First Avenue in Turmoil

Looking north up First Ave, from Main Street

For those who haven’t visited Pioneer Square recently, or traversed First Avenue, you’re in for a bit of shock. As the old fellah from Vermont once drawled, ‘Ya cahn’t get there from heah.’ Well…you can, but we recommend you take a bus and walk. Here’s a few photos of the upheaval, which is projected to last for many months  (of course, click to enlarge):

 

Seattle Now & Then: 3rd and Pike Looking East, ca. 1903

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Sarah Sophia Frye Bass, a pioneer Denny family granddaughter grew up on Pike Street in the 1870s. In her oft-read book Pigtail Days In Old Seattle, published in 1938, she noted “it is today the busiest street in town by actual traffic counts.”
NOW: In this contemporary look east on Pike Street from Third Avenue, little of the turn-of-the-century street survives.

With the number 677 inked, lower-right, on the original glass negative, this is an early exposure from the Webster and Stevens Studio. Loomis Miller was the last owner of this magnum opus (about 40,000 mostly glass negatives) which PEMCO purchased for the Museum of History and Industry in 1983.  The low number of this subject in MOHAI’S “PEMCO Collection” dates it very early in the twentieth century.  (I’m choosing a circa 1903 date until corrected.)

Pike Street runs left-right (west-east) in this detail pulled from the 1904-5 Sanborn real estate map. Third Avenue is on the left and Fourth on the right. Both the Heussy Building and the Abbott Hotel can be found in both the map and the featured photo. They face each other across Pike Street at  its intersection with Third Avenue..
A circa 1904 look south down Third Avenue from the south summit of Denny Hill, the site of the Denny Hotel, aka the Washington Hotel.  CLICK TO ENLARGE
Third Avenue looking north from Third Avenue with the Denny Hotel on the horizon but still closed. The photo dates from the early 1890s. The hotel opened to its first guest, Theo Roosevelt, in 1903. The Heussy Building, at the northeast corner of Third and Pike, is on the far right.
Heussy and his partner Filz advertise two locations for their Parlor Pharmacy, one in “old town,” on Commercial Street south of Pioneer Place, (aka Square), and the other on booming city’s new north end retail strip, on Pike Street and to its sides.  Parlor adver appeared in The Times for June 30, 1896.
With a little searching you will find optician Elliott’s fairly typical in the “then” hanging from the Heussy Buildgins above the sidewalk.

The photographer – perhaps one of the partners, either Ira Webster or Nelson Stevens – focuses east on Pike Street through its intersection with Third Avenue.  While I have just speculated with some confidence on the date, I have no idea what the purpose of the triangular contraption (a kind of designed street clutter on the left) is for.  (You will need to enlarge the scan to see this detail. ) With the aid of magnification one discovers that the wood frame holds two gears that may be connected to the large coil of rope partially hidden behind the second man from the left.  He is looking in the direction of the “SIGNS” sign attached to the corner of the ornate Heussy Building. Meanwhile, directly below him, another man, smoking his pipe, has improvised the coil as a chair, a modern-looking one.

Pike Street looking east from the northwest corner of Second Avenue to the nearly new Seattle High School on the Capitol Hill horizon in the early 1900s. One block north at Pike’s intersection with Third Avenue, both the Abbot and the Heussy can be found.  CLICK TO ENLARGE
Like the subject above it, this Robert Bradley photo was taken from an upper floor of the Eitel building at the northwest corner of Second Avenue and Pike Street.  A Woolworth has taken the old Abbott Hotel corner.
Looking south on Third Across Pike Street between two of the business district’s more affordable retailers, Woolworth’s and Kress.   The next photo below nearly the same point of view as the above, but from circa 1909.  The Addott Hotel is still on the left.
South on Third from Pike ca. 1909.
Yet another look south on Third Ave. and through its intersection with Pike Street. The long work of building the main post office at the southeast corner of Third and Union has not yet begun. The completed P.O. appears in the photo above this one.

