Seattle Now & Then: Digging the Fremont Canal

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: This panorama could have used a tower (or drone) to better survey the size of the June 1, 191l, crowd gathered in Fremont/Ross to celebrate the beginning of construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)
THEN: This panorama could have used a tower (or drone) to better survey the size of the June 1, 191l, crowd gathered in Fremont/Ross to celebrate the beginning of construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)
NOW: Although more than a century has passed, many of the structures showing in the 1911 panorama survive, including the front porch on the far left of both the ‘then’ and Jean Sherrard’s repeat. Blue reflections off the canal shine on the right.
NOW: Although more than a century has passed, many of the structures showing in the 1911 panorama survive, including the front porch on the far left of both the ‘then’ and Jean Sherrard’s repeat. Blue reflections off the canal shine on the right.

I had been familiar with the right half of this panorama for nearly forty years, but beyond recognizing that Queen Anne Hill was on the right horizon, it continued to puzzle me.  Recently a studious friend, Ron Edge, while reviewing the Webster and Stevens Collection of historical Seattle subjects in the library of the Museum of History and Industry, found the left half, the street scene with the loosely parked array of motorcars.  After merging the two parts, Ron was able to match the historical porch of the home on the far left with the existing porch at the northwest corner of N.W. Canal Street and First Avenue N.W.  It is mostly hidden behind the landscape in Jean Sherrard’s repeat, again on the far left.  [Next, we will include two looks at the same neighborhood that sits, with these,  across the canal’s mostly completed ditch perhaps two years or three after the featured photo was first recorded in 1911.   The “existing porch,” noted above, can be found in both of the details. ] 

The obscure porch is easily found on the far left of both of the above photos. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
The obscure porch is easily found on the far left of both of the above photos.  To ENLARGE it will help to CLICK TWICE.] (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

The site is about a half-mile west of the Fremont Bridge, on the north side of what, prior to the ship canal, was still called Ross Creek, Lake Union’s outlet to Salmon Bay. Before the Fremont lumber mill was constructed in the late 1880s, this was known as part of Ross, a community named for the truly pioneer family that first settled here in the 1850s.  Ross School on Third Ave. N.W. survived until 1940.  

An 1890s mostly imagined development - including Ross, far-right - along the north shore of Lake Union. Latona is long since part of Wallingford. This is true, as well, of Edgewater, although Fremont might claim part of that too. Brooklyn, far-right, was the first name that held, for a time, for the University District.
A  late 1890s map of the mostly imagined development – including Ross, far-left – along the north shore of Lake Union.  Latona is long since part of Wallingford. This is true, as well, of Edgewater, although Fremont might claim part of that too. Brooklyn, far-right, was the first name that held, for a time, for the University District.
Another snap
Another snap from the June 1, 1911 celebration for the start at digging the ship canal.   The poster on the far left  includes a date that led us to also dating the celebration.

We found a clue to the date for this celebration in another Webster and Stevens photo of this event, which included a detail of a Dreamland poster promoting a dance for the 2nd of June.  From the evidence of the motorcars, we began our search in late May of 1911, and we were soon rewarded. The smoke rising from the center of the pan marks the moment – or nearly – when, to quote the next day Seattle Times for June 2, 1911, the elderly Judge Roger Greene

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Above and above, two more Webster and Stevens records from the June 1, 1911 canal-digging celeberation. {Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
Above and above, two more Webster and Stevens records from the June 1, 1911 canal-digging celebration. {Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

“stood on the little platform in the midst of a throng and waving, with all the vigor of his long-past youth … gave the signal which started the steam shovels in their task of digging the canal west of Fremont … It was the most dramatic moment of the entire day, which had been dedicated to the celebration in this city of the Progress & Prosperity events taking place on June 1.”  That singular day’s long list of promotions began downtown with a Second Avenue parade celebrating the completion of the 18-story Hoge building, briefly the tallest in Seattle, and the start of construction on the 42-story (more or less) Smith Tower. [For aging eyes like ours click the below twice for reading.  It is the Times next day report on the June 1, 1911 celebration.]

The Seattle Times next day report on the June 1, 1911 celebration at Ross/Freemont.
The Seattle Times next day report on the June 1, 1911 celebration at Ross/Freemont.   CLICK TWICE TO ENLARGE

The parade, led by Kavanaugh’s marching band, included a long line of motorcars and “at least 400 Ballard citizens” carrying picks and shovels. The Ballardian canal boomers led the auto-less pedestrians up Second Avenue to trolleys waiting on Pike Street to carry them to Fremont and the afternoon program featuring prosperity-succoring VIPs, speaking loudly in counterpoint with the satisfied growling of steam shovels. 

Another later look across the canal to the neighborhood where the first digging was celebrated - and started - on June 1, 1911. And the house with the porch can be found here, as well.
Another later look across the canal to the neighborhood where the first digging was celebrated – and started – on June 1, 1911. And the house with the porch can be found here, as well.  Ran Edge, and I, challenge our readers to date this pan and also elaborate-identify some of its parts and landmarks.   [You are now on your own.]
Friend of Foe?
Friend of the canal or foe or, perhaps, an American ex-patriot in England scheming to trade some of his wealth for a title and a life of meetings and parties with Europe’s who is who?

The leader of the Progress & Prosperity Day committee was Millard Freeman, the brilliantly pugnacious publisher of the Pacific Fisherman, the Pacific Motorboat and The Town Crier.  With federal money at last insuring the canal project, Freeman promoted the Progress & Prosperity Day in part to get even by expressing his political resentments toward the canal’s “lurking foes … and to flay these opponents with the lash of pubic scorn and resentment.”  And at the end of the day, “to insure the steady progress of Seattle and the prosperity of all the people,” The estimated 310,00 residents of Seattle were urged to keep their porch lights burning city-wide between 9 and 10 pm.  

