Seattle Now & Then: The Westlake Triangle (aka The Silverstone Block)

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THEN: This Webster and Stevens studio photo dates from either late 1917 or early 1918. The grand Frederick and Nelson Department store, rising above Fifth Avenue, has not yet reached its sumptuous Sept. 3. 1918 opening. In the foreground, the much smaller but also elegant flatiron building, bordered by Pine Street, in the foreground, and Westlake and Fifth Avenues to the sides, was razed and replaced also in 1918 by a three story retail block on the same flatiron footprint. (Courtesy, the Museum of History & Industry)
THEN: This Webster and Stevens studio photo dates from either late 1917 or early 1918. The grand Frederick and Nelson Department store, rising above Fifth Avenue, has not yet reached its sumptuous Sept. 3. 1918 opening. In the foreground, the much smaller but also elegant flatiron building, bordered by Pine Street, in the foreground, and Westlake and Fifth Avenues to the sides, was razed and replaced also in 1918 by a three story retail block on the same flatiron footprint. Photos of that replacement will first be found two imagines down.  (Courtesy, the Museum of History & Industry)
NOW: The featured triangular block was ultimately covered over with the 1988 opening of Westlake Center.
NOW: The featured triangular block was ultimately covered over with the 1988 opening of Westlake Center.

In a note scribbled on the 1937 tax card for this modest block, it is named the “triangle.”  Bordered by Pine Street, 5th Avenue, and Westlake Avenue, it is really one of about a dozen triangles attached to Westlake Avenue through its seven-block run between Fourth Avenue and Denny Way.   The triangles, and about seven more irregularly-shaped blocks, date from 1906-07 when Westlake Avenue was cut through the original city grid.  This eccentric

The "Triangle," an appropriate and descriptive name for the odd block bordered here by 5th Ave. on the Left, Westlake Ave. on the right, and Pine Street at the far end of the "Triangle." The photo comes from one of the thousands of "tax cards" produced by a depression-time Works Progress Administration documenting every (nearly) taxable structure and a few churches too in King County.
The “Triangle,” an appropriate and descriptive name for the odd block bordered here by 5th Ave. on the Left, Westlake Ave. on the right, and Pine Street at the far end of the “Triangle.” The photo comes from one of the thousands of “tax cards” produced by a depression-time Works Progress Administration documenting every (or almost every)) taxable structure and a few churches too in King County.

regrade was meant to channel the increasing traffic to Denny Way, there to continue north through the “funnel,” as the South Lake Union retail neighborhood was then sometimes called, to the picturesque viaduct built in 1890 for pedestrians, wagons and trolleys along the west shore of Lake Union all the way to Fremont.

Looking north on Westlake by the lake in the 1890s. The viaduct continued along the west shore of Lake Union to the Fremont Bridge at Lake Union's Ross Creek outlet.
Looking north on Westlake by the lake in the 1890s. The viaduct continued along the west shore of Lake Union to the Fremont Bridge at Lake Union’s Ross Creek outlet.

The featured photo at the top  is one of three Webster and Stevens Studio photographs of the original charming flatiron with its waving cornice.  It sights north over Pine Street along the east side of Westlake.  Another of the three photos is printed directly below.  It looks in the opposite direction, and shows the same single motorcar parked on Westlake (perhaps the photographer’s) and the produce stand with its fruit and customers protected by an awning opened over the sidewalk.  The Pearl Oyster and Chop House is the

The second of three looks at the "Tirangle" looking south-southeast over Westalke Avenue with 5th Avenue on the left and the brand new Frederick and Nelson Department store on its far side.
The second of three looks at the “Tirangle” looking south-southeast over Westalke Avenue with 5th Avenue on the left and the brand new Frederick and Nelson Department store on its far side.  

next storefront south of the produce stand.  Taped to it windows are more than one poster promoting the week-long visit to the Metropolitan Theatre, beginning Monday January 7, of the Shakespearean troupe led by the “eminent” Shakespearian John E. Kellerd.  It is by this bit of advertising that we can easily figure that the three photos were taken sometime either in late 1917 or early 1918.  Frankly, this discovery saddened me because I prefer this little triangle with its curvilinear cresting and large basket-handle windows to its several successors, the first of which is shown on the tax photo printed above, three images back or above .  (The third of the three Webster and Stevens photos follows, all are used courtesy of the Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI.)

Another of the first of the "Triangle Buildings," this one looking northwest through the intersection of Pine Street and Fifth Avenue. Frederick and Nelson is just out-of-trams to the right. The Seattle Times building on Westlake between Olive and Stewart is on the far right.
Another of the first of the “Triangle Buildings,” this one looking northwest through the intersection of Pine Street and Fifth Avenue.  Frederick and Nelson is just out-of-frame to the right. The Seattle Times building on Westlake between Olive and Stewart is on the far right.
Jean's "repeat" from late August 1916.
Jean’s “repeat” from late August 2016.
A 1949 look at the somewhat modernized Triangle Building.
A 1949 look at the somewhat modernized Triangle Building.

In the 1908 Baist Real Estate map only a small wooden shed is foot-printed on the block. By four years later, in the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map, the block has been tightly fitted for the little retail center captured here, and through its few years of existence it was also home for the Seattle station of the Everett Interurban, which started running in 1910. Sometime in 1918 this attractive triangle was razed and replaced with a three-story structure that bordered the block with a foundation sturdy enough to support a twelve-story high-rise that was never constructed. Through its more than half-century of service and two remodels (the tax card tells us in 1949 and 1959), the three-story triangle serviced many retailers. The tax-photo illustrating the last of these changes reveals a nearly windowless brick mass impressively filling the block with “Weisfield’s Credit Jewelers” signed in big neon letters on its south façade facing Pine Street. (I remember this and I suspect many of you do as well.)

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Judging by the tenants’ advertisements published in this paper through the first weeks of 1919, the quickly-built three-story replacement was completed sometime in late 1918.  Among the first tenants were The Silk Shop, Violet Tatus’ New Hat Shop and the New Owl Drug Company. The building was named the Silverstone

The Triangle block appears at the center-bottom of this detail from the 1923 map by Kroll of Seattle's "business section."
The Triangle block appears at the center-bottom  (below the Frederick and Nelson block) of this detail from the 1923 map by Kroll of Seattle’s “business section.”

after Jay C. Silverstone, a Kansas City native who moved to Seattle with his family to found the Boston Drug Company.  Silverstone became a super-promoter for properties in this nearly new retail neighborhood.  When he added the little flatiron to his neighborhood holdings, the headline for the Seattle Times for Sept. 2, 1917, read “New Retail /District Sets Record Price for Seattle Realty.”  Silverstone and his brother Hiram, a physician practicing in Kansas City, purchased the block from Seattle architect John Graham, paying “$56 Per Square Foot for the Westlake Triangle,” which figured to $250,000, most of it in cash. 

The Times Sept. 2, 1917 report on Jay C. Silverstone's record-breaking purchase of the featured little triangle.
The Times Sept. 2, 1917 report on Jay C. Silverstone’s record-breaking purchase of the featured little triangle.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Surely Jean.  As is his way, Ron Edge has pulled up several neighborhood shots and held in each are many more, some of which will be repeated many times through the selection.  Which is our way.

THEN: Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill. Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner. (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

THEN: Sometime between early December 1906 and mid-February 1907 an unnamed photographer with her or his back about two lots north of Pike Street recorded landmarks on the east side of Third Avenue including, in part, the Washington Bar stables, on the right; the Union Stables at the center, a church converted for theatre at Pine Street, and north of Pine up a snow-dusted Denny Hill, the Washington Hotel. (Used courtesy of Ron Edge)

Great railroad signs, theatre signs and ranks of neon were still the greatest contributors to night light at 4th and Westlake in 1949. (Photo by Robert Bradley compliment of Lawton and Jean Gowey)

THEN: Thanks to Pacific reader John Thomas for sharing this photograph recorded by his father in 1927. It looks north across Times Square to the almost completed Orpheum Theatre. Fifth Avenue is on the left, and Westlake on the right.