Looking east on Pike (not in the photo directly above, which looks south on Third Ave, but in the featured photo at the top) we can make out, in the half-haze, the Capitol Hill horizon about a mile away.  The tracks in the foreground were a feeder to three Capitol Hill trolley lines: one that did not reach the summit, another that did on 15th Avenue and a third that went over it.  In the early 1900s tracks were not new on Pike Street.  In 1872, there was the narrow-gauge railroad that ran between the Pike

The citizens of Seattle got a free ridge on the first run of the coal railroad between, here, Lake Union and the Pike Street Coal Wharf and bunkers. This the first of Seattle’s coal railroads ran between 1872 and 1878.
The coal railroad’s tracks on Pike Street can be found – with a searching eye – in this detail from Peterson and Bro’s. panorama of Seattle taken from Denny Hill in 1878. The nifty home sits here at the southeast corner of Pike and Second Avenue. The rails run through the hand written “Pike St.” left-of-center in the detail. In 1878 the coal company abandoned the PIke Street-Lake Union route to Lake Washington with its new King Street Pier and a largely unimpeded run to the east side coal mines through Renton and around the south end of Lake Washington.

Street coal wharf and the south end of Lake Union. There coal from the east side of Lake Washington reached its last leg on prosperous trips to the fleet of coal-schooners that kept California stoked with our own Newcastle nuggets.  The coal was transferred from barges on Lake Union to the coal hoppers waiting at the railroad’s lake terminus, about a block east of where Westlake now crosses Mercer Street. In 1884 the horse cars from the Pioneer Square

Two of the rolling stock for Seattle’s first street railway pose in from of their livery at the northeast corner of Second Avenue and Pike Street sometime in the mid-1880s. The horses were replaced with cable railways and electric trolleys in the late 1880s.

neighborhood on Second Avenue first turned on to Pike on their zig-zag route to Lake Union.  In 1889 the four-legged horsepower was forsaken for electric trollies, which were scrapped in the early 1940s when replaced with gas and rubber.

Trolleys on Pike Street delayed by a break in a watermain. A feature for this from January 29, 1995 is included  with the Links gathered by Ron and Paul that follow next.

Both the Heussy Block on the left and the Hotel Abbott on the right of the featured photograph were prestigious three-story brick additions to Pike Street in the early 1890s.  The timing of their construction was one part fortuitous and the rest self-evident.  The booming of Seattle in the 1880s continued into the teens, and the city’s Great Fire of 1889, which was blocks away in the oldest neighborhoods and on the central waterfront, helped quicken the development of this the North End.

Detail from the 1884 Sanborn map ‘our’ corner of Third and Pike upper-left center. The Lutherans showing in the pan that follows are not yet in place.
A circa 1885 look south from Denny Hill into what was then still a residential neighborhood with a few institutions like the Territorial University on Denny Knoll, upper-left, and the Swedish Lutheran Church on Third Avenue, on the left.  It rests on the second lot north of Pike Street. Here both the southeast and northwest corners of Third and Pike are still only barely developed. Comparing this to the subject that follows, another look into the neighborhood, circa 1909, and a a quarter-century of boom-development is revealed, spread across what was a spread of residences.   
I’ve timed this ca.1909 because my knees ache, that is, I’m not getting up to find out if it is 1908. There are many clues including the deconstruction of the Methodist church at the southeast corner of Pine Street and Third Avenue, the work of adding floors to the Seaboard Building at Fourth and Pike, on the left, and the development of the Metropolitan Tract top-center. Let us know and we will fix this caption.

We find no motor vehicles on Pike in the featured photo because they were still rare.  On December 23, 1904;, the city’s Public Works Department counted the vehicular visits through Pike Street’s intersection with Second Avenue.  Nearly lost in the total count of 3,959, a mere fourteen were not pulled by horses.

WEB EXTRAS

Here’s a serendipitous, if unrelated, treat of local restoration. As I was strolling down 1st Avenue and Washington Street this afternoon, I caught a glimpse of an old friend, the harbor pergola back in its rightful spot.

THEN: The harbor pergola, built in 1918.
NOW: The pergola re-installed, after years of absence.
A King County tax photo from the 30s with detailed information about the structure

Anything to add, fellahs?  It is a swell surprise, your pergola.  I did not know that it was saved and probably restored for its next century – even.  I wrote more about this in The Illustrated History of the Seattle Waterfront – I think we named it.  You will find that – or can find it – among the list of books we have published and then also scanned for this blog.

The flood on Pike first appeared in Pacific on January 29, 1995.

