Seattle Now & Then: The St. James Dome Collapse

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Of the three largest Seattle roofs – the Alki Point Natatorium, a grandstand section of the U.W.’s Denny Field, and the St. James Cathedral dome - that crashed under the weight of the “Northwest Blizzard” in February 1916, the last was the grandest and probably loudest. It fell “with a crashing roar that was heard many blocks distant.” (Courtesy Catholic Archdiocese.)
THEN: Of the three largest Seattle roofs – the Alki Point Natatorium, a grandstand section of the U.W.’s Denny Field, and the St. James Cathedral dome – that crashed under the weight of the “Northwest Blizzard” in February 1916, the last was the grandest and probably loudest. It fell “with a crashing roar that was heard many blocks distant.” (Courtesy Catholic Archdiocese.)
NOW:
NOW: Jean Sherrard looks down through St. James Cathedral’s oculus, or ‘God’s Eye,’ during the special centennial service commemorating the dome’s collapse, which fortunately occurred on a Wednesday when no one was at church.
I confess to having first used this rousing photo of the snow-doomed-dome of St. James Cathedral for a Pacific feature on March 17, 1983.  (We will include it at the very bottom of what follows.)  It was, however, not that Sunday’s “THEN” photo, which was a portrait of the intact cathedral, but played instead a supporting although still dominating role in the feature.  Had Jean Sherrard been taking our ‘nows’ in 1983, it might have been different, for he embraces exposed heights that I shunned then and now.  

StJames-ContractoCannonWEB

John McCoy, past archdiocesan spokesman and author of A Still and Quiet Conscience, a biography of Seattle Archbishop Emeritus Raymond G. Hunthausen, first alerted us to the decision of the archdiocese to create a centennial commemoration of the dome’s fall.  I next called Maria Laughlin, Director of Stewardship at St. James, to ask about the possibility of repeating the hole-in-the-dome shot from the Big Snow of 1916 during the commemorative service. She asked, “How does Jean feel about heights?”  After I listed some of his ascents, she agreed to introduce Jean to Brenda Bellamy who would serve as his guide.   Here’s Jean’s recap of the climb.

VB john mccoy

“After reaching the rooftop, we clambered through a small exterior door leading into the ‘attic.’ To avoid interrupting the centennial service below, we crept along catwalks and ramps in near darkness. Squeezing between struts and support beams, we climbed several ladders to reach our final destination: the oculus, a twelve-foot- (I’m guessing here) wide circular opening directly above the altar of the cathedral.  My guide had already hoisted a snowmaking machine up onto the opposite side of the oculus, waiting for a dramatic, if necessarily truncated, recreation of the Big Snow of 1916 during the service.

St. James Cathedral
St. James Cathedral – ABOVE & BELOW the original altar, before the crash. [Mea Culpa: I made the same mistake three times – here and the two photos following – of describing them all as records of St. James before the 1916 flop.  They are rather the repaired St. James that followed the dome’s collapse.  We learned this from Joseph Adam, a helpful agent of St. James itself.  Thanks Joseph.  We [well I, Paul Dorpat] will not do it again .  Jean is clean and stays so.)  
The main altar and Sanctuary. The main altar was dovated by Mrs. Elizabeth Foss. The ***** and Foss altar railing ***** the gift of Mr. Patrick J. Henry in memory of his mother Michael J. Henry.
The main altar and Sanctuary.
The main altar was dovated by Mrs. Elizabeth Foss. The ***** and Foss altar railing ***** the gift of Mr. Patrick J. Henry in memory of his mother Michael J. Henry.

“I scooted around the upper outside edge of the oculus. While below us readers, quoting from newspaper accounts of the day, told the thrilling story of the dome’s collapse, I tried out different angles for our repeat. Particular culpability was ultimately reserved for the New York City engineers or fabricators who had assembled the dome’s flawed superstructure.  It was allowed that Seattle and the Good Lord were blameless.  At an appropriate moment, the lights dimmed and Brenda Bellamy switched on the snow-maker, sending a small blizzard of flakes down through the oculus and over the altar below. We then returned to the cathedral floor, where young Irish dancers were entertaining the congregants to the sound of pipes.”

Raised a Protestant, the centennial show has made me consider conversion.

St. James Cathedral - The original organ loft, before the crash.
St. James Cathedral – The original organ loft, before the crash.
The organ after the crash - looking west from the chancel.
The organ after the crash – looking west from the chancel.
The same (or nearly) point-of-view as the photograph above this one. This was taken in 2005 by Paul, weeks before Jean started to increasingly record the "nows" for this feature.
The same (or nearly) point-of-view as the photograph above this one. This was taken in 2005 by Paul mere weeks before Jean started to increasingly record the “nows” for this feature.  “What an improvement – and relief.”  [Paul quoted]

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Fra Paul? Brother Ron?  Yes, and we can promise you and the readers more twin towers.  We start, again, with Ron’s pull of relevant features – including on Protestant (3rd up from the bottom of the “Ron Links”) mixed in with a few more Catholics –  posted here since we began doing these weekly duties.   Then we will attach a few features from the distant past – again relevant ones.  (And we will surely miss a few of the many First Hill features we have managed to assemble over the past thirty-four years.*)

THEN: A circa 1923 view looks south on Eighth Avenue over Pike Street, at bottom left.

Holy Names THEN

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/1-future-courthouse-site-1937-web1.jpg?w=1144&h=738

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN: Constructed in 1890 as the Seattle Fire Department’s first headquarters, these substantial four floors (counting the daylight basement) survived until replaced by Interstate Five in the 1960s. (photo by Frank Shaw)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/zindorf-apts-714-7th-ave-mf1.jpg?w=735&h=923

THEN:

THEN: The city's regrading forces reached Sixth Avenue and Marion Street in 1914. A municipal photographer recorded this view on June 24. Soon after, the two structures left high here were lowered to the street. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: Harborview Hospital takes the horizon in this 1940 recording. That year, a hospital report noted that "the backwash of the depression" had overwhelmed the hospital's outpatient service for "the country's indigents who must return periodically for treatment." Built in 1931 to treat 100 cases a day, in 1939 the hospital "tries bravely to accommodate 700 to 800 visits a day."

THEN: Looking west on Madison Street from Seventh Avenue circa 1909. (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)

sorrento-late-construction-WEB

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Saint-Edwards-then-web

St.-Edwards-Now-WEB

First appeared in Pacific,
First appeared in Pacific, November 7, 2004

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A-St.-Anne-on-Lee-St.-web

First appeared in Pacific, November 26, 1995.
First appeared in Pacific, November 26, 1995.

x St. Anne's now WEB

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_Benedict-wallingford-web

St. Benedict's Wurst for 2011. CLICK TO ENLARGE
St. Benedict’s Wurst for 2011. CLICK TO ENLARGE

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First appeared in Pacific, September 2, 2001.
First appeared in Pacific, September 2, 2001.

Outcropping-of-Bad-Blood-ST-1904-web

Blood-and-Hearing-test,-WEB

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St. Josephs when nearly new. 18th and Aloha.
St. Josephs when nearly new. 18th and Aloha.

St.-Josephs-on-Aloha-now

First appeared in Pacific, April 13, 1999.
First appeared in Pacific, April 18, 1999.
St. Joseph's interior
St. Joseph’s interior

=======

1907 – 2007

Saint James 1907 dedication, looking southeast thru the intersection of 9th Avenue and Marion Street.
Saint James 1907 dedication, looking southeast thru the intersection of 9th
Avenue and Marion Street.
Temporary illuminated date for the 2007 Saint James Centennial.
Temporary illuminated date for the 2007 Saint James Centennial.