The Army Corps 1891 map of its proposed route for the canal between salt water and fresh. Thru the ensuing quarter-century until its completion many changes were made.
The Army Corps 1891 map of its proposed route for the canal between salt water and fresh. Thru the ensuing quarter-century until its completion, many changes were made. CLICK CLICK

WEB EXTRAS

Additions, mes potes?  Several past feature from the canal or near it, Jean.  We claim no more.

THEN: Looking east from the roof of the still standing testing lab, the Lock’s Administration Building (from which this photograph was borrowed) appears on the left, and the district engineer’s home, the Cavanaugh House (still standing) on the center horizon. (Photo courtesy Army Corps of Engineers at Chittenden Locks)

THEN: Captioned Salmon Bay, 1887, this is most likely very near the eastern end of the bay where it was fed by Ross Creek, the Lake Union outlet. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan Vintage Posters and Photographs)

THEN: From the Fremont Bridge, this subject looks northwest across the torrent that followed the washout of the Fremont Dam in the early afternoon of March 13, 1914. Part of the Bryant Lumber and Shingle Mill appears left-of-center. The north end of the Stone Way Trestle appears in the upper right corner. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: One of a few photographs recording from different prospects the Fremont trolley car barn on Dec.11, 1936. North 35th Street, on the right, was originally named Blewett for Edward and Carrie Blewett. In 1888 the couple, fresh from Fremont, Nebraska, first named and promoted Fremont as a Seattle neighborhood. That year Fremont also got its lumber mill. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Looking west down Ewing Street (North 34th) in 1907 with the nearly new trolley tracks on the left and a drainage ditch on the right to protect both the tracks and the still barely graded street from flooding. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)

THEN: James Lee, for many years an official photographer for Seattle’s public works department, looks south over Ballard’s Salmon Bay a century ago. Queen Anne Hill marks the horizon, with a glimpse of Magnolia on the far right. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: With great clouds overhead and a landscape 45 years shorter than now, one vehicle – a pickup heading east – gets this part of State Route 520 to itself on a weekday afternoon. (courtesy Lawton Gowey)

Built for the manufacture of a fantastic engine that did not make it beyond its model, the Fremont factory’s second owner, Carlos Flohr, used it to build vacuum chambers for protecting telescope lenses. Thirty feet across and made from stainless steel the lens holders were often mistaken for flying saucers. (photo courtesy Kvichak marine Industries.)

Then: Photographed from an upper story of the Ford Factory at Fairview Avenue and Valley Street, the evidence of Seattle's explosive boom years can be seen on every shore of Lake Union, ca. 1920. Courtesy of MOHAI

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THEN: The Latona Bridge was constructed in 1891 along the future line of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge. The photo was taken from the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway right-of-way, now the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. The Northlake Apartment/Hotel on the right survived and struggled into the 1960s. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The historical view looks directly south into the Latona addition’s business district on Sixth Ave. NE. from the Northern Pacific’s railroad bridge, now part of the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Long-time Wallingford resident Victor Lygdman looks south through the work-in-progress on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge during the summer of 1959. Bottom-right are the remnants of the Latona business and industrial district, including the Wayland Mill and the Northlake Apartments, replaced now with Ivar’s Salmon House and its parking. (Photo by Victor Lygdman)

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THEN: Pioneer Arthur Denny's son, Orion, took this photo of popularly named Lake Union John and his second wife, Madeline, sometime before the latter's death in 1906.

THEN: The 1906-07 Gas Works at the north end of Lake Union went idle in 1956 when natural gas first reached Seattle by pipeline. In this photo, taken about fifteen years later, the Wallingford Peninsula is still home to the plant’s abandoned and “hanging gardens of metal.” (Courtesy: Rich Haag)

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Looking north over the short-lived Fremont high bridge in 1911.
Looking north over the short-lived
Fremont high bridge in 1911.
Looking north on the Fremont high bridge, 1911.
Looking north on the Fremont high bridge, 1911.

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Enjoying the noontime sun while resting or fishing perhaps with a hidden pole on the bridge that cross the Lake's Fremont outlet. Beyond is the trolley bridge. The scene looks west towards Ross and Ballard.
Enjoying the noontime sun while resting or fishing perhaps with a hidden pole on the bridge that cross the Lake’s Fremont outlet. Beyond is the trolley bridge. The scene looks west towards Ross and Ballard.

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Work on the north pier of the Fremont Bascule Bridge.
Work on the north pier of the Fremont Bascule Bridge.

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First appeared in Pacific January 29, 1987
First appeared in Pacific January 29, 1987

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First appeared in Pacific, December 11, 1988.
First appeared in Pacific, December 11, 1988.

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First appeared in Pacific, July 15, 1984.
First appeared in Pacific, July 15, 1984.

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First appeared in Pacific Oct. 31, 2004.
First appeared in Pacific Oct. 31, 2004.

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First appeared in Pacific, August 14, 2001.
First appeared in Pacific, August 19, 2001.

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Seattle Now & Then: Denny’s Swale

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: We imagine that the photographer A.J. McDonald waited for one of his subjects, the cable car to Queen Anne Hill, to reach the intersection of Second Ave. N. and Aloha Street below him before snapping this panorama in the mid-1890s.
THEN: We imagine that the photographer A.J. McDonald waited for one of his subjects, the cable car to Queen Anne Hill, to reach the intersection of Second Ave. N. and Aloha Street below him before snapping this panorama in the mid-1890s.
NOW: Jean Sherrard chose the revealing upper west-bound half of Ward Street to record his ‘repeat’ south into the Seattle Center.
NOW: Jean Sherrard chose the revealing upper west-bound half of Ward Street to record his ‘repeat’ south into the Seattle Center.