Great railroad signs, theatre signs and ranks of neon were still the greatest contributors to night light at 4th and Westlake in 1949. (Photo by Robert Bradley compliment of Lawton and Jean Gowey)

THEN: James P. Lee, Seattle’s busy public works photographer of the early 20th century, recorded this 1922 look north from near the west end of Denny Way on the bluff above the then-forming Elliott Way. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN:The early evening dazzle of the Roosevelt Theatre at 515 Pike Street, probably in 1941. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: This rare early record of the Fourth and Pike intersection was first found by Robert McDonald, both a state senator and history buff with a special interest in historical photography. He then donated this photograph - with the rest of his collection - to the Museum of History and Industry, whom we thank for its use. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: Looking east on Pike Street from Fifth Avenue early in the twentieth century. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Seattle Architect Paul Henderson Ryan designed the Liberty Theatre around the first of many subsequent Wurlitzer organs used for accompanying silent films in theatres “across the land”. The Spanish-clad actor-dancers posed on the stage apron are most likely involved in a promotion for a film – perhaps Don Q, Son of Zorro (1925) or Douglas Fairbanks’ The Gaucho (1929) that also played at the Liberty. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: With her or his back to the Medical-Dental Building an unidentified photographer took this look northeast through the intersection of 6th and Olive Way about five years after the Olive Way Garage first opened in 1925. (Courtesy, Mark Ambler)

THEN: Looking south from Pine Street down the wide Second Avenue in 1911, then Seattle’s growing retail strip and parade promenade. (courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill. Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner. (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

THEN: Where last week the old Washington Hotel looked down from the top of Denny Hill to the 3rd Ave. and Pine St. intersection, on the left, here the New Washington Hotel, left of center and one block west of the razed hotel, towers over the still new Denny Regrade neighborhood in 1917. (Historical photo courtesy of Ron Edge)

THEN: Sometime between early December 1906 and mid-February 1907 an unnamed photographer with her or his back about two lots north of Pike Street recorded landmarks on the east side of Third Avenue including, in part, the Washington Bar stables, on the right; the Union Stables at the center, a church converted for theatre at Pine Street, and north of Pine up a snow-dusted Denny Hill, the Washington Hotel. (Used courtesy of Ron Edge)

THEN: We are not told but perhaps it is Dora and Otto Ranke and their four children posing with their home at 5th and Pike for the pioneer photographer Theo. E. Peiser ca. 1884. In the haze behind them looms Denny Hill. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: The Hotel York at the northwest corner of Pike Street and First Avenue supplied beds on the American Plan for travelers and rooms for traveling hucksters. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Looking west on Pike Street from Fourth Avenue, the variety in the first block of this retail district includes the Rhodes Bros. Ten Cent Store, Mendenhall’s Kodaks, Fountain Pens and Photo Supplies, Remick’s Song and Gift Shop, the Lotus Confectionary, Fahey-Brockman’s Clothiers, where, one may “buy upstairs and save $10.00”. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

THEN: Mark Tobey, almost certainly Seattle’s historically most celebrated artist, poses in the early 1960s with some Red Delicious apples beside the Sanitary Market in the Pike Place Market. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The Pike Place Market’s irregular block shapes and bluff-side topography joined to create a multi-level campus of surprising places, such as this covered curve routing Post Alley up into the Market. Here, in 1966, the “gent’s” entrance to Seattle’s first Municipal Rest Room (1908) is closed with red tape and a sign reading “Toilet room, closed temporarily for repairs.” The Market was then generally very much in need of repair. (by Frank Shaw, courtesy, Mike Veitenhans)

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The Denny Hotel, the landmark that waiting a dozen years for Teddy Roosevelt’s visit in the Spring of 1903 when it first opened as the Washington Hotel. . Before that it loomed down on the growing city a testimony to the stresses of business partnerships.

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Hear Ye, Jean has picked this as one of the about 100 features that will be included in our next volumn of now-and-thens. We are planning for you to purchase it for yourself and loved ones in the months before Christmas, some will call it and/or sing it.  (Blessed Bach). Please anticipate Jean’s “repeat” for now until then, and all else that will be included in this Fourth Volume, for which Jean and Clay Eales have conjured a new name, which they promise, will reveal their considerable talens for promotion.

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BELOW:

THIRD AVE ON THE OTHER – NORTH – SIDE OF THE DENNY AKA WASHINGTON HOTEL – Looking south across Blanchard Street.

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ANOTHER and probably DIFFERENT HEUSSY and ABBOTT looking across this feature column at each other.  One of the primary delights got with doing these Sunday features is the odd matter picked up with research, especially reading old newspapers.  Here are TWO EXAMPLES both pulled or picked from The Seattle Times archive.  The first is dated Feb 19, 1897 and reveals with the reflections of Dr. Lyman Abbott how far forward Darwin and his “truth of evolution”  have ‘evolved’  through the then still lingering 19th Century.  The second celebrates the decision of Dr. C.W. Heussy, a young medical doctor, to locate his practice in Seattle.