======

THE DAY THE DOME FELL

From the Seattle Times for March 27, 1983

CLICK TWICE TO ENLARGE
CLICK TWICE TO ENLARGE

Seattle Now & Then: Albert Braun’s Brewery in Georgetown

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Extended thanks to Ron Edge and his maps and aerials for properly siting Braun’s Brewery, to collector Dan Kerlee for letting us use this company portrait, and to Gary Flynn, the Bellingham-based breweriana collector and brewery historian.
THEN: Extended thanks to Ron Edge and his maps and aerials for properly siting Braun’s Brewery, to collector Dan Kerlee for letting us use this company portrait, and to Gary Flynn, the Bellingham-based breweriana collector and brewery historian.
NOW: Because of Boeing Field restrictions, Jean Sherrard’s “now” was taken from a prospect closer to the line-up of brewery employees and their families in the “then,” than to the unidentified historical photographer.
NOW: Because of Boeing Field restrictions, Jean Sherrard’s “now” was taken from a prospect closer to the line-up of brewery employees and their families in the “then,” than to the unidentified historical photographer.

Albert Braun arrived from Iowa soon after Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889.  Or perhaps before.  I we can trust the photo published below, Braun was here on the day of the fire and enjoying come cold beers at the beer garden that was then open at Pike Street and Front Street (First Avenue).  The caption to his piece of Seattle Times nostalgia from 1934 makes some spirited claims.  

The man sitting far left is identified as Albert Braun in this March 8, 1934 citizen-shared clipping from The Seattle Times.
The man sitting far left is identified as Albert Braun in this March 8, 1934 citizen-shared clipping from The Seattle Times.  The caption is worth reading in toto.  

Whether before the Great First or after it, within a year-and-a-half of the young German immigrant’s arrival here, with financial help from local and mid-western investors, Albert Braun built this brewery about two miles south of Georgetown.  The then still serpentine Duwamish River is hidden behind the brewery.  Directly across the river, on its west side and also hidden, was the neighboring community of South Park.  Braun’s name is emblazoned on the brewery’s east façade, and so it was best read from the ridge of Beacon Hill and from the trains on the mainline railway tracks below.

Well into the 20th Century when the reproduction of photographs in publications left much to be desired, it was typical for businesses of size to use litho depictions of their homes and plants. This one of Braun's brewery is peculiar. I includes structures that are not in the photo at the top but almost surely would have been include had they be build by the time of its recording. Also the litho puts Mount Rainier - if that is what it is - to the northwest of the brewery when it was the opposite. But then (and now) who is checking?
Well into the 20th Century when the reproduction of photographs in publications left much to be desired, it was typical for businesses of size to use litho depictions of their homes and plants. This one of Braun’s brewery is peculiar. It includes structures (far left) that are not in the photo at the top but almost surely would have been include had they been built by the time of its recording. Also the litho puts Mount Rainier – if that is what it is – to the northwest of the brewery when it was the opposite. But then (and now) who is checking?  (Courtesy, Gary Flynn)

The brewing began here mid-December 1890, and the brewery’s primary brands, Braun’s Beer, Columbia Beer, and Standard Beer, reached their markets late in March of 1891.  The 1893 Sanborn Fire Insurance map for Seattle includes a footprint of the plant that is faithful to this undated photograph.  The map’s legend notes that the buildings were “substantial, painted in and outside” with “electric lights and lanterns” and that a “watchman lives on the premises.”  It also reveals, surprisingly, that the brewery was “not in operation” since July of that year. What happened?

A detail of the 1893 Sanborn map is printed in the bottom-right corner. Running left-right through the middle of the montage is a detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map, and on the top is a detail from the current GoogleEarth space shot of the old brewery site. (Thanks to Ron Edge for assembling this.)
A detail of the 1893 Sanborn map is printed in the bottom-left corner. Running left-right through the middle of the montage is a detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map, and on the top is a detail from the current GoogleEarth space shot of the old brewery site. (Thanks to Ron Edge for assembling this.)  CLICK to ENLARGE

The economic panic of 1893 closed many businesses and inspired a few partnerships, too.  Braun’s principle shareholders partnered his plant with two other big beer producers, the Claussen Sweeney and Bay View breweries, to form the Seattle Brewing and Malting Co.  Braun’s landmark was then designated as “Albert Braun’s Branch.”  Of the three partnering breweries, this was the most remote, and it was largely for that reason – combine with the year’s panic – , it seems, that it was soon closed.  The upset Braun soon resigned, sold most of his interests in the partnership, and relocated in Rock Island, Illinois.  There, in quick succession – or simultaneously – he started work on a new brewery and fell in love, but with tragic results.  Early in 1895 (or late in 1894, depending) Albert Braun committed suicide, reportedly “over a love affair.”  

Pulled from the Seattle Times for October 1, 1899.
Pulled from the Seattle Times for October 1, 1899.

For six years this tidy Braun brewery beside the Duwamish River stood like a museum to brewing, but without tours.  Practically all the machinery was intact, from its kettles to its ice plant, until the early morning of Sept 30, 1899, when The Seattle Times reported “the nighthawks who were just making their way home and the milkmen, butchers and other early risers were certain that the City of Tacoma was surely being burned down.”  They were mistaken. It was Braun’s five-story brewery that was reduced to smoldering embers.  The plant’s watchman had failed that night to engage the sprinkler system that was connected to the tank at the top of the five-story brewery. The eventually flame-engulfed tank, filled with 65,000 gallons of river water, must have made a big splash. 

A clip pulled from The Seattle Times for August 11, 1900.
A clip pulled from The Seattle Times for August 11, 1900.

There is at least a hint that the brewery grounds were put to good use following the fire.  The Times for August 11, 1900, reports that the teachers of the South Park Methodist Episcopalian Sunday School took their classes “Out for a holiday on the banks of the beautiful Duwamish River, (and for) a pleasant ride over the river to the Albert Braun picnic grounds.” 

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Here’s Lady Rainier to cheer you on!

Cheers, Santé, Prost, and Skål!
Cheers, Santé, Prost, and Skål!

Yup.  Ron has found a few links that prowl the territory – widely conceived – and we have reached far for four or five more.

Looking southwest from Walker Street to the burning ruins.

THEN: Sometime before her first move from this brewery courtyard in 1912, Lady Rainier was moved by a freeze to these sensational effects. She did not turn her fountain off. (Courtesy of Frank & Margaret Fickeisen)

THEN: The work of filling the tidelands south of King Street began in 1853 with the chips from Yesler’s sawmill. Here in the neighborhood of 9th Ave. S. (Airport Way) and Holgate Street, the tideland reclaiming and street regrading continue 70 years later in 1923. (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)

THEN: Part of the pond that here in 1946 filled much of the long block between Massachusetts and Holgate Streets and 8th Avenue S. and Airport Way. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: In 1852 many of Seattle’s first pioneers removed from Alki Point by dugout canoe for the deeper and safer harbor along the east shore of Elliott Bay (our central waterfront). About a half-century later any hope or expectation that the few survivors among these pioneers could readily visit Alki Beach and Point by land were fulfilled with the timber quays and bridges along Spokane Street. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

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One of the Hemrich brothers
One of the Hemrich brothers

Rainier-Beer-Plant-,-bayview-web

First appeared in Pacific January 17, 1988. Directly below this photo is another of the same Bayview site, but earlier.
First appeared in Pacific January 17, 1988. Directly below this photo is another of the same Bayview site, but earlier.
Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry
Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry
The same Bayview site - later.
The same Bayview site – later.
The Rainier Beer brewery during its years of service to Tully's.
The Rainier Beer brewery during its years of service to Tully’s.
Rainier Brewery reclaimed
Rainier Brewery reclaimed
First appeared in Pacific on
First appeared in Pacific on  August 15, 1999.