For reasons that may in part have had something to do with nostalgia for farm life and open mid-western pastures, the young city builders David and Louisa Denny protected from development most of the swale, or naturally cleared wetland, on their pioneer claim.  Much of that clearing is included in this look south from the still lightly developed southern slope of Queen Anne Hill, in the foreground, to the extensive scatter of structures on Denny Hill, crowned by its landmark Denny Hotel, at the middle distance.  The far horizon extends from West Seattle, on the right, along the ridge of Beacon Hill to First Hill, the ‘Profanity Hill’ part of it, where the brandishing tower of the King County Court House makes a perpetual promotion for law and order.

A closer look to the rear of the Denny (AKA Washington) Hotel, this shot early by the NPRR photographer Hayes on visit to Seattle ca. 1890 or 1891. The shot looks south on Third Avenue from north of Virginia Street. (Courtesy, Montana Historical Society)
A closer look to the rear of the Denny (AKA Washington) Hotel, this was recorded by the NPRR photographer F. J. Hayes on a visit to Seattle ca. 1890 or 1891. The shot looks south on Third Avenue from Lenora  Street. (Courtesy, Montana Historical Society)
The same hotel - Denny or Washington - looking northwest form Fourth Avenue between Pine and Steward Streets. Stewart is on the right. (Courtesy of Louise Lovely, is what we called in the early One Reel Vaudeville days when Louise performed at fairs and festivals from the rear of a truck rigged with a stage. )
The same hotel – Denny or Washington – looking northwest from Fourth Avenue between Pine and Steward Streets. Stewart is on the right. (Courtesy of Louise Lovely.  That  is what we called Louise in the early One Reel Vaudeville days when she performed at fairs and festivals from the rear of a truck rigged with a stage. )

This week’s ‘then’ is one of a dozen or more panoramas that the photographer A. J. McDonald took of Seattle from a few of its hills during his, it seems, brief stay in the early mid-1890s.  (We will attached a few more below.)  This is one of the more softly focused of the photographer’s recordings, but it is still outstanding.  No doubt, McDonald is standing with his tri-pod on or near Ward Street and sighting south on Second Ave. N.  It is about 1895, the year the Seattle Dept. of Public Works regularized and thereby restrained the often imaginative collection of Seattle’s street names. 

A detail of the South Queen Anne neighborhood from the 1893 Sanborn Real Estate Map, before the regularizing of the street names. Notice there are two Thomas Streets showing here.
A detail of the South Queen Anne neighborhood from the 1893 Sanborn Real Estate Map, before the regularizing of the street names. By way of example, notice there are two Thomas Streets showing here.  A portion of Harrison is named Fourth, and Queen Ane Ave. is still Temperance Ave, which with Republican Street  heralds the political devotions of David and Louisa Denny who set their migrant’s claim here.  [Click to Enlarge]

Previously, Second Ave. N. was Poplar Avenue, and Ward was Villard Street. The last was named for the journalist-capitalist who brought the Northern Pacific Railroad to Seattle in the early 1880s and then promptly lost it. 

Running left-right (east-west) above the center of the pan is Harrison Street, which now passes through the fanciful clutter of the irregularly-shaped Seattle Center.  Nob Hill Avenue, which was Ash Avenue until 1895, reaches Harrison directly above the center of McDonald’s panorama.  Directly below that intersection is the swale, still holding on to its green, but now transformed into part of the artificial grass end zone of the Seattle Memorial Stadium.  [There is a good now-then comparison of the swale among the Edge Links that follow this brief exposition.]

The swale hosting a circus. The view looks north from near Harrison Street. Nob Hill Ave. is on the right.
The swale hosting a circus. The view looks north from near Harrison Street. Nob Hill Ave. is on the right.

The list of historical uses of this clearing begins with the Duwamish Tribe’s both ritual and practical potlatch celebrations, and their catching in nets the low-flying waterfowl passing between Elliott Bay and the then restful tulles at the south end of Lake Union.  With the Dennys in the early 1850s came their extensive gardens, which helped feed both their family and Seattle’s produce needs. In the late 1890s the swale was fitted with an army corral filled with horses and mules for help with the Spanish-American War.  Soon after McDonald’s visit, the swale repeatedly hosted other horses, with carnivals and traveling circuses.  Part of it was also developed into a fenced field with bleachers for professional baseball.  In 1927-28 the swale was appointed with the concrete core for Seattle’s arts and entertainment culture: the Civic Auditorium, Arena, and Civic Field.

Construction on Civic Field, the Civic Auditorium and Ice Arena in the late 1920s. The aerial looks northeast over Lake Union and it's clutter of salvaged ships.
Construction on Civic Field, the Civic Auditorium and Ice Arena in the late 1920s. The aerial looks northeast over Lake Union and it’s clutter of abiding ships waiting for sale, use, salvage  or perhaps to be cleaned in fresh water..

In 1958, or thirty years later, the Seattle City Council allotted $7,550 for the clearing away of eighteen “dilapidated buildings” from the by then probable site of the Century 21 Exposition, Seattle World’s Fair. It is likely the McDonald’s panorama includes some of the condemned structures in the neighborhood beyond Harrison Street, on the far side of the swale.

A copy of most of the
A copy of most of Ordinance No. 86033 “providing for the condemnation of property as a site for civic center development.  This is sent compliments of Scott Cline, the city’s archivist who is about to retire after thirty-plus years of organizing the municipal archive with considerable success and consistent skill.  Regarding this ordinance, the retiring archivist notes “I’ve included the portion of the ordinance that lists all of the property subject to condemnation.  It is listed by legal description (addition, block, and lot).  The rest of the ordinance (on a different page) is boiler plate with a section that notes the costs will be paid through the Seattle Civic Center Development Bonds 1956 Fund.  The ordinance was passed by Council on April 8,1957 and signed by Mayor Clinton on April 9. ”  Thanks Scott, and may your plans for a retirement of writing, exercise  and travel follow.  We will add that on June 26, 1958 the Seattle Times reported that “Fred B. McCoy, City Building Superintendent, asked City Council to appropriate $7, 550 to raze 18 dilapidated  buildings in the Civic Center area.”

