been prepared for them. The Seattle Times noted that “It was the first time that the traditional pillars have been tampered with without some sort of ceremony.”  Since then the “ancient pillars” have witnessed a good share of pomp and circumstance during school’s graduation exercises.

“Postcard Artist Ellis”” colored record of the Quad before the Cherries.
The Quad with Cherry trees but not their blossoms in the 1960s during the “winter of our discontent” and a student demonstration in favor of “getting the war machine off campus.”
WEB EXTRAS

As per your request, Paul, I’ll toss in a few just for fun:  They make us better Jean.

Anything to add, blossoms?

THEN: For the four-plus months of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the center of commerce and pedestrian energy on University Way moved two blocks south from University Station on Northeast 42nd Street to here, Northeast 40th Street, at left.

THEN: Named for a lumberman, and still home for the UW’s School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, the upper floor’s high-ceilinged halls, including the Forest Club Room behind Anderson Hall’s grand Gothic windows, were described for us by the department’s gregarious telephone operator as “very popular and Harry Potterish.” (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: An estimated 50 percent of the materials used in the old Husky Union Building were recycled into its recent remodel. The new HUB seems to reach for the roof like its long-ago predecessor, the AYP’s landmark Forestry building. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: When the Oregon Cadets raised their tents on the Denny Hall lawn in 1909 they were almost venerable. Founded in 1873, the Cadets survive today as Oregon State University’s ROTC. Geneticist Linus C. Pauling, twice Nobel laureate, is surely the school’s most famous cadet corporal. (courtesy, University of Washington Libraries)

THEN: Above Lake Washington’s Union Bay the Hoo-Hoo Building on the left and the Bastion facsimile on the right, were both regional departures from the classical beau arts style, the 1909 AYPE’s architectural commonplace. Courtesy John Cooper

THEN: We suspect that this quiet exposure of the Washington State Building was photographed before the gates of the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition were first opened, and certainly before a bandstand gazebo was built in the grassy circle between it and the Forestry Building. (Courtesy University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections)

THEN: On March 25, 1946, or near it, Wide World Photos recorded here what they titled “University Vet Housing.” It would soon be named the Union Bay Village and house the families of returning veterans. The first 45 bungalows shown here rented for from $35 to $45 dollars a month. It would increase to a “teeming conglomerate of 500 rental units.” With housing for both married students and faculty. The view looks north over a street that no longer exists. The homes on the right horizon face the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail on N.E. Blakeley Street near N.E. 45th Place. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

THEN: The Gothic University of Washington Campus in 1946 beginning a seven-year crowding with prefabricated dormitories beside Frosh Pond. In the immediate background [on the right] is Guggenheim Hall. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The first house for Delta Gamma at N.E. 4730 University Way. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: sliver of the U.W. campus building called the Applied Physics Laboratory appears on the far right of this 1940 look east towards the U.W. campus from the N.E. 40th Street off-ramp from the University Bridge. While very little other than the enlarged laboratory survives in the fore and mid-grounds, much on the horizon of campus buildings and apartments still stand. (Courtesy, Genevieve McCoy)

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ANOTHER IONICICONIC – MOVED&SAVED

PLYMOUTH CONGREGATIONAL COLUMNS, March 21, 1966.

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MORE of MAHLER AND WAGNER

More of Mahler – and with Wagner – posing on campus in 1996.

Seattle Now & Then: The Market’s Front Door

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: By 1931, the likely year for this photo looking east on Pike Street from the Pike Place Market, this intersection had been loved for a quarter-century as the market’s front door. (Photo courtesy Museum of History & Industry)
NOW: In the market’s 111th year, the four modest corners of this brick-lined, walk-all-ways intersection welcome the footsteps of about 35,000 people every day.

Four weeks ago, Jean Sherrard stood at what is known as the front door to the Pike Place Market, the intersection of First Avenue and Pike Street. Hoisting a pole that extended as tall as the base of the market’s clock, he pointed his heavy Nikon eastward, up the center of Pike Street.  From a similar perch about 88 years earlier, a Webster and Stevens Studio photographer also looked east on Pike and recorded this week’s “then.” We are dating this photo as circa 1931, based not on the automotive license plates, which are hard to read, but rather the five-story construction under way for the J.C. Penney department store at the southwest corner of Second Avenue and Pike Street, here right-of-center and still without windows.