2.-Rainier-Beer-billboard-'Now-Vigor-&-Strength-in-Every-Drop'WEB

One of the millions of barrels shipped and a few of the plants hundreds of employees.
One of the millions of barrels shipped and a few of the plants hundreds of employees.
Seattle Brewing and Malting Georgetown plant seen looking southwest over main line railroad tracks.
Seattle Brewing and Malting Co.’s Georgetown plant seen looking southwest over main line railroad tracks.
Georgetown's abandoned brewery looking southeast over Airport Way. (Jean Sherrard - about a dozen years ago)
Georgetown’s spiritless cathedral  looking southeast over Airport Way. (Jean Sherrard – about a dozen  years ago)
A short stack of saloon advertisements pulled from the Dispatch for October 15, 1877.
A short stack of saloon advertisements pulled from the Dispatch for October 15, 1877.
Joseph Butterfield and Martin Schmeig opened this brewery at the watefrtont foot of Columbia Street, the southwest corner, in 1865. It was not Seattle's earliest brewery, but nearly. And it was the largest of the early breweries - those before the Bayview Brewery.
Joseph Butterfield and Martin Schmeig opened this brewery at the watefrtont foot of Columbia Street, the southwest corner, in 1865. It was not Seattle’s earliest brewery, but nearly. And it was the largest of the early breweries – those before the Bayview Brewery.
Looking east from the elbowed end of Yesler's Wharf to the waterfront at Columbia Street in 1878. The brewery is behind the first Colman Dock, far right. Columbia Street climbs First Hill from Front Street. In the foreground some of Henry Yesler's logs float in his mill pond.
Looking east from the elbowed end of Yesler’s Wharf to the waterfront at Columbia Street in 1878. The brewery is behind the first Colman Dock, far right. Columbia Street climbs First Hill from Front Street. In the foreground some of Henry Yesler’s logs float in his mill pond.

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BEFORE PROHIBITION

Beer on board - beer everywhere.
Beer on board – beer everywhere.

JUST 45 DRINKING DAYS LEFT (A Collection of Pioneer Square neighborhood saloon life before they closed in Washington State on the first day of 1916.   Jean notices that here no women are to be found.  The photographer for these 5×7 glass plates has not been identified eiher.)

CLICK TO ENLARGE

glass---45-drinking-days-left-web

Bar-#5-c10glass--web

Bar#4-c10Glass-seattle-web

glas-bar-seattle-web

glass-bar-no.-2-web-

glass-bar-interio-#1-web

PROHIBITION

Confiscated hooch
Confiscated hooch
The Seattle Times registers the public ambivalence towards the prohibition with a pole and prizes! A clip from March 7, 1926, still seven years before the end of it.
The Seattle Times registers the public ambivalence towards the prohibition with a poll and prizes on “the prohibition question.!”   A clip from March 7, 1926, still seven years before the end of it.

AFTER PROHIBITION

Tavern-Counter-w-Rheinlander-beer-signs-and-attendants-web

Pilsener-Pale-Beere-truck-and-trailer-web

FK-HAPPY-PEPPY-BEER-#1-web

Jean makes note of the absence of men.
Jean notes the absence of men.

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Thanks to Gary Flynn the Bellingham-based “brewerian” for his writing on Braun’s brewery and many others.   In 2010 Flynn received the American Breweriana Association’s Excellence in Literature award for “Outstanding achievement in supporting the objectives of ABA and the Breweriana community.”

Jean's caption "Either the dark Demon Rum or a member of the Anti-Saloon League rides his ass to the bar."
Jean’s caption “Either the dark Demon Rum or a member of the Anti-Saloon League rides his ass to the bar.”
A Rainier Beer advertisement with a typical topographical mistake. The Bailey Peninsula (Seward Park) is repeatedly imagined and depicted as an island in its most conventional view from the Mount Baker neighborhood ridge above Lake Washington.
A Rainier Beer advertisement with a typical topographical mistake. The Bailey Peninsula (Seward Park) is repeatedly imagined and depicted as an island in its most conventional composition from the Mount Baker neighborhood ridge above Lake Washington.

Seattle Now & Then: Seward Street, Juneau, Alaska

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Photographer Frank LaRoche arrived in Seattle a few weeks after its Great Fire of 1889. Through the 1890s he made scores of round-trips to the Klondike, including this visit to the Juneau intersection of Seward Avenue and Front Street. (Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: Photographer Frank LaRoche arrived in Seattle a few weeks after its Great Fire of 1889. Through the 1890s he made scores of round-trips to the Klondike, including this visit to the Juneau intersection of Seward Avenue and Front Street. (Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Through the nearly 120 years that separate this week’s now and then, the Mount Juneau horizon has kept its same recognizable profile. Four-thousand feet up and about seven miles north-northeast rests the Juneau Icefield. It feeds about thirty glaciers, including the Mendenhall, which comes to within a dozen miles of this Juneau intersection. By Seattle analogy, that is roughly the distance between West Point at Discovery Park to Bellevue’s Meydenbauer Bay.
NOW: Through the nearly 120 years that separate this week’s now and then, the Mount Juneau horizon has kept its same recognizable profile. Four-thousand feet up and about seven miles north-northeast rests the Juneau Icefield. It feeds about thirty glaciers, including the Mendenhall, which comes to within a dozen miles of this Juneau intersection. By Seattle analogy, that is roughly the distance between West Point at Discovery Park to Bellevue’s Meydenbauer Bay.
Juneau with its namesake mountain above it. By LaRoche (Courtesy of Michael Maslan)
Juneau with its namesake mountain above it. By LaRoche (Courtesy of Michael Maslan)
Seward Street is in there somewhere.
Seward Street is in there somewhere.

Through our now thirty-four years of “weekly repeating,” the farthest we have strayed from Seattle’s Pioneer Square and/or the PacificNW offices has been to Spokane.  But this Sunday we have stepped as far as Juneau, Alaska’s capital. Jean Sherrard, this feature’s regular “repeater” for nearly a decade, has found it exhilarating.   Here’s Jean.

Dated 1916, a winter harbor scene at Juneau probably a bit colder than Jean's and Karen's a century later.
Dated 1916, a winter harbor scene at Juneau probably a bit colder than Jean’s and Karen’s a century later.

“Karen and I flew up to Juneau, a two-hour flight, on MLK Jr. weekend to visit our friends Robin Walz and Carol Prentice. Now we highly recommend Juneau in winter. It’s a small town of 30,000 people, nestled in the sea-level valley between impassible mountains (note: a little local ribbing at the expense of summer tourists, who stepping off the big ships and seeing snow, ask, “What’s the elevation of Juneau?”). During the chilly off-season the landscape is gorgeous and tourist-free. On Sunday morning we headed downtown to take this repeat of Frank LaRoche’s Gold Rush Seward Street. Robin and Carol, Karen, and some friendly locals crossed the street to enliven the photo, and then we adjourned to a table in the locally owned Heritage Coffee Company on the left – not too long ago a McDonald’s franchise.”

In the Video at the top, Robin locates this look across Juneau as near where the cruise ships now slip in.
In the Video at the top, Robin locates this look across Juneau as near where the cruise ships now slip in.
The same profile (in part) of Mount Juneau, upper-right, can be found in the wider LaRoche record printed above this one by "Winter and Pond." .
The same profile (in part) of Mount Juneau, upper-right, can be found in the wider LaRoche record printed above this one by “Winter and Pond.” .