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, kids?  Sure Randall.  Ron has topped his past clips from the neighborhood with another by McDonald panaorama, one that looks northwest from Terry Avenue and Union Street towards Lake Union with the northeast corner of Queen Anne Hill on the far right.   But first we will “trump” Ron by showing a merge he composed of two other McDonald pans that were, like the featured photo, taken from a prospect on or very near Ward Street and looking east over Fifth Avenue.   That double pan follows now.  Please double click it.

Two McDonald pans from Queen Anne Hill with a sweeping Capitol Hill horizon have been merged by Ron Edge
Two McDonald pans from Queen Anne Hill with a sweeping Capitol Hill horizon have been merged by Ron Edge.  The home on the far left is at or near the southeast corner of Ward Street and Fifth Avenue.  Please Double Click.

THEN: A.J. McDonald’s panorama of Lake Union and its surrounds dates from the early 1890s. It was taken from First Hill, looking north from near the intersection of Terry Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: In the first years of the twentieth century, visiting circuses most often used these future Seattle Center acres to raise their big tops. After 1911 the favored circus site was moved to the then freshly-cleared Denny Regrade neighborhood (Courtesy, Mike Cirelli)

THEN: Looking west from the southwest corner of 6th Ave. N. and Mercer St. to the trolley barn and yards for the (renamed in 1919) Seattle Municipal Railway in 1936. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: An early-20th-century scene during the Second Avenue Regrade looks east into its intersection with Virginia Avenue. A home is being moved from harm's way, but the hotel on the hill behind it would not survive the regrade's spoiling. Courtesy of Ron Edge.

THEN: In 1910, a circa date for this look north on First Avenue across Virginia Street, the two corners on the east side of the intersection were still undeveloped – except for signs. The Terminal Sales Building, seen far right in Jean Sherrard’s repeat, did not replace the billboards that crowd the sidewalk in the “then” until 1923. (Seattle Municipal Archive)

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THEN: The home at bottom right looks across Madison Street (out of frame) to Central School. The cleared intersection of Spring Street and Seventh Avenue shows on the right.

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THEN: The Dog House at 714 Denny Way was strategically placed at the southern terminus for the Aurora Speedway when it was new in the mid-1930s. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College Branch.)

THEN: Long thought to be an early footprint for West Seattle’s Admiral Theatre, this charming brick corner was actually far away on another Seattle Hill. Courtesy, Southwest Seattle Historical Society.

THEN: Looking south from Pine Street down the wide Second Avenue in 1911, then Seattle’s growing retail strip and parade promenade. (courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: Before this the first shovel of the last of Denny Hill was ceremonially dropped to the conveyor belt at Battery Street, an “initial bite of 30,000 cubic yards of material” was carved from the cliff along the east side of 5th Avenue to make room for both the steam shovel and several moveable belts that extended like fingers across the hill. It was here that they met the elevated and fixed last leg of the conveyor system that ran west on Battery Street to the waterfront. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

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THEN: Thanks again and again to Lawton Gowey for another contribution to this feature, this ca. 1917 look into a fresh Denny Regrade and nearly new “office-factory” at 1921 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey.)

THEN: The Seattle Central Business District in 1962. I found this panorama mixed in with the Kodachrome slides photographed by Lawton Gowey. It was most likely taken by my helpful friend Lawton, who died in 1983, or Robert Bradley, Lawton’s friend in the then active Seattle Camera Club. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

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The SARAH B. YESLER HOME (for working girls), AKA the NEW WAYSIDE EMERGENCY HOSPITAL, AKA the CLINTON APARTMENTS, AKA the CLARION APARTMENT HOUSE, all of them at the northwest corner of Republican Street and Second Avenue North, and found in the shadows on the far right of the featured photo at the top, and also below.

First appeared in Pacific on Sept. 30, 2001.
First appeared in Pacific on Sept. 30, 2001.
In its last incarnation as the Clarion Apartments. This is another neighborhood photo taken by Lawton Gowey who lived up the hill for his entire life.
In its last incarnation as the Clarion Apartments. This is another neighborhood photo taken by Lawton Gowey who lived up the hill for his entire life.

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ANOTHER MCDONALD PAN – This from DENNY HILL to CAPITOL HILL with the Cascade Neighborhood in between.

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THE BAGLEY MANSION, Northeast Corner of Aloha and Second Ave. N.

Clarence Bagley published the now classic three-volume history of Seattle in 1916. He worked administering the city's public works department.
Clarence Bagley published the now classic three-volume history of Seattle in 1916. He worked administering the city’s public works department.
From The Seattle Times for December 27, 1925. [CLICK-CLICK to ENLARGE]
From The Seattle Times for December 27, 1925. [CLICK-CLICK to ENLARGE]
From the Times Dec. 7, 1933.
From the Times Dec. 7, 1933.
From the Times, Jan. 16, 1944.
From the Times, Jan. 16, 1944.