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THEN: A motorcycle courier for Bartell Drugs poses before the chain’s Store No. 14, located in the Seaboard Building at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Pike Street, circa 1929. (Courtesy Bartell Drugs)

THEN: Looking west on Pike Street from Fourth Avenue, the variety in the first block of this retail district includes the Rhodes Bros. Ten Cent Store, Mendenhall’s Kodaks, Fountain Pens and Photo Supplies, Remick’s Song and Gift Shop, the Lotus Confectionary, Fahey-Brockman’s Clothiers, where, one may “buy upstairs and save $10.00”. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

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THEN: With her or his back to the Medical-Dental Building an unidentified photographer took this look northeast through the intersection of 6th and Olive Way about five years after the Olive Way Garage first opened in 1925. (Courtesy, Mark Ambler)

 

THEN:The early evening dazzle of the Roosevelt Theatre at 515 Pike Street, probably in 1941. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: We are not told but perhaps it is Dora and Otto Ranke and their four children posing with their home at 5th and Pike for the pioneer photographer Theo. E. Peiser ca. 1884. In the haze behind them looms Denny Hill. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: A float for the 1911 Potlatch parade carries piggyback a smaller 1897 version of a Polk City Directory on a much bigger 1911 copy. The fourteen years between them is meant to symbolize the growth of the city since the Alaskan/Yukon gold rush of 1897 that the Golden Potlatch of 1911 was created to commemorate. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Thanks again and again to Lawton Gowey for another contribution to this feature, this ca. 1917 look into a fresh Denny Regrade and nearly new “office-factory” at 1921 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey.)

THEN: Looking south from Pine Street down the wide Second Avenue in 1911, then Seattle’s growing retail strip and parade promenade. (courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: The row house at the southwest corner of 6th Avenue and Pine Street in its last months, ca. 1922-23. (Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: This rare early record of the Fourth and Pike intersection was first found by Robert McDonald, both a state senator and history buff with a special interest in historical photography. He then donated this photograph - with the rest of his collection - to the Museum of History and Industry, whom we thank for its use. (Courtesy MOHAI)

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ALSO NEARBY (Chapter – or feature – NO. 20 from Seattle Now and Then Volume One, which can be read from cover to cover on this blog, and it found in the front page bug ”

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Seattle Now & Then: Yesler’s Wharf, 1891

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THEN: F. Jay Haynes recorded this ca. 1891 look up the Seattle waterfront and it’s railroad trestles most likely for a report to his employer, the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)
THEN: F. Jay Haynes recorded this ca. 1891 look up the Seattle waterfront and it’s railroad trestles most likely for a report to his employer, the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)
NOW: For his repeat, about 125 years late, Jean Sherrard looks north from what is left of the old Pier 48 to the King County Water Taxi’s loading dock at the waterfront foot of Yesler Way.
NOW: For his repeat, about 125 years late, Jean Sherrard looks north from what is left of the old Pier 48 to the King County Water Taxi’s loading dock at the waterfront foot of Yesler Way.

We might wonder what the photographer, F. Jay (“the Professor”) Haynes, found captivating in this long stretch of the Seattle waterfront.   It reaches from a small sample of the Magnolia Peninsula on the far left to the outer end of the famous namesake wharf that the pioneer Henry Yesler rebuilt after the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, which destroyed it and practically everything

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else on Seattle’s central waterfront.  Although difficult to read, both at this size and in the subject’s morning light, the shed/warehouse seen on the far right (of the  featured photo at the top) has Yesler’s name printed on its west wall facing Elliot Bay.   We will insert here another look at the water end of Yesler’s Wharf most likely photographed in 1890-1.  The wharf  is left-of-center, and the block-lettered name is the same and easier to read, especially if your click-to-enlarge the pan and all else.

Compare this post-fire view from both the featured photo at the top and the pan that follows. All three were recorded from coal wharves at the foot of King Street.
Compare this post-fire view from both the featured photo at the top and the ca. 1887 pan that follows. All three were recorded from coal wharves at the foot of King Street.
Another record of the waterfront looking north from the King Street Coal warf, this one most likely in 1887. Denny Hill, on the far left, has been cleared of trees for development, but there is as yet no Denny Hotel on the top of this the Hill's southern summit.
Another record of the waterfront looking north from the King Street Coal wharf, this one most likely in 1887. Denny Hill, on the far left, has been cleared of trees for development, but there is as yet no Denny Hotel on the top of this the Hill’s southern summit.  Yesler’s wharf is at the scene’s center.
A detail of the featured docks grabbed from the 1893 Sanborn real estate map. Yesler's cock is at the top.
A detail of the featured docks grabbed from the 1893 Sanborn real estate map. Yesler’s  dock is at the top.  King Street is just off-frame at the bottom.   All is new here – except the pile of ship’s ballast on which “501” is printed.  Most of the ballast was dumped there in the 1870s by ships visiting to pick up coal at King Street.  With the construction of docks between the bunkers beisde King Street  and Yesler Wharf the ballast-dropping was  stopped here, and sizeable docks and sheds were constructed above the ballast and/or to its sides.   The tuning=fork dock between Madison and Main Streets (marked again by “502”) was fitted with a warehouse at its water (west) end that tended ships, while the east end of the new (in 1882) dock was left open revealing Ballast Island and waiting for later development, both before and after the 1889 fire. 
Part of Ballast Island is exposed, bottom-right, in this pre-fire 1884 Seattle Birdseye. Note Mill Street at the center. Here off-shore it is part of Yesler Wharf
Part of Ballast Island is exposed, bottom-right, in this pre-fire 1884 Seattle Birdseye. Note Mill Street at the center. Here off-shore it is part of Yesler Wharf.  At the center not Mill Street where it is off-shore and part of Yeslere Wharf (or dock). 

We imagine that there may have also been a sensitive side to Haynes’ choice  – an aesthetic motivation.  The vessel near the featured scene’s center, which atypically reveals no name on its stern, marks a striking divide between the intimate waterfront congestion of barrels and half-covered bricks on this side of Yesler’s dock, far right, and to the left of the steamship, the long and somewhat mottled urban growth that was then North Seattle. Belltown’s gray dapple on Denny Hill’s western slope, left of center, is composed almost entirely of improvised and rent-free squatters’ vernacular sheds, both on the hill and on the beach.

Another Haynes view, this one from some vessel off shore of Marion Street. (It lines up with the photographer's prospect.) Notes Denny Hill on the far left.
Another Haynes view, this one from some vessel off shore of Marion Street. (It lines up with the photographer’s prospect.) Note Denny Hill on the far left.  CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE, please.

Haynes’ subject might also have been assigned.  Born in Michigan in 1853, the year Seattle’s mid-western founders moved from Alki Point to this east shore of Elliott Bay, Haynes missed the Civil War but not an apprenticeship with Doctor William H. Lockwood’s Temple of Photography in Ripon (‘Birthplace of the Republican Party’), Wisconsin.  In the Temple he learn his trade and met Lily Snyder, his co-worker and future wife.  Together, they purchased from the Northern Pacific Railroad a Pullman car, which they fitted for a photography studio.  In exchange for publicity photographs of the railroad’s expansion and rolling stock, the couple – while raising a family – traveled the greater Northwest, prospering with their own rolling dark room and sales gallery.  To his status as the Northern Pacific’s official photographer, Haynes added the same distinction for Yellowstone National Park, where he has a mountain named for him. 

The rising hotel on the hill is seen between the stack and mast rising from another and unidentified vessel on the south central waterfront following some post-'89 fire reconstruction, the warehouse rooftops about the vessel are familiar, and the Denny Hotel is still sans tower. But not below. The Haynes photo that follows shows the back of the hotel and tower from looking south on Third Ave. new Blanchard Street.
The rising hotel on the hill is seen between the stack and mast rising from another (and unidentified) vessel on the south central waterfront following early  post-’89 fire reconstruction.  The warehouse rooftops above the vessel are familiar, and the Denny Hotel is still sans tower. But not below. The Haynes photo that follows shows the back of the hotel and tower looking south on Third Ave. thru the intersection with  Blanchard Street.
Denny Hotel from the rear. This later Haynes exposure looks south across Third Avenue's intersection with Blanchard Street.
Denny Hotel from the rear. This later Haynes exposure looks south across Third Avenue’s intersection with Blanchard Street.

Dating this (at the top) visit by Haynes to Puget Sound has left me with an ‘about’ year of circa 1891, two years following the Great Fire.  By obscuring the center of the Denny Hotel on Denny Hill, the steamship’s smokestack also hides the hotel’s tower, the last part of the hotel built, and thereby a perhaps helpful clue toward a more refined date. Finally, with the help of an array of historical photos, Ron Edge, a devotee of Seattle history, has determined that the resting steamship here is the City of Kingston and not, as I first thought, its younger sister, the City of Seattle.  Ron discovered that there were small differences between them, especially at the stern on the railing for the lower deck.  The City of Seattle had a railing. 