Before the five-floors of Penney’s there was the three of the Bon Marche at the southwest corner of Pike Street and Second Avenue, and so across the alley from Hahn’s building at the southeast corner of Pike and First Avenue. Hegg’s view looks east from First Avenue.
Looking east on Pike from Front Street (First Avenue) in the mid-1890s. Here the future Bon and then Penney’s corner  holds a one-story brick retail building about the same size as the Hahn Building.
With the Elliott Hotel, the Hahn Building on the right at its full 3-stories on April 2, 1963. The photo was taken by Lawton Gowey as was the one that follows after the Penney’s adds below and thirteen years later.

Clipped from The Seattle Times for August 18, 1931.
Lawton Gowey – again – looking east on Pike from First Avenue, here on April 21, 1976.

Later branded as JCPenney but known by one and all as Penney’s, the store opened Thursday, Aug. 13, 1931. In contrast to the uncertainties and outright failures of the Great Depression, Penney’s placed an advertisement in this daily five days later claiming that a “staggering” and “conservative” estimate of 125,000 had visited since the store’s opening. Some were “curious,” others “skeptical,” but many left with “arms loaded, satisfied that regardless of business conditions, people will buy when prices are right.”

NOW IS THE TIME to INTRODUCE ROBERT HAHN

Clipped from The Seattle Times for June 14, 1904 where Robert Hahn has struck a deal with the Copeland Medical Hustlers Institute to reveal (for local fame and perhaps more) that he had been cured of “his long years of suffering form catarrhal disease” with “his final cure” got from Copeland. The testimony lets us look into the revived full-face of Hahn with a sketch at a time in periodical publishing when half-tone rendering were still often undependable. .

Ten years later, Seattle traded financial troubles for the anxieties and orders of World War II. By then, the Hahn family had been associated with the intersection of First and Pike for more than 60 years. Robert Ernest Hahn, a German immigrant from Saxony, arrived in Seattle in the late 1860s and soon purchased the southeast corner when First Avenue (then named Front Street) and Pike Street were mere paths. Their neighbors included Seattle pioneers Arthur and Mary Denny and the lesser-known C. B. Shattuck.

Part of the scaffolding for the trestle that restrained coal cars on thru their final feet to the Pike Street Coal Wharf, where at its far western end were attached the company’s coal bunkers. This detail from a 1878 panorama recorded from the King Street Coal Wharf that replaced the service of the Pike wharf and bunkers that year. Perhaps C.B. Shattuck’s home or even office was made in one these few unidentified structures.    Mary and Arthur Denny’s home was behind Peterson and off-camera to the right at the southeast corner of Front (First Ave) and Union Street. 

Shattuck managed the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company that from 1871 to 1878 moved coal from their mine at Newcastle by a route that required both barges on the lakes and trains including one that crossed back-and-forth through this intersection from the company’s bunkers and wharf at the foot of Pike Street to their wharf at the south end of Lake Union. We imagine that Hahn chose not to get soiled by working for his neighbor.  Instead, he thrived as a painter and interior decorator, continuing to buy property and, with his wife, Amelia, raise a family of five children including Ernie who gained some local celebrity as a sportsman.   A Salmon Derby trophy was named for him.

Ernie Hahn and his friend Eddie Bauer show their catches for The Seattle Times of June 4, 1928.
The “Summer Garden” on the Hahn corner in the early 1890s.  It was replaced by the first floor of the Hahn Building.   This view of the Garden looks east from the south side of Pike Street and near its southeast corner with Front Street, aka First Avenue. 

By the time of Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889, the Hahn corner was a popular summer retreat from the heat with a beer garden, which real-estate maps indicate was approached from Pike Street. In 1909, the Hahns completed what survives as First and Pike’s southeast corner post, the three-story brick Hahn Building, also long known as the Elliott Hotel and seen above in our “now” as the Green Tortoise Hostel. The recent proposal that it be razed for a high-rise is rousing the market’s many friends to protect this “humble hundred-year old guardian structure” from the wages of plastic and glass.