 

This McDonald pan was taken from within a low shouting distance of the Ward (Villiard) Street pan featured at the top. That pan just missed including a corner of the Bagley mansion at the northeast corner of Second Ave and Aloha Street, bottom-right. Mercer School is found just above and beyond it. Again the horizon is held by Capitol Hill. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
This McDonald pan was taken from within a short shouting distance of the
Ward (Villiard) Street pan featured at the top. That pan just missed including a corner of the Bagley mansion at the northeast corner of Second Ave and Aloha Street, bottom-right. Here, Mercer School is found just above and beyond it. Again the horizon is held by Capitol Hill. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

Seattle Now & Then: The Making of Western Avenue

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: James P. Lee, Seattle’s busy public works photographer of the early 20th century, recorded this 1922 look north from near the west end of Denny Way on the bluff above the then-forming Elliott Way. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: James P. Lee, Seattle’s busy public works photographer of the early 20th century, recorded this 1922 look north from near the west end of Denny Way on the bluff above the then-forming Elliott Way. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: For three generations, going on four, the Andrews family has owned the two buildings bordering the “postage stamp” park, which holds to what is left of the bluff that James Lee used as a prospect for his 1922 photo. The is a mix of planting, ramps and a few parking place. It is maintained with the volunteer stewardship of the Andrews.
NOW: For three generations, going on four, the Andrews family has owned the two buildings bordering the “postage stamp” park, which holds to what is left of the bluff that James Lee used as a prospect for his 1922 photo. The is a mix of planting, ramps and a few parking place. It is maintained with the volunteer stewardship of the Andrews.

Here the reader will wonder, we hope, how Jean and I sought and found (we are confident) the site for his contemporary repeat. While the date, “1-4-22,” carefully hand-printed at the lower-left corner of the subject, does not, of course, name the place, the general environs and directions are familiar. The right horizon is Queen Anne Hill with the dark forehead of its Kinnear Park landscape top-center. Magnolia makes the more distant horizon, on the left, and below it the dark elevator on the Great Northern Railroad’s Smith Cove pier stands tall.

The Great Northern pier and elevator as seen from Queen Anne Hill. The Photographer Andres Wilse dates this March 21, 1899, and (if I understand his caption) described this ship Kidship Maru as the first vessel to visit the GN's pier.
The Great Northern pier and elevator as seen from Queen Anne Hill. The Photographer Andres Wilse dates this March 21, 1899, and (if I understand his caption, bottom-left) describes this ship, Kidship Maru, as the first vessel to visit the GN’s pier.

Considerable help for our search arrived when we flipped the hard card on which the original print was glued and gratifyingly read another caption: “Streets Western Ave. W. looking N.W. from 1st Ave. W. Jan 14, 1922.” Note that the caption’s author has misread by 10 days the date printed on the print itself, which was most likely both correct and written by the photographer and city employee James P. Lee. Lee’s early 20th-century photography for public works was both prolific and in focus. Obviously, Lee liked his work, and on the fourth of January 1922 he was at it on a Saturday.

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MAPS AND AERIALS OF  CONCERNED CORNER FROM 1904, 1912, 1929

This detail from the 1904 Sanborn real estate map shows the line-up of First Avenue W. and Denny Way and the string of squatters shacks that were ultimately razed for the Elliot Ave. regrade and, if they survived into the 1920s, the continuation of Western to Elliott.
This detail from the 1904 Sanborn real estate map shows the line-up, bottom-center,  of First Avenue W. and Denny Way and the string of squatters shacks that were ultimately razed for the Elliott Ave. regrade and, if they survived into the 1920s, the continuation of Western to Elliott.
Detail of the same site from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.
Detail of the same site from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.
A detail of our corner, and a little more, from the 1929 aerial survey of Seattle. Courtesy, Municipal Archive and Ron Edge.
A detail of our corner, and a little more, from the 1929 aerial survey of Seattle.  The intersection (or meeting of concern or study here ) is left-of-center. Denny Way comes in from the upper-right.   Western runs from the bottom-right corner to the upper-left.  Courtesy, Municipal Archive and Ron Edge.

Lee is looking from where First Avenue North and Denny Way would have formed an intersection except for this bluff. If we draw lines (or consult Google Earth) west on Denny Way and south on First Ave West, they meet here. First West and Denny “met” by extending Western for a half block between them, while not yet cutting it through to the waterfront, which in 1904 and 1912 was still the beach.  In Jean’s repeat, the sidewalk along the west side of Western Avenue West continues down and north to the waterfront. What the municipal photographer is showing his engineers is where they will be both cutting and filling to extend Western Avenue down to the also new Elliott Avenue, part of the tidelands regrade and reclamation then under way below the bluff. 

Looking north on First Avenue West from where it meets the extended Western Avenue before Western was continued to the new Elliot Ave. soon after the featured photos was recorded by Lee. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey, not from his camera but his research and collecting. This is very possibly also a Lee photo, but an earlier one by a decade or so.))
Looking north on First Avenue West from where it meets the extended Western Avenue before Western was continued to the new Elliot Ave. soon after the featured photos was recorded by Lee. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey, not from his camera but his research and collecting. This is very possibly also a Lee photo, but an earlier one by a decade or so.)
This is my - and neither Jean's nor Lawton Gowey's - repeat of the supposed Lee photo above it. This means that I probably wrote one of the now about 1750 Pacific "now and then" features, but have since misplaced it. Which makes me date to ask, if there is anyone among you dear readers who would give me a hand in organizing and scanning this 34-year opera I will embrace your help and also have a better chance of batting 2000 sometime in 2021. Bless you - bless me.
This is my – and neither Jean’s nor Lawton Gowey’s – repeat of the supposed Lee photo above it. This means that I probably wrote one of the now about 1750 Pacific “now and then” features on this comparison, but have since misplaced it.  Which makes me dare to ask, if there is anyone among you dear readers who would give me a hand in organizing and scanning this 34-year opera I will embrace your help and also have a better chance of batting 2000 sometime in 2021. Bless you – bless me. (CLUE: I’ve dated this “now” photo, 1995.)
Here it is! Our intersection in the foreground where Western meets Denny Way, on the right, and extends it north to First Avenue West, at the curve. This too is possibly an earlier Lee recording. [Bless Lee and Gowey and the Seattle Municipal Archive.)
Here it is! Our intersection in the foreground where Western meets Denny Way, on the right, and extends it north to First Avenue West, at the curve. This too is possibly an earlier Lee recording. [Bless Lee and Gowey and the Seattle Municipal Archive.)  I may have also done a now-then feature on this, but have not stumbled upon a “now” as I did for the now-then above this eureka.  Note that the billboard furthers to the right appears in both the above shot and in the one above it as well. 