DR. ABBOTT

DR. HEUSSY (or is is Henssy or Heusey?)

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A Southern Exposure…

A short trip to sunny CA – just north of San Diego. A momentary respite from the rain and recent snow.

(as always, click to enlarge)

Take off over the N gate
Port of Tacoma
Mount St Helens
Reader’s choice
Leucadia surfer access
Beach property by Rube Goldberg
A Carlsbad canyon view
Carlsbad power
Buddhist garden by the seaside
Black Buddha blossoms
Nighty bears…

Seattle Now & Then: St. Francis Hall

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: From 1891 to 1909, the St. Francis Hall faced Spring Street on the second lot west of Sixth Avenue. The Hall was photographed by the Norwegian immigrant Anders Wilse in 1900 only weeks before he returned to Norway for photographic work that made him a Norwegian national treasure. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The Women’s University Club was built in 1922 with arched windows and its own ornamented side entrance on Spring Street.

When portraits of classes or entire student bodies became increasingly commonplace in the 1880s, a variation arose that required more work in the darkroom.  Some professionals offered a montage presentation in which the group portrait included, most often in a corner of the photograph or at other times stretched across the sky, a portrait of the school as well. (An example of such a montage with a pan is attached at the bottom of the blog.)  Our corner example in the week’s featured photo was recorded by one of the best photographers to have ever worked in Seattle, Anders Beer Wilse.

An Anders Wilse  portrait of the city council accompanying City Engineer Regi Thomson (secdon from the left) on a tour of the Cedar River gravity system water facilities in Seattle, this one in Kinnear Park. (Photo by Wilse, courtesy MOHAI.)

The nineteen-year-old Norwegian emigrated to the U.S. in 1884, first working with the United States Geological Survey, much of it in the mountains of the Northwest.  In 1897, the first year of the Yukon Gold Rush, Wilse did not ship north but instead opened his studio in Seattle. He was soon garnering prestigious jobs, such as photographing the construction of Seattle’s community water system that delivered fresh water to the city from the Cedar River.

The 1908 BAIST MAP detail above shows St. Francis Hall in purple-red, upper-right, with its last name “Woodman Hall.”   Across Spring Street from Providence Hospital it was also one block east of the then new Seattle Public Library.   In the 1912 BAIST MAP detail below the hall is gone, a victim of upheaval connected with street regrades on Spring Street and 6th Avenue.  

Francis Hall appears here across Spring Street to the left of Providence Hospital. The photograph was shot most likely from the then new Seattle Public Library and looks east across its back yard to Fifth Avenue. Note the verdant row of poplars bordering Madison Street on the right.  CLILCK TO ENLARGE

For this week’s feature, Wilse’s Seattle contacts took him to Rev. F.X. Prefontaine’s St. Francis Hall.  For the group shot, the photographer stood on the unpaved Spring Street a half-block west of Sixth Avenue.  That the students are generally divided by gender may be by Wilse’s or the teacher’s direction, or by the students’ own proclivity for herding.  The portrait is inscribed “class St. Francis School Seattle, Jan. 11, 1900.” The adult on the porch may be Elsie, which the 1901 Polk City Directory names the school’s teacher.

Regrading Spring Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue. St. Francis Hall is far-right. We wrote a feature on this and it  may be found below at the top of WEB EXTRAS waiting as one of the ‘Ron Clips’ of recent blog features.

Francis Prefontaine was Seattle’s first Roman Catholic priest.  With aid of both parishioners and protestants, in 1870 he built Our Lady of Good Help, the city’s first Catholic Church. (In 2017 we featured Our Lady twice in PacificNW, on March 12 and 19.) The gregarious priest built St. Francis Hall in 1890-91 and named it for the Italian saint known for his loving sermons to ‘all creatures great and small.’  That the original Seattle priest’s first name was also Francis may be considered a cheerful coincidence.

For Eleventh  hour uses of St. Francis aka Woodman Hall a long wood stairway was built up from the new Spring Street grade to the Hall’s porch.