A clip from The Times for Nov. 29, 1981 on the proposed renovation of the “historic Hahn Building.”  CLICK TO ENLARGE
Work-in-progress on the Hahn Building at the southeast corner of First Avenue and Pike Street. Lawton Gowey dated his slide May 2, 1982, and named it the Endicott Building.    The hangout International Donut House at the corner is shuttered. 
The restored corner (and Donut feeder) ca. 1962, as seen by a linked couple waiting to head south on First Avenue from its northeast corner with Pike Street.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads? Another mix from the neighborhood considered, which also reveals our love for it.

pmarket-n-arcade-30s-then-mr

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: The Hotel York at the northwest corner of Pike Street and First Avenue supplied beds on the American Plan for travelers and rooms for traveling hucksters. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

Montana-Horse-Meat-MR-THEN

 

THEN: Seattle Architect Paul Henderson Ryan designed the Liberty Theatre around the first of many subsequent Wurlitzer organs used for accompanying silent films in theatres “across the land”. The Spanish-clad actor-dancers posed on the stage apron are most likely involved in a promotion for a film – perhaps Don Q, Son of Zorro (1925) or Douglas Fairbanks’ The Gaucho (1929) that also played at the Liberty. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Mark Tobey, almost certainly Seattle’s historically most celebrated artist, poses in the early 1960s with some Red Delicious apples beside the Sanitary Market in the Pike Place Market. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market. It had already been scheduled for demolition. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: The Pike Place Market’s irregular block shapes and bluff-side topography joined to create a multi-level campus of surprising places, such as this covered curve routing Post Alley up into the Market. Here, in 1966, the “gent’s” entrance to Seattle’s first Municipal Rest Room (1908) is closed with red tape and a sign reading “Toilet room, closed temporarily for repairs.” The Market was then generally very much in need of repair. (by Frank Shaw, courtesy, Mike Veitenhans)

THEN: Charles Louch’s grocery on First Avenue, north of Union Street, opened in the mid-1880s and soon prospered. It is possible – perhaps probable – that one of the six characters posing here is Louch – more likely one of the two suited ones on the right than the aproned workers on the left. (Courtesy RON EDGE)

THEN: A circa 1920 look north along the tiled roofline of the Pike Place Market’s North Arcade, which is fitted into the slender block between Pike Place, on the right, and Western Avenue, on the left. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971. (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)

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Seattle Now & Then: Mill Street, ca. 1887

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: A pre-1889 Great Fire look east on Mill Street (Yesler Way) from the west side of Commercial Street (First Ave. South). (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Jean Sherrard’s arresting look east on Yesler Way, on the east side of First Avenue, in Pioneer Square.

This week I wish to lead with Jean Sherrard’s “now.”  It is a noon-hour streetscape graced by a morning downpour.  The clean puddle on Yesler Way reflects the dappled clouds that fringe the 40-plus story Smith Tower, which is mirrored in this small flood nearly as brilliantly as the landmark’s terra-cotta tiles shine in the noon-hour sky.  Sunlight escaping across Yesler Way from the alley between First Avenue and Occidental Street draws a warm path through the scene’s center.

Looking east on Mill Street (Yesler Way) a few months earlier than the featured photo. Note that the distant east end of the Occidental Hotel (right-of-center) is in an earlier stage of construction than is t he featured photo.

The featured “then” at the top we have picked to ponder with Jean’s now is not “on spot.”  Rather, it was recorded a half-block west on Yesler Way.  I chose this “then” for a list of reasons, including repeat photography.   At the photograph’s center stand two of the landmarks that Seattle rapidly raised in 1883-84, early boom years for the growing town that in 1881 first took the prize for numbered citizens in Washington Territory.  This developing strip of Victorian landmarks on Mill Street (Yesler Way) continues south from this intersection on Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) and especially north on Front Street (First Ave.)  (If you wish to explore the blog dorpatsherrardlomont you will find many opportunities to keyword-explore all with the help of past now-and-then features and books compiled from them.)