The steamer City of Seattle on one of its many runs to Alaska. This is, the caption reads, "just below Dixon's Entrance. (Courtesy, Cornell University Library)
The steamer City of Seattle on one of its many runs to Alaska. This is, the caption reads, “just below Dixon’s Entrance. (Courtesy, Cornell University Library)
The steamer City of Kingston on the Seattle waterfront.
The steamer City of Kingston on the Seattle waterfront.  [Courtesy, Michael Maslan]
Two looks at the City of Kingston's stern. Compare it to one of the City of Seattle, the stern that follows.
Two looks at the City of Kingston’s stern. Compare it to one of the City of Seattle, the stern that follows.
The City of Seattle's stern.
Above: the City of Seattle’s stern.
Part of a page on Lewis and Dryden's history of Puget Sound vessels published long ago.
Part of a page on Lewis and Dryden’s history of Puget Sound vessels, including the “companion ships” shown above, published long ago.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

WEB EXTRAS

Jean: We had help along the way on taking this photo… Thanks to Laura Newborn from the State DOT for making the connections and Marty Martin, Facilities Manager, for accompanying me onto the decaying Pier 48.

Paul: Jean, strip it, the pier, is of its clues.  Do you remember – and did you attend – any of the big Book Fairs that used Pier 48 sometime in 1990s?

Jean: I did not attend, though I vaguely remember.

Marty Martin, facilities manager, DOT, on Pier 48
Marty Martin, facilities manager, DOT, on Pier 48
Ravaged surface of the pier, access forbidden
Ravaged surface of the pier, access forbidden

Anything to add, fellow travelers?  This week like the last 200 or more we’ll pile on a few more features to the Edge Links that Ron put up.   But first a copy of the montage that we used to figure out and describe for Laura and Marty the prospect on Pier 48 that we calculated was the correct one for a proper repeat.  The red arrow marks the spot.  You may wish to notice the range of freedom Jean has used for his art.

Above Pier 48, Courtesy of Google
Above Pier 48 from on high, Courtesy of Google
Furthermore, may we help you?
Furthermore, may we help you?

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

THEN: The S. S. Suveric makes a rare visit to Seattle in 1911. (Historical photo courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: The new sub H-3 takes her inaugural baptism at the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company’s ways on Independence Day, 1913. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The driver, lower left, leads his team towards First Avenue up a planked incline on Madison Street. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: From boxcars and rooftops to the planks of Railroad Avenue, excitement builds for the ceremonial re-enactment of the S.S.Portland’s 1897 landing with its “ton of gold” on the Seattle waterfront, the city’s first Golden Potlatch Celebration. [Courtesy, Michael Maslan]

THEN: Between the now lost tower of the Pioneer Building, seen in part far left, and the Seattle Electric Steam Plant tower on the right, are arranged on First and Railroad Avenues the elaborate buzz of business beside and near Seattle’s Pioneer Square ca. 1904.

THEN: The original for this scene of a temporary upheaval on Mill Street (Yesler Way) was one of many historical prints given to the Museum of History and Industry many years ago by the Charles Thorndike estate. Thorndike was one of Seattle’s history buffs extraordinaire. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

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Seattle Now & Then: Delta Gamma on the Ave

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THEN: The first house for Delta Gamma at N.E. 4730 University Way. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: The first house for Delta Gamma at N.E. 4730 University Way. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The literate developers of the recently constructed Lothlorien Apartments got their place name from fantasist J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings.”
NOW: The literate developers of the recently constructed Lothlorien Apartments got their place name from fantasist J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings.”
A Google Earth detail of the feature block frames with a detail from the 1905 Sanborn Map. Delta Gamma has been marked with a red frame. (Courtesy Ron Edge)
A Google Earth detail of the feature block frames with a detail from the 1905 Sanborn Map. Delta Gamma has been marked with a red frame. Click-Click to Enlarge. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

The designers and/or carpenters of this slender house may have taken care to give its front porch a stairway both wide and high enough to pose a large group portrait, perhaps of Delta Gamma Sorority’s charter membership.  It was the first local sorority to receive a charter from a national organization. The lobbying, which began in 1900, was rewarded on May 15, 1903, the last day of Delta Gamma’s annual convention held that year in Wisconsin.  One year later the coeds were living here at 4730 University Way.

 

From The Seattle Times for May 18 , 1903
From The Seattle Times for May 18 , 1903. BELOW, group portrait of member in 1904.

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The Times Oct. 26, 1907 report on a reception given by Delta Gamma to the school faculty is a sign of the important role this sorority, and others, played in the social and ceremonial life of the University.
The Times Oct. 26, 1907 report on a reception given by Delta Gamma to the school faculty is a sign of the convivial  role this sorority, and others, played in the social and ceremonial life of the University.

The Greek letters Delta and Gamma are signed on the tower of the featured photo at the top, which seems otherwise useless, since there is neither room enough nor light for either a crow’s nest study or a co-ed’s bed chamber. The photograph’s source, the Museum of History and Industry, gives this University District scene an annum of 1904. The neighborhood was then still more likely referred to either as Brooklyn or University Station.  The latter was named after or for the trolley that carried students and faculty to the new university from their remote residences in spread-out Seattle.  The former was the name first given the neighborhood by James Moore, Seattle’s super developer, in 1890, the year the future University District was first successfully platted.  There was then no knowledge of the coming surprise: the University of Washington.  The name Brooklyn was embraced as a cachet pointing to another suburb (Brooklyn) that also looked across water (the East River) to another metropolis (New York.)

A Post-Intelligencer clipping from December 1, 1890
A Post-Intelligencer clipping from December 1, 1890
From The Seattle Press, Dec. 1, 1890
From The Seattle Press, Dec. 1, 1890

Columbus Avenue was the name that Moore gave to the future University Way.  This was soon dropped for 14th Avenue, until 1919 when the University Commercial Club joined the neighborhood’s newspaper, the University Herald, to run a contest for a new name, which University Way easily won. Brooklyn Avenue and 14th Avenue were Seattle’s first fraternity/sorority rows.  In early December of 1904, the Seattle Times reported, “The Beta Chapter of the Delta Gamma Sorority of the state university gave a dancing party at its new clubhouse on Fourteenth Ave. N.E. Friday.”

The rear facade of Delta Gamma shows on the left in another photograph taken by the Webster Stevens Studio and used here courtesy of the Museum of History and Industry. Kappa Kappa Gamma, the primary subject here is mid-block on the west side of 15th Ave. East. The montage of Secret Societies included below dates from Sept 10, 1905. It show a new home for Delta Gamma, most likely on the east side of 14th Ave. aka "The Ave." (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
The rear facade of Delta Gamma shows on the left in another photograph taken by the Webster Stevens Studio and used here courtesy of the Museum of History and Industry. Kappa Kappa Gamma, the primary subject here is mid-block on the west side of 15th Ave. East. The montage of Secret Societies included below dates from Sept 10, 1905. It show a new home for Delta Gamma, most likely on the east side of 14th Ave. aka “The Ave.” (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
A page from The Times for Sept. 10, 1905. Note the new home for Delta Gamma, bottom-center.
A page from The Times for Sept. 10, 1905. Note the new home for Delta Gamma, bottom-center of the above montage, and below on its own.. CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE

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A Seattle Times clipping from August 21, 1916.
A Seattle Times clipping from August 21, 1916.

University Way, especially, was a sign of the city’s and its university’s then manic growth.  Other Greeks soon joined the co-eds of Delta Gamma at addresses north of N.E. 45th Street in Moore’s then new and only two-block-wide University Heights Addition, which had  been platted in 1899.  Seven years later, and directly to the east of University Heights, Moore opened his much larger University Park

Looking southeast toward the Cascades and Mt. Rainier.
Looking southeast toward the Cascades and Mt. Rainier. [CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE]

Addition.  In this 1904 featured look east from the Ave. we can see that University Park is still a forest.  After 1906 it was increasingly stocked with homes for the University of Washington’s growing faculty and Greek community. Many of the students’ ‘secret societies’ first got their start in University Heights, often in mansion-sized houses larger than Delta Gamma’s, which were profitably let go for the developing businesses along University Way.  Typically the Greek houses eventually moved to nearby University Park.

On the left, Delta Gamma's new home in 1916, and a century later, on the right. It was this structure that was arranged for use by the Russian House years after it had been moved across 25th Avenue, where it survives.
On the left, Delta Gamma’s new home in 1916, and a century later, on the right. It was this structure that was arranged for use as the Russian House years after it was  moved across 21st Avenue, where it survives.
News of the Russian House from The Times for August 2, 1963.
News of the Russian House from The Times for August 2, 1963.