As a secular priest, Prefontaine was not required to make a vow of poverty.  His uses of St. Francis Hall were diverse, and for a time in the late 1890s he lived there with his niece Maria Rose Pauze, who both edified and entertained her uncle with her piano playing.  She described him as “one to acquire property, clean it up and make a go of it.”  Other groups who rented the Hall from the priest were the Knights of Columbus, Professor Ourat (from Florence) with his dancing academy, dancing parties sponsored by the Adante Non Troppo Club, and late in the Hall’s life a fraternity, Woodmen of the World, who arranged to attach their name to the brick landmark.  One of the Hall’s last engagements is reviewed in The Times for March 10, 1908: “Knights of Columbus Make Merry at Woodmen of the World Hall . . . The crowd that attended taxed the capacity of the place.”  St. Francis Hall did not survive the nearly twenty-foot cuts that came with the 1909 Spring Street Regrade.

The penultimate-new Seattle Public Library, on the right, is under construction in this October 16, 1957 look east on Spring Street from Fourth Avenue. Two blocks up Spring on the left side beyond the Emel Motor Hotel (formerly the Spring Apartment Hotel) the Women’s University Club (site formerly for St. Francis Hall) rises in noon-hour shadows.  The Emel was renamed the Kennedy Hotel during the summer of 1969.  

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, mortals?  We welcome Jean back from his adventures in South California so near the variously scorned, beloved and broken border.

THEN: The home at bottom right looks across Madison Street (out of frame) to Central School. The cleared intersection of Spring Street and Seventh Avenue shows on the right.

THEN: The Metropolitan Tract's Hippodrome was nearly new when it hosted the A.F. of L. annual convention in 1913.

tsutakawa-1967-then

THEN: The city's regrading forces reached Sixth Avenue and Marion Street in 1914. A municipal photographer recorded this view on June 24. Soon after, the two structures left high here were lowered to the street. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

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DENNY SCHOOL CLASS (one of them) POSING IN PORTRAIT ON SCHOOL STEPS IN MONTAGE WITH SCHOOLS FRONT NORTH FACADE on the northeast corner of BATTERY and FIFTH AVENUE. 

Notice printed in The Seattle Times for January 7, 1929

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: Parades at 4th and Pine

(click to enlarge photos)

WE INTERRUPT Here at the TOP, but BELATEDLY –   with something we promised in The Times PacificNW printing of this feature but failed to fulfill – until now.  It is a look up Fourth Avenue before its and Denny Hill’s regrade.  We insert this photo (shot from the southwest corner of Fourth and Pike)  for a comparison between it and this Sunday’s featured photo of the parade scene, now the second photo below.  The tardy and intruding photo at the top looks north on Fourth Avenue, on the left, and the nearly new Westlake shortcut to Lake Union, on the right.  Pine Street passed left-right behind the triangular HOTEL PLAZA that was wedged between Fourth and Westlake.   Therefore, the first block showing in the parade shot is the same block as the first hillside block that ascends Denny Hill behind and to the left of the Hotel.  Get it?   It once got steep north of Pine but no more since the hill was flushed away.

THEN: Fewer than fifty years before this 1953 parade was photographed on Fourth Avenue, the block between Pine and Stewart Streets negotiated, barely, one of the steepest streets on Denny Hill.
NOW: On Saturday January 20, last, the second annual women’s march made its turn here from Pine Street north on to Fourth Avenue for its last leg to Seattle Center.

Here we compare Jean Sherrard’s confident and colorful farrago of the recent Women’s March with a manly marching band heading south on Fourth Avenue sixty-five years ago.  Its baton-wielding leader is entering the crosswalk of Fourth’s intersection with Pine Street. We have not found the name for this marching band, but hope that the uniforms might be clue enough for an astute PacificNW reader to let us all know.  We do know the occasion. It is the Memorial Day parade of May 30, 1953.

The same east side of Fourth Avenue only fifty-two years earlier during the 1911 Potlatch Parade. The Carpenters Hall was built by the local for the carpenters union and was also home for the Hotel Ritz.

The block-long line of businesses on the east side of Fourth includes, right-to-left, the Ben Paris, Raff’s Shoes, the Hotel Ritz, the Up & Up Tavern, Sherman Clay Co. music store, and last, at the southeast corner of Fourth and Olive Way, the still floating Mayflower Hotel.  On the out-of-frame west side of Fourth, the Bon Marche Department Store was a block-long point of prestige for its neighbors.

Years later the Mayflower Hotel at the southeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Olive Way and next to it the modernized front of the Sherman Clay Music Store.

