Seattle Now & Then: Second and Columbia, 1886

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THEN: Both of this week’s featured photographs were recorded from the same elevated prospect, but by different professional photographers: T. E. Peiser and D.R. Judkins. The latter’s can be identified by the studio sign that rises high, far left on a post at the southwest corner of Second Avenue and Columbia Street. Both photos date from 1886, and include different cues: the one of uniformed Knights of Pythias member-musicians marching south on Second and the other for the most part of primary students posing on the boardwalk. Both photographs also include, right-of-center, the home built by J.T. Jordon, Seattle’s second mayor, at the northeast corner of Second and Columbia, and left-of-center at the northeast corner of Second and Marion, the Stetson-Post Terrace, Seattle’s first swank apartments designed for its first ‘1 percent.’
NOW: Jean Sherrard has used his extension pole to approach the elevation exploited by the two pioneer photographers on the second floor of a neighbor’s home on the west side of Second Avenue.

Pioneer photographs of any Seattle street other than Mill Street (Yesler Way), Commercial Street (First Ave. S.), and Front Street (First Ave. north of Mill Street) are rare.  Here are two exceptions.  Both are on Second Avenue and both were recorded from the same prospect – within inches of one another.

In the 1880s pioneer photographers Theodore E. Peiser and David Judkins set up studios a block apart on the west side of Second Avenue.  They were competitors and almost certainly did not plan this propinquity.   Peiser’s studio was on the second lot south of Marion Street and Judkins’ on the southwest corner with Columbia Street.  The two professionals photographed parades of different sorts near their studios on Second Avenue, and only about six weeks apart.

I am long familiar with Peiser’s May 13, 1886 record of parading members of the secret society Knights of Pythias pausing for his professional snap. As a pioneer classic it has appeared often in publications and exhibits.  We used it for its own “now and then” in PacificNW on January 17, 1999. (see above)  Judkin’s photo, (2nd from the top) however, I had never seen before last week.  I was thrilled.

Nearly the same prospect looking north on Second from between Cherry and Columbia Streets, although recorded a quarter-century later during the 1912 Golden Potlatch Celebraton.

The alert Ron Edge discovered it while helping the Museum of History and Industry scan some of its oldest prints. The print of Judkins’ line-up of primary school children – about 200 of them on the east side of Second Avenue filling the block between Columbia and Marion Streets, and more – is dated June 23, 1886.

Handwriting on the back makes a claim for Emma Blocksom.  It is her “school picture” and Emma is probably one of the posing 200 or so.  The Blocksoms are listed once in the 1886 city directory, below,  living on Washington Street.  The promising family lead stops there. (And for us, now, as well.)

Seattle opened Central School in 1883 four blocks up First Hill from here. Central School was big enough to handle as many scholars, and more, as those lined up. Perhaps this late June day is the last before summer vacation for these students, and taking one school picture is certainly more efficient than several.  (In 1886 Seattle’s population of school-age citizens between four and twenty-one years old was 2,591.)

Central School, the impressive white box with a tower seen here, sat on the south side of Madison Street, between Sixth and Seventh avenues. This view of it was recorded ca. 1886 from near the corner of Ninth Avenue and Columbia Street. It shows how to the east of 6th Avenue First Hill nearly leveled off, pausing in its climb. Later in the 1960s this interruption became a more convenient topography for building the Seattle Freeway [Interstate-5).
Central School looking north from near Mill Street (Yesler Way) in the mid-1880s.  Apparent here, again, is the pause in First Hill’s climb east of Sixth Avenue. Seventh Avenue is on the right.

What is not explained for either of these pros is how did they lift or carry their heavy cameras so high above the boardwalk?  Here I am again thankful for help from Ron Edge. In the MOHAI collection off older prints, Ron found an 1887 panoramic look from Denny Hill that includes an unobstructed sighting down Second Avenue. While it is soft on focus, it still shows many of the landmarks included here.  Most importantly, the leafy tree near the northwest corner of Second and Columbia, on the left in both of the featured photos, is standing in the panorama, a welcomed help for our ‘hide-and-seek’ after the photographer’s prospect.  About a third-of-a-block south of Columbia Street a two-story residence stands at the curb and over the sidewalk that uniquely runs below it. The residence, we suspect, was constructed before Second Avenue was developed from a path into a street.  Most likely both photographers were invited by this neighbor to shoot their parades from the this second floor veranda.