After several moves, in 1916 Delta Gamma reached its present location at the northwest corner of NE 45th Street and 21st Avenue NE in 1916.  Twenty years later it ‘moved’ again while staying put.  In 1936 the sorority’s house was sold and rolled across 21st Avenue from the northwest corner with NE 45th Street to the northeast corner to become the house for the Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity.  It was later named the Russian House, for its popular Russian studies and “Russian Only” rule.  Across 21st Avenue, NE. at the recently vacated northwest corner, the sorority built again, this time the grand Arthur Loveless-designed 80-year-old Delta Gamma house. In sum the sorority has now held to this corner for a century.  

From The Times for April 16, 1937.
Above: From The Times for April 16, 1937.
From The Times for September 1, 1936.
From The Times for September 1, 1936.
Pulled from The Seattle Times for November 23, 1936.
Pulled from The Seattle Times for November 23, 1936.
The north shore of Lake Union circa 1898.
The north shore of Lake Union circa 1898.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, guys?  Yup Jean – from the neighborhood where once we sometimes hung out, and the greater neighborhood where we still live with our lakes.   First Ron Edge comes up with about twenty links (again, all of which have their  own links, which inevitably include some duplicates), and I will follow Ron’s list with another string of clips – sometime after I have walked the dog.  It is now 3:54 AM.  And so depending on Guido’s performance, I may wait until tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon to add the promised string.

THEN: With great clouds overhead and a landscape 45 years shorter than now, one vehicle – a pickup heading east – gets this part of State Route 520 to itself on a weekday afternoon. (courtesy Lawton Gowey)

This rare glimpse of the rapid Ravenna Creek’s fall through Cowen Park was photographed not long before the stream that had had “topped off” Green Lake into Lake Washington’s Union Bay for thousands of years was shut off in 1911. (Photo courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: When it was built in 1902, this box home, with classic Ionic pillars at the porch, was set above the northwest corner of the freshly graded Brooklyn Avenue and 47th Street in the University District. (Courtesy, John Cooper)

THEN: First designated Columbus Street in the 1890 platting of the Brooklyn Addition, and next as 14th Avenue to conform with the Seattle grid, ‘The Ave,’ still its most popular moniker, was renamed University Way by contest in 1919. This trim bungalow at 3711 University Way sat a few lots north of Lake Union’s Portage Bay. (Courtesy, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Archive)

THEN: On March 25, 1946, or near it, Wide World Photos recorded here what they titled “University Vet Housing.” It would soon be named the Union Bay Village and house the families of returning veterans. The first 45 bungalows shown here rented for from $35 to $45 dollars a month. It would increase to a “teeming conglomerate of 500 rental units.” With housing for both married students and faculty. The view looks north over a street that no longer exists. The homes on the right horizon face the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail on N.E. Blakeley Street near N.E. 45th Place. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

THEN: The Gothic University of Washington Campus in 1946 beginning a seven-year crowding with prefabricated dormitories beside Frosh Pond. In the immediate background [on the right] is Guggenheim Hall. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The historical view looks directly south into the Latona addition’s business district on Sixth Ave. NE. from the Northern Pacific’s railroad bridge, now part of the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Roosevelt Way bustling after the war. This subject first appeared in The Seattle Times on July 7, 1946. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: sliver of the U.W. campus building called the Applied Physics Laboratory appears on the far right of this 1940 look east towards the U.W. campus from the N.E. 40th Street off-ramp from the University Bridge. While very little other than the enlarged laboratory survives in the fore and mid-grounds, much on the horizon of campus buildings and apartments still stand. (Courtesy, Genevieve McCoy)

THEN: When the Oregon Cadets raised their tents on the Denny Hall lawn in 1909 they were almost venerable. Founded in 1873, the Cadets survive today as Oregon State University’s ROTC. Geneticist Linus C. Pauling, twice Nobel laureate, is surely the school’s most famous cadet corporal. (courtesy, University of Washington Libraries)

THEN: Above Lake Washington’s Union Bay the Hoo-Hoo Building on the left and the Bastion facsimile on the right, were both regional departures from the classical beau arts style, the 1909 AYPE’s architectural commonplace. Courtesy John Cooper

THEN: An estimated 50 percent of the materials used in the old Husky Union Building were recycled into its recent remodel. The new HUB seems to reach for the roof like its long-ago predecessor, the AYP’s landmark Forestry building. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: For the four-plus months of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the center of commerce and pedestrian energy on University Way moved two blocks south from University Station on Northeast 42nd Street to here, Northeast 40th Street, at left.

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Seattle Now & Then: Third & Virginia, 1936

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THEN: The five buildings shown here on the west side of Third Avenue south of Virginia Street have endured with few changes since the ‘then’ photo was snapped in 1936. The exception is the smallest, far-right, the Virginian Tavern now stripped for an open garage at Third’s southwest corner with Virginia Street. The six-story Hardon Hall Apartments, at the center of the five, was renovated in 2006 for low-income housing by the Plymouth Housing Group.
THEN: The five buildings shown here on the west side of Third Avenue south of Virginia Street have endured with few changes since the ‘then’ photo was snapped in 1936. The exception is the smallest, far-right, the Virginian Tavern now stripped for an open garage at Third’s southwest corner with Virginia Street. The six-story Hardon Hall Apartments, at the center of the five, was renovated in 2006 for low-income housing by the Plymouth Housing Group.
NOW: To avoid sidewalk landscaping Jean moved to the curb for his repeat. The 3rd Avenue block between Virginia and Stewart streets has largely escaped the recent structural changes in the Denny Regrade Neighborhood.
NOW: To avoid sidewalk landscaping Jean moved to the curb for his repeat. The 3rd Avenue block between Virginia and Stewart streets has largely escaped the recent structural changes in the Denny Regrade Neighborhood.

Here is yet another billboard negative from the Foster and Kleiser collection that Jean and I have visited a few times for this Sunday feature. The anonymous photographer chose a prospect that exposed the company’s two billboards on the roof of the Virginian Tavern, the tenant of the modest brick building at the southwest corner of Virginia Street and Third Avenue. This time Jean’s ‘repeat’ shows us that in this block not much has changed in the intervening eighty years.  To gain some perspective on this booming town, the negative date, December 11, 1936, roughly splits the years between when the first settler-farmers landed near Alki Point in 1851 and now.

Here (above) we are about 100 feet higher and one block further north. This is F.J. Haines look south on 3rd Avenue from north summit of Denny Hill to Denny Hotel on the front or south summit of the hill.
Here (above) we are about 100 feet higher and one block further north than in the featured photographs. This is F.J. Haines ca. 1891 look south on 3rd Avenue from the north summit of Denny Hill to Denny Hotel on the front or south summit of the hill.   This is remote.  Most of Seattle is to the other side of the hotel and below it.  (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)
This looks north on Third Avenue from an upper story in the Denny (aka Washington) Hotel. The negative was shared with me by Carrie Coe, she did, however, knowo who took it, although it may have been her mother who had talent with her camera. The roof bottom-left covers the frame apartment house at the northwest corner of 3rd and Virginia. Queen Anne Hill marks most of the horizon.
This looks north on Third Avenue from an upper story in the Denny (aka Washington) Hotel. The negative was shared with me by Carrie Coe, she did, however, knowo who took it, although it may have been her mother who had talent with her camera. The roof bottom-left covers the frame apartment house at the northwest corner of 3rd and Virginia, the corner taken by the building that covers most of the bottom of the photo below this one.    Queen Anne Hill marks most of the horizon.
I recorded this in 2003 from the roof of the parking garage at the southeast corner of Virginia and Third Avenue. The view, then, looks northwest with Virginia on the left and Third Ave. on the right.
I recorded this in 2003 from the roof of the parking garage at the southeast corner of Virginia and Third Avenue. The view, then, looks northwest with Virginia St/ on the left and Third Ave. on the right.   In the ensuing thirteen years the Denny Regrade, aka Belltown. neighborhood has seen many changes with the high rise structures promised or envisioned for it a century ago when the regrading was done.
Like the Haynes photo above it, this was taken sometime in the early 1890s and years before the hotel was opened by its fighting developers. The hotel is behind the unidentified photographer of this illustration copied from a piece of stationary.
Like the Haynes photo above it, this was taken sometime in the early 1890s and years before the hotel was opened by its fighting developers. The hotel is behind the unidentified photographer of this illustration, which we copied from a piece of stationary. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
A warning published in The Seattle Times for the day the featured photo was dated and most likely recorded, December 11, 1936.
A warning published in The Seattle Times on the day the featured photo was dated and most likely recorded, December 11, 1936.

What were they thinking, the pedestrians and motorists here on Third Avenue?  Surely of the kings of England: both of them.  This is the day, a Friday, when it was at last fulfilled at 1:52 pm that the Duke of York took – or was given – the throne of his older brother Edward VIII who abdicated it for love. The Seattle Times, of course, trumpeted news about the switch, including a front page photograph of the new king’s daughter, the ten-year old Elizabeth who, an unnamed friend of the royals assured, as an “astute sharp-witted little girl” was figuring it out.  