Raff’s Shoes was, I think, an economy chain.  I remember purchasing a pair of Raff loafers at its Spokane branch, also in the early 1950s.  (I may still have them in storage.)  Carpenters Local No. 131 built the Hotel Ritz in 1906.  It continued to serve as a parody of the Parisian Ritz until well after WWII.  Next door to the north, the Sherman Clay Company was Seattle’s music mecca, selling not only instruments but concerts and tickets to them.  The coast-wide chain began in San Francisco around 1870.  In 1929, when the ornate home on Fourth was about to open, its Seattle manager ironically boasted – just before the Great Depression – “It will be more than a store. It will be a very real Cathedral of Music.”  Here on its marquee in 1953, more neon flash is given to radios than to pianos.  The Seattle store closed in the fall of 2013.  It was the last of the chain.

A Seattle Times clipping for Sherman Clay from July 25, 1920.

We’ll conclude this little cityscape sketch with the once very popular Ben Paris, the combo sporting goods store/restaurant on the far right.  We’ll quote from notes Seattle Time’s humorist Emmett Watson shared before his passing in 2001.  Emmett interviewed his friend Guy Williams, a wit and legend among local promoters and publicists.  Emmett asked Guy and Ivar Haglund, the fish restaurateur who sat next to him, “Where did you guys hang out in the 1930s?”  Guy answered, “Ben Paris.  Everyone was going there.  You could cash your check – if you had one.  Get your shoes shined.  Shoot snooker.  Play cards.  Get a roast beef sandwich with plenty of gravy.  I mean that was one great place . . . There’s been nothing quite like it. There wasn’t a phony thing about it. There were fighters in there, newspaper guys, politicians  Ivar answered “Oh, that was wonderful!”

The Whittelsys caught by a candid camera on April 17, 1937. Through the years of this feature we have used a few Whittelsy cityscape snapshots. The public works department employee and his poet wife lived on the north end of Capitol Hill.

WEB EXTRAS

My contribution this week, a few random shots from the Women’s March.

Coming down Pine
Cellphone photos abound
Wonder Woman marches too, impervious to cold and rain

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Anything more to add, kids?  Sure PaPa Jean, and more of the same or similar.  By now many of these should be familiar to our readers, recalling now that “repetition is the mother of all learning. (Our mothers taught us that.”  We will include at the bottom (or near it) MORE PARADES with terse captions.   First, Ron’s pulls of nearby and recent features.

THEN: With feet nearly touching the Madison Street Cable Railway’s cable slot, five “happy workers” squeeze on to the front bumper of an improvised Armistice Day float. (Photo courtesy Grace McAdams)

THEN: Thanks to Pacific reader John Thomas for sharing this photograph recorded by his father in 1927. It looks north across Times Square to the almost completed Orpheum Theatre. Fifth Avenue is on the left, and Westlake on the right.

THEN: Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill. Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner. (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: This rare early record of the Fourth and Pike intersection was first found by Robert McDonald, both a state senator and history buff with a special interest in historical photography. He then donated this photograph - with the rest of his collection - to the Museum of History and Industry, whom we thank for its use. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: A motorcycle courier for Bartell Drugs poses before the chain’s Store No. 14, located in the Seaboard Building at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Pike Street, circa 1929. (Courtesy Bartell Drugs)

THEN: Looking west on Pike Street from Fourth Avenue, the variety in the first block of this retail district includes the Rhodes Bros. Ten Cent Store, Mendenhall’s Kodaks, Fountain Pens and Photo Supplies, Remick’s Song and Gift Shop, the Lotus Confectionary, Fahey-Brockman’s Clothiers, where, one may “buy upstairs and save $10.00”. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

THEN: Lawton Gowey looks north through the tail of the 1957 Independence Day Parade on Fourth Avenue as it proceeds south through the intersection with Pike Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

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First appeared in Pacific, June 1, 2008
This ca. 1882 look south on Commercial Street (First Ave. S.).was photographed from the Occidental Hotel and like it everything in  photograph was destroyed during the 1889 Great Fire, except, of course, for the ruins.

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First appeared in Pacific May 11, 1986.  Hence the NOW above it thirty-one years old.  I shot is from a window in my friend and mentor CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE

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A circus parade looking north on Second Avenue from near Spring Street. The Denny aka Washington Hotel is on the horizon. We have long ago written a feature about this photograph but it is not yet scanned in toto, i.e. with text and the “now.”.