Actually, the only snow we can find in Jean’s January repeat is high above where Seward Street is stopped at the steep foot of Mt. Juneau. The snow this Sunday is mostly hidden in the forest.  In LaRoche’s “then,” (below the video at the top)  photographed sometime in the late 1890s, the corner for Jean’s coffee retreat on the left is occupied in part by The New York Store, where any anxious argonaut heading for the gold fields was assured by a mural-sized sign that he could get “cheap . . .the best men’s heavy clothing, underwear, rubber boots, etc.” 

In Juneau - once upon a time - but not a likely retreat for tourists or pilgrims.
In Juneau – once upon a time – but not a likely retreat for Jean and Karen or other tourists and pilgrims.

Other outfitters, tobacco stores, bars, chop and oyster houses, and cheap lodgings covered most of the commerce done on Seward Street during the Rush.  Now jewelers, galleries, and souvenir shops waiting on what Robin Walz figures are the “up to fifteen- thousand passengers and crew who are set ashore from four-to-five cruise ships every day from April into October.”  Alaskan Heritage is an alternative to pricey knick-knacks on Seward Street.  The blue and pink banner hanging from the corner light standard on the right lists some of the attractions north of here at Front Street on Seward: “Governor’s House, Juneau City Museum, State Capital (and) St. Nicholas Church.”

A Juneau church, although not St. Nicholas, and lost. Presbyterian.
A Juneau church, although not St. Nicholas.  Now  lost and Presbyterian.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, pardners?  Sure Jean, and please mix with what you have written just above a few of the other shots from your visit to Juneau and its surrounds, although I suspect that some of those will be in the video at the top.  (What a labor it must have been to cut back Robbin and my dialogue from forty-plus minutes to twenty-something.)

Hi Paul, Jean here, with a few shots from Juneau and surrounds:

Upon arrival, Robin and Carol drove us out to catch the last rays of sun on the Mendenhall Glacier
Upon arrival, Robin and Carol drove us out to catch the last rays of sun on the Mendenhall Glacier
Just a bit closer...
Just a bit closer…
The waterfall pouring into Mendenhall Lake from the vast snowfield above...
The waterfall pouring into Mendenhall Lake from the vast snowfield above…
Mendenhall lake after sunset - click to zoom into the blue glacial ice circled by ice skaters
Mendenhall lake after sunset – click to zoom into the blue glacial ice circled by ice skaters
The old Russian church in Juneau
The old Russian church in Juneau
A citizen of Juneau contemplates one of many stair climbs leading out of the central business district
A citizen of Juneau contemplates one of many stair climbs leading out of the central business district
Juneau sheet metal fabricator with a unique hobby
Juneau sheet metal fabricator with a unique hobby
A retreat/shrine to St. Therese of Lisieux - nestled in a lovely islet forest
A retreat/shrine to St. Therese of Lisieux – nestled in a lovely islet forest
A view of the islet from the shrine's maze
A view of the islet from the shrine’s maze
Sunset from the shrine
Sunset from the shrine
flight home
flight home

Immediately below are ten Edge-Links connected by Ron Edge to former blog features that are more-or-less relevant to this week’s subject.  Under these  links we will attach the several Alaska photos – most of them by LaRoche, one of the gold rush photographers from Seattle – that appear in the video at the top.  The bottom will round-out  – so to speak – with a few more by now nearly ancient now-and-then features that relate to the allures of Alaska.

THEN: During the few years of the Klondike Gold Rush, the streets of Seattle’s business district were crowded with outfitters selling well-packed foods and gear to thousands of traveling men heading north to strike it rich – they imagined. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Through its two decades — 1892 to 1913 — at the northeast corner of Cherry Street and Third Avenue, the Seattle Theatre was one of the classiest Seattle venues for legitimate theater as well as variety/vaudeville

THEN: Above Lake Washington’s Union Bay the Hoo-Hoo Building on the left and the Bastion facsimile on the right, were both regional departures from the classical beau arts style, the 1909 AYPE’s architectural commonplace. Courtesy John Cooper

THEN: For the four-plus months of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the center of commerce and pedestrian energy on University Way moved two blocks south from University Station on Northeast 42nd Street to here, Northeast 40th Street, at left.

THEN: The new sub H-3 takes her inaugural baptism at the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company’s ways on Independence Day, 1913. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The driver, lower left, leads his team towards First Avenue up a planked incline on Madison Street. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: From boxcars and rooftops to the planks of Railroad Avenue, excitement builds for the ceremonial re-enactment of the S.S.Portland’s 1897 landing with its “ton of gold” on the Seattle waterfront, the city’s first Golden Potlatch Celebration. [Courtesy, Michael Maslan]

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ALASKA GOLD RUSH ERA PHOTOS (seen and described in the video at the top)

As explained in the video by Robbin, these Alaskan's - Eskimos - are farther north of Juneau than Seattle is south of it.
As explained in the video by Robin, these Alaskan’s – Eskimos – are farther north of Juneau than Seattle is south of it.   AK is  a big sky country larger than Texas, and much larger than Montana.
As taught by Robin Metlakahtla is the last stop in the Alaska panhandle before crossing south into British Columbia.
As taught by Robin, Metlakahtla is the last stop in the Alaska panhandle before crossing south into British Columbia.
Another glacier - the Muir in Alaska's Glacier Bay - about thirty-plus miles north of Juneau. Like a drive to Everett.
Another glacier – the Muir in Alaska’s Glacier Bay – about thirty-plus miles north of Juneau. Like a drive to Everett.

 

The strange and/or unique Chilkoot Pass, the highest step in the trek from salt water to the Yukon River and its gilded dreams of 1897-8.
The strange and/or unique Chilkoot Pass, the highest step in the trek from salt water  of Lynn Canal to the Yukon River and its gilded dreams of 1897-8.
The later and easier way over that ridge.
The later and easier way over that ridge.
The harbor that we noted in the video as unidentified. Now Robin has pegged it. It is Skagway, and the LaRoche that follows is of Skagway's Broadway. Skagway, I believe, is where you caught the train but now a bus or rent a car..
The harbor that we noted in the video as unidentified. Now Robin has pegged it. It is Skagway, and the LaRoche that follows is of Skagway’s Broadway. Skagway, I believe, is where you caught the train but now a bus or rent a car..
Skagway's Broadway during the warmer cruising months a mad-way of Gold Rush nostalgia and boardwalk kitsch.
Skagway’s Broadway during the warmer cruising months a mad-way of Gold Rush nostalgia and boardwalk kitsch.

FOUR FROM SITKA (as described in the Video at the Top.)

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The last of LaRoche's Alaska included here.
The last of LaRoche’s Alaska included here.

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Click to Enlarge!

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First appeared in Pacific on April 29, 2001.
First appeared in Pacific on April 29, 2001.

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CLICK TWICE to ENLARGE

Seattle Now & Then: Big Snow in Ballard, 1916

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THEN: Ballard photographer Fred Peterson looks south-southeast on Ballard Avenue on February 3rd or 4th, 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: Ballard photographer Fred Peterson looks south-southeast on Ballard Avenue on February 3rd or 4th, 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Jean Sherrard’s hopes for some snow escaped him and Ballard Avenue. He did, however, find that many of the historical structures on this landmarked street have survived, including four of the five seen here across the historic way.
NOW: Jean Sherrard’s hopes for some snow escaped him and Ballard Avenue. He did, however, find that many of the historical structures on this landmarked street have survived, including four of the five seen here across the historic way.

This week’s subject, a snow-bound Ballard Avenue, was chosen ceremonially: it celebrates the one-hundredth anniversary of Seattle’s – and the Northwest’s – Big Snow of 1916. (Actually, by the time this feature appears in PacificNW, our centennial commemoration will be a bit late, as this is being written in mid-January.)