 A sizeable detail from the front page of The Seattle Times for December 11, 1936.
A sizeable detail from the front page of The Seattle Times for December 11, 1936.

The neighborhood was then variously called the Uptown Retail Center, Belltown, and the Denny Regrade.  Only the first two names survive.  It is likely that many of these motorists on Third Avenue between Virginia and Stewart Streets remembered the regrade itself, and knew that they were driving under what only thirty years earlier was the south summit of Denny Hill. 

LaRoche's early 1890s look north on Third Avenue
LaRoche’s early 1890s look north on Third Avenue with his back to University Street.  The Denny Hotel effectively looms over the citiyi. 
The Washington Hotel, formerly the Denny, recorded from the southwest corner of Pike and Second Ave. The Pine and Second Avenue regrades encroaching on the hotel began their cuttings in 1903. (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
The Washington Hotel, formerly the Denny, recorded from the southwest corner of Pike Street and Second Ave. The Pine and Second Avenue regrades encroaching on the hotel began their cuttings in 1903. (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
The lobby most likely briefly before the hotel opened to Theo Roosevelt, its first guest, in the spring of 1903.
The lobby. most likely recorded briefly before the hotel opened in the Spring of 1903 to its  first guest, President Theodore Roosevelt,   With the hotel straddling the as yet undeveloped Third Avenue north of Stewart Street, the lobby was also stationed about 80 feet above Third’s future post-regraded elevation. 
Passing the mid-point in the hotel's destruction as seen looking north on Third Avenue looking through Pine Street.
Passing the mid-point in the hotel’s destruction as seen looking north on Third Avenue through Pine Street.
The White Garage's ornamental banding across Third Avenue from the garage on its east side. (2003)
The gone yellow White Garage’s ornamental banding at its cornice (or below it) across Third Avenue from another garage on the avenue’s  east side in 2003.

Just left of center, the six-story White Garage, the tallest of the five buildings on the east side of Third Avenue, fails to reach the elevation of the historic summit.  It is also short of reaching the elevation of what before the regrading was the basement of the majestic Denny Hotel, a.k.a. Washington Hotel, that sat atop the hill and advertised itself as “the scenic hotel of the West.”  Both the south summit and the hotel were razed between 1906 and 1908.

The Methodist church at the southeast corner of Pine Street and Third Avenue with the east wing of the hotel above it.
Left-of-center, outfitted and signed for theatre, the Methodist church at the southeast corner of Pine Street and Third Avenue with the east wing of the hotel still holding to the hill above it.
The church-as-theatre on the right at the southeast corner of Third Ave. and Pine Street, with the hotel long-gong and the south summit of Denny Hill mostlyi gone as well.
The church-as-theatre on the right at the southeast corner of Third Ave. and Pine Street, with the hotel long-gone and the south summit of Denny Hill mostly gone as well.

Given that the featured photo at the top was photographed  in the midst of the Great Depression, Third Avenue seems surprisingly rife with motorcars. A review of some historical vehicular statistics may explain the motorized zest.  Four blocks away at Second Avenue and Pike Street, and only thirty-two years earlier, the city’s street department counted 3,959 vehicles visiting the intersection, of which only fourteen were automobiles.  One year earlier there were no motorcars – everything moved by horse or by pedal. By 1916 many Seattle cyclists had turned into motorists, and Seattle had some 16,000 cars.  By 1921, with the doughboys returned from World War I, there were about 48,000 cars in Seattle. By 1929 there were 129,000 cars on the city’s streets.  

Of the two billboards above the Virginian Tavern, the one on the left advertises next year’s model 1937 Buick for $1,099.  Figured for inflation, the price seems surprisingly affordable.  In today’s showroom, the sticker would convert to about $18.400.   It seems that despite the ongoing depression, if one had a good middle class job, it was possible to own the mobility and prestige of a brand new Buick. 

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, fellahs?   Ron Edge has put forward this week’s neighborhood links below – neither less nor more than nineteen of them, except that each is also bound to be packed with other links and so on and on.   I have not lifted so much.   It is, Jean, now nearly 5 am Sunday morning and I’m surrendering to my heart’s beating pleading for sleep.   However, should I survive the night I will return tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon to finish up this feature.  Now I lay me down to sleep . . . and the rest that passes all understanding.

THEN: The northeast corner of Belltown’s intersection of Blanchard Street and Fourth Avenue was about 100 feet higher than it is now. The elegant late-Victorian clutters of the Burwell homes’ interiors are also featured on the noted blog. (Courtesy John Goff)

THEN: Sometime between early December 1906 and mid-February 1907 an unnamed photographer with her or his back about two lots north of Pike Street recorded landmarks on the east side of Third Avenue including, in part, the Washington Bar stables, on the right; the Union Stables at the center, a church converted for theatre at Pine Street, and north of Pine up a snow-dusted Denny Hill, the Washington Hotel. (Used courtesy of Ron Edge)

THEN: Where last week the old Washington Hotel looked down from the top of Denny Hill to the 3rd Ave. and Pine St. intersection, on the left, here the New Washington Hotel, left of center and one block west of the razed hotel, towers over the still new Denny Regrade neighborhood in 1917. (Historical photo courtesy of Ron Edge)

THEN: Steel beams clutter a freshly regraded Second Avenue during the 1907 construction of the Moore Theatre. The view looks north toward Virginia Street.

THEN: An early-20th-century scene during the Second Avenue Regrade looks east into its intersection with Virginia Avenue. A home is being moved from harm's way, but the hotel on the hill behind it would not survive the regrade's spoiling. Courtesy of Ron Edge.

THEN: Before this the first shovel of the last of Denny Hill was ceremonially dropped to the conveyor belt at Battery Street, an “initial bite of 30,000 cubic yards of material” was carved from the cliff along the east side of 5th Avenue to make room for both the steam shovel and several moveable belts that extended like fingers across the hill. It was here that they met the elevated and fixed last leg of the conveyor system that ran west on Battery Street to the waterfront. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill. Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner. (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: Looking south from Pine Street down the wide Second Avenue in 1911, then Seattle’s growing retail strip and parade promenade. (courtesy of Jim Westall)

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THEN: In 1910, a circa date for this look north on First Avenue across Virginia Street, the two corners on the east side of the intersection were still undeveloped – except for signs. The Terminal Sales Building, seen far right in Jean Sherrard’s repeat, did not replace the billboards that crowd the sidewalk in the “then” until 1923. (Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: Thanks to Pacific reader John Thomas for sharing this photograph recorded by his father in 1927. It looks north across Times Square to the almost completed Orpheum Theatre. Fifth Avenue is on the left, and Westlake on the right.

Seattle Now & Then: Fire Station No. 5 (or ‘You’ll Like Tacoma’)

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THEN: This post-1889 waterfront block of sheds and ships was replaced in 1911 by the Grand Trunk Pacific Dock, described at the time as “the largest wooden finger pier in North America.” The exception was Fire Station No. 5 on the left at the foot of Madison Street. A brick station replaced it in 1913. (Museum of History & Industry)
THEN: This post-1889 waterfront block of sheds and ships was replaced in 1911 by the Grand Trunk Pacific Dock, described at the time as “the largest wooden finger pier in North America.” The exception was Fire Station No. 5 on the left at the foot of Madison Street. A brick station replaced it in 1913. (Museum of History & Industry)
NOW: The fourth Fire Station No. 5 was dedicated on a cold December 27, 1963. The chill was endured through a short ceremony that featured Ivar Haglund, the station’s neighbor to the north at Pier 54. Haglund sang a song of his own composition accompanied by the Firehouse Five Plus Two, led by Pep Perry a retired fireman.
NOW: The fourth Fire Station No. 5 was dedicated on a cold December 27, 1963. The chill was endured through a short ceremony that featured Ivar Haglund, the station’s neighbor to the north at Pier 54. Haglund sang a song of his own composition accompanied by the Firehouse Five Plus Two, led by Pep Perry a retired fireman.

Here is the last busy remnant of Railroad Avenue that was piece-by-piece constructed on the central waterfront following the city’s Great Fire of 1889.  This Webster and Stevens portrait of it dates, most likely, from 1909. By then most of the waterfront’s new railroad docks were in place, from King Street on the south to the Pike Street Wharf.  But not here.  This vigorous confusion of ships and sheds is the interrupting exception.