Lawton Gowey looks east from a spot close to that taken by the photographer of the featured photo. Lawton visited the site on February 7, 1961.

This look into Pioneer Square, or Pioneer Place as it was first named, shows the photographer W.F. Boyd’s stamp on its flip side. Boyd arrived in Seattle not long before he recorded this view.  Beside his centered stamp there are additional messages written by other hands on the back, including “Photo taken day before fire,” meaning the Great Fire of June 6 1889.  But it cannot be. Instead we have chosen to date this circa 1887, largely on a lead from Ron Edge, who pointed out the work-in-progress extending the Occidental Hotel (with the flagpole and mansard roof) to fill the entire flatiron block bordered by Mill Street, James Street and Second Avenue.

Looking northwest thru Pioneer Place at the Yesler-Leary Building when it was new, ca. 1884.

An item copied by Michael Cirelli  from an 1883 feature in the Seattle Weekly Chronicle on August 23, 1883. . It is one of the many discoveries he shared from his enthused study of Seattle’s pioneer history. [CLICK TO ENLARGE]
Another grand construction stands center-left: the Yesler-Leary Building, with its showplace tower topped by a weather vane, at the northwest corner of Front and Mill Streets.  One of our “other reasons” for picking this “then” on Mill Street is the brick building in the shadows on the scene’s far right.  We ask readers smarter than we to name this three-story pre-fire landmark.  [Soon after we made this request, Ron Edge, a frequent contributor to this blog, came forward – or up – with the answer.  Continue on for both his correct identification and his evidence.]

While I have never seen any face-on photograph of this south side of Mill Street, west of First Ave., it does appear in a Seattle1884 birdseye map and in that year’s Sanborn map as well.  But neither of these early sources give it a name or address.  Perhaps it is the Villard House*, listed in the 1884 city directory at 15 Mill Street and “near the Steamboat Wharf,” aka Yesler’s Wharf.  C.S. Plough, the proprietor, dauntlessly advertised it with a mondo boast, “The Villard is the best and cheapest hotel in the city.”

  • RON EDGE’S 11TH HOUR DISCOVERY:  NOPE – NOT THE VILLARD HOUSE, BUT RATHER THE SCHWABACHER BUILDING.   
Here the “mystery” structure is revealed in a detail pulled by Ron Edge from a 1887 panorama taken of the city from Denny Hill. The SCHWABACHER BUILDING, not the Villard Hotel, is circled by Ron. Compare this facade to the one depicted in the 1884 etching above it. Note here, far left, the slender spire of the Yesler-Leary Building at the northwest corner of Front Street (First Ave.) and Mill Street (Yesler Way.)
RON EDGE also found this new report in the July,8,1883 Post-Intelligencer (its forebear) on the construction of the Schwabacher Building. As the frame for this clipping reveals, Ron copied this from a scan open to the public on-line in the Library of Congress.

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JEAN ASKS – ANYTHING TO ADD LADS.

Anything to add, lads?   Beyond what is revealed just above, Ron Edge’s 11th hour identification of the three-story brick building on the far of the week’s feature, we have more of our weekly same, which is more past feature’s from the neighborhood.

THEN: In Lawton Gowey’s 1961 pairing, the Smith Tower (1914) was the tallest building in Seattle, and the Pioneer Square landmark Seattle Hotel (1890) had lost most of its top floor. (by Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Seen here in 1887 through the intersection of Second Avenue and Yesler Way, the Occidental Hotel was then easily the most distinguished in Seattle. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: With the clue of the ornate Pergola on the right, we may readily figure that we are in Pioneer Square looking south across Yesler Way.

THEN: For the first twenty years of his more than 40 years selling tinware and other selected hardware, Zilba Mile's shop looked south across Yesler Way down First Ave. S, then known as Commercial Street.