Peterson's other recording of the Big Snow looks back (northwest) over the same part of Ballard Avenue covered in the shot that is at the top. Here you can also see the tower of the Ballard City Hall and fire station..
Peterson’s other recording of the Big Snow looks back (northwest) over the same part of Ballard Avenue covered in the shot that is at the top. Here you can also see the snow-topped tower of the Ballard City Hall and fire station..

On the first of February the snow began an unrelenting twenty-four hour drop that added nearly two feet more to the two that had already accumulated through an exceptionally cold January. For many Ballardians, the fact that prohibition began its sixteen year run at the beginning of 1916 added to the chill, especially on Ballard Avenue, celebrated for its saloons. With its rough count of Ballard Avenue bars, the famous newspaper feature “Ripley’s Believe it or Not” figured that there was “one for every church in Ballard.”

The Saint James Cathedral after the Big - and wet - show of 1916 crushed its dome.
Not at Ballard church but the  Saint James Cathedral after the Big – and wet – show of 1916 crushed its dome.
Here in the interests of balance is a Ballard sanctuary without snow.
Here in the interests of balance is a Ballard sanctuary without snow.

The new and heavy snow of early February “put on ice,” and sometimes under, commuting, public entertainment, classroom education, railroads, and weak roofs. The grandest disaster was on First Hill, where the St. James dome collapsed into the Cathedral’s narthex. For this exceptional occasion the Bishop expressed thanks that no one was in church.

A November 1916 advertisement for photographer Fred Peterson run in The Seattle Times. This Peterson is working near the Pike Street Market. Perhaps he moved his commercial studio from Ballard.
A November 1916 advertisement for photographer Fred Peterson run in The Seattle Times. This Peterson is working near the Pike Street Market. Perhaps he moved his commercial studio from Ballard.

Here (at the top) a neighborhood professional photographer, Fred P. Peterson, sights to the southeast with his back near what was until Seattle annexed Ballard in 1907, its City Hall at 22nd Ave. N.W. Peterson has stamped in red ink at the bottom of his snapshot a claim of copyright next to a caption, which records a “record snow fall of 38 inches” accumulated on the second and third of February. At least six trolleys are stalled on Ballard Avenue, and close to Peterson a motorcar straddles the avenue and its sidewalk. The sign swinging above it suggests that this might be a Studebaker stuck in its attempts to get service.

Not in Ballard but on First Avenue near Seneca Street and deep.
In neither Ballard nor Colorado but on First Avenue near Seneca Street and deep.
A scene from out biggest snow, that of 1880. The prospect is from the front door to another and different Peterson photograph, the pioneer one at the foot of Cherry Street. The snowscape of 1880 on Cherry is compared to two shots of the street from the same prospect about 30 years later. It is also a lesson in what a boom town can do in three decades.
A scene out of our biggest snow, that of 1880. The prospect is from the front door to another and different Peterson studio, the pioneer Peterson and Bros.  whose studio was at the foot of Cherry Street. Here the snow scape of 1880 on Cherry is compared to two shots of the street from the same prospect about 30 years later. It is a lesson in what a boom town can do in three decades.

Measured principally by depth and not by winter mayhem, Seattle’s biggest big snow blanketed the village in 1880. (This feature could not commemorate that big snow with a centennial because “Now and Then” first got going in the winter of 1982. I remember that it was raining.) On Sunday January 4, 1880, the rain froze. On Monday it was all snow. Two days later the Seattle Intelligencer purposely exaggerated the depth at ten feet “in order to play it safe.” Pioneer promoters liked calling Puget Sound our “Mediterranean of the Pacific.” On Saturday, January 10, the Seattle Intelligencer advised, “If anyone has anything to say about our Italian skies . . . shoot him on the spot.”

First Avenue south of Pine Street at the first melting of the Big Snow of 1916. The Liberty Theatre is on the left, and the Corner Market Building on the far right. (Courtesy, University of Washington Libraries, Northwest Collection in the Special Collections.
First Avenue south of Pine Street at the first melting of the Big Snow of 1916. The Liberty Theatre is on the left, and the Corner Market Building on the far right. (Courtesy, University of Washington Libraries, Northwest Collection in the Special Collections.

Among our pioneers were many weather watchers who kept diaries. By their authority, six-and-a-half-feet of snow were measured in the first week of January 1880, and on the twelfth it began to rain.

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WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?   Surely Jean, and before the reader reaches the collection of links that Ron Edge has put up, we will pause together and remember the historian Murray Morgan.  We may still consider him the “Dean of Northwest Historians.”  His Skid Road is the most read history of Seattle, and was first published for the city’s first Centennial in 1951.  Murray was born in Tacoma during the big snow of 1916.  Had he lived he would have been celebrating his own centennial about now.  His century will be celebrated at the Tacoma Public Library on Saturday the upcoming 27th, probably in the elegant and yet well-packed Murray and Rosa Morgan Room there.  Check out the library’s web page if you like.   Here’s a portrait of Murray taken by Mary Randlett and shared by her.  Below it  is another 1916 big snow shot.  We miss both Murray and Rosa.

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MURRAY MORGAN’S CENTENNIAL

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THEN: Captioned Salmon Bay, 1887, this is most likely very near the eastern end of the bay where it was fed by Ross Creek, the Lake Union outlet. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan Vintage Posters and Photographs)

THEN: Looking east from the roof of the still standing testing lab, the Lock’s Administration Building (from which this photograph was borrowed) appears on the left, and the district engineer’s home, the Cavanaugh House (still standing) on the center horizon. (Photo courtesy Army Corps of Engineers at Chittenden Locks)

THEN: A Seattle Street and Sewer Department photographer recorded this scene in front of the nearly new City-County Building in 1918. The view looks west from 4th Avenue along a Jefferson Street vacated in this block except for the municipal trolley tracks. (Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: A circa 1908 look northeast through the terminus of the Loyal Electric Street Railway line at the corner of now Northwest 85th Street, 32nd Ave. Northwest, and Loyal Way Northwest. (Courtesy, the Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: With his or her back to the original Ballard business district, an unnamed photographer looks southeast on Leary Way, most likely in 1936.

THEN: Built in 1910, Ballard’s big brick church on the northwest corner of 20th Avenue NW and NW 63rd Street lost the top of its soaring tower following the earthquake of Nov. 12, 1939.

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Appeared first in Pacific on March 11, 2001.
Appeared first in Pacific on March 11, 2001.

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First appeared in Pacific on January 12, 2003.
First appeared in Pacific on January 12, 2003.
This photo of a snow-bound Volunteer Park pavilion may or may not be from the big one of 1916.
While the panorama put above the feature above is of the big snow, this photo of a snow-bound Volunteer Park pavilion may or may not be from the big one of 1916.
Nearby at the southeast corner of 14th Ave.E. and Prospect Street.
Nearby at the southeast corner of 14th Ave.E. and Prospect Street.

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Horse logging down 15th Avenue Northeast with Science Hall (Parington Hall) on the U.W. campus.
Horse logging down 15th Avenue Northeast with Science Hall (Parrington Hall) on the U.W. campus.
First appeared in Pacific on Jan. 31, 1999.
First appeared in Pacific on Jan. 31, 1999.

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Seattle Now & Then: Ballard’s Bascule Bridge

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THEN: James Lee, for many years an official photographer for Seattle’s public works department, looks south over Ballard’s Salmon Bay a century ago. Queen Anne Hill marks the horizon, with a glimpse of Magnolia on the far right. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: James Lee, for many years an official photographer for Seattle’s public works department, looks south over Ballard’s Salmon Bay a century ago. Queen Anne Hill marks the horizon, with a glimpse of Magnolia on the far right. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Ballard’s bascule bridge opened on 15th Ave. N.W. in 1917.
NOW: Ballard’s bascule bridge opened on 15th Ave. N.W. in 1917.