The Grand Trunk Pacific pier, far-left, seen from the Marionj Street Overpass, ca. 1911, the year it was constructed. South of Fire Station No. 3, which is still standing here, the Grand Trunk Dock replaced the irregular assembly of sheds and docks that mark the featured photo north of Colman Dock.
The Grand Trunk Pacific pier, far-left, seen from the Marion Street Overpass, ca. 1911, the year it was constructed. to the south of Fire Station No. 3, which is still standing here.   The Grand Trunk Dock replaced the irregular assembly of sheds and docks north of Colman Dock that mark the featured photo at the top.

The cluttered seaboard block, here at the front, begins on the left in the feature photograph with Fire Station No. 5 at Madison Street.  The purpose of its tower was for more than hanging wet hoses to dry — it also served as an observatory for the Harbormaster.  The station was one of four speedily built after the 1889 fire. The Snoqualmie, the city’s first fireboat, seen right-of-center in the featured photo with its dark double stacks, is parked here beside the station. Far right, reaching Railroad Avenue between Columbia and Marion Streets, is the east end of the new Colman Dock.  It was built in 1908-09 for the

Ca. 1900 front facade of Colman Dock before the waterside pier was extended in 1908/9.
Ca. 1900 front facade of Colman Dock facing a rough Railroad Avenue  before the bay-side  of the pier was extended in 1908/09.
The Snoqualmie posing beside a pier farther south of it's Station No. 5.
The Snoqualmie posing beside a pier farther south of it’s Station No. 5.

prudently expected crush of tourists visiting Seattle for the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exhibition.  The dock was replaced in the mid-1930s to welcome the Black Ball Line’s then new art deco ferry, the streamlined and yet generally trembling Kalakala.

The new ferry Kalakala imagined passing in front of the towered Colman Dock that was replace with the Art Deco dock, below, to compliment the "world's first streamlined ferry."
The new ferry Kalakala imagined passing in front of the towered Colman Dock that was replaced  with the Art Deco dock, below, to compliment the “world’s first streamlined ferry.”
The deco Colman Dock post-WW2 with a Welcome Home sign on the roof and Black Ball's flagship the Kalakala on the right.
The Deco Colman Dock post-WW2 with a Welcome Home sign on the roof and Black Ball’s flagship, the Kalakala, on the left.
Wade Stevenson's looks to the waterfront from the Smith Tower observatory circa 1959. Here the Kalakala is docked in t he slip between Pier 2 and 2, the "Alaska Piers." The Grand Trunk Pier, far right, is still in place. One of the ferries purchased from San Francisco Bay following the construction their of the suspension bridges, appreoached Colman Dock.
Wade Stevenson’s look to the waterfront from the Smith Tower observatory circa 1959. Here the Kalakala is docked in the slip between Piers 50 and 51, the “Alaska Piers.” The Grand Trunk Pier, far right, is still in place. One of the ferries purchased out of  San Francisco Bay following the construction  of the suspension bridges, approaches Colman Dock.

Not trembling was the most famous resident of this block, the Flyer, the sleek mosquito fleet steamer.  While its name is posted at the scene’s center, edging the horizon along the crown of a shed, the steamer is away, surely at work.  Its routine itinerary was back-and-forth to Tacoma, covering between sixty- and seventy-

The Flyer steaming north on Elliott Bay passing Belltown.
The Flyer steaming north on Elliott Bay passing Belltown. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
The Flyer Dock/shed at the foot of Marion Street. (Courtesy, Waterfront Awareness)
The Flyer Dock/shed at the foot of Marion Street. (Courtesy, Waterfront Awareness)

thousand miles a year.  It consumed about twenty-four cords of wood a day.  In the featured photograph at the top, note the firewood below and on the dock to the right of the  “…’ll Like Tacoma” sign.  The physically large but rhetorically modest sign was adopted by Tacoma boosters to lure fair-goers also to visit Commencement Bay and its “City of Destiny.”

The grandest of the "You'll Like Tacoma" signs was set along the north shore of Portage Bay for ready inspection from the AYPE grounds on the UW campus. Illuminated, its greatest effect was at night.
The grandest of the “You’ll Like Tacoma” signs was set along the north shore of Portage Bay for ready inspection from the AYPE grounds on the UW campus. Illuminated, its greatest effect was at night.  Capitol Hill is on the horizon.

Also below the sign is the Burton, the passenger steamer nestled between the Snoqualmie fireboat and the stacks of firewood.  The ninety-three-foot Burton’s raucous history gets sensational coverage in the “McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest,” edited by Gordon Newell.  With the also island-tending steamer, the Vashon, the Burton ran “one of the most bitter and spirited rivalries in the history of Sound steam-boating.”  Rate wars, races, pitched battles between the crews, and collisions “were the order of the day.”  You may doubt with me the most soiled of these dirty tricks: “the custom of a steamboat man of helpfully picking up a baby and carrying it aboard his craft on the theory that the mother would follow it and become a paying customer.”   

We have not as yet found the name for the nifty little port-holed steamer, front-and-center in the featured photo at the top.  We suspect that it was a patrol boat servicing the Harbormaster, and so also handy for chasing any sea-bound kidnappers that might first be spied from the tower. 

Another way to like if not reach Tacoma in 1909.
Another way to like if not reach Tacoma in 1909.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, guys?  Yes, Jean.  The sometimes shy  R. Edge has boldly brought forward some very relevant extras including more treatments or approaches to the featured spot, the  waterfront slip for Fire Station No. 5 at the foot of Madison Street.

THEN: Frank Shaw’s late winter composition of waterfront landmarks at the foot of Madison Street in 1963. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

THEN: In this 1887 look up Columbia Street from the waterfront is the bell tower of the fire station, tucked into the hill on the right. It would soon fail to halt the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. The station and everything between it and Elliott Bay were reduced to ashes, smoldering bricks and offshore pilings shortened like cigars. (courtesy, Kurt Jackson)

THEN: The driver, lower left, leads his team towards First Avenue up a planked incline on Madison Street. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: From boxcars and rooftops to the planks of Railroad Avenue, excitement builds for the ceremonial re-enactment of the S.S.Portland’s 1897 landing with its “ton of gold” on the Seattle waterfront, the city’s first Golden Potlatch Celebration. [Courtesy, Michael Maslan]

THEN:Ruins from the fire of July 26, 1879, looking west on Yesler’s dock from the waterfront. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

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Seattle Now & Then: The Waldorf Apartments

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THEN:
THEN: Encouraged by the rapid growth of Seattle’s business and retail districts to the north, the Waldorf, then the biggest apartment house in town, was raised on the northeast corner of Pike Street and 7th Avenue in 1906-7. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Beginning in the Great Depression of the 1930s, the “upper Pike” neighborhood of hotels and apartment buildings grew increasingly blue and seedy. The Waldorf endured until 9:05 a.m. on May 30, 1999 when it was imploded.
NOW: Beginning in the Great Depression of the 1930s, the “upper Pike” neighborhood of hotels and apartment buildings grew increasingly blue and seedy. The Waldorf endured until 9:05 a.m. on May 30, 1999 when it was imploded.

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The impressive speed with which the Waldorf Apartments were topped-off at seven stories was explained in the Times for August 19, 1906. “The building has been put up in record time…for the past few weeks work has been carried on day and night. The carpenters who have prepared the framework for the concrete have worked in the daytime and the concrete men have done their part at night by electric light. When completed the Waldorf will be the largest apartment house in the city and the equal in all respects of any similar building in the country. It will be ready for occupancy about Nov. 1” Not quite.

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The Waldorf Building Co. started soliciting reservations for its units late in October.  (see above)  The units had much to offer, including “first class janitor service,” night-and-day elevator service, and a laundry for tenants in the basement. The promotions warned that “satisfactory references (were) required.” Through the fall of 1906 the company almost routinely announced delays, until a few days before Christmas when it reported that the Waldorf was at last “ready for occupancy.” The formal opening, however, waited until the following March 27.

A clip from The Seattle Times for Nov. 25, 1906.
A clip from The Seattle Times for Nov. 25, 1906.

Diana James, author of Shared Walls, a history of early Seattle apartment buildings, pulled from her research a novelty connected with the Waldorf construction. “Each of the apartments is to be equipped with a peculiar device, an idea of Mr. Ryan (the Waldorf’s architect), for house cleaning, so arranged that any occupant of any apartment, by the simple attachment of a short rubber hose, can clean the apartment with compressed air in a few minutes’ time, driving all dust to the basement and eliminating the necessity of sweeping. This is a feature that so far as known has never been installed in any other similar building ever constructed.”

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The Waldorf's presentation in the booming publication "Prosperous Washington."
The Waldorf’s presentation in the booming publication “Prosperous Washington.”