BEST IF YOU ENLARGE THIS NOW.  Putting our heads and pictures together, Ron Edge and I have found what we think – but cannot yet prove — is the likely perch for the two photographers. It is, as noted in the text,  a few yards south of Columbia Street on the west side of Second Avenue.   The young tree that stands here above the center of the photograph is on the west side of Second Avenue and to the left of the two story clapboard that shines brilliantly in the late afternoon sun sometime in 1886.  It is the same tree that shows next to the sidewalk at the left border of the Judkins photograph, second down from the top.   Now you best pay attention.  Under the tree and a few yards beyond it up the west side of Second Avenue is a shadow caste by a structure which is not seen except for two well-lighted (by the same sun) posts.  We hope to determine later if these support a balcony over the sidewalk or an enclosed second floor in the here  otherwise hidden structure.   It is from there, we suggest and nearly believe, that the two photographers took their two similarly elevated recordings of Second Avenue  north of Columbia Street.  This detail was pulled from  a panorama taken from Denny Hill and reveals much else including  the Plymouth Congregation Church steeple, which appears in both of the neighbors’ photographs on the east (left) side of Second Avenue.   The large ornamented structure beyond and to the right of our intersection is the Occidental Hotel before its 1887 additions.  When destroyed by the city’s Great Fire of 1889 the hotel (its rubble) filled the flatiron block of Mill Street (Yesler Way), James Street, Second Avenue and Pioneer Place. 

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, cherubs?

THEN:

THEN: The west side of Second Avenue between Columbia and Marion Streets was typical of the commercial district that was quick to develop after the city’s Great Fire of 1889. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The Big Snow of 1916 trims two jewelers’ clocks on the west side of Second Avenue, north of Marion Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The Moose float heads south on First Avenue at Columbia Street during the 1912 Potlatch parade of fraternal and secret societies. Behind them are Julius Redelsheimer's clothing store and the National Hotel, where daily room rates ran from 50 cents to a dollar.

THEN: With feet nearly touching the Madison Street Cable Railway’s cable slot, five “happy workers” squeeze on to the front bumper of an improvised Armistice Day float. (Photo courtesy Grace McAdams)

THEN: Looking south from Pine Street down the wide Second Avenue in 1911, then Seattle’s growing retail strip and parade promenade. (courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: In this 1887 look up Columbia Street from the waterfront is the bell tower of the fire station, tucked into the hill on the right. It would soon fail to halt the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. The station and everything between it and Elliott Bay were reduced to ashes, smoldering bricks and offshore pilings shortened like cigars. (courtesy, Kurt Jackson)

THEN: A float for the 1911 Potlatch parade carries piggyback a smaller 1897 version of a Polk City Directory on a much bigger 1911 copy. The fourteen years between them is meant to symbolize the growth of the city since the Alaskan/Yukon gold rush of 1897 that the Golden Potlatch of 1911 was created to commemorate. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971. (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)

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Seattle Now & Then: Savery Cherries

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THEN: The southwest end of the University of Washington’s Savery Hall, still under construction, on the left, was completed in 1920, also a likely year for the photograph. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The dependable March blooming of the Quad’s Yoshino cherry trees, is compliments of the University’s Arboretum and the Washington State Department of Transportation. The trees were moved from the Arboretum and transplanted in the Quad during construction of the Evergreen Point Bridge and SR-520. Thereafter, as revealed by Jean’s repeat from his 21-foot pole, the Quad has become a favored setting for wedding photos.

When classes first began Sept. 4, 1895, on the University of Washington’s new Interlaken campus, the students were greeted by  the school bell, carried from the old campus to the new, but hanging in the Denny Hall belfry.  Denny Hall is out-of-frame up the paved path that runs through the columns to the right.  The bell soon became annoyingly familiar after sunrise when the bell ringer took, it seemed, cruel pleasures in waking not only students but also the citizens of Brooklyn. (Brooklyn was the University District’s first popular name.) If the weather were right, the bell could be heard in Renton.

The twenty-foot tall hand-carved columns were examples of the Greek Ionic order. Inevitably, perhaps, they also became iconic, and for some the University’s most representative symbol. Each weighing about one-thousand pounds, they were originally grouped along the façade of the school’s first structure on the original 1861 campus, near what is long since the northeast corner of Seneca

Here, in 1907, the first campus main hall has been pivoted 90 degrees clockwise from its original footprint near the northwest corner of Fourth Ave. and Seneca Street and moved north to face Union Street, while its fate was still not decided. The four columns have been kidnapped to the new campus. The view looks southeast from near Union Street and Fifth Avenue, before the latter was cut through the campus soon after this photo was recorded.