We can be pretty confident about why James Lee photographed this look south across Ballard’s Salmon Bay to the Queen Anne Hill horizon. Lee has dated his negative – and presumably his visit here – June 23, 1915.  That was one month before the city’s public works department opened bids for the construction of two bascule bridges, of the department’s own design, both of which are still lifting, one in Fremont and the other here in Ballard.  Through his long service as a employee of public works, Lee’s efforts as a photographer of the city grew into one of the greater collections of Seattle subjects.  And, like this view, nearly all had some public works purpose, and were in focus, too. Many examples of his work can be studied through on-line links with the Seattle Municipal Archives.

The Public Works Dept. call for bids on both the Fremond and Ballard bridges, in the Seattle Times for June 8, 1915.
The Public Works Dept. call for July 23  bids on both the Fremont and Ballard bridges,  announced in the Seattle Times for June 8, 1915.

The featured photograph at the top is the photographer’s record of the path that the Ballard Bridge would follow by continuing 15th Ave. N.W. from Interbay north to Ballard proper. It would replace the 14th Ave. Bridge, the clutter of contiguous spans on the left, whose first trestle was pile-driven into the shallow Salmon Bay in 1891. It was built for the West Street Electric trolley line, the first streetcar railway from the Seattle Waterfront to reach Ballard, which was then promoting itself as “the Shingle Capitol of the World.”  The industrious community’s first lumber mill was built on Salmon Bay in 1888, and by 1890 there were seven more – at least.   

An early look across Salmon Bay from the northwest corner of Queen Anne Hill. The curving Great Northern Railroad trestle (1892-3)
An early look across Salmon Bay from the northwest corner of Queen Anne Hill. The curving Great Northern Railroad trestle (1892-3) easily reached the Ballard waterfront over short pilings.  The railroad then snaked along the north shore of the bay and behind the several mills built along the waterfront in order to receive lumber and ship  finished products like cedar shingles.  The trolley and wagon bridge along 14th Avenue n.e. is out of frame to the right, but can be seen in several photos included below.  .

I think it likely that it was the Phoenix Shingle Co. mill where Lee found his high prospect for shooting south through the line of 15th Ave. N.W., although some Ballard mills changed names and positions often enough to be confusing.  In the 1912 Baist real estate map, included on the blog listed at the end of this feature, the Phoenix footprint is shown just east of a short wharf that extends 15th Ave. about 200 feet into Salmon Bay.  The map reveals that Lee’s chosen overview is a few yards east of 15th Ave.  For his “now,” Jean Sherrard has nestled above the east side railing of the Ballard Bridge.  Although separated by a century, I think James and Jean are close.

The Phoenix Shingle Co. mill is footprinted on the Baist map framed here beside another photograph of the site, but one that looks back - and north - at early construction on the north pier for the new Ballard Bascule Bridge.
The Phoenix Shingle Co. mill is foot-printed on the Baist map framed here beside another and somewhat later James Lee  photograph of the site, one that looks back – and north – at early construction on the north pier for the new Ballard Bascule Bridge.   This alternative photo is discussed in Jean’s video that introduces this “bascule blog.”  I was also tempted to choose it for this week’s historical photo printed in The Times, but dismissed it for that primary role because we were not secure about where to put Jean and his Nikon.  I imagine that Lee was aboard a boat for this shot, a few feet west of the future western margin of the 15th Ave. Bridge. .  (To read the map click the mouse.)
Again, this "other" look of the north end is featured with some talk in the video. Saint Alphonso's tower on 15th just punctures the far left horizon. The mill burning tower on the left and the metal warehouse right-of-center, both appear in the later photo that follows. It was recorded looking north at the bridge's north pier from below its south pier.
Again, this “other” look of the north end is featured with some talk in the video. Also noted there is Saint Alphonso’s tower on 15th, which here   just punctures the far left horizon.  (We include an Alphonso girls school sotball team feature below) The burning tower on the left and the metal warehouse, right-of-center, both appear in the later photo that follows. It was recorded looking north at the bridge’s north pier from below its south pier. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey and the Seattle Municipal Archive.)
Dated April 24, 1917, the piers, north and south, are up, but not the teeter-totter wings for the bascule, and the bridge would consequently not be ready for the Lake Washington Ship Canal's July 4, 1917 inaugural opening. Again - as noted in the caption above this one - note that the burning tower and chimney on the left and the metal warehouse on the right, both appear in the earlier photo above this one. This photo then was our primary clue for locating the photo above it.
Dated April 24, 1917, the piers, north and south, are up, but not the teeter-totter wings for the bascule.  Consequently, the bridge would  not be ready for the Lake Washington Ship Canal’s July 4, 1917 inaugural opening.  (The Fremont Bridge was completed in time.) Again, the burning tower and chimney on the left and the metal warehouse on the right, both appear in the earlier photo above this one. This photo then was our primary clue for placing the photo above it.

The bridges at Ballard and Fremont (and soon the University District) were built for the Lake Washington Ship Canal.  Ballard had long campaigned for a canal, not to reach Lake Washington but for dredging to deepen Salmon Bay in order to move more lumber off and on to its waterfront.  In the spring of 1915 City Engineer A.H. Dimock calculated that once the bids were in and the contractors chosen it would take about a year to build the new bridges.  Here in Ballard Dimock was half right.  Work started on Sept 1., 1915.  However, a Times headline, “Ballard Viaduct Thrown Open to Traffic,” did not appear until Dec. 1, 1917. 

This 1908 Baist map may be compared to the 1912 map printed above. Some of the milll names are different, but the relationship between the curving Great Northern trestle and the 14th Ave wagon and trolley bridge is the same.
This 1908 Baist map may be compared to the 1912 map printed above. Some of the milll names are different, but the relationship between the curving Great Northern trestle and the 14th Ave wagon and trolley bridge is the same.
Looking north from Interbay to the Ballard side led by familiar lines made by the Great Northern bridge, on the left, and the 14th Ave. trolley bridge on the right.
Looking north from Interbay to the Ballard side led by familiar lines made by the Great Northern bridge, on the left, and the 14th Ave. trolley bridge on the right.
First appeared in Pacific, January 29, 1987.
First appeared in Pacific, January 29, 1987.
Looking east from the 15th Avenue Ballard Bridge's north approach to the Bolcom-Canal Lumber Company at the southeast corner of Salmon Bay in 1923.
Looking east from the 15th Avenue Ballard Bridge’s north approach to the Bolcom-Canal LumberCompany at the southeast corner of Salmon Bay in 1923.   The 8th Ave. W. Railroad bridge reaches the horizon near the scene’s center. 
The Bolcom-Canal mill looking southwest from the Ballard side.
The Bolcom-Canal mill looking southwest from the Ballard side.

WEB EXTRAS

More to add, my droogs?  First, Ron Edge has posted eleven other blog features that will get one somehow to Ballard and/or Magnolia – sometimes with transfers.  We will also add a few more past features scanned from clippings.

