The sundials in the Hôtel des Invalides

A part of the restoration of the Invalides’ southern façade of the “cour d’honneur” has been completed, and now we can see the magnificent sundials restored to their original condition. The Hôtel des Invalides was built in 1671 at the request of Louis XIV to host his veterans. It became the Army Museum. The upper dials date from around 1679, the lower dials from 1770.

The sundials give the local true solar time which is different from the time indicated by our watches. There is about a gap of 1 hour 9 ’20’’, knowing that I took my picture at 3:12 PM …

Les cadrans solaires de l’Hôtel des Invalides

Une partie de la restauration de la façade méridionale, de la cour d’honneur des Invalides est terminée, et l’on peut découvrir les magnifiques cadrans solaires restaurés à l’identique.

L’Hôtel des Invalides a été construit en 1671 sur la demande de Louis XIV pour accueillir ses vétérans. Il est devenu le Musée de l’Armée. Les cadrans datent d’environ 1679, les cadrans du dessous de 1770.

Les cadrans solaires donnent l’heure solaire vraie locale qui est différente de l’heure légale indiquée par notre montre.

Il y a environ une heure 1 heure 9’ 20’’ de décalage, tout en sachant que j’ai pris ma photo à 3 :12 PM …

The well-known domes of the Invalides garden

Les dômes bien connus du jardin des Invalides

La Cité fête ses 10 ans

(please click to enlarge photo)

For the 10th anniversary of the Cité d’Architecture, SpectreLab studio highlights some treasures from the collection of the Museum of French Monuments, one of the oldest museums dedicated to architecture. Here is the cast (scale 1) of the portal of the cathedral of Amiens (mid-thirteenth century). Lighting simulates polychromy as it could be defined from scientific research. Technology allows us the fascinating rediscovery of these kind of monuments as they were originally designed.

A l’occasion des 10 ans de La Cité d’Architecture, le studio SpectreLab met en lumière certains trésors de la collection du Musée des Monuments français, l’un des plus anciens musées dédié à l’architecture. Ici, le moulage (échelle 1) du portail de la cathédrale d’Amiens (milieu du XIIIème siècle). L’éclairage simule la polychromie telle que l’on peut la définir à partir des recherches scientifiques. La technologie permet ainsi la redécouverte passionnante de ces monuments tels qu’ils ont été conçus.

https://www.citedelarchitecture.fr/fr/article/sculpture-monumentale

Seattle Now & Then: The Swedish Club

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The first “permanent home for the Swedish Club at 1627 Eighth Avenue – between Pine and Olive Streets – was built in 1901-2. After a half-century in Seattle’s greater-retail neighborhood, the Club moved to its abiding home on Dexter Avenue overlooking Lake Union from Queen Anne Hill. (Courtesy, Stan Unger)
NOW: First replaced by another of the neighborhood’s many parking lots, the old home site of the Swedish Club is now reflecting the neighborhood from the glass curtain sides of a Hyatt Hotel.

Swedish Club, west side of 8th Avenue near Olive Street,

I’m pulled into this clutter of storefront commerce and small hotels that extend through about half of the west side of 8th Avenue between Pine and Olive Streets. Photographed in 1938, the year of my nativity, it offers attractions that I remember from my youth first in Grand Forks, North Dakota and then – beginning in 1946 – in Spokane.  Following Locksmith Snyder’s many keys and services, far left, are the 35 cent haircuts available from the Eighth Avenue Barber at 1619 8th Avenue, and Jackson C. Clifford’s Red Front Cigar Store, at 1621.  After that comes the modest front door to the Olive Court Apartments.   There Mrs. Sigrid Fales is in charge, equipped with a telephone.  Most likely, Sigrid was originally from Northern Europe, and as Scandinavian as her nearby neighbors directly across 8th Avenue, the Viking Tavern and Krono Coffee Shop, both at 1622 Eighth Ave.  And next door to Sigrid is her grandest neighbor, The Swedish Club.

The rear of the Swedish Club on July 6, 1924. Broadway High School is on the Capitol Hill horizon, far right. The rear of the Swedish Baptist Church at the northwest corner of Pine and 9th is also on the right but only two blocks distant. (CLICK to ENLARGE)
Looking south down the alley with the Swedish Club and one modern Ford from the 1950s.  A comparison with the earlier photo of the rear – the one sitting on top of this one – will confirm that they are the same although divided by about a quarter-century.   I once owned a Ford like this one – a used one.  
The front of the “old club” approaching its end on Eighth Avenue.  This too has its Ford.