The decision to continue Western on to the waterfront north of Denny Way was made in 1917 but prevented by the city’s preoccupations with building ships and handling transshipments during World War I. By then, Seattle had become the second busiest port in the nation (after New York), and it was hard to keep city employees from fleeing for better work in the shipyards. Here, below, the Elliott sanitary fill is taking form, lifting the old tidelands to three feet above high tide. In 1923, both Elliott Way and Western, reaching with 15th Avenue N.W. to the then new Ballard Bridge, created a new speedway to the north end for a commuting population then riding rubber wheels, not hooves. 

Looking south up the completed link on Western Ave. to the also new Elliott Ave. on the right. Is it not a wonder how still it is?
Looking south up the completed link on Western Ave. to the also new Elliott Ave. on the right. Is it not a wonder how still it is?   This is the early 1920s; O.M. Kulien’s Northwest Industrial Buildings do not as yet fill the flat-iron block center-right between Western and Elliott.

In the late 1920s, O.M. Kulien built the Northwest Industrial Buildings that still stand here on the west side of Western Avenue West. Later, the Andrews family purchased the buildings, and later still, in 2000, remodeled them with a new name: the Northwest Work Lofts. Sid Andrews explains, “The Andrews family have by now owned the buildings for three generations – with the fourth in training.”  

WEB EXTRAS

I’m going to divert attention from our historical remit for just a moment to wish Stu Dempster a very happy 80th birthday!

A photo Jean took of Stu in 2008
A photo Jean took of Stu in 2008

Anything to add, lads?   Surely Jean, and an  joyful excuse. (You might might have included more of tonight’s photos of Stu and the crew.  It was because we enjoyed tonight’s orchestral tribute to Stu at the Chapel performance space in Historic Seattle’s Wallingford venue at Good Shepherd, and preluded it with a visit to a private affair celebrating Historylink’s prexy Marie McGaffrey’s 65th Birthday that we did not get as far into this week’s blog as we might have.  The neglect was worth it.   We start these “adds” with more links panned-out by Ron Edge, and will turn tomorrow with more discoveries including a dozen looks along Elliott Avenue mostly in the 1930s.  We will put it then to our readers to repeat any of them with their smart phones or other digital hardware and send them along to us and we will will slip them in.  All of them and with much credit and thanks.  What fun.  I may do it too Jean.  Ron?    (These mildly manic proposals are probably influenced by Fats Domino to whom I am now, by coincidence. listening, “all by myself” at 3am Sunday morning.)

THEN: Pier 70 when it was still Pier 14, ca. 1901, brand new but not yet "polished." Courtesy, Lawton Gowey

THEN: A circa 1912 look at the Wall Street finger pier from the foot, not of Wall, but Battery Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

belltown-moran-then

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/bell-st-bridge-then-web1.jpg?w=1122&h=673

THEN: Tied momentarily to the end of the Union Oil Co dock off Bay Street, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship Maud prepares to cast-off for the Arctic Ocean on June 3, 1922. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: In 1913, or near to it, an unnamed photographer recorded this view southeast across the Lower Queen Anne corner of Denny Way and First Avenue North. Out of frame to the left, the northeast corner of this intersection was home then for the Burdett greenhouse and gardens. By its own claim, it offered plants of all sorts, “the largest and most complete stock to choose from in the state.” Courtesy, the Museum of North Idaho.

THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market. It had already been scheduled for demolition. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

======

TIMELY INTERRUPTION from JAN 25, 1922 (The Times)

Z-ST-Jan-15,-1922-Copettes-w.-pistols-WEB

========

AN ELLIOTT REPEAT CHALLENGE (or Game)

We invite you dear readers to take your digital cameras and repeat the dozen or so recordings below of Elliott photographed by/for the Foster Kleiser Billboarders between 1938 and 1942.   All of them have their own captions, however beware.  The descriptions are of the billboards and their positions  in relationship to the nearest streets that intersect with Elliott. Most of the captions also include company code.  If you have the gumption to partake in this Repeato-Exploration then please send us your digits and we will insert them with credits.  Include any insightful or heart-felt captions you like. Jean where do they send them?  Paul, they should send them to paul@dorpat.com

Here they are in no particular order.

[BEWARE and careful with the traffic]

No. 1

FK---Elliot-EL-240'-N-[prob-web

====

No. 2

FK-Elliott-(EL-240'-s-of-Mercer-Pl-R-90-Sept-29-39-web

====

No. 3

FK-Elliott-&-Harrison-(NW)-Seattle-11-28-41-web

====

No. 4

FK-ELLIOTT-&-Harrison-(sw)-March-14,-1940-web

====

No. 5

FK-Elliott-&-Prospect-pl.-N.E.-[lk-no.]-B-2612-Aug-13-40-web

====

No.  6

FK-ELLIOTT-&-republican-(nw--Jan.-31,-1939-web

====

No. 7

FK-ELLIOTT-&-W-Prospect-Pl--Jan-31,1939-web

====

No. 8 [Elliott Ave. lk. n. to 4th W., 1940]

FK-Elliott-Ave-lk-n-to-4th-W-1940-web

====

No. 9 [Elliott near Roy and Prospect, Feb. 12, 1940]

FK-ELLIOTT-Ave.-[near-Roy,-Prospectd]-2-12-1940-web

====

No. 10 [Elliott lk s. fm 4th Ave. W.  Sept 21, 1939]

FK-Elliott-Ave.-lk-s-fm-4th-Ave.-W.-Sept.21,-39-web

====

No. 11

FK-Elliott-meets-Westlake-&-Thomas-(WL-60'-s-Thomas-P-1)-March-19,-1937-web

====

No. 12

FK-ELLIOTT-near-Thomas--6-10-1940-web

 

 

 

# Euro 2016 Place de la Contrescarpe

 

Yesterday night,  we watched the EURO 2016,  at « Delmas  » the large café located  place de la Contrescarpe in the 5th arrondissement.  For great sports events, it is very usual in Latin Quarter, to share one’s emotions in cafés .