THEN: Captioned Salmon Bay, 1887, this is most likely very near the eastern end of the bay where it was fed by Ross Creek, the Lake Union outlet. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan Vintage Posters and Photographs)

THEN: A Seattle Street and Sewer Department photographer recorded this scene in front of the nearly new City-County Building in 1918. The view looks west from 4th Avenue along a Jefferson Street vacated in this block except for the municipal trolley tracks. (Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

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THEN: Looking east from the roof of the still standing testing lab, the Lock’s Administration Building (from which this photograph was borrowed) appears on the left, and the district engineer’s home, the Cavanaugh House (still standing) on the center horizon. (Photo courtesy Army Corps of Engineers at Chittenden Locks)

THEN: Long-time Wallingford resident Victor Lygdman looks south through the work-in-progress on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge during the summer of 1959. Bottom-right are the remnants of the Latona business and industrial district, including the Wayland Mill and the Northlake Apartments, replaced now with Ivar’s Salmon House and its parking. (Photo by Victor Lygdman)

THEN: With his or her back to the original Ballard business district, an unnamed photographer looks southeast on Leary Way, most likely in 1936.

THEN: Built in 1910, Ballard’s big brick church on the northwest corner of 20th Avenue NW and NW 63rd Street lost the top of its soaring tower following the earthquake of Nov. 12, 1939.

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First appeared in Pacific, March 9, 1986,
First appeared in Pacific, March 9, 1986,

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A "now" from thirty-two years ago.
A “now” from thirty-two years ago.
First appeared in Pacific, July 15, 1984.
First appeared in Pacific, July 15, 1984.

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 first appeared in Pacific, October 31, 2004.

first appeared in Pacific, October 31, 2004.

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The Ballard Bridge profile from the east.  ABOVE, on February 24, 1917, with the piers but not the wings.   BELOW, on September 14, same year, 1917, now with the completed wings.

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First appeared in Pacific, December 11, 1988.
First appeared in Pacific, December 11, 1988.

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First appeared in Pacific, October 20, 1996.
First appeared in Pacific, October 20, 1996.

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First appeared in Pacific, January 6, 1985.
First appeared in Pacific, January 6, 1985.

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First appeared in Pacific, August 19, 2001.
First appeared in Pacific, August 19, 2001.

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Seattle Cedar looking west from the Ballard Bridge.
Seattle Cedar looking west from the Ballard Bridge.

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First appeared in Pacific, June 24, 1984.
First appeared in Pacific, June 24, 1984. ======

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ECUMENICAL BALLARD

First appeared in Pacific, March 10, 1996.
First appeared in Pacific, March 10, 1996.
First appeared in Pacific, November 18, 2007
First appeared in Pacific, November 18, 2007

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Measuring for the flood coming with the closing of the Chittenden Locks and the lifting of Salmon Bay "around" Nine Feet to the level of Lake Washington - and the rest.
Measuring for the flood coming with the closing of the Chittenden Locks and the lifting of Salmon Bay “around” Nine Feet to the level of Lake Washington – and the rest.
Jean's FINI
Jean’s FINI

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Seattle Now & Then: Baker’s Dock aka The Ecclefechan

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THEN: Looking south from the Schwabacher Wharf to the Baker Dock and along the Seattle waterfront rebuilt following the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: Looking south from the Schwabacher Wharf to the Baker Dock and along the Seattle waterfront rebuilt following the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
Following its collapse during an 1982 storm, the Baker's wharf was rebuilt longer as the Arlington Pier. This view, like the one above it, also looks south from the Schwabacher Pier.
Following its collapse during an 1892 storm, the Baker’s wharf was rebuilt longer as the Arlington Pier. This view, like the one above it, looks south from the Schwabacher Pier.
NOW: Jean Sherrard also looks south, but from the Pike Street Wharf, and across the open water of Seattle’s Waterfront Park and a twilight that reaches from the container cranes on Harbor Island, on the right, to the Smith Tower on the left.
NOW: Jean Sherrard also looks south, but from the Pike Street Wharf, and across the open water of Seattle’s Waterfront Park and a twilight that reaches from the container cranes on Harbor Island, on the right, to the Smith Tower on the left.

We may thank Jean Sherrard, the weekly provider of our “nows,” for finding and deciphering the name of the long ship posing here, the sizable four-masted Ecclefechan.  The name is attached to the bow on the far right, where it quarter-hides behind the ship’s anchor and its shadows. (To repeat his sleuthing you will need an enlarged print

ecclefechan whisky grab

and a magnifying glass.)  The Ecclefechan was named for a Scottish village about eight miles northwest of the border between Scotland and England and as close to the Irish Sea.  The town modestly thrived for two-hundred-plus years as a stop for stagecoaches on the six-day, 400-mile-ride between Glasgow and London.  (It now takes four hours and a few minutes by train.)

Thomas Carlyle, born and buried in Ecclefechan.
Thomas Carlyle, born and buried in Ecclefechan.

On February 5, 1881, when plans for the Ecclefechan were underway in a Port Glasgow shipyard, Thomas Carlyle, the favorite son of Ecclefechan, died.  As “the first man of English letters,” Carlyle had been offered a burial at Westminster Abby, but he declined in favor of a gravesite beside his parents in the churchyard of the town where he was born in 1795.  One description of the ship notes that a sculpted figurehead of Carlyle was fitted on its bow. It seems possible, or perhaps likely, that Thomas G. Guthrie, the ship’s first owner, was an admirer of the author. 

The Ecclefechan was short-lived.  On February 23, 1900, filled with 15,000 bales of Indian jute, the classified barque ran upon Skateraw Rocks about fifty miles short of Dundee, its port-of-call on the east coast of Scotland.  Although the ship broke in half, its cargo was saved.

A mid-1890s look at the Pike (left) and Schwabacher (right) piers side-by-side, but not of the Baker/Arlington dock, which is off-frame to the right. (Courtesy, Ron Edge.)
A mid-1890s look at the Pike (left) and Schwabacher (right) piers side-by-side, but not of the Baker/Arlington dock, which is off-frame to the right.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge.)
 This rare record looks north on the two railroad trestles - the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern on the left and the Ram's Horn, on the right, that survived from this point north the city's Great Fire of June 6, 1889, with the splashing work of bucket lines. The Schwabacher Wharf seen here, thereby survived to serve in the early rebuilding of the ruined business district and the waterfront, which from this point south was consumed to the water-line.
This rare record looks north on the two railroad trestles – the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern on the left and the Ram’s Horn, on the right, that from this point north survived the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, with the splashing work of bucket lines. Thereby the Schwabacher Wharf, seen here, survived to serve in the early rebuilding of Seattle’s  ruined business district and waterfront, which from this point south was burned to the water-line.

Our “then,” but not our “now,” looks south from the Schwabacher Wharf at the foot of Union Street.  It was the only pier on Seattle’s central waterfront to survive the Great Fire of 1889, and so was the gateway for the shipped materials needed to rebuild the some thirty city blocks flattened by the fire.  The photo was recorded sometime after the fire and before the November storm of 1892, when “high and violent winds” collapsed the next dock south of the Schwabacher, Baker’s Dock at the foot of University Street.  Here it is still standing on the far side of the 290-foot-long and dark green Ecclefechan, resting at what since 1974 has been the south side of Waterfront Park. 

Pier 6 (since 1944 Pier 57) in a 1938 tax photo.
Pier 6 (since 1944 Pier 57) in a 1938 tax photo.
The over-size "Mosquito Fleet" steamer Yosemite parked at the end of the Pier 6 Arllington Wharf, before its name change to Milwaulkee.
The over-size “Mosquito Fleet” steamer Yosemite parked at the end of the Pier 6 Arllington Wharf, before the wharf’s name change to Milwaukee.