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POTLATCH PARADES SAMPLER

1912, First Ave. S. and Washington Street.
Potlatch Dad’s Day parade, looking north on 2nd Ave. to Marion Street.
1912 Potlatch parade totems, looking north on Fourth Avenue from near Virginia Street, the parade’s review stand is on the right and Denny School at the northeast corner of 5th and Battery on the horizon.

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1911 Potlatch parade with nearly new Central Building. Courtesy Michael Maslan
Fruit Harvest Float on Fourth Avenue, 1911 Potlatch Parade.

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PREPAREDNESS DAY PARADE, JUNE 10, 1916 (Warming for WWI)

DOUBLE-CLICK to ENLARGE. The Seattle Union Record’s take on preparations for the 1916 Preparedness Day Parade. This may remind you of Trump’s proposed military parade.
Looking north on First Ave. fro Seneca Street. We did a feature on this too, but like many others it is not yet scanned in toto.

A rare example of a pre-Jean NOW. I shot this for the Sept 17, 2006 feature. By then Jean and I were momentarily mixing the responsibility of the “nows.” Soon after this he would “take it over.”

The 1916 Preparedness Parade in Pioneer Square aka Place.

INDEPENDENCE DAY ON PIONEER PLACE (aks Square) ca 1900

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MORE MILITARY PARADING

Looking south on 4th Avenue over Stewart Street and Olive Way beyond it. The Time Square building – once the home of this newspaper – enters, barely, on the far right. I once knew the occasion for this marching and hope to sometime know again.
A Word War I hoopla to recruit investors more than soldiers – it seems, at least, from the banner on the side of the parading tank.  This was among a handful of Wesbster and Stevens prints that Old Seattle Paperworks proprietor John Hanawalt shared with me early on in my search for regional historical photos.   Thanks again John.  His shot is still busy on the Public Market’s lower level.

FAUX MILITARY PARADING

Looking south on Second Avenue through the Knights Templar arch built at the intersection with Marion Street, 1925.. 

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TWO PRESIDENTS OF THESE UNITED STATES

President Harding in Belltown.
More of Harding on July 27, 1923. Not feeling well he died in San Francisco a week later on August 2, 1923. (Courtesy, U.W.Northwest Collection aka Special Collections. )
Pres. Harry Truman in Seattle for his 1948 campaign. 

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And NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT – A PIONEER PARADE IN RITZVILLE, WA.  Jean recorded the “now” for our book (now long out of print) of “Washington State Then and Nows”.  Jean is currently at work on a fourth volume of SEATTLE NOW AND THENs, except it wont be titled so.  Here’s Ritzville on our visit a few years back.  To catch the red-suited marching band, Jean’s NOW is a bit wider than the THEN.

Ritzville’s Pioneer Tower and Modern Art at Washington and Main.

 

 

Happy New Year!

(as always, click to enlarge photos)

While the lunar new year (of the dog!) doesn’t actually begin until this coming Friday, festivities were begun today in the International District. Your faithful Now & Then operative was there to record a few repeat photos, but got caught up in the fun…

Using his 21′ extension pole, Jean shot high above the crowd looking west towards the King Street station
Lion dancers about to parade through the streets. Firecrackers are crackling behind Jean’s back.
Minutes later, Mayor Jenny Durkan arrives to kick off the celebration. Her young, somewhat tentative companion helped feed the lions

Seattle Now & Then: Cornish School Construction, 1921

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Cornish School under construction in 1921 at its new campus at Harvard Avenue and E. Roy Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The arts academy’s “purpose-built” home is named Kerry Hall for the philanthropist Mrs. A.S. Kerry, who co-founded the Music and Art Foundation that ran Cornish School as a non-profit.
Cornish, a few years later aka “in the 1920s.”

11th Hour investing in Cornish construction. An adver clip from The Times for March 14, 1921.
Advers from June 30, 1921 include the announcement that the Cornish move off Broadway to Harvard would be delayed but for only a few days.
A clip from The Times for July 10, 1921
Another Times clip from July 10, 1921.
The Times summary of some of the events connected with the school’s dedication.  A Times clip from July 24,1921.
Nellie Cornish

Construction for the new campus of ‘The Cornish School for Drama, Music, Dance’ began on the first day of 1921.  The work was rushed forward so that the school could open early in September, on time for the still young institution’s eighth season.  Perhaps predictably, in late summer agents with homes to sell or apartments to rent in the neighborhood enhanced with this new landmark, began running classifieds for their properties with the message “near Cornish School” in both The Times and The Post-Intelligencer.  That enticing landmark is under construction in this week’s “then,” although its bricks are not yet adorned with the ornamental tiles and stucco skin that still define its Spanish Colonial lines.