Hier soir, nous avons regardé l’EURO 2016, au” Delmas “le grand café situé Place de la Contrescarpe dans le 5eme arrondissement . Pour les grands événements sportifs , c’est habituel au Quartier Latin de partager ses émotions en chœur et au café.

During the match

Durant le match

FOOT_Lomont_076At the end of the match after « the Bleus » ( french team ) had beaten Germany 2 – 0 and so they reach the final facing  Portugal on next Sunday.

A la fin du match, après que “les Bleus ” ( l’équipe française ) aient battu l’Allemagne 2 – 0 ,  et donc parviennent en  finale contre le Portugal dimanche prochain

EURO2016-07-07-2016

Oh happy night !!!

Oh nuit de bonheur !!!

Seattle Now & Then: The Rhodes Mansion (with 2 Electric Cars)

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The ‘Seattle showplace’ Rhodes mansion on Capitol Hill, ca. 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: The ‘Seattle showplace’ Rhodes mansion on Capitol Hill, ca. 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Leila Gorbman, a long-time friend, stands in with her battery motivated KIA Soul EV for our ‘repeat.’
NOW: Leila Gorbman, a long-time friend, stands in with her battery motivated KIA Soul EV for our ‘repeat.’

Certainly many PacificNW readers are familiar with the elegant Rhodes residence at the northwest corner of 10th Avenue E. and E. Howell Street.  Although a fortress-sized hedge largely guards the house gardens from sight, the street is by now a busy arterial. It is a century since the couple moved into this Capitol Hill prospect. From plans by local architect Augustus Warren Gould, the mansion was built big but not vast. Albert and Harriet Rhodes were childless.  Their ‘dependents’ were the 500 employees who worked in their Rhodes Department Store.  Before the move to Capitol Hill, the

Kitty-corner to Rhodes during a Golden Potlatch parade (we figure) of soon after one.
Kitty-corner to Rhodes during a Golden Potlatch parade (we figure) or soon after one.

Rhodes lived for a few weeks in the New Washington Hotel (now the Josephinum Apartments) on Second Avenue, conveniently only three blocks north of the couple’s prosperous store at Second and Union Street.  Their intention to leave the hotel for the hill was announced in the Society section of The Times for December 11, 1915, where it was also reported that Hotel management had hosted a complimentary goodbye banquet for the couple and their friends. On the next day, the 12th of December, the paper’s classified section included a notice that the Rhodes were seeking “a thoroughly competent girl for general housework: references required; apply 1901 10th Av. N.”    

A clip from the Times for Dec. 11, 1915, on the eve of the Rhodes moving to their new home featured here at the top.
A clip from the Times for Dec. 11, 1915, on the eve of the Rhodes moving to their new home featured here at the top.

We have learned from Carolyn Marr, librarian for the Museum of History and Industry, that this week’s featured historical photograph was recorded by the Webster and Stevens studio, for years the editorial photographer for this newspaper. If this photo was used in The Times, we have not found it.  However, we do know the car.  With help from Fred Cruger, our Granite Falls–based antique cars expert and collector, we know that this is a battery powered Detroit Electric.  (For goodness sakes, Fred owns one.) 

A Detroit Electric ad from the fall of 1915.
A Detroit Electric ad from the fall of 1915.
An earlier clip from April 7, 1912
An earlier clip from April 7, 1912
A clip form August 26, 1917.
A clip from August 26, 1917.

But is that Harriet Rhodes pausing at the open door to the battery-powered hardtop?  Or is it, perhaps, a hired model posing for the local Detroit Electric dealer (also on Capitol Hill) promoting the dealership’s pride in front of a status-radiating mansion?  Actually, we do think it is Harriet, based on the somewhat soft evidence of two later portraits of the department store owner.  (You might consult the blog listed below, and there compare the ‘resemblances’ and decide for yourself.)

Here, we believe, are three of Harriet Rhodes. You can agree or not or remain puzzled by comparing the detail from the featured photo, at the center, with the identified portraits of Harriet to the left and right.
Here, we believe, are three of Harriet Rhodes. You can agree or disagree  or remain puzzled when comparing the detail from the featured photo, at the center, with the identified portraits of older Harriets to the left and to the right.
Harriet Rhodes Seattle Times obituary from July 6, 1944.
Harriet Rhodes Seattle Times obituary from July 6, 1944.
The Rhodes owner honored in The Times for Feb. 28, 1932.
The Rhodes owners honored in The Times for Feb. 28, 1932.

Albert met Harriet in the Dalles, Oregon, while he was working as a traveling salesman of household goods for a Portland firm.  They married in 1893, living first in Tacoma, where Albert was joined by his three brothers who had followed him west from Wisconsin.  Together they started several stores, from populist five-and-dime dispenseries to posher shops, all with the family name attached.  After their move to Seattle the couple was consistently charmed with both business and social successes.  What Albert lacked was longevity. The front-page banner headline of The Times for February 17, 1921, reads: “A.J. Rhodes Dies in New York.”  He succumbed to the flu while visiting New York on business for the Seattle Chamber of Commerce.  He was fifty-six. 

The Seattle Times front page (the top of it) from February 17, 1921.
The Seattle Times front page (the top of it) from February 17, 1921.  Click to ENLARGE although probably not enough to read the fine print. 
Times front page September 26, 1926
Times front page September 26, 1926 – CLICK CLICK CLICK  and hope.
Times clip for the New Rhodes and its lobby organ. December 7, 1927.
Times clip for the New Rhodes and its lobby organ. December 7, 1927.