Street and Fourth Avenue.  When the classic quartet was detached and moved to the new campus, student preservation activists continued to hope that the entire building would follow them to be reunited in time for the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition.  It was not to be.  Instead, selected remains of the University’s first home were carved into commemorative canes. The four surviving columns were consigned to this position in the then still future Quad. They were named, “Loyalty”, “Industry”, “Faith”, and “Efficiency.”  Neither Jean nor I know which is which.

The blooming Quad in the Spring of 1996 with members of the Volunteer Park Conservatory Orchestra  posing with David Mahler, their director, far left.

In 1915 the school’s Board of Regents embraced architect Carl F. Gould’s “Revised General Plan of the University of Washington,” which included the Quad and prescribed that the architectural style to be used in its several buildings should be Collegiate Gothic.  Commerce Hall, the brick and tile example on the right of the featured photo at the top, was completed in 1917.  Work on Philosophy Hall, on the left, was delayed by the material needs of the First World War, and completed late in the fall of 1920. By 1972 the names of both halls were changed to Savery, in honor of William Savery, the head of the University’s Department of Philosophy for more than forty years.

Icon inspects icon: history professor Edmund Meany in a Feb. 21, 1930 clipping from The Seattle Times.
Loyalty, Industry, Faith and  Efficiency get a cleaning, from a Seattle Times clipping for May 12m 1942,

The columns see from the rear of the Sylvan Theatre with Anderson Hall around the corner.
The Sylvan Theatre in late November, 1993.

With the completion of Commerce and Philosophy Halls, the quartet of columns was moved in 1921 to the Sylvan Theatre, which had been prepared for them. The Seattle Times noted that “It was the first time that the traditional pillars have been tampered with without some sort of ceremony.”  Since then the “ancient pillars” have witnessed a good share of pomp and circumstance during school’s graduation exercises.

“Postcard Artist Ellis”” colored record of the Quad before the Cherries.
The Quad with Cherry trees but not their blossoms in the 1960s during the “winter of our discontent” and a student demonstration in favor of “getting the war machine off campus.”
WEB EXTRAS

As per your request, Paul, I’ll toss in a few just for fun:  They make us better Jean.

Anything to add, blossoms?

THEN: For the four-plus months of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the center of commerce and pedestrian energy on University Way moved two blocks south from University Station on Northeast 42nd Street to here, Northeast 40th Street, at left.

THEN: Named for a lumberman, and still home for the UW’s School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, the upper floor’s high-ceilinged halls, including the Forest Club Room behind Anderson Hall’s grand Gothic windows, were described for us by the department’s gregarious telephone operator as “very popular and Harry Potterish.” (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: An estimated 50 percent of the materials used in the old Husky Union Building were recycled into its recent remodel. The new HUB seems to reach for the roof like its long-ago predecessor, the AYP’s landmark Forestry building. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: When the Oregon Cadets raised their tents on the Denny Hall lawn in 1909 they were almost venerable. Founded in 1873, the Cadets survive today as Oregon State University’s ROTC. Geneticist Linus C. Pauling, twice Nobel laureate, is surely the school’s most famous cadet corporal. (courtesy, University of Washington Libraries)

THEN: Above Lake Washington’s Union Bay the Hoo-Hoo Building on the left and the Bastion facsimile on the right, were both regional departures from the classical beau arts style, the 1909 AYPE’s architectural commonplace. Courtesy John Cooper

THEN: We suspect that this quiet exposure of the Washington State Building was photographed before the gates of the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition were first opened, and certainly before a bandstand gazebo was built in the grassy circle between it and the Forestry Building. (Courtesy University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections)

THEN: On March 25, 1946, or near it, Wide World Photos recorded here what they titled “University Vet Housing.” It would soon be named the Union Bay Village and house the families of returning veterans. The first 45 bungalows shown here rented for from $35 to $45 dollars a month. It would increase to a “teeming conglomerate of 500 rental units.” With housing for both married students and faculty. The view looks north over a street that no longer exists. The homes on the right horizon face the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail on N.E. Blakeley Street near N.E. 45th Place. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

THEN: The Gothic University of Washington Campus in 1946 beginning a seven-year crowding with prefabricated dormitories beside Frosh Pond. In the immediate background [on the right] is Guggenheim Hall. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The first house for Delta Gamma at N.E. 4730 University Way. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: sliver of the U.W. campus building called the Applied Physics Laboratory appears on the far right of this 1940 look east towards the U.W. campus from the N.E. 40th Street off-ramp from the University Bridge. While very little other than the enlarged laboratory survives in the fore and mid-grounds, much on the horizon of campus buildings and apartments still stand. (Courtesy, Genevieve McCoy)

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ANOTHER IONICICONIC – MOVED&SAVED

PLYMOUTH CONGREGATIONAL COLUMNS, March 21, 1966.