Cornish was founded in 1914 on Capitol Hill in the Booth Building at the SE corner of E. Pine and Broadway, less than a mile south of its new campus. (see below)  After a year, in the summer of 1915, it featured two studios, five teachers and eighty pupils.  The growth was impressive. Five years later when the enlarged and relocated academy was being planned and the cash to build it first pursued, the school held twenty-seven studios serving 1,154 pupils, led by twenty-six teachers.  These halls of ivy then sometimes surely resonated with the reflecting sounds of rehearsing students.  (I remember well that joyful, on the whole, noise in the early 1970s when I taught filmmaking to Cornish students, most of whom, like myself, could not afford to make films.)

This school of “allied arts” was founded by its namesake, the confident pedagogue-pianist Nellie Cornish.  As late as the 1970s the often-convivial tone of her directions were still remembered by some as sometimes comedic.  For instance, at one of the Sunset Club’s Masquerades Nellie proved her sense of humor when she won the “funniest costume” award.  Cornish also frequently gave lectures, many of them before the city’s applauded Ladies Musical Club.  (Would that there then had been smart phones with digital recorders.)

The Roy Street entrance to the Women’s Century Club served for about a quarter century as the  popular door into Jim Osteen and Art Bernsstein’s (respectively, left and right), Harvard Exit Theatre.

For the featured photographs at the top both photographers aimed northwest from the fortunately irregular Capitol Hill intersection of E. Roy Street and Harvard Avenue.  Following the Cornish example, this part of the Capitol Hill neighborhood became sophisticatedly snug when joined by the Woman’s Century Club and the Rainier Chapter of the D.A.R. (both built in 1925), and architect Arthur Loveless’s charming Studio Building.  Historylink’s principal founder, Walter Crowley, describes the last in his National Trust Guide to Seattle (1998), as a “delightful mimic” of England’s Cotswold villages.  Crowley notes that to the north and west of this prospect are the admired homes that make this Seattle’s only residential preserve, the Harvard-Belmont Landmark District.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, boys?  For sure Jean, and Ron will start again with some recent* features  and I’ll follow with some scans from older clippings. (*Since we started the blog about  ten  years ago.  Jean will know, but he sleeps.)

 

THEN: The Volunteer Park water tower was completed in 1907 on Capitol Hill’s highest point in aid the water pressure of its service to the often grand homes of its many nearly new neighbors. The jogging corner of E. Prospect Street and 15th Avenue E. is near the bottom of the Oakes postcard. (Historical Photo courtesy Mike Fairley)

THEN: Both the grading on Belmont Avenue and the homes beside it are new in this “gift” to Capitol Hill taken from the family album of Major John Millis. (Courtesy of the Major’s grandchild Walter Millis and his son, a Seattle musician, Robert Millis.)

broadway-widening-1blog

THEN: Looking across Capitol Hill’s Broadway Avenue during its 1931adjustments. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

Holy Names THEN

THEN: A circa 1923 view looks south on Eighth Avenue over Pike Street, at bottom left.

THEN: Most likely in 1902 Marcus M. Lyter either built or bought his box-style home at the northwest corner of 15th Avenue and Aloha Street. Like many other Capitol Hill addition residences, Lyter's home was somewhat large for its lot.

yesler-way-umpire-day

THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)

THEN: We have by three years or four missed the centenary for this distinguished brick pile, the Littlefield Apartments on Capitol Hill. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: An early portrait, circa 1911, of The Silvian Apartments, one of Capitol Hill’s abiding architectural jewels. (Courtesy, Bill Burden)

THEN: A carpenter’s jewel with Victorian ornaments recorded by a tax assessor’s photographer in 1936, nestles at 615 Eastlake beside the surviving Jensen Apartments, aka the O’Donnell Building, on the left. (Courtesy Stan Unger)

THEN: The ‘Seattle showplace’ Rhodes mansion on Capitol Hill, ca. 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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First appeared in Pacific on March 31, 2002

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First printed in The Times on March 3, 2002

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First appeared in Pacific on Sunday January 21, 1990.

Now & Then here and now