Harriet began her remaining twenty-three years by expanding their department store.  One of the additions was an impressively large Aeolian Duo Art organ in the lobby dedicated to the memory of Albert. Harriet also travelled often, collecting art.   She returned to her Capitol Hill home with what an unnamed Times arts reporter described on August 9, 1931, as “endless treasures, yet each so complementing the other and partaking so surely in the dominating personality of the house that it is a home of rare beauty, not a museum.”  Harriet Rhodes died in 1944 after visiting New York and staying in the same hotel where her Albert had died.  Her obituary reads, “Close friends believe that Mrs. Rhodes knowing she was ill, made the journey out of sentiment.” 

More about Rhodes and his organ. This from Times for May 8, 1960. Best to click this TWICE, although it may be too small for some eyes.
More about Rhodes and his organ. This from Times for May 8, 1960. Best to click this TWICE, although it may be too small for some eyes. (CLICK)
A. J. Rhodes rememberd by "Just Cogitating" Conover, a pioneer journalist/real estate promoter who kept writing for the paper into his 90s.
A. J. Rhodes remembered by “Just Cogitating” Conover, the pioneer journalist/real estate promoter(he named our “Evergreen State”)  who kept writing for the paper into his 90s.  Click it TWICE and his feature may pop large enough  for some of you dear readers to negotiate his cogitations. 

WEB EXTRAS

Seeing that the high shrubbery concealed all but the top of this lovely mansion, I peeked around the leaves and grabbed a snapshot of the front of the house.

Rhodes mansion beyond the topiary
Rhodes mansion beyond the topiary and Queen Anne Hill on the horizon too.

And here Jean to compliment your innocent peek is an advertisement from April 19, 1931 that uses the Rhodes manse and its landscape to promote Babcock Sprinklers.   The Rhodes big home was used by many as a handy landmark for piggy-backing prestige with directions.  Following the sprinklers, we will follow with two examples.

z-ST-april-19,-1931-Babcock-sprinklers-at-Rhodes-home-WEB

A Times classified from July 27, 1926.
A Times classified from July 27, 1926.
June 19, 1927 - again a Time classified.
June 19, 1927 – again a Time classified.
The south end of Lake Union from the Rhodes lawn. It dates from the early 20s, unless we are contradicted. The City Light steam plan on Eastlake (and Fairview) appears above the photo's center-right.
The south end of Lake Union from the Rhodes lawn. It dates from the early 20s, unless we are contradicted. The City Light steam plan on Eastlake (and Fairview) appears above the photo’s center-right.

Anything to add, mes braves?  Yes, again and again we discover more than we have time to scan and put in place.   Again, Ron Edge has saved the day and found a dozen-or-so features to add from the neighborhood.  These are all grabbed from past blog posts.  There are about 50 others that have yet to be scanned, earlier features from before 2008.

THEN: Both the grading on Belmont Avenue and the homes beside it are new in this “gift” to Capitol Hill taken from the family album of Major John Millis. (Courtesy of the Major’s grandchild Walter Millis and his son, a Seattle musician, Robert Millis.)

broadway-widening-1blog

THEN: Looking across Capitol Hill’s Broadway Avenue during its 1931adjustments. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

Holy Names THEN

THEN: The Cascade neighborhood, named for its public grade school (1894), now long gone, might have been better named for the Pontius family. Immigrants from Ohio, they purchased many of the forested acres north of Denny Way and east of Fairview Avenue.

THEN: Werner Lenggenhager's recording of the old St. Vinnie's on Lake Union's southwest shore in the 1950s should remind a few readers of the joys that once were theirs while searching and picking in that exceedingly irregular place.

THEN: Most likely in 1902 Marcus M. Lyter either built or bought his box-style home at the northwest corner of 15th Avenue and Aloha Street. Like many other Capitol Hill addition residences, Lyter's home was somewhat large for its lot.

THEN: The Volunteer Park water tower was completed in 1907 on Capitol Hill’s highest point in aid the water pressure of its service to the often grand homes of its many nearly new neighbors. The jogging corner of E. Prospect Street and 15th Avenue E. is near the bottom of the Oakes postcard. (Historical Photo courtesy Mike Fairley)

MINOR-&-THOMAS-P-patch-THEN-mr

THEN: An early portrait, circa 1911, of The Silvian Apartments, one of Capitol Hill’s abiding architectural jewels. (Courtesy, Bill Burden)

THEN: A.J. McDonald’s panorama of Lake Union and its surrounds dates from the early 1890s. It was taken from First Hill, looking north from near the intersection of Terry Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

===========

MORE RHODES AND ELECTRIC TRANSPORT

Harriet Rhodes gave a lot of her time, wealth and study traveling the world to collect art and artifacts for her home.  She was also a frequent sponsor of local art events and programs, and hostess to groups that were similarly disposed.  Included in the clips below is by any standard a wonderfully rich one describing what was inside the Rhodes home.  And the author is not credited?

DEC. 9, 1928, FROM THE TIMES.
DEC. 9, 1928, FROM THE TIMES.
An elaborate inventory of the Rhodes home supply of art and artifacts. From the times for August 9, 1931.
An elaborate inventory of the Rhodes home supply of art and artifacts. From the times for August 9, 1931.  CLICK CLICK
FROM THE TIMES, APRIL 7, 1918.
FROM THE TIMES, APRIL 7, 1918.
From THE TIMES for December 21, 1914.
From THE TIMES for December 21, 1914.
November 25, 1917.
November 25, 1917.

z Electric-Car-crash-web

By Bob Bradley, 1967.
Above: By Bob Bradley, 1967.
Courtesy, Seattle City Archive
Courtesy, Seattle Municipal  Archive
FROM THE TIMES, MAY 11, 1931.
FROM THE TIMES, MAY 11, 1931.

Now & Then here and now

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