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MORE of MAHLER AND WAGNER

More of Mahler – and with Wagner – posing on campus in 1996.

Seattle Now & Then: The Market’s Front Door

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THEN: By 1931, the likely year for this photo looking east on Pike Street from the Pike Place Market, this intersection had been loved for a quarter-century as the market’s front door. (Photo courtesy Museum of History & Industry)
NOW: In the market’s 111th year, the four modest corners of this brick-lined, walk-all-ways intersection welcome the footsteps of about 35,000 people every day.

Four weeks ago, Jean Sherrard stood at what is known as the front door to the Pike Place Market, the intersection of First Avenue and Pike Street. Hoisting a pole that extended as tall as the base of the market’s clock, he pointed his heavy Nikon eastward, up the center of Pike Street.  From a similar perch about 88 years earlier, a Webster and Stevens Studio photographer also looked east on Pike and recorded this week’s “then.” We are dating this photo as circa 1931, based not on the automotive license plates, which are hard to read, but rather the five-story construction under way for the J.C. Penney department store at the southwest corner of Second Avenue and Pike Street, here right-of-center and still without windows.

Before the five-floors of Penney’s there was the three of the Bon Marche at the southwest corner of Pike Street and Second Avenue, and so across the alley from Hahn’s building at the southeast corner of Pike and First Avenue. Hegg’s view looks east from First Avenue.
Looking east on Pike from Front Street (First Avenue) in the mid-1890s. Here the future Bon and then Penney’s corner  holds a one-story brick retail building about the same size as the Hahn Building.
With the Elliott Hotel, the Hahn Building on the right at its full 3-stories on April 2, 1963. The photo was taken by Lawton Gowey as was the one that follows after the Penney’s adds below and thirteen years later.

Clipped from The Seattle Times for August 18, 1931.
Lawton Gowey – again – looking east on Pike from First Avenue, here on April 21, 1976.

Later branded as JCPenney but known by one and all as Penney’s, the store opened Thursday, Aug. 13, 1931. In contrast to the uncertainties and outright failures of the Great Depression, Penney’s placed an advertisement in this daily five days later claiming that a “staggering” and “conservative” estimate of 125,000 had visited since the store’s opening. Some were “curious,” others “skeptical,” but many left with “arms loaded, satisfied that regardless of business conditions, people will buy when prices are right.”

NOW IS THE TIME to INTRODUCE ROBERT HAHN

Clipped from The Seattle Times for June 14, 1904 where Robert Hahn has struck a deal with the Copeland Medical Hustlers Institute to reveal (for local fame and perhaps more) that he had been cured of “his long years of suffering form catarrhal disease” with “his final cure” got from Copeland. The testimony lets us look into the revived full-face of Hahn with a sketch at a time in periodical publishing when half-tone rendering were still often undependable. .

Ten years later, Seattle traded financial troubles for the anxieties and orders of World War II. By then, the Hahn family had been associated with the intersection of First and Pike for more than 60 years. Robert Ernest Hahn, a German immigrant from Saxony, arrived in Seattle in the late 1860s and soon purchased the southeast corner when First Avenue (then named Front Street) and Pike Street were mere paths. Their neighbors included Seattle pioneers Arthur and Mary Denny and the lesser-known C. B. Shattuck.

Part of the scaffolding for the trestle that restrained coal cars on thru their final feet to the Pike Street Coal Wharf, where at its far western end were attached the company’s coal bunkers. This detail from a 1878 panorama recorded from the King Street Coal Wharf that replaced the service of the Pike wharf and bunkers that year. Perhaps C.B. Shattuck’s home or even office was made in one these few unidentified structures.    Mary and Arthur Denny’s home was behind Peterson and off-camera to the right at the southeast corner of Front (First Ave) and Union Street. 