Perhaps because of its bay windows, I’d always imagined that the Waldorf was an oversized frame construction. I did not look closely. Rather it was not wood but concrete, and the attentive press was pleased to report, “absolutely fireproof.” The International Fireproof Construction Company was the builder. U. Grant Fay, superintendent of the construction, was, like the hotel’s status-conscious name, yet another gift from New York City. The Times announced his spring of 1906 arrival while piling on more prestige with news that Fay had been “superintendent of construction of the Hotel St. Regis of New York City, said to be the finest hotel in the world.”

The namesake, sort of, or swank symbol made flesh with an expatriate who
The namesake, sort of, or swank symbol made flesh with an expatriate who is branded above as a “tuft hunter,” which – if you look it up – is one “that  seeks association with persons of title or high social status: snob.”  In exchange William Waldorf Astor had his millions and his hotel.  In 1890 with the death of his father, William Waldorf Astor became “the richest man in America.”  Also that year he began construction on his namesake hotel, after which  his cousin, John Jacob “Jack” Astor IV, built the adjoining Astoria Hotel in 1897.  Together they made the euphonious sounding Waldorf-Astoria, and misleading.   The cousins were rivals and not  in harmony.   Jack’s mother Lena acted as the guardian angel  of New York Society, and was in part responsible for William Waldorf’s flight to the old world with his new wealth, wife and five children. 

In the early stages of construction, the Waldorf was wrapped in class by the local media. As an example, on February 25, 1906, the Times included an architect’s sketch of the Waldorf among five illustrations for a full-page feature titled “Seattle, The Beautiful Metropolis.”

From the Seattle Times for Feb. 25, 1906.
From the Seattle Times for Feb. 25, 1906. – CLICK CLICK to enlarge.
The Waldorf remodeled its lobby in the midst of the Great Depression. This splotchy pulp print was featured in The Times for Nov. 24, 1935.
The Waldorf remodeled its lobby in the midst of the Great Depression. This splotchy pulp print was featured in The Times for Nov. 24, 1935.
The Waldorf, lower-right, with its
The Waldorf, lower-right, with some of its neighbors in, it seems, the 193Os.  The frame home, bottom-center and just left of the Waldorf, is featured in one of the now-then’s below – the second one from the top.. 

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, kids?  Thru the years Jean we have touched these surrounds and with Ron Edge’s help we will follow our custom and feature a few of them.   As is also, by now, our habit, there will be repeats.   You may treat these as pavlovian opportunities or as annoying stumps in the road and jump beyond any of these web extras while coughing and/or grumbling.

THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

THEN: A circa 1923 view looks south on Eighth Avenue over Pike Street, at bottom left.

THEN: The row house at the southwest corner of 6th Avenue and Pine Street in its last months, ca. 1922-23. (Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The city’s north end skyline in 1923 looking northwest from the roof of the then new Cambridge Apartments at 9th Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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THEN: Built in 1909-10 on one of First Hill’s steepest slopes, the dark brick Normandie Apartments' three wings, when seen from the sky, resemble a bird in flight. (Lawton Gowey)

THEN: We are not told but perhaps it is Dora and Otto Ranke and their four children posing with their home at 5th and Pike for the pioneer photographer Theo. E. Peiser ca. 1884. In the haze behind them looms Denny Hill. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

THEN: In the 32 years between Frank Shaw's dedication picture and Jean Sherrard's dance scene, Freeway Park has gained in verdure what it has lost in human use.

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN:The early evening dazzle of the Roosevelt Theatre at 515 Pike Street, probably in 1941. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898. Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The brand new N&K Packard dealership at Belmont and Pike in 1909. Thanks to both antique car expert Fred Cruger for identifying as Packards the cars on show here, and to collector Ron Edge for finding them listed at this corner in a 1909 Post-Intelligencer. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry.)

Great railroad signs, theatre signs and ranks of neon were still the greatest contributors to night light at 4th and Westlake in 1949. (Photo by Robert Bradley compliment of Lawton and Jean Gowey)

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THEN: Thanks to Pacific reader John Thomas for sharing this photograph recorded by his father in 1927. It looks north across Times Square to the almost completed Orpheum Theatre. Fifth Avenue is on the left, and Westlake on the right.

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: This rare early record of the Fourth and Pike intersection was first found by Robert McDonald, both a state senator and history buff with a special interest in historical photography. He then donated this photograph - with the rest of his collection - to the Museum of History and Industry, whom we thank for its use. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: A motorcycle courier for Bartell Drugs poses before the chain’s Store No. 14, located in the Seaboard Building at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Pike Street, circa 1929. (Courtesy Bartell Drugs)

THEN: Looking west on Pike Street from Fourth Avenue, the variety in the first block of this retail district includes the Rhodes Bros. Ten Cent Store, Mendenhall’s Kodaks, Fountain Pens and Photo Supplies, Remick’s Song and Gift Shop, the Lotus Confectionary, Fahey-Brockman’s Clothiers, where, one may “buy upstairs and save $10.00”. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

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The Waldorf polished near its end.
The Waldorf polished near its end.

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Seattle Now & Then: Mark Tobey in the Market

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Mark Tobey, almost certainly Seattle’s historically most celebrated artist, poses in the early 1960s with some Red Delicious apples beside the Sanitary Market in the Pike Place Market. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: Mark Tobey, almost certainly Seattle’s historically most celebrated artist, poses in the early 1960s with some Red Delicious apples beside the Sanitary Market in the Pike Place Market. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW:
NOW: The public market enthusiasts posing for Jean Sherrard on a Pike Place sidewalk are, left to right, Sara Patton, Ernie Dornfeld, Paul Dorpat, Jack Mathers, Heather McAuliffe, Paul Dunn, Kate Krafft and John Turnbull.

The posers in Jean Sherrard’s “repeat” are members of a new creation: the Pike Place Market Historical Society. By studied accord the members have concluded that Mark Tobey, the celebrated artist posing beside the artfully stacked Red Delicious apples in our “then,” prefigured their position.  Both are standing at the cusp of the ground floor of the Public Market’s Sanitary Market Building and the sidewalk on the east side of Pike Place.  At the top of their circle, Market merchant Jack Mathers, holding a crab, joins the historians. This fishmonger-musician has been stocking and selling at his steaming Jack’s Fish Spot since 1982. 

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Nellie Cornish
Nellie Cornish
Cornish at Harvard and Roy under construction. Like the later record of the completed school, this on also looks west on Roy.
Cornish at Harvard and Roy under construction. Like the later record of the completed school, this on also looks west on Roy.

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Mark Tobey first arrived in Seattle in the early 1920s, hired by Nellie Cornish, a respected piano teacher, to build a new visual arts department for her namesake school that was then primarily admired for its music and dance programs.  In his early thirties, Tobey brought with him from New York City some success working as a magazine illustrator.  It was long before he was often honored world-wide with solo shows and awards, including the Grand International Prize at the Venice Biennale of 1958.

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Tobey was largely self-taught and quick to revelations.  Most important of these inspirations was his “white writing,” an at once flat and floating atmosphere made from squiggles and brush strokes influenced by Oriental calligraphy and much else.  By the testimony of his students, Tobey was also a volatile mass of pedagogic pizzazz, at once attracting and repelling.  An early student, Viola Hansen Patterson, confessed, “He was full of tremendous energy, such energy he’d bowl you over — Almost blow you out of the room. I did take three lessons with him, and then I caved in. It was too much for me.”  

Another of Tobey at the Pike Place Public Market, perhaps on the same day and perhaps not.
Another of Tobey at the Pike Place Public Market, perhaps on the same day –  perhaps not.

A Post-Intelligencer photographer snapped the Tobey in the Market portrait  featured at the top, which is held at the Museum of History and Industry.  MOHAI photographer Howard Giske assigns it a deliberated date.  “That photograph of Mark Tobey was dated July 1961 by the PI staffers, but he seems overdressed for July…the dates recorded for the PI photos are often the file date and not creation date, so maybe just say 1961.”

Mark Tobey at 66.
Mark Tobey at 66.

Kate Krafft, second from the right in Jean Sherrard’s circle of Market historians, has written about Mark Tobey’s fondness for the Pike Place Market and the importance of his activism in its preservation.  “In 1939 and 1940 he spent many of his days in the Pike Place Public Market sketching produce, architecture and particularly the people of the Market. Between 1941 and 1945, he completed a distinctive series of pictures in tempera paint that were based on the prior market sketches, combining figurative work within the abstract-like maze of daily market activity. . . In 1964 the University of Washington Press published Mark Tobey: The World of the Market, a volume that included many of his Pike Place Market sketches and studio paintings with an introduction expressing his deep affection for the Market.” 