After its 1892 collapse, Baker’s Dock (it is written on photographer George H. Braas’s negative, lower-right) was rebuilt, longer and stronger, as the Arlington Dock.  (Compare the pre-and-post storm piers in the two “then” photos at the top.) About a dozen years later it was replaced by the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway pier, which survives and now supports a Ferris wheel.  Five years after Braas used it for his prospect, the Schwabacher Wharf hosted the sensational arrival of the S.S. Portland, the “ton of gold” steamer

The "ton of gold" Portland parked in the north slip of the Schwabacher Wharf which is busy with the almost hysterical crowd.
The “ton of gold” Portland parked at low tide in the north slip of the Schwabacher Wharf, which is busy with a potentially  hysterical crowd.   The Pike Street Pier is on the far side of the Portland.

that in 1897 incited the hysteria surrounding the Yukon Gold Rush. Seventy years later the old wharf was torn down by its owner, the Port of Seattle, in preparation, in turned out, for the open water of Seattle’s Waterfront Park and Jean’s many-splendored view.

The Century 21 "boatel" Catala parked at the south "prong" of what remained of the Schwabacher Dock in 1962.
The Century 21 “boatel” Catala parked at the south “prong” of the tuning-fork-shaped dock: what remained of the Schwabacher Dock in 1962.
Waterfront Park construction, April 11, 1974, by Frank Shaw.
Waterfront Park construction, April 11, 1974, by Frank Shaw.
Waterfront Park by Frank Shaw, November 15, 1974.
Waterfront Park by Frank Shaw, November 15, 1974.
Waterfront Park, November 26, 1974 by Frank Shaw.
Waterfront Park, November 26, 1974 by Frank Shaw.

 

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, me lads?  Yes Jean, Ron has committed himself to a generous embrace of past features, and all are off the waterfront, or near it.

THEN: The S. S. Suveric makes a rare visit to Seattle in 1911. (Historical photo courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: The driver, lower left, leads his team towards First Avenue up a planked incline on Madison Street. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/bell-st-bridge-then-web1.jpg?w=474

THEN: The new sub H-3 takes her inaugural baptism at the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company’s ways on Independence Day, 1913. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Tied momentarily to the end of the Union Oil Co dock off Bay Street, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship Maud prepares to cast-off for the Arctic Ocean on June 3, 1922. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Frank Shaw’s late winter composition of waterfront landmarks at the foot of Madison Street in 1963. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

Seattle Now & Then: The Bank of Redmond

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Redmond reaped its first bank in 1911 at the pioneer corner of Cleveland Avenue and Leary Way. (Courtesy, Kirkland Historical Society)
THEN: Redmond reaped its first bank in 1911 at the pioneer corner of Cleveland Avenue and Leary Way. (Courtesy, Kirkland Historical Society)
NOW: The bank building survives as part of Redmond’s historic core. Homegrown, the present tenant, is an enriched sandwich shop that uses local produce and breads for its savory creations.
NOW: The bank building survives as part of Redmond’s historic core. Homegrown, the present tenant, is an enriched sandwich shop that uses local produce and breads for its savory creations.

With help from Tom Hitzroth, Chair of Redmond’s City Landmark Commission, I can construct a thumbnail history of the Redmond State Bank, one of that community’s designated landmarks. The comely brick structure survives at the northwest corner of Leary Way and Cleveland Street.  Somewhat typical for many community banks, this one has lent its front door a grandeur by cutting the bank’s footprint at the southeast corner of the chosen lot.  This allows the bank to continue with a bold angle its distinguished ways both north up Leary Way, here to the right, and west on Cleveland.  Clearly from this town center in 1912, by walking or riding two blocks or three west on Cleveland, one was soon out of town.

The date I chose for this postcard snap shot is mildly arbitrary.  That is, I intuit the date from experience. A half-dozen locals of some means and/or muscle incorporated the Redmond State Bank on July 28, 1911. Much of the muscle was provided by Clayton Shinstrom and Fred Roberts, who scouted the town’s surrounds for likely customers.  Clayton, according to his son Dick Shinstrom, whom Hitzroth interviewed in 2009, spent a lot of time on his bicycle and row boat canvassing the area and earnestly convincing the potential, but often skeptical, customers, that putting their money in his planned bank was safer than secreting it in the attic or barn.   

Given the widespread pioneer distrust of bankers, the father must have been convincing, for on September 11, 1911, less than two months since the bank’s incorporation, it guarded – and we imagine carefully invested – $10,012 in deposits.  By December the sum had reached over $32,000.  When Seattle Trust and Savings purchased the renamed First National Bank of Redmond in 1976, it held $13 million in deposits and certainly a sentimental corner in the hearts of many of its surviving depositors.   

An early look, ca. 1888, at Redmond's lasting railroad depot built for the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad.
An early look, ca. 1888, at Redmond’s lasting railroad depot built by the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad.
Redmond's Post Office and first brick building.
Redmond’s Post Office and first brick building.

Long before Redmond got its bank, it landed a federal post office and in 1888 its own station on the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad, the line that opened the King County hinterland to more forestry, mining and settlement. The town was named by and for, sort of, its second postmaster, Luke McRedmond. Although Luke dropped the “Mc”, his neighbor, Warren Perrigo, equally a community founder, was not pleased, and apparently the two pioneer families thereafter were at odds. 

In identifying the town’s founder as Luke Redmond, the pioneer’s “Mc” was also dropped by the editors of Washington, a Guild to the Evergreen State, the now out-of-print but still popular depression-era big book of state motor tours.  On page 321 Redmond was included on an alternative route to Seattle from Fall City.  Nearly half of the book’s brief description of Redmond concludes with a fine example of silly human interest.  “Excitement ran high in 1935, when a black bear strayed into town, was treed, and, despite efforts of townspeople and police, sheriff and deputies, remained in the tree three days.”  (We will print directly below the Redmond page from the Washington, a Guide to the Evergreen State.  This is a repeat from last week, because it fits best here.  This big book was written in the late depression, supported by New Deal public works funding,  and published in the early 1940s.)

evergreen-guide-title-page-web

evergreen-guide-p-321-on-redmond-web

WEB EXTRAS

Something to add, boys?   Yes Jean, Ron Edge has put up a half-dozen former east side features, and below those a sample of Redmond Aerials from his collection of prints and/or scans.   These will be dated with a challenge to the readers.  All of aerials include-to-find the Redmond Bank (from this week), Brown’s Garage (from last week) and the two story brick Brown Building. This little hide-and-seek will be followed  by another Edge addition, a verdant panorama of Willowmoor, aka Marymoor.

THEN: With his or her back to the east shore of Lake Sammamish an unidentified photographer recorded this Monohon scene in about 1909, the date suggested by the Eastside Heritage Center, by whose courtesy we use this historical record.

THEN: Snoqualmie Falls appears in full force, probably during a spring runoff.

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THE REDMOND AERIALS – BEGINNING with the  OLDEST from 1934 

[CLICK-CLICK to ENLARGE]

A Laidlaw Aerial of Edmonds from April 6, 1934. It looks south. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
A Laidlaw Aerial of Redmond from April 6, 1934. It looks south. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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June 14, 1939, looking
June 14, 1939, looking northeast.

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Also from June 14, 1939 and looking north.
Also from June 14, 1939 and looking north.

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May 26, 1946 - looking southeast
May 26, 1946 – looking southeast

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Redmond, 1950 - looking east.
Redmond, 1950 – looking east.

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MORE WILLOWMOOR aka MARYMOOR

First appeared in Pacific Sept. 21, 1986. First appears here last week.
First appeared in Pacific Sept. 21, 1986. First appears here last week.

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A 1921 panorama of WILLOWMOOR. Courtesy of Ron Edge and first published in The Seattle Times.
A 1921 panorama of WILLOWMOOR. Courtesy of Ron Edge and first published in The Seattle Times.  CLICK to ENLARGE

 

Now & Then here and now

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