Shattuck managed the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company that from 1871 to 1878 moved coal from their mine at Newcastle by a route that required both barges on the lakes and trains including one that crossed back-and-forth through this intersection from the company’s bunkers and wharf at the foot of Pike Street to their wharf at the south end of Lake Union. We imagine that Hahn chose not to get soiled by working for his neighbor.  Instead, he thrived as a painter and interior decorator, continuing to buy property and, with his wife, Amelia, raise a family of five children including Ernie who gained some local celebrity as a sportsman.   A Salmon Derby trophy was named for him.

Ernie Hahn and his friend Eddie Bauer show their catches for The Seattle Times of June 4, 1928.
The “Summer Garden” on the Hahn corner in the early 1890s.  It was replaced by the first floor of the Hahn Building.   This view of the Garden looks east from the south side of Pike Street and near its southeast corner with Front Street, aka First Avenue. 

By the time of Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889, the Hahn corner was a popular summer retreat from the heat with a beer garden, which real-estate maps indicate was approached from Pike Street. In 1909, the Hahns completed what survives as First and Pike’s southeast corner post, the three-story brick Hahn Building, also long known as the Elliott Hotel and seen above in our “now” as the Green Tortoise Hostel. The recent proposal that it be razed for a high-rise is rousing the market’s many friends to protect this “humble hundred-year old guardian structure” from the wages of plastic and glass.

A clip from The Times for Nov. 29, 1981 on the proposed renovation of the “historic Hahn Building.”  CLICK TO ENLARGE
Work-in-progress on the Hahn Building at the southeast corner of First Avenue and Pike Street. Lawton Gowey dated his slide May 2, 1982, and named it the Endicott Building.    The hangout International Donut House at the corner is shuttered. 
The restored corner (and Donut feeder) ca. 1962, as seen by a linked couple waiting to head south on First Avenue from its northeast corner with Pike Street.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads? Another mix from the neighborhood considered, which also reveals our love for it.

pmarket-n-arcade-30s-then-mr

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: The Hotel York at the northwest corner of Pike Street and First Avenue supplied beds on the American Plan for travelers and rooms for traveling hucksters. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

Montana-Horse-Meat-MR-THEN

 

THEN: Seattle Architect Paul Henderson Ryan designed the Liberty Theatre around the first of many subsequent Wurlitzer organs used for accompanying silent films in theatres “across the land”. The Spanish-clad actor-dancers posed on the stage apron are most likely involved in a promotion for a film – perhaps Don Q, Son of Zorro (1925) or Douglas Fairbanks’ The Gaucho (1929) that also played at the Liberty. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Mark Tobey, almost certainly Seattle’s historically most celebrated artist, poses in the early 1960s with some Red Delicious apples beside the Sanitary Market in the Pike Place Market. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market. It had already been scheduled for demolition. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: The Pike Place Market’s irregular block shapes and bluff-side topography joined to create a multi-level campus of surprising places, such as this covered curve routing Post Alley up into the Market. Here, in 1966, the “gent’s” entrance to Seattle’s first Municipal Rest Room (1908) is closed with red tape and a sign reading “Toilet room, closed temporarily for repairs.” The Market was then generally very much in need of repair. (by Frank Shaw, courtesy, Mike Veitenhans)

THEN: Charles Louch’s grocery on First Avenue, north of Union Street, opened in the mid-1880s and soon prospered. It is possible – perhaps probable – that one of the six characters posing here is Louch – more likely one of the two suited ones on the right than the aproned workers on the left. (Courtesy RON EDGE)

THEN: A circa 1920 look north along the tiled roofline of the Pike Place Market’s North Arcade, which is fitted into the slender block between Pike Place, on the right, and Western Avenue, on the left. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971. (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)

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Seattle Now & Then: Mill Street, ca. 1887

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THEN: A pre-1889 Great Fire look east on Mill Street (Yesler Way) from the west side of Commercial Street (First Ave. South). (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Jean Sherrard’s arresting look east on Yesler Way, on the east side of First Avenue, in Pioneer Square.

This week I wish to lead with Jean Sherrard’s “now.”  It is a noon-hour streetscape graced by a morning downpour.  The clean puddle on Yesler Way reflects the dappled clouds that fringe the 40-plus story Smith Tower, which is mirrored in this small flood nearly as brilliantly as the landmark’s terra-cotta tiles shine in the noon-hour sky.  Sunlight escaping across Yesler Way from the alley between First Avenue