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Krafft continues, “Late in the hard-fought seven-year long campaign to ‘Keep the Market,’ Friends of the Market mounted a public initiative campaign. The campaign needed to finance television spots but lacked the necessary funds.” Here the by then famous artist donated 29 lithographs to the Friends.  This gift served, Krafft concludes, as collateral for “a bank loan that funded the subsequent television ad campaign. The November 1971 public initiative was approved by the citizens of Seattle, thus creating what is known today as the Pike Place Market Historic District.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, boys?  Certainly Jean, and again (and again) all are probably repeats in whole and in their parts.  We have put up a few features circulating about the Pike Market over the last few  months and so we again follow our common pedagogy that “repetition is the mother of all  learning.”  Sounds like Horace, but certainly I first learned it from my own mother, Eda Garena, Christiansen-Dorpat.

Ron Edge has again plucked forward  a few neighborhood features from the past, and following those we will use this week’s artsy temper as an opportunity to update our readers on the condition now of MOFA, our Museum Of Forsaken Art.   It is time now to join the membership.  As you will discover near the bottom all it takes is colored printer to produce an impressively official looking membership certificate and a witness for forge your name as your forge theirs.

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THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

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THEN: Seattle Architect Paul Henderson Ryan designed the Liberty Theatre around the first of many subsequent Wurlitzer organs used for accompanying silent films in theatres “across the land”. The Spanish-clad actor-dancers posed on the stage apron are most likely involved in a promotion for a film – perhaps Don Q, Son of Zorro (1925) or Douglas Fairbanks’ The Gaucho (1929) that also played at the Liberty. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

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THEN: Looking south from the Schwabacher Wharf to the Baker Dock and along the Seattle waterfront rebuilt following the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The Hotel York at the northwest corner of Pike Street and First Avenue supplied beds on the American Plan for travelers and rooms for traveling hucksters. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market. It had already been scheduled for demolition. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

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THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971. (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)

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One of a few thousand portraits I took from our apartment above Peters on Broadway (southeast corner of Broadway and Republican) in the mid-60s.
One of a few thousand portraits I took from our apartment above Peters on Broadway (southeast corner of Broadway and Republican) in the mid-60s.   We like the subject and her appointments, and the wear of the posters on the bus stop shelter wall behind her.  Notice that we have flipped this image from the posture the subject takes below in MOFA’s CERTIFICATE OF MEMBERSHIP.    Please join.   It costs nothing and promises nothing.  MOFA was first “announced” in late  October 2013 at an Ivar’s Salmon House Banguet at which the about 75 dinners attending were obliged to pay for their own salmon (Jean tells me that some skipped out leaving Jean to pay the charge.) and bring for donation a object of forsaken art to add to the Museum’s collection.  And all those attending were made members  – even the freeloaders.  You cannot discriminate.  While we mean to catalogue this growing collection and show it both on line and off, with descriptions and criticisms author by the members, we are, like you too busy to get at it.  However, we have continued to receove (and pursue) a lot of new works for the Museum, and we will sample a few o;f these below. 

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Find a colored printer and print the above. Instructions follow.
Now please find  a colored printer and print the above, and then  file it under, we suggest, MOFA. .  Other Instructions may follow.

FOLLOWS NOW A FEW NEW* ADDITIONS TO MOFA  (*While new to the collection, they may be otherwise old.)  Details regarding their sources (the artists), medium and size will be included in the work that we are having a difficult time getting to.   This, we assure you, is not because  we dread it.  We do not dread it.  Rather, we will be thrilled to do it . . . later.  (Might you be a interested in helping . . . please?)  If we know a title we will use it, but rarely do we know the artist.  A reminder –  these are, or rather were, forsaken and for reasons not explained.  Most of them were formerly objectionable objects de art, and some surely remain so.

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APEX COOP in Belltown, "before."
APEX COOP in Belltown, “before.”

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[Somewhere in Florida, we think]
[Somewhere in Florida, we think]
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[Something it seems created with the help of an early copy machine.]
[Something it seems created with the help of an early copy machine.]
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Artist's Sunday Softball at the Cascade Playfield in the late 1970s.
Artist’s Sunday Softball at the Cascade Playfield in the late 1970s.

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Above: The Blue Boy – Below:   The Blue Boy Copy

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Art glass made from broken pieces given to an impoverished glass class student by students endowed with glass. The result resembles a jig saw puzzle.]
Art glass made from broken pieces given to an impoverished glass class student by students endowed with broken bits of glass for which they  had no use. The result, if I understand it,  resembles a jig saw puzzle.]

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Utah Rock Art - variations
Utah Rock Art – variations on prehistoric tags

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Seattle Public Library front steps on Fourth Avenue, ca. 1940s - unless someone knows better..
Intentional Art Photography – Seattle Public Library front steps on Fourth Avenue, ca. 1940s – unless someone knows better..

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Dr. Fulller with his mother in front of their new SAM in the early 1930.
Dr. Fulller with his mother in front of their new SAM in the early 1930.

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A REMINDER – TWO HAPPY MEMBERS

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[Protest on Eastlake Avemie. ca. 1978.]
[Protest on Eastlake Avemie. ca. 1978.]
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A popular prof and subject, Edmund Meany - of the hall, hotel and publication of Washington place names.]
A popular prof and subject, Edmund Meany – of the hall, hotel and the publication of Washington place names.]

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GNOSIS
LAUGHING GNOSIS

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"COLD ROCK FORMAL WEAR"
“COLD ROCK FORMAL WEAR”

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"Guardian Angle"
“Guardian Angel”

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[A classic velvet]
[A classic velvet]
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Guatemalan Observer
Guatemalan Observer

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"Bouquet on Corless"
“Bouquet on Corless”

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Maltby Halloween, ca. 1977
Maltby Halloween, ca. 1977

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Kent Halloween, The Neely mansion, ca. 1968.
Kent Halloween, The Neely mansion, ca. 1968.

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Patriot Nebulae
Patriot Nebulae

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CONTINUING – and concluding for now – MONDAY 8/15/16

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Paved Figure Study
Paved Figure Study

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War & Peace Mandala
War & Peace Mandala

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detail: Pregnancy Timelapse ca. 1972
detail: “Word Made Flesh” – Pregnancy Timelapse ca. 1972

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Oval Office
Oval Office

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Tacoma Window ca. 1982
Tacoma Window ca. 1982

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Wallingford Flora - 4/19/10
Wallingford Flora – 4/19/10

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Second Ammendment on the Beach with Child
Second Amendment on the Beach with Child

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SAM - East Facade ca.1977
SAM – East Facade ca.1977

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REST IN PEACE - A painting by Paul Heald in Freelard storage, 2015

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TWEEDY & POP - VACANT INTERIOR, 6/8/09
TWEEDY & POP – VACANT INTERIOR, 6/8/09

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Lenin at The Finland Station
Lenin at The Finland Station

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BELOW – ART EDUCATION

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Victoria and Eric in Occidental Park - Art Night 1970s
Victoria and Eric in Occidental Park – Art Night 1970s

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Jean Sherrard (with camera, far left) and Friends at the Louvre, 2005
Jean Sherrard (with camera, far left) and Friends at the Louvre, 2005

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Art Sketching at Eagle Falls, 1927 (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
 Sketching Class (in heels)  at Eagle Falls, 1927 (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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Johanna Went performance, Pioneer Square ca. 1977
Johanna Went performance, Pioneer Square ca. 1977

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Art Criticism, Halloween 2012
Art Criticism, Halloween 2012

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Undecided Concerning Medium
Undecided Concerning Medium

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Frye Art Museum, 1952
Frye Art Museum, 1952

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Mrs. William D. Lovell dreamed she went to the Seattle Art Museum in her at-home wear ... and by golly she will at noon Thursday, when the Seattle Art Museum Guild has its annual spring luncheon and a lingerie fashion show. Mrs. Lovell, a member of the guild boards, and other guild members, will model fashions from the Pink Garter in Bellevue... The background art is by Morris Graves - three panels that are on long-time loan to the museum from the collection of Mr. And Mrs. Allen Vance Salsbury.
Mrs. William D. Lovell dreamed she went to the Seattle Art Museum in her at-home wear … and by golly she will at noon Thursday, when the Seattle Art Museum Guild has its annual spring luncheon and a lingerie fashion show. Mrs. Lovell, a member of the guild board, and other guild members, will model fashions from the Pink Garter in Bellevue… The background art is by Morris Graves – three panels that are on long-time loan to the museum from the collection of Mr. And Mrs. Allen Vance Salsbury. (ca. 1952, clipping from The Seattle Times)

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1962
1962

Now & Then here and now