“The Club,” as its many members called it, was the best evidence that downtown Seattle had its own “Snooze Junction” or corner, a variation on Ballard.  From the beginning the Swedish Club was an institutional reminder of the left homeland.  It was a profound and shared nostalgia that ran through its many banquets for fondly remembered traditional gatherings, and its choral concerts, dances, and opportunities for mixing and courting.  Also in a less secular line, neighborhood’s Gethsemane Lutheran, Swedish Baptist, First Covenant, Reformer Presbyterian, and others churches, were all Scandinavian  sourced congregations.

Looking north across Pine Street’s intersection with 8th Avenue. The Swedish Club is down the block and hidden behind hotel on the left. We feature this photo in an earlier Pacific and will interrupted this feature with the clipping.

This detail from a 1925 map includes the Swedish Club on 8th Avenue and a number of other structures that have appears in past features. East is on the top.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

The club was first organized on August 12, 1892 by recently arrived Swedes.  They were young and living in Belltown’s Stockholm Hotel.  It was a name chosen to attract them.  In spite of the economic crash or panic of 1893 and following, the club flourished, largely because there were so many migrating Swedes.  (Migrating Norwegian’s and Danes had their own clubs.)  Using the often generous contributions from members of the burgeoning Swedish community, the Club built its home here on 8th Avenue on its own terms.  Andrew Chilberg, the Seattle-based vice consul for both Sweden and Norway was a charter member and the Club’s first president.  He was also founder of the Scandinavian-American Bank: Seattle’s Scandinavian godfather.  Chilberg bought the property for the Club’s construction and half-century of use.  N.D. Nelson the partner in Frederick and Nelson Department Store, also helped with the club’s financing and first construction, as did Otto Roselead, the contractor for both the Swedish Club and the Swedish Hospital.  The dark brick façade with its ornamental banding and spiral scrolls or volutes, both seen in the feature photo, were soon added to the original frame structure when the neighborhood was regraded.

The Swedish Club in the 1950s.
Looking north on Eighth Avenue through its intersection with Olive Way. A municipal photographer standing on a roof directly across 8th Avenue from the Club recorded this in 1932 for some official reason.

The diverse flips in needs and interests that have understandably followed through the club’s now century and a quarter of service are typical for cultural institutions that have their origins in other hemisphere’s.  It has been long since members were more likely to join classes to learn Swedish than English.  Now sponsored group flights to the homeland are fast and for many affordable.   (Thanks to Club president Christine Leander for lots of help with this.)

The Swedish Club’s new home on Dexter Avenue in 1961. With the lights on and overlooking Lake Union it was designed to perform like a glowing ornament for those across the lake on Capitol Hill.

WEB EXTRAS

In the Hyatt’s glass curtains, from a slightly less oblique angle, we find a reflection of the lovely Camlin Hotel, recently featured in this column:

Camlin cubist reflection

Anything to add, fellahs?  Lots of past but not lost features Jean – all but two are from the neighborhood or near it but one of the two is named Anderson.  Let us hope that our readers CLICK TO ENLARGE.

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898. Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Built in 1910, Ballard’s big brick church on the northwest corner of 20th Avenue NW and NW 63rd Street lost the top of its soaring tower following the earthquake of Nov. 12, 1939.

THEN: Werner Lenggenhager's recording of the old St. Vinnie's on Lake Union's southwest shore in the 1950s should remind a few readers of the joys that once were theirs while searching and picking in that exceedingly irregular place.

THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

THEN: First dedicated in 1889 by Seattle’s Unitarians, the congregation soon needed a larger sanctuary and moved to Capitol Hill. Here on 7th Avenue, their first home was next used for a great variety of events, including a temporary home for the Christian Church, a concert hall for the Ladies Musical Club, and a venue for political events like anarchist Emma Goldman’s visit to Seattle in 1910. (Compliments Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Lawton Gowey looks north through the tail of the 1957 Independence Day Parade on Fourth Avenue as it proceeds south through the intersection with Pike Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN:

THEN: Built quickly in the winter of 1906-07, the Prince Rupert Hotel faced Boren Avenue from the third lot north of Pike Street. About fifty-five years later it was razed for the I-5 Freeway. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The city’s north end skyline in 1923 looking northwest from the roof of the then new Cambridge Apartments at 9th Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: The scene looks north through a skyline of steeples toward the Cascade neighborhood and Lake Union, ca. 1923.