Then: The Pacific House, behind the line-up of white-gloved soldiers, might have survived well into the 20th Century were it not destroyed during Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889. Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry

THEN: The Lebanon aka Jesse George building at Occidental and Main opened with the Occidental Hotel in 1891. Subsequently the hotel’s name was changed first to the Touraine and then to the Tourist. The tower could be seen easily from the railroad stations. It kept the name Tourist until replaced in 1960 with a parking lot. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

THEN: A winter of 1918 inspection of some captured scales on Terrace Street. The view looks east from near 4th Avenue. (Courtesy City Municipal Archives)

THEN: Frank Shaw’s pre-preservation visit to First Avenue South on February 26, 1961. He looks north from Main Street. (photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: Looking north-northeast from the corner of Main Street and Occidental Avenue two or three weeks after the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy the Museum of History and Industry – MOHAI)

THEN: The original for this scene of a temporary upheaval on Mill Street (Yesler Way) was one of many historical prints given to the Museum of History and Industry many years ago by the Charles Thorndike estate. Thorndike was one of Seattle’s history buffs extraordinaire. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN:Ruins from the fire of July 26, 1879, looking west on Yesler’s dock from the waterfront. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: F. Jay Haynes recorded this ca. 1891 look up the Seattle waterfront and it’s railroad trestles most likely for a report to his employer, the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)

THEN: The Phoenix Hotel on Second Avenue, for the most part to the left of the darker power pole, and the Chin Gee Hee Building, behind it and facing Washington Street to the right, were both built quickly after Seattle’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy: Museum of History and Industry.)

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Seattle Now & Then: Dairy Men at Dreamland

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Thanks to Larry Lowry who long ago shared with me this grand photograph of Dreamland. He noted, “My grandfather, Waverly Mairs, was the ice cream maker at the old Seattle Dairy.” Perhaps, Waverly is also in the photograph.
NOW: The Eagles Auditorium replaced Dreamland in 1925. In 1983 the Auditorium was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. It became the home of ACT Theatre in 1996

Once cameras could be used comfortably out-of-doors, one of the sustaining services promoted by commercial photographers was portraits for families posing on the porch or front yard and businesses that grouped owners with their employees in front of the shop or factory that supported them.   This week’s feature has both, with a variation.

Pulled from The Seattle Times for August 20, 1934

The man in the dark suit nearest the camera is probably Syvert Stray, proprietor of the Seattle Dairy. He is standing beside, we assume, his wife Lillian, while holding onto the high wagon chair where his daughter poses for the professional photographer.  Down the line are the horses and drivers for Stray’s five milk wagons. The twist in this group portrait is that the subjects here are not posing beside the

Shot from the roof of the Cambridge Apartment-Hotel, the Seattle Dairy is boldly signed – right-of-center – at the front of the dairy’s factory on the south side of 8th Avenue.  The dairy is one of the exceptions – it was built of bricks.  (The accompanying details from the 1908 and 1912 Baist maps show the dairy only  in the later one at 1415 Eighth Avenue.   Most of the Dreamland roof shows upper left and beside it, to the right, the Unitarian Church with its clipped tower. (By the time of the above photo the Unitarians had moved up to Capitol Hill.)  Surely one of the two gas stations are a McKales, and under the management of the milkman Stray and his son. 
Details of Baist Maps, 1908 on the left beside 1912.   {CLICK to ENLARGE]
For comparison with the two Baist maps above here is a detail from the ever-helpful 1925 Kroll map of the Seattle Business Section.  University Street is on the far right, followed by Union, Pike, Pine Streets leading to the split where Howell Street begins off of OLive Street (or Way).    Eagles Hall is marked at its corner of Union and Seventh one block to the left from the details’ east border  (far-(right) with University Street.   Seattle Dairy can also be bound on Eighth Ave. “behind” the Eagles. 

company’s office and/or livery on Eighth Avenue. Rather they are around the corner from it on Union Street.  The reason is obvious.  They are sharing the splendor of a new and magnificent neighbor.  This is the showy south façade of Dreamland, a hall that filled the northeast corner of Seventh Avenue and Union Street.

DREAMLAND at the northeast corner of 7th Avenue and Union Street.
The Dreamland interior on November 17, 1911..

This ornate landmark could have held a hundred horses but never did.  Rather, it was made for entertainments and engagements. From its arching roof to the hardwood floor this big room was made for dancing, skating, conventions, banquets and shows of many sorts.  It was often decorated with streamers hanging from the ceiling.  Dreamland was also the political platform of choice for progressives, labor unions, and political campaigning.  The dances thrown here were big ones. And the sweating populist spectator sports of boxing and wrestling could fill the place.

Dreamland’s adver. for its opening in 1906.

From its beginning, Dreamland was promoted primarily as a roller skating rink. The opening was “by invitation” on October 14, 1906, for the Monday Night Skating Club.  The following night it was promoted in The Times as “the ideal rink for discriminating skaters… with Prof. Chas L. Franks and his daughter Lillian “performing as Champion Fancy Skaters.”  Stray, Dreamland’s dairyman neighbor, was also into roller skating, sponsoring a competitive team in the Seattle Roller Hockey League.

“Give a little, Take a little,”  Stray gets a deal on a new Rothweiler

In 1915, after Stray bought a Rothweiler truck, an illustrated advertisement of the purchase appeared in The Times.  Like the milk wagons Stray was replacing, his new truck was partially covered with a sign naming his dairy. Stray’s spirit for internal combustion developed into his second entrepreneurial passion, as director of McKale’s Inc., a small chain of stylish service stations.  The number one McKale’s was on the northwest corner of Union Street and Eighth Avenue, two doors from Stray’s Seattle Dairy.

A McKales on Broadway, ca. 1937. This is the intersection with Roy Street where Broadway “splits” to either side of McKales. From here going north it is still Broadway on the west and 10th Avenue East on the east.

Born in Christiansun, Norway, in 1871, the seventeen-year-old Syvert reached the U.S. in 1888 and Seattle in 1902.  Prior to his death in 1934 Stray was a life member in The Fraternal Order of Eagles, whose elegant aerie replaced Dreamland at Seventh Avenue and Union Street in 1925.  Since 1997, it is a corner where the play has continued with ACT Theatre.

A flyer for the first Eagles light-show concert, a benefit for FUS, the Free University of Seattle on January 14,  1967.    We were  “busted” by the police department’s dance squad, a good-cop bad-cop combo, for violating a “shadow dancing” ordinance from 1929.  We convinced the team to let the show go on if we turned the lights up, which we did – sort of.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, dreamers?  Yup Jean, Ron Edge is now laying upon us a few recent and relevant features and I’ll follow them with some older ones

THEN: The city’s north end skyline in 1923 looking northwest from the roof of the then new Cambridge Apartments at 9th Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: We give this panorama from the roof of the Washington Athletic Club a circa date of 1961, the year that Horizon House, a First Hill retirement community, first opened its doors to residents at Ninth Avenue and University Street. The high-rise L-shaped Horizon stands top-center. (Lawton Gowey)

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THEN:

THEN: In the 32 years between Frank Shaw's dedication picture and Jean Sherrard's dance scene, Freeway Park has gained in verdure what it has lost in human use.

THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

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THEN: A circa 1923 view looks south on Eighth Avenue over Pike Street, at bottom left.

THEN: Looking north-northeast from a low knoll at the southwest corner of Seneca Street and Seventh Avenue, circa 1916. By 1925, a commercial automobile garage filled the vacant lot in the foreground. [Courtesy, Ron Edge]

THEN: The Metropolitan Tract's Hippodrome was nearly new when it hosted the A.F. of L. annual convention in 1913.

THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898. Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN: Built in 1909-10 on one of First Hill’s steepest slopes, the dark brick Normandie Apartments' three wings, when seen from the sky, resemble a bird in flight. (Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The “then” photo looks southeast across Union Street to the old territorial university campus. It was recorded in the Fall of 1907, briefly before the old park-like campus was transformed into a grand commercial property, whose rents still support the running of the University of Washington. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

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CALL CODA COLLECT

A Seattle Times Clip from May 10, 1911.
Clip from The Seattle Times for June 11, 1929.

 

 

Now & Then here and now