Seattle Now & Then: The Great White Fleet, 1908

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THEN: About a year after he recorded this fashionable throng on Second Avenue celebrating the visit of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet in the spring of 1908, Frank Nowell became the official photographer for Seattle’s six-month-long Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exhibition in 1909.
THEN: About a year after he recorded this fashionable throng on Second Avenue celebrating the visit of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet in the spring of 1908, Frank Nowell became the official photographer for Seattle’s six-month-long Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exhibition in 1909.
NOW: As a guide, Jean Sherrard’s ‘repeat’ includes, on the far right, a glimpse of the Moore Theatre at the southeast corner of Virginia Street and Second Avenue.
NOW: As a guide, Jean Sherrard’s ‘repeat’ includes, on the far right, a glimpse of the Moore Theatre at the southeast corner of Virginia Street and Second Avenue.

Perched near, and somehow above, the sidewalk on the east side of Second Avenue, Frank Nowell, the photographer of this flood of fashionable pedestrians, is standing about a half-block north of Stewart Street. The crowd seems to spill onto Second from what the Times called the “immense viewing stand” on its west side.  The pack has gathered to celebrate President Teddy Roosevelt’s ‘Great White Fleet’ during its four-day visit to Seattle.  The American battleships were circumnavigating the world in a show of her military prowess.

A fuller view of the stands and the Moore Theater too. The Washington Hotel, at the northeast corner of Stewart and Second Ave., is on the far right. The subject looks north, of course. (Courtesy, Bob Royer)
A fuller view of the stands and the Moore Theater too. The Washington Hotel, at the northeast corner of Stewart and Second Ave., is on the far right. The subject looks north, of course. (Courtesy, Bob Royer)

Designed to support a mix of spectators paying a dollar a seat and free-loading dignitaries, the Chamber of Commerce enlarged the viewing stand from ten-to fifteen- thousand seats in hurried construction the week before the grand parade of Tuesday May 26,1908.  Nowell’s camera (for the featured photo at the top) points to the northwest, so given the shadows on both the celebrants’ faces and The Harvard Hotel at the northwest corner of Virginia Street and Second Avenue, it seems likely that this was recorded after the morning parade when its route was safe to swarm. 

 

A worn print of the Harvard at the northwest corner of Second Ave. and Virginia Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry aka MOHAI)
A worn print of the Harvard at the northwest corner of Second Ave. and Virginia Street in the early 1890s. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry aka MOHAI)
The Hotel Harvard in need, clipped from The Seattle Times for February 19, 1901.
The Hotel Harvard in need, clipped from The Seattle Times for February 19, 1901.

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Before the parade, the Times predicted “a sea of bright-colored summer costumes and striking hats.”  Many of those bonnets included ostrich feathers, and surely some of those plumes were purchased at the Bon Marche’s May 21 sale priced from $1.50 to $6.95, depending upon the color and length.  The Bon also predicted

A detail from a nearly full page adver for the Bon Marche keying on the patriotic needs for Ostrich feathers to greet the thousands of sailors parading in their uniforms. The clip was pulled from the May 21, 1908 Seattle Times.
A detail from a nearly full page adver for the Bon Marche keying on the patriotic needs for Ostrich feathers to greet the thousands of sailors parading in their uniforms. The clip was pulled from the May 21, 1908 Seattle Times.  CLICK TO ENLARGE
A Seattle Times cartoonist shows that broad-brimmed hats might get in the way.
A Seattle Times cartoonist suggests that broad-brimmed hats might get in the way of fleet sight-seeing.
A Seattle Times satire printed on the same May day as the cartoon above.
A Seattle Times satire printed on the same May fleet-week day as the cartoon above: May 26.
Asahel Curtis' stock postcard shot of the Atlantic Fleet on Puget Sound.
Asahel Curtis’ stock postcard shot of the Atlantic Fleet on Puget Sound.

that the four-day visit of fourteen battleships from Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet would be “the greatest event in Seattle history.” It may have been, in terms of condensed sensation, remembering that in 1908 there were no radio, television or smart phones to distract one from mixing with others in patriotic fervor and sartorial show.  

Looking west on James St. from the Collins Building at its southeast corner with Second Avenue. Some of the Fleet-visit bunting can be seen here draping a corner of the Seattle Hotel.
Looking west on James St. from the Collins Building at its southeast corner with Second Avenue. Some of the Fleet-visit bunting can be seen here draping a corner of the Seattle Hotel.   The feet is also seen parked in Elliott Bay. 
One of the most-favored decorations was the illuminated battleship hung above First Avenue between Marion and Madison Streets. Its sponsor, the
One of the most-favored decorations was the illuminated battleship hung above First Avenue between Marion and Madison Streets. Its sponsor, the Seattle Electric Company, anchored it in the Hotel Rainier Grand, see here on the left.   Below: looking south on First Avenue from Madison Street, most likely after the parade.

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The days of the Fleet's visit were filled with a variety of sensations including visits to the battleships and fireworks.
The days of the Fleet’s visit were filled with a variety of sensations including visits to the battleships and fireworks.

It was this newspaper’s penchant to print on its editorial page the latest estimate for the city’s booming population.  At the time of the fleet’s visit, it was 276,462, plus about 125,000 more who reached Seattle by all means possible. Seattle’s suburbs were abandoned, the Times reported.  Full-up, the Great Northern Railroad “left 250 standing on the platform in Wenatchee.”  Fifteen-thousand arrived by railroad in one afternoon, which the newspaper headlined, “Chaos Reigns in King Street Station.” In its front-page afternoon summary of the morning parade, the newspaper estimated a total of about 400,000 for those watching the parade and marching in it.  The latter included 6000 men from the Fleet.   

Above: The Grote Rankin department store used the Fleet's visit to sell bedding, which the
Above: The Grote Rankin department store used the Fleet’s visit to sell bedding, which the Century Furniture Co., below, use it to go out of business.

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This newspaper’s weeklong coverage of the Atlantic Fleet’s sensational visit is truly wondrous and often whimsical.  Readers, we are fond of reminding them, can use their Seattle Public Library cards for online explorations of the Seattle Times Archives.  You will be taken away.  And while delving we recommend both historylink’s essay on the fleet’s visit and Bob Royer’s astute reflections on his own blog The Cascadia Courier. Here’s the link http://www.thecascadiacourier.com/2014/07/the-arrival-of-great-white-fleet-in.html. I suspect that many readers will remember his early 1980s term as Seattle’s Deputy Mayor and brotherly advisor to Charles Royer, mayor then and for many years following.  Bob Royer is presently historylink’s Chairman of the Board.  

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Gosh Jean we spent a good  part of the afternoon searching the archive here in Wallingford for a sizeable stack of glass negatives of scenes from the fleet’s 1908 visit, but failed to find them.   Our club of addendums have now another member.  When we find them we will print them.  Otherwise we have, as is our custom, a few part features – most of them recent – from the neighborhood.   Thanks to Ron Edge for helping us mount them this week again.

THEN: Steel beams clutter a freshly regraded Second Avenue during the 1907 construction of the Moore Theatre. The view looks north toward Virginia Street.

THEN: In 1910, a circa date for this look north on First Avenue across Virginia Street, the two corners on the east side of the intersection were still undeveloped – except for signs. The Terminal Sales Building, seen far right in Jean Sherrard’s repeat, did not replace the billboards that crowd the sidewalk in the “then” until 1923. (Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: An early-20th-century scene during the Second Avenue Regrade looks east into its intersection with Virginia Avenue. A home is being moved from harm's way, but the hotel on the hill behind it would not survive the regrade's spoiling. Courtesy of Ron Edge.

THEN: Where last week the old Washington Hotel looked down from the top of Denny Hill to the 3rd Ave. and Pine St. intersection, on the left, here the New Washington Hotel, left of center and one block west of the razed hotel, towers over the still new Denny Regrade neighborhood in 1917. (Historical photo courtesy of Ron Edge)

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THEN: Looking south from Pine Street down the wide Second Avenue in 1911, then Seattle’s growing retail strip and parade promenade. (courtesy of Jim Westall)

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THEN: With feet nearly touching the Madison Street Cable Railway’s cable slot, five “happy workers” squeeze on to the front bumper of an improvised Armistice Day float. (Photo courtesy Grace McAdams)

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OTHER VISITS

The Atlantic Fleet also paused at Port Angeles, and marched in both Bellingham and Tacoma.  The first two views below are of the Whatcom parade and the third one shows the Tacoma Harbor -Commencement Bay –  light show for the fleet (some fleet – perhaps a later one.  I also seem to have misplaced my copy of Building Washington, which includes a thumbnail history of the Tacoma City Hall and clock included in the spotlighted Tacoma scene.)

The Bellingham Parade
The Bellingham Parade, above and below.

 

Bellingham above and below.

Tacoma light show.
Tacoma light show.

OTHER FLEETS

A visit to Elliott Bay by the Navy in 1936. Pier 54 is on the far right, although it was then still number Pier 3. Next to it to the right is the fire station and then the Grand Trunk Pier and Colman Dock.
A visit to Elliott Bay by the Navy in 1936. Pier 54 is on the far right, although it was then still number Pier 3. Next to it to the right is the fire station and then the Grand Trunk Pier and Colman Dock.
Resting in Lake Union, the unique war surplus of Woodrow Wilson's Wooden Fleet.
Resting in Lake Union, the unique war surplus of Woodrow Wilson’s Wooden Fleet.  This is the southeast “corner’ of the lake and that’s Queen Anne Hill on the left horizon.   A hint of the Gas Works shows itself far right.

A Visit to the Columbia

Thought I’d toss up a few photos of the Columbia Gorge for perusal and enjoyment.  This past week, we drove down to Maryhill and explored that section of the Columbia – but it was Thursday last, when most of the following photos were taken, that thunderheads chased us east, providing some dramatic photo ops.

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The West. Powerlines and barbed wire.
The West. Powerlines and barbed wire.
During inclement weather, the play of shadows and highlights in the Gorge
During inclement weather, the play of shadows and highlights in the Gorge
Heading up Interstate 97, just above the river. Wind turbines and farms co-exist.
Heading up Interstate 97, just above the river. Wind turbines and farms co-exist.
Flowers in the box canyons of Horse Thief Butte.
Flowers in the box canyons of Horse Thief Butte.
More from Horse Thief Butte, flowers and hieroglyphs
More from Horse Thief Butte, flowers and hieroglyphs
Shades of 'Maverick' on the Columbia - click to zoom in on this paddlewheeler.
Shades of ‘Maverick’ on the Columbia – click to zoom in on this paddlewheeler.
Big sky above the river
Big sky above the river
The railroad bridge near Wishram threatened by looming dark clouds
The railroad bridge near Wishram threatened by looming dark clouds
The Four Mountain viewpoint, where Paul's dad, the Very Reverend Theodore Dorpat would stop the car on family trips. Just a couple miles south of Goldendale
The Four Mountain viewpoint, where Paul’s dad, the Very Reverend Theodore Dorpat would stop the car on family trips. Just a couple miles south of Goldendale
A trail above the river leads into the lush hills - by summer the green will turn to gold
A trail above the river leads into the lush hills – by summer the green will turn to gold
Rainbow seen from I-90 just west of Ellensburg, Thursday evening
Rainbow seen from I-90 just west of Ellensburg, Thursday evening

Seattle Now & Then: James Street Cable Cars

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THEN: A half-century after they reached the top of First Hill, electric streets cars and cable cars prepare to leave it. (Courtesy, The Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: A half-century after they reached the top of First Hill, electric streets cars and cable cars prepare to leave it. (Courtesy, The Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: We have a right and opportunity to enjoy the irony of Jean Sherrard’s “now” repeat. With this “Seattle Street Car,” the trolleys, at least, have returned to the summit of First Hill. For no particular reason beyond ascension, I hope soon to take a ride on this “elevator service.”
NOW: We have a right and opportunity to enjoy the irony of Jean Sherrard’s “now” repeat. With this “Seattle Street Car,” the trolleys, at least, have returned to the summit of First Hill. For no particular reason beyond ascension, I hope soon to take a ride on this “elevator service.”

A Post-Intelligencer photographer standing at the summit of First Hill snapped this photograph at the intersection of James Street and Broadway in February 1940. That was forty-nine years and a few months after the electric trolleys, on the left, and the James Street cable cars, on the right, first started meeting here beside the Union

Circa 1939 looking north on Broadway through James Street with the power house on the right. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Circa 1939 looking north on Broadway through James Street with the power house on the right. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

Trunk Line’s big red brick powerhouse and car barn stationed at the northeast corner.  Either on the instruction of the photographer, or motivated by a ceremonial urge, the crews of these cars are waving to each other across the short distance between them in the featured photo at the top. They are waving goodbye.  This is the end – or nearly.

Lawton Gowey has described this as "last ride on the last night, James Street Cable."
Lawton Gowey has described this as “last ride on the last night, James Street Cable.” That would be Feb. 17, 1940. 

Carolyn Marr, the Museum of History and Industry’s (MOHAI) librarian, tells us that the “given date” for this P-I negative is February 23, 1940.  This introduces a small problem, because the James Street cable cars made their last run around midnight on February the 17th.  Perhaps, the date written on the negative holder

A detail from the featured photograph.
A detail from the featured photograph.  We reflect on this detail a few inches lower in the main body of the feature.  We have imagined that the woman sitting near the front door and above the number “73”  [the record  number, if you have missed it, of victories in an NBA season,  for the Golden State Warriors, this year] is the conductor’s wife. 

is its filing date.  For some cable car enthusiasts a sorrier possibility is that the cable car is here heading for its scrapping.  (This seemed unlikely to our attentive PacificNW editor, who wondered if this is headed for scrap what will become of the woman passenger?  We wondered – somewhat lamely in return – that perhaps this is the conductor’s wife, on board to support here hubby on his last ride.) This junking followed in the first year after the cars stopped carrying passengers up what the Seattle Times Associate Editor, James Woods, admiringly described as its half-century “elevator service” up the hill from Pioneer Square to this its summit. 

A clip of goodbye in the Times for February 18, 1940.
A clip of goodbye in the Times for February 18, 1940.
An excerpt from Times
An excerpt from Times Associated Editor James Wood’s column “Speaking for the Times”  on  April 4, 1940.

In the April 4th printing of his feature, “Speaking for the Times,” Woods proposed, “Why not keep that James Street cable line going? . . . This would be greatly to the convenience and comfort of many people. It would also have advertising value, as one of the only two cable lines in American cities.  In that respect we would rate a James Street cable car considerably higher than a totem pole.”  Editor Woods was alluding to the arson-torched and dry-rotting Pioneer Square totem that was then being replaced, near James Street, with a replica.  Clearly it was a restoration that the editor compared unfavorably to bringing back the James Streets cable cars.  

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A clip on the travails of Ward's Lunch on February 9, 1938. [If was, acting forward, a deception that followed by conception a week before.
A clip on the travails of Ward and his Lunch from The Times for February 9, 1938. [If was, acting forward, a deception that followed my conception by about one week and 1500 miles into the midwest of Grand Forks, North Dakota.]

There’s another dating ambiguity here.  Although difficult, and perhaps for some impossible, to read, a poster holding to the right-front of the cable car promotes the 47th Annual Policemen’s Ball scheduled for Thursday, February 22 at the Municipal Coliseum.  [We have inserted a blow-up of the poster five prints up.] The top of the poster advises, “Ride The Street Cars.”  That would be difficult on this cable car from this position on this corner.  The cable cars on James stopped running, we remember, on the Saturday night of February 17, 1940. 

With the power house on the right and the Haller mansion "Castlemount" on the left, a James Street Cable car approaches the end of its short run up First Hill from Pioneer Square.
With the power house on the right and the Haller mansion “Castlemount” on the left, a James Street Cable car approaches the end of its short run up First Hill from Pioneer Square.

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A detail of the intersection lifted from the 1912 Baist real estate map.
A detail of the intersection lifted from the 1912 Baist real estate map.
The western end of James Street and its cable run at Pioneer Square in 1932.
The western end of James Street and its cable run at Pioneer Square.
Two pioneer looks east on James Street from Pioneer Square and decades still before the trolley climbed it. The top view dates from ca. 1868 and that below it (and above this) from 1859. This last is the oldest surviving photo of any part of Seattle. Note that the tree-line has not moved much in the decade between the two recordings. The 1860s were a depressed Civil War decade hereabouts.
Two pioneer looks east on James Street from Pioneer Square and decades still before the trolley climbed it. The top view dates from ca. 1868 and that below it from 1859. This last is the oldest surviving photo of any part of Seattle. Note that the tree-line has not moved much in the decade between the two recordings. The 1860s were a depressed Civil War decade hereabouts.

MOHAI has consigned the decidedly low number 27,175 to our featured negative from its P-I Collection.  Howard Giske, the museum’s now long-time pro-photographer, advises, “We are still numbering that collection.  It is a work-in-progress that is now reaching two million negatives. We suspect that it will reach far beyond that.”  And we add and hope that ultimately most of this collection will be on line for all to share and use, and that the museum’s library will be generously funded to do it.

Extreme circumstances on the James Street Cable during the Fourth Avenue Regrade in 1907. The First Baptist church seen above the car did not survive the grade change, but moved to it's present corner on First Hill.
Extreme circumstances on the James Street Cable during the Fourth Avenue Regrade in 1907. The First Baptist church, seen here above the car, did not survive the grade change, but moved to it’s present corner on First Hill.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, fellahs?  Lots of links from the neighborhood and or of more ‘rails’ mounted by Ron Edge.  Most of them will be familiar to regulars.   Following that – Jean – you have promised to share a few of the scenes you gathered his past week on  your and Karen’s visit to the Columbia Gorge.  Our readers I know will love them.  I do.  I hope you put them up first thing Sunday morning.

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THEN: Looking across Capitol Hill’s Broadway Avenue during its 1931adjustments. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: The brand new N&K Packard dealership at Belmont and Pike in 1909. Thanks to both antique car expert Fred Cruger for identifying as Packards the cars on show here, and to collector Ron Edge for finding them listed at this corner in a 1909 Post-Intelligencer. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry.)

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THEN:

THEN: First Hill’s distinguished Old Colony Apartments at 615 Boren Avenue, 1910.

THEN: Built in the early twentieth century at the northeast corner of Jefferson Street and Boren Avenue, Bertha and Frank Gardner’s residence was large but not a mansion, as were many big homes on First Hill. (Courtesy Washington State Museum, Tacoma)

THEN: Harborview Hospital takes the horizon in this 1940 recording. That year, a hospital report noted that "the backwash of the depression" had overwhelmed the hospital's outpatient service for "the country's indigents who must return periodically for treatment." Built in 1931 to treat 100 cases a day, in 1939 the hospital "tries bravely to accommodate 700 to 800 visits a day."

THEN: The Sprague Hotel at 706 Yesler Way was one of many large structures –hotels, apartments and duplexes, built on First Hill to accommodate the housing needs of the city’s manic years of grown between its Great Fire in 1889 and the First World War. Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey

THEN: This Seattle Housing Authority photograph was recorded from the top of the Marine Hospital (now Pacific Tower) on the north head of Beacon Hill. It looks north to First Hill during the Authority’s clearing of its southern slope for the building of the Yesler Terrace Public Housing. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Yesler Way’s corner with 17th Avenue is about three blocks west and 30 feet short of Yesler Way’s summit on Second Hill. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey.)

THEN: Built in 1887, the Minor-Collins Home at the northeast corner of Minor Avenue and Cherry Street was one of the grandest and longest surviving pioneer mansions on First Hill. (Courtesy Historic Seattle)

THEN: Most likely in 1902 Marcus M. Lyter either built or bought his box-style home at the northwest corner of 15th Avenue and Aloha Street. Like many other Capitol Hill addition residences, Lyter's home was somewhat large for its lot.

THEN: At the northwest corner of Columbia Street and Boren Avenue, two of the more ordinary housing stock on First Hill in the 1890s. (Courtesy MOHAI)

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First appeared in Pacific on December 26, 1999.
First appeared in Pacific on December 26, 1999.

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Mary Christmas from rail fan, author, and collector extraordinair, Warren Wing. Printed in the Times for December 20, 1998.
Merry Christmas from rail fan, author, and collector extraordinaire, Warren Wing. Printed in the Times for December 20, 1998.

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Trinity Episcopal at 8th Avenue and James Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Trinity Episcopal at 8th Avenue and James Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

Seattle Now & Then: “We Love the Junction!”

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THEN: Looking into West Seattle’s Junction and north on California Ave. SW to its intersection with SW Alaska Street in 1941. The Hamm Building, is seen above the light-colored car, and the Campbell Building is at right, behind the G.O. Guy Drugs sign.
THEN: Looking into West Seattle’s Junction and north on California Ave. SW to its intersection with SW Alaska Street in 1941. The Hamm Building, is seen above the light-colored car, and the Campbell Building is at right, behind the G.O. Guy Drugs sign.
NOW: The five leaders of the “We Love the Junction” Task Force (West Seattleites all) boldly interrupt the site of the “then” while adding homage to another crossing, that by the Beatles on London’s Abbey Road in 1969. These striders are (from left) Crystal Dean, Esther Armstrong, Cody Othoudt, Peder Nelson and Brad Chrisman.
NOW: The five leaders of the “We Love the Junction” Task Force (West Seattleites all) boldly interrupt the site of the “then” while adding homage to another crossing, that by the Beatles on London’s Abbey Road in 1969. These striders are (from left) Crystal Dean, Esther Armstrong, Cody Othoudt, Peder Nelson and Brad Chrisman.

To those who do not live in West Seattle, the “parts” that best represent it are, I imagine, a trio of large landmarks: Duwamish Head, Alki Point, and Lincoln Park. We might make it a quartet by adding Schmitz Park, although I doubt that many residents of Laurelhurst, Wallingford or Ballard have ever ventured into its virgin wilds.  These four destinations are, of course, very familiar to West

The West Seattle Ferry heading into the Duwamish Horizon, seen, most likely, from near the foot of Marion Street.
The West Seattle Ferry heading into the Duwamish Horizon, seen, most likely, from near the foot of Marion Street.
Tidying the founder's pylon near Alki Point for Seattle's centennial in 1951.
Tidying the founder’s pylon near Alki Point for Seattle’s centennial in 1951. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)
Lincoln Park beyond the Fauntleroy Ferry Landing by A. Curtis.
Lincoln Park beyond the Fauntleroy Ferry Landing by A. Curtis.

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Seattleites, but I will further speculate that it is none of the four but rather the Junction that best represents the heart and soul of West Seattle, the grand peninsula at the southwest corner of Elliott Bay.  It is the Junction, extending in every direction from the intersection of SW Alaska Street and California Ave. SW, that is the best-loved corner in that corner.   

Looking west. from West Avalon Way to Fauntleroy Way SW in 1934, and heading for The Junction.
Looking west. from West Avalon Way to Fauntleroy Way SW in 1934, – approaching The Junction.

Here – in the featured photo at the top –  is the Junction on September 23, 1941.  With its low-rise profile and small-shop milieu, Jean Sherrard’s repeat is similar to the neighborhood recorded two months and two weeks before the United States entered the Second World War.  At that time a photographer on assignment for the Foster and Kleiser billboard company was working to promote the Junction neighborhood as a fine place to advertise.  Note the sign on the roof left-of-center – and in the other company signs collected here.  The photographer has aimed his or her camera north on California from midway between SW Edmunds Street and SW Alaska Street.  The four shining and parallel lines marking the pavement at the scene’s center are the surviving remnants of the Junction’s creation in 1907.  That year the Fauntleroy and West Seattle electric streetcar lines first converged: a junction.  It also was the year of West Seattle’s convergence with, or annexation into, Seattle. 

Heading west for the Junction on W. Alaska St. - another Foster and Kleiser billboard photo. 1939
Heading west for the Junction on W. Alaska St. – another Foster and Kleiser billboard photo. 1939

Because of its connections, the Junction soon grew into West Seattle’s commercial center. William (known as W.T.) Campbell, a skilled real-estate boomer, was largely responsible for the Junction’s rising above the sometimes wetland (it began, in places, as a swamp).  And it was Campbell who built the two two-story brick buildings that still hold half of the intersection: the Campbell Building (1918) at the northeast corner and the Hamm Building (1926) at the northwest corner.  It is these two ornate landmarks that one of the city’s most energetic heritage groups, the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is nominating as worthy of preservation with a project it has named “We Love the Junction.” 

Why?  Clay Eals, the group’s executive director, explains, “We know that none of us will live forever. But landmarking the unique structures that for the past century have created an attractive and vibrant center for connection and collaboration, for friendly commerce, for appreciation of the visionaries who came before us, for the inexpressible sense of home, and for affirmation of our humanity – this is the stuff of identity, of legacy and of hope.”  We will add that a visit to loghousemuseum.info, the group’s website, will reveal with moving splendor this heritage group’s good works, including those of “We Love the Junction.”

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WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, mes amis?  Yes Jean, Ron has returned to the blog a few of its more recent neighborhood insertions.  While was have quite a stack of ancient features that we might have lifted here, we will not for want of time, which must be given to our next contribution to the Times, also a West Seattle feature – one from Alki Point.  For coda we will now slip in a poem on California Street, which seems – to me – to date from about 1940.   I confess that I do not remember where I picked it up.  Perhaps a reader will know and enlighten us all.

THEN: The Gatewood Craftsman Lodge was built on a road, in a neighborhood, and near a public school all named for the developer Carlisle Gatewood, who also lived in the neighborhood. The three women posing in the third floor’s open windows are the Clark sisters, Jean, Dorothy and Peggy, members of the family that moved into the home in the late 1930s.

THEN: In 1852 many of Seattle’s first pioneers removed from Alki Point by dugout canoe for the deeper and safer harbor along the east shore of Elliott Bay (our central waterfront). About a half-century later any hope or expectation that the few survivors among these pioneers could readily visit Alki Beach and Point by land were fulfilled with the timber quays and bridges along Spokane Street. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: Included among the several detailed photos taken for the Bernards of their new and yet rustic Fir Lodge, was this one of the living room with its oversized fireplace and the piano on which Marie, their older daughter, learned to play well enough to concertize. (Courtesy Doris Nelson)

THEN: Looking southeast from above Alki Avenue, the Schmitz Park horizon is serrated by the oldest trees in the city. The five duplexes clustered on the right were built 1919-1921 by Ernest and Alberta Conklin. Ernest died in 1924, but Alberta continued to live there until well past 1932, the year this photograph was recorded. (Seattle Municipal Archives.)

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For “SO SHORT A TIME” a CALIFORNIA AVENUE CLOCKCourtesy, Southwest Seattle Historical Society

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Seattle Now & Then: Lake Union

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THEN: Samuel McKnight’s early 1890s panorama of Lake Union also looks north into most of Seattle’s seventeen square-mile annexation of 1891, when the city limits were pushed north from McGraw Street to 85th Street. Fremont, Edgewater, the future Wallingford, Latona, and Brooklyn (University District) were among the neighborhoods included. (Courtesy, Dan Kerlee)
THEN: Samuel McKnight’s early 1890s panorama of Lake Union also looks north into most of Seattle’s seventeen square-mile annexation of 1891, when the city limits were pushed north from McGraw Street to 85th Street. Fremont, Edgewater, the future Wallingford, Latona, and Brooklyn (University District) were among the neighborhoods included. (Courtesy, Dan Kerlee)
NOW: The atmospheric splendor of Jean Sherrard’s repeat was made with no plans but to get off the hydroplaning freeway and snap it.
NOW: The atmospheric splendor of Jean Sherrard’s repeat was made with no plans but to get off the hydroplaning freeway and snap it.

This week’s ‘Now & Then’ is a rare – and perhaps the only – occasion in the thirty-four years of this weekly feature to find a ‘then’ that is a harbinger of a ‘now.’  After Jean Sherrard photographed the latter a while ago, I kept it on my desk as a challenge to find a historical scene that foretokened it, or nearly so.  The omen recently reached us through the agency of Ron Edge, a frequent help to this feature.  Ron let us know that a mutual friend, the public historian and collector Dan Kerlee, had earlier shared this week’s ‘then’ with him.  The pioneer photographer recorded his shot within a soft shout of Jean’s storm-soaked capture. It will do nicely. 

Not so revealing but still another early Lake Union by McKnight. For this shot he moved a block or so to the north.
Not so revealing but still another early Lake Union by McKnight. For this shot he moved a block or two to the north.

Here’s Jean recollection.  “On a spring evening, driving north on I-5 from downtown, I found myself in a torrent – a quantity and quality of rainfall that occurs in the tropics, but rarely in Seattle. Buckets, cats and dogs, and Noah’s flood were the metaphors that came to mind. The windshield wipers pushed through liquid an inch thick, and everyone in their right mind had slowed to a crawl. Then, minutes before setting behind Queen Anne, the sun broke through the downpour, slicing away a few lower-lying clouds. I exited at Lakeview Drive and splashed up to a viewpoint overlooking the freeway. Like most natives, I don’t carry an umbrella, so I held a cardboard box over my head to protect my camera while I snapped a dozen shots of the city north and south, capturing Seattle in one of its rarer incarnations, under a sun-soaked deluge.”

Taken from a nearby prospect but somehat later by Major Millis.
Taken from a nearby prospect but somehat later by Major Millis.
Another early 90s look from Capitol Hill to the northwest over Lake Union. This print was found in a mid-western antique shop, and the photographer is not identified - as yet.
Another early 90s look from Capitol Hill to the northwest over Lake Union. This print was found in a mid-western antique shop, and the photographer is not identified – as yet.

Samuel F. McKnight, the photographer of the fortuitous early scene (at the top) operated a studio here for a few years before and after the city’s Great Fire of 1889.  His surviving work is not large.  The featured print looks north-northwest across a Lake Union only recently divested of its surrounding forest. 

A detail of the Eastlake park and beer garden lifted from the featured print.
A detail of the Eastlake park and beer garden lifted from the featured print.  The detail includes a blurred record of the southbound electric trolley on the far-right.

On this southeast corner of the lake, the line of Louisa and David Denny’s electric trolley to Brooklyn (University District) and Ravenna Park passes between the homes on Eastlake Ave., bottom-left, and a park/beer garden landscaped with a swimming beach and a screen of shade trees growing beside it.  This park with its windmill and tower was opened in 1886 as a lure to what was then the terminus of the horse-drawn Seattle Street Railway.  The little bay beyond the trees has since been mostly filled in.  The ships of NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, were long parked here, and the Lake Union Dry Docks, off-camera to the left in the featured photo at the top (but markedly shown three photos down), has been at work since 1919.  Fremont and Ballard, upper-left, are mottled with smoke and steam from their mills.

In our featured bay part of Woodrow Wilson's Wooden Fleet of unused WW1 vessels parked in the fresh water of Lake Union. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Beyond our featured bay part of Woodrow Wilson’s Wooden Fleet of unused WW1 vessels parked in the fresh water of Lake Union. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Another of our featured bay, undated but sometime after the 1932 opening of the Aurora Bridge.
Another of our featured bay, undated but sometime after the 1932 opening of the Aurora Bridge.
The Lake Union Dry Dock photographed from the City Light steam plant, or construction on it. Fairview Avenue runs north over our featured by from the far right and continues around the point, top-center.
The Lake Union Dry Dock photographed from the City Light steam plant, or construction on it. Fairview Avenue runs north over our featured bay from the far right and continues around the point, top-center.
First appeared in Pacific on July 25, 1993. Photo courtesy of the Washington State Museum, Tacoma.
First appeared in Pacific on July 25, 1993. Photo courtesy of the Washington State Museum, Tacoma.
Pivoting 90 degrees to the Southwest.
Pivoting 90 degrees to the Southwest.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Surely – another necklace of links from more recent features unfolded by Ron and pulls in the ancient majority pulled by me.   Some visitors  – five or ten – may noticed that we have again failed to introduce our blog with a little and somewhat improvised video on the week’s featured photo.   In the midst of Jean’s play production and my organizing/editing some 1400 pages of “Keep Clam”  (a bio of Ivar Haglund), we are now and for a while so busy.   But at some point in this rejuvenating season we shall return with our playful – we hope – videos.

THEN: Both the grading on Belmont Avenue and the homes beside it are new in this “gift” to Capitol Hill taken from the family album of Major John Millis. (Courtesy of the Major’s grandchild Walter Millis and his son, a Seattle musician, Robert Millis.)

Then: Photographed from an upper story of the Ford Factory at Fairview Avenue and Valley Street, the evidence of Seattle's explosive boom years can be seen on every shore of Lake Union, ca. 1920. Courtesy of MOHAI

THEN: The home at bottom right looks across Madison Street (out of frame) to Central School. The cleared intersection of Spring Street and Seventh Avenue shows on the right.

THEN: A.J. McDonald’s panorama of Lake Union and its surrounds dates from the early 1890s. It was taken from First Hill, looking north from near the intersection of Terry Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: William O. McKay opened show rooms on Westlake in July of 1923. After fifty-seven years of selling Fords, the dealership turned to the cheaper and more efficient Subaru. Now reconstructed, the old Ford showroom awaits a new tenant.

THEN: The Cascade neighborhood, named for its public grade school (1894), now long gone, might have been better named for the Pontius family. Immigrants from Ohio, they purchased many of the forested acres north of Denny Way and east of Fairview Avenue.

THEN: The 1906-07 Gas Works at the north end of Lake Union went idle in 1956 when natural gas first reached Seattle by pipeline. In this photo, taken about fifteen years later, the Wallingford Peninsula is still home to the plant’s abandoned and “hanging gardens of metal.” (Courtesy: Rich Haag)

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

THEN: sliver of the U.W. campus building called the Applied Physics Laboratory appears on the far right of this 1940 look east towards the U.W. campus from the N.E. 40th Street off-ramp from the University Bridge. While very little other than the enlarged laboratory survives in the fore and mid-grounds, much on the horizon of campus buildings and apartments still stand. (Courtesy, Genevieve McCoy)

THEN: From 1909 to the mid-late 1920s, the precipitous grade separation between the upper and lower parts of NE 40th Street west of 7th Ave. NE was faced with a timber wall. When the wall was removed, the higher part of NE 40th was shunted north, cutting into the lawns of the homes beside it. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

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THEN: Werner Lenggenhager's recording of the old St. Vinnie's on Lake Union's southwest shore in the 1950s should remind a few readers of the joys that once were theirs while searching and picking in that exceedingly irregular place.

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THEN: From the Fremont Bridge, this subject looks northwest across the torrent that followed the washout of the Fremont Dam in the early afternoon of March 13, 1914. Part of the Bryant Lumber and Shingle Mill appears left-of-center. The north end of the Stone Way Trestle appears in the upper right corner. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: Like violence in a classic Greek play, the carnage suggested by this 1934 crash scene on the then new Aurora speedway was kept off stage, either behind the city’s official photographer, or in the county morgue. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.)

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First printed in Pacific, March 8, 1987
First printed in Pacific, March 8, 1987  Click to read.
Click to Enlarge and Read, please.
Click to Enlarge and Read, please.
First appeared in Pacific, Nov. 26, 2006.
First appeared in Pacific, Nov. 26, 2006.

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CLIP-U-DISTRICT-OVER-PORTAGE-BAYweb.

First appeared in Pacific, December 15, 1985.
First appeared in Pacific, December 15, 1985.

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Photography from on high on March 20, 1949, this aerial shows our featured bay on the right and much else. [Courtesy, Ron Edge]
Photography from on high on March 20, 1949, this aerial shows our featured bay on the right and much else. Click – maybe twice – to enlarge. [Courtesy, Ron Edge]
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First appeared in Pacific, November 28, 2004.
First appeared in Pacific, November 28, 2004.

Seattle Now & Then: West Woodland Neighbors

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: This look west from the West Woodland neighborhood toward Ballard comes by way of the Museum of History and Industry, with some help from both Ron Edge and West Woodland historian Susan Pierce.
THEN: This look west from the West Woodland neighborhood toward Ballard comes by way of the Museum of History and Industry, with some help from both Ron Edge and West Woodland historian Susan Pierce.
NOW: Susan Pierce, posing with her son Andy in front of the 1890s Jensen home, researches and shares information about her West Woodland neighborhood. Pierce lives across the street from the pioneer home.
NOW: Susan Pierce, posing with her son Andy in front of the 1890s Jensen home, researches and shares information about her West Woodland neighborhood. Pierce lives across the street
from the pioneer home.

Here’s an early mist-enveloped glimpse looking west into Ballard from the West Woodland corner of 4th Avenue NW and NW 60th Street.  Turn around and the landscape rises sharply to the east, climbing Phinney Ridge to its Woodland Park summit. The homes of sawyers and other breadwinners have not as yet filled the blocks this far east from Ballard’s many lumber mills, although this West Woodland neighborhood has been nearly clear-cut and is waiting for buyers.   

A detail from the Jensen home photo feature. Thanks to Susan
A detail from the Jensen home photo feature. Thanks to MOHAI for the featured print and to Susan Pierce for the the quartet of mostly tax photos below.

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The modest and yet surely comfortable home, posing above with its residents at the center, dates from the 1890s. It was probably built by the carpenter-contractor Rasmus “Robert” Jensen, the man standing on the front porch with his wife Marie and most likely their daughter Anna. The lawn is fitted with a small orchard.  In a later photo the fruit trees have multiplied and taken charge of the acres surrounding the home.  These learned observations come by way of Susan Pierce. who is posing with her son Andy for Jean Sherrard in his recent repeat.  Nine years ago Susan and her husband Blake moved into the home that stands directly east across 4th Avenue from the pioneer Jensen abode.

Flip side for the featured Museum of History and Industry
Flip side for the featured Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) print.

 

From their kitchen window the couple look out upon the Jensen homestead.  It is a prospect not far removed from that taken by, if we can believe the pencil note on the back of the original print (above), Broback Photo, an itinerate photographer from San Francisco. The original print, number 6446, is kept in the Museum of History and Industry’s “original photo file.”  It is from these files that many grapevines of heritage study sprout – including mine. (I began my study of Seattle’s pictorial history with visits to the MOHAI library forty-five years ago.)

This detail from the 1908 Baist Real Estate map reach from the west short of Green Lake on the right to the Jensen home at the northeast corner of 4th West and West 60th Street at its bottom-left corner.
This detail from the 1908 Baist Real Estate map reach from the west short of Green Lake on the right to the Jensen home at the northeast corner of “4th Ave. NW”  and “N. 60th Street” at its bottom-left corner.    It also surrounds the marked West Woodland Park Addition.    Phinney Ave., the ridge’s spine or summit, runs up-down thru the center of the detail.
Looking north on Phinney Avenue from 65th Street in 1937.
Looking north on Phinney Avenue from 65th Street in 1937.

With her son Andy’s birth three years ago, Susan was awakened not only to nurturing her boy but the western slope of Phinney Ridge as well.  These nourishing urges came together while taking Andy and her camera for perambulations around the neighborhood, and her research continued at home during Andy’s naps.  By now the baby is a boy who can distinguish between a gable and a bay window. Susan opened both a Facebook page and blog on the subject of her neighborhood’s history.  The results are admirable, and flourishing too, with over 600 users.  With the help of her neighbors this genial grapevine keeps on growing.  You may wish to review the fruits of these labors, either on the blog at https://vintagewestwoodland.wordpress.com/ or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/vintagewestwoodland

Front page to the latest edition of Susan Pierce's blog, which you can enter by clicking the link above this illustration.
Front page to the latest edition of Susan Pierce’s blog, which you can enter by clicking the link above this illustration.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, mates?  First what we did NOT add – another video.  The play is the thing.  Jean has two more weeks of play production ahead and then we hope to resume the video treatments of these weekly features again.  Otherwise we have more neighborhood features, some recent and some rather old.   We start again with the more recent features pulled forward by Ron Edge.  Click them to open them.   We count “neighborhood” here as anything from Ballard to Green Lake, but still we have acted with restraint.

THEN: Midwife Alice Wood Ellis, far right, joins her mother and two children on the front lawn of their half-finished home in the East Green Lake neighborhood, ca. 1901. Courtesy Carol Solle

THEN: James Lee, for many years an official photographer for Seattle’s public works department, looks south over Ballard’s Salmon Bay a century ago. Queen Anne Hill marks the horizon, with a glimpse of Magnolia on the far right. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: With his or her back to the original Ballard business district, an unnamed photographer looks southeast on Leary Way, most likely in 1936.

THEN: Ballard photographer Fred Peterson looks south-southeast on Ballard Avenue on February 3rd or 4th, 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: A Seattle Street and Sewer Department photographer recorded this scene in front of the nearly new City-County Building in 1918. The view looks west from 4th Avenue along a Jefferson Street vacated in this block except for the municipal trolley tracks. (Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

41st-aurora-pedes-overpass-10-22-36mr

Then: The thousands of skaters on Green Lake in this late January 1916 view could not have known that the skating would soon be over, one of the victims of the Big Snow of 1916. Courtesy Fairlook Antiques

THEN: Captioned Salmon Bay, 1887, this is most likely very near the eastern end of the bay where it was fed by Ross Creek, the Lake Union outlet. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan Vintage Posters and Photographs)

THEN: Built in 1910, Ballard’s big brick church on the northwest corner of 20th Avenue NW and NW 63rd Street lost the top of its soaring tower following the earthquake of Nov. 12, 1939.

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JOHN B. ALLEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

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Clip-Allen-School-test-WEB

clip Allen-School-Now-colorWEB

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GRADING ON NORTHWEST 57TH AVENUE

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WOODLAND PARK (Northwest Corner)

First appeared in Pacific July 29, 1990
First appeared in Pacific July 29, 1990

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SIMPSON BIBLE INSTITUTE

clip Bible-Institute-phinney-ridge-THEN-WEB

First appeared in Pacific July 27, 2003.
First appeared in Pacific July 27, 2003.

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First appeared in Pacific November 10, 1996.
First appeared in Pacific November 10, 1996.

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First appeared in Pacific March 4, 2001
First appeared in Pacific March 4, 2001

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COLUMBIA LUTHERAN HOME

First appeared in Pacific on December 22, 1991.
First appeared in Pacific on December 22, 1991.
The Columbia Lutheran Home on Phinney Ridge, Courtesy of the Swedish Club
The Columbia Lutheran Home on Phinney Ridge, Courtesy of the Swedish Club

Seattle Now & Then: The Juneau Street Footbridge

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: As the caption at the bottom allows, the Juneau Street footbridge opened for pedestrians on March 26,1915. It crossed the main track lines – not spurs – of three railroads and reached east from the Georgetown business district to a sprawling neighborhood of workers’ homes on the gentle slope of the Beacon Hill ridge. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives.)
THEN: As the caption at the bottom allows, the Juneau Street footbridge opened for pedestrians on March 26,1915. It crossed the main track lines – not spurs – of three railroads and reached east from the Georgetown business district to a sprawling neighborhood of workers’ homes on the gentle slope of the Beacon Hill ridge. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives.)
NOW: Had the approximately 200-foot long footbridge survived, it would have required a 300-foot extension to make it over the Interstate-5 Freeway.
NOW: Had the approximately 200-foot long footbridge survived, it would have required a 300-foot extension to make it over the Interstate-5 Freeway.

In 1904 when the Seattle Brewing and Malting Company had nearly completed the construction on their oversize plant in Georgetown, the citizens there, at least 300 of them brewery employees, voted to incorporate. The citizens took to politics largely to facilitate the sale of booze and associated pleasures – to create a town free of censors, prohibitionists, and all but the least acquisitive of tax collectors.  The brewery’s superintendent, John Mueller, won two of the new town’s most important positions: mayor and fire chief.  The third position, chief of police, was paid well. 

The pedestrian trestle still under construction, looking north along the tracks. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
The pedestrian trestle still under construction, looking north along the tracks. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

Also in 1904, the brewery’s superintendent had a sincere talk with himself, the town’s mayor, about building, for the convenience of workers, a footbridge over the railroad tracks that separated the brewery from Beacon Hill, which is not so steep where it rises east of Georgetown. Although the footbridge was delayed for twenty years, the building of small workers’ homes to the east of the tracks was not.  Many of these survive.  On snuggly-fitted blocks 800 feet-long, upwards of thirty homes look at each other across streets, such as 16th and 17th Avenues South. 

The Juneau Street footbridge can be found crossing the tracks just below the subject's center. The brewery is on the left. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive and Ron Edge)
The Juneau Street footbridge can be found crossing the tracks just below the subject’s center. The brewery is on the left. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive and Ron Edge)
A detail from the 1936 aerial. The trestle is gone, although its "scar" can be detected upper-left. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
A detail from the 1936 aerial. The trestle is gone, although its “scar” can be detected upper-left. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

When new in 1904, the 855-foot-long red brick brewery along Duwamish Avenue (Airport Way) was a few feet longer than St. Peter’s Cathedral in the Vatican.  It was billed by its boosters as the largest brewery west of the Mississippi, and by 1912, after some additions were made, including greater ice production and doubling the size of the bottling works, the Georgetown brewery was listed as the sixth largest in the world.

CLICK to ENLARGE
CLICK & CLICK to ENLARGE
Juneau Street Footbridge construction order, Dec. 9, 1914. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
Juneau Street Footbridge construction order, Dec. 9, 1914. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

Locally, Georgetown’s “cathedral to brewing” was described as the largest industrial establishment in the state in 1914, the year that plans for the Juneau Street footbridge were revived. The brewery covered the cost, about $3,300.  A C.H. Stratton won the contract on Dec. 10, 1914. Expecting to complete the construction in ninety days, he ran only a little late.  As the caption across the base of the featured print at the top notes, “Juneau S. footbridge Built 1914-5, Open 3-26-1915,” which may be the date, or close to it, this print was recorded.  A second caption at the bottom of the negative is too faded to include here.  It reads, “Secured by efforts of Dept. of P.W.” (Public Works).

This prohibition-era Sanborn Real Estate map shows the line of the foot bridge on the far right. The text, upper-right, explains that the brewery has been closed since Jan. 1, 1916, which was the start for Washington State's dry years.
This prohibition-era Sanborn Real Estate map shows the line of the foot bridge on the far right. The text, upper-right, explains that the brewery has been closed since Jan. 1, 1916, which was the start for Washington State’s dry years.   CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE

It was a different sort of “public works” that caused Georgetown’s growth and increasing optimism of the mid-teens to flounder.  In 1916, the anti-saloon warriors and Washington State’s effective teetotaling legislators won the war against intoxicants by imposing statewide prohibition.  Rainier Beer was moved to San Francisco. After midnight on Jan 1, 1916, bars were closed and all the jobs serving the imbibing culture – including those of hundreds of brewery and bar workers in Georgetown – were over.  National prohibition, beginning in 1920, prevailed for thirteen often-farcical years of abstinence, until the breweries and bars were reopened in 1933.  Months earlier, on Monday, Oct. 17, 1932, the deteriorating Juneau Street footbridge was closed to pedestrians and soon dismantled. 

The Lander Street footbridge was another rail-crossing the city built for pedestrians in 1915. This Municipal Archive photograph is dated April 23, 1915.
The Lander Street footbridge was another rail-crossing the city built for pedestrians in 1915. This Municipal Archive photograph is dated April 23, 1915.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, chief?   Not as much as we ordinarily contribute.  We will make up for it in about one month when our now-then on the Georgetown RR Station will be featured.  It is a neighbor within yards of the pedestrian bridge.  We will treat on both subjects – the trestle and the station – then in our video, which since late last year has introduced the blog.   The truth is that Jean is also busy producing/directing another play with his students at Hillside School (in Bellevue – see the link for the school on our front page) and I am happy to give more time to wrapping up “Keep Clam,” my long work-in-progress on an Ivar Haglund bio.  Meanwhile here on some neighborhood-related features, plus a few bridges, from the blog’s recent past, which Rod Edge has pulled and placed.

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THEN: Sometime before her first move from this brewery courtyard in 1912, Lady Rainier was moved by a freeze to these sensational effects. She did not turn her fountain off. (Courtesy of Frank & Margaret Fickeisen)

Looking southwest from Walker Street to the burning ruins.

Walter Ross Baumes Willcox, the architect who planned this 1911 Arboretum aqueduct, went on to design another city landmark mades of reinforced concrete and ornamental bricks: the 1913 Queen Anne Boulevard retaining wall. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/bell-st-bridge-then-web1.jpg?w=474

THEN: The work of filling the tidelands south of King Street began in 1853 with the chips from Yesler’s sawmill. Here in the neighborhood of 9th Ave. S. (Airport Way) and Holgate Street, the tideland reclaiming and street regrading continue 70 years later in 1923. (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)

THEN: The new sub H-3 takes her inaugural baptism at the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company’s ways on Independence Day, 1913. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Part of the pond that here in 1946 filled much of the long block between Massachusetts and Holgate Streets and 8th Avenue S. and Airport Way. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

Now & Then here and now

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