Then: Photographed from an upper story of the Ford Factory at Fairview Avenue and Valley Street, the evidence of Seattle's explosive boom years can be seen on every shore of Lake Union, ca. 1920. Courtesy of MOHAI

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

MINOR-&-THOMAS-P-patch-THEN-mr

9th-&-Union-1937-tax-pix-THEN-mr

THEN: With her or his back to the Medical-Dental Building an unidentified photographer took this look northeast through the intersection of 6th and Olive Way about five years after the Olive Way Garage first opened in 1925. (Courtesy, Mark Ambler)

THEN: Named for a lumberman, and still home for the UW’s School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, the upper floor’s high-ceilinged halls, including the Forest Club Room behind Anderson Hall’s grand Gothic windows, were described for us by the department’s gregarious telephone operator as “very popular and Harry Potterish.” (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Tied momentarily to the end of the Union Oil Co dock off Bay Street, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship Maud prepares to cast-off for the Arctic Ocean on June 3, 1922. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Through its two decades — 1892 to 1913 — at the northeast corner of Cherry Street and Third Avenue, the Seattle Theatre was one of the classiest Seattle venues for legitimate theater as well as variety/vaudeville

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Around the corner from the club, a flatiron where Howell Street originates out of Olive just east of 8th Avenue. (We did a feature on this long ago but have misplaced the clip. It happens.)

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Nearby El Goucho in 1961 in preparation, flexing its beef for Century 21.

Seattle Now & Then: Olympia Beer on the Waterfront

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Nearly new, the Holden Warehouse on the left, and the bottling plant for Olympia Beer each take half of the block on the east side of Railroad Avenue between Virginia and Pine Streets.
NOW: The fence here is meant to temporarily keep traffic and pedestrians out of the seawall reconstruction zone at the shared waterfront foot of both Pine and Stewart.

The ambiguity of this waterfront corner is revealed by its signage.  In Jean Sherrard’s “now” the city’s green Pine Street sign only seems to rest on the wire fence in the foreground above the cyclist peddling the red bicycle.  Rather, it stands at the northeast corner of Alaskan way and – what? This is the point where both Pine Street and the linked Stewart Street, Olive Way and E. Olive Street, begin their forty-plus block course or two-plus miles east from the central waterfront (soon interrupted by the Pike Place Public Market) through Seattle’s slim waistline to Lake Washington

Here are  parts of two Sanborn real estate maps showing the point where Stewart Street reaches the waterfront – or nearly. The larger detail on the left is from 1905. The smaller one to the right dates from 1893 when there were still a good selection of sheds and shacks between First (or Front Street) and the tides.  The 1905 detail shows the north portal of the Great Northern Railroad tunnel.   I names the footprint of the concrete plant that was used for the construction of the tunnel’s thick walls and curved ceiling.  The 1905 detail includes the footprint of Holden’s Warehouse that shows in the featured photograph and what it describes as a “platform, partially burned.,”  That is the half-block where soon the Olympia Brewery’s bottling plant would be built.  Below: three years later – a detail from the 1908 Baist Real Estate Map.
Detail from the 1908 Baist Real Estate Map.

Although hard to read in this printing, there is also a sign for Stewart Street fixed to the southwest corner façades of the Olympia Brewery Bottling Works in the featured “then” photograph at the top.  The sign is just above the last wagon on the right, which puts it at the northeast corner of Stewart Street and Railroad Avenue. Perhaps for excitement or distraction during the Great Depression the last street name was changed from Railroad Avenue to Alaskan Way.  Some contending choices were Cosmos Quay, Sea Portal Avenue, Commerce Way, and one that came close to winning the contest, Seatlaska Way.

The north portal then (about 1904) and now (about 1984), The concrete mixing plan is evident in the lower photo to the right of the tunnel.   The HOTEL YORK is still standing on the left horizon.  [The York is described and pictured in or with the 13th clip that follows the feature’s lead text.] Because of the shaking that accompanied the building of the tunnel and  later its use, the York was condemned and razed sometime soon after this photograph was snapped by some member of the Duffy family.    
Hidden behind the Bottling Works was the north portal to the Great Northern Railroad’s tunnel beneath the city. The carving of the hole and blasting of about a dozen squatter’s shacks that were in the way began on April Fools Day 1903.  [See the clip below for a photo and description of this opening.]  The about mile-long tunnel was completed on January 2, 1905. The building of the Holden Warehouse on the left of the feature photo at Virginia Street soon followed and in the spring of 1906 the Virginia Street Dock across Railroad Avenue was built as a near twin to the Gaffney Dock its neighbor to the south.  (They are out of frame to the left.) As piers 62 and 63, both were ultimately cleared of their warehouses for creation of the concert pier that is now being improved for the new Waterfront Park.

The Gaffney and Virginia Street Piers, side-by-side.

Olympia brewer Leopold Schmidt’s bottling plant for his Olympia Beer was also built soon after the clearing of the tunnel’s north portal site of its buildings for mixing concrete and the narrow-gauged railroad used for moving the glacial till and other diggings extracted during the construction of the tunnel.  Throughout the month of August 1908 Olympia Beer inserted display ads in the local papers offering added meaning to its slogan, “it’s the water.”  This water, however, was not from the brewery’s vaunted artesian wells but from Seattle’s Green River watershed.  The ads are headed, “About Bottles” and continue  “First we soak the bottle in a cleaning solution, then it is rinsed, next it is washed three times inside, twice outside and again rinsed.  Then it is examined before being filled and if not absolutely clean it is rejected.”

A small display adver. pulled from The Times for December 10, 1907.
Appeared in The Times for August 21, 1912.

The work of cleaning bottles for beer was short-lived here.  Prohibition began in Washington State on January 1, 1916.  The delivery horse teams were sold and their teamsters laid off. By the time Olympia Beer was again filling its bottles in 1934 with more spirited waters, the brewery’s building at the mouth of the tunnel had been home to other businesses, most notably Belknap Glass, one of the city’s larger manufacturers of plate glass.

A 1934 – 1936 comparison of this part of the waterfront looking south from the Lenora Street overpass before and after the construction of the seawell between Mansion and Borad Streets.  .
Looking north from the Pike Street viaduct that used to cross here. By consulting the parked cars you might judge the accuracy of the caption that dates this Ca. 1945.   Note the armory on Western Avenue between Virginia and Lenora, upper-right.  

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Yes Jean, more of more from the waterfront side of the neighborhood.

THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market. It had already been scheduled for demolition. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/bell-st-bridge-then-web1.jpg?w=1165&h=699

THEN: Steel beams clutter a freshly regraded Second Avenue during the 1907 construction of the Moore Theatre. The view looks north toward Virginia Street.

THEN: An early-20th-century scene during the Second Avenue Regrade looks east into its intersection with Virginia Avenue. A home is being moved from harm's way, but the hotel on the hill behind it would not survive the regrade's spoiling. Courtesy of Ron Edge.

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: A circa 1920 look north along the tiled roofline of the Pike Place Market’s North Arcade, which is fitted into the slender block between Pike Place, on the right, and Western Avenue, on the left. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The Hotel York at the northwest corner of Pike Street and First Avenue supplied beds on the American Plan for travelers and rooms for traveling hucksters. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The driver, lower left, leads his team towards First Avenue up a planked incline on Madison Street. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: Frank Shaw’s late winter composition of waterfront landmarks at the foot of Madison Street in 1963. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: This post-1889 waterfront block of sheds and ships was replaced in 1911 by the Grand Trunk Pacific Dock, described at the time as “the largest wooden finger pier in North America.” The exception was Fire Station No. 5 on the left at the foot of Madison Street. A brick station replaced it in 1913. (Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: The ruins left by Seattle’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, included a large neighborhood of warehouses and factories built on timber quays over the tides. Following the fire the quays were soon restored with new capping and planking. A close look on the far-right will reveal some of this construction on the quays underway. (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)

THEN: Following the city’s Great Fire of 1889, a trestle was built on University Street, between Front Street (First Avenue) and Railroad Avenue (Alaskan Way). By the time Lawton Gowey photographed what remained of the timber trestle in 1982, it had been shortened and would soon be razed for the Harbor Steps seen in Jean Sherrard’s repeat. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: From boxcars and rooftops to the planks of Railroad Avenue, excitement builds for the ceremonial re-enactment of the S.S.Portland’s 1897 landing with its “ton of gold” on the Seattle waterfront, the city’s first Golden Potlatch Celebration. [Courtesy, Michael Maslan]

THEN: F. Jay Haynes recorded this ca. 1891 look up the Seattle waterfront and it’s railroad trestles most likely for a report to his employer, the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)

THEN: A circa 1912 look at the Wall Street finger pier from the foot, not of Wall, but Battery Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Pier 70 when it was still Pier 14, ca. 1901, brand new but not yet "polished." Courtesy, Lawton Gowey

THEN: Tied momentarily to the end of the Union Oil Co dock off Bay Street, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship Maud prepares to cast-off for the Arctic Ocean on June 3, 1922. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Mark Tobey, almost certainly Seattle’s historically most celebrated artist, poses in the early 1960s with some Red Delicious apples beside the Sanitary Market in the Pike Place Market. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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Listed from The Seattle Times, March 3, 1912.

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FULL DISCLOSURE 

Below we insert a copy of the original print from which this Sunday’s featured photo was cropped and retouched (i.e. polished).  [Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI]

 

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Paris Photo

 

Paris Photo is the great photographic event in November in Paris. For the 21st edition , the fair has selected 151 french and international galleries, and editors, under the Grand Palais glass roof. This rendez-vous attracts collectors and lovers from all the world. It is a fascinating ballad though early, modern, and contemporean regards from all the cultures.

Paris Photo est le grand évènement photographique du mois de novembre à Paris. Pour la 21éme édition, la foire a sélectionné 51 galeries françaises et internationales sous la verrière du Grand Palais et attire une foule de collectionneurs et amateurs du monde entier. C’est une ballade fascinante à travers des regards anciens, modernes et contemporains de toutes les cultures.

Now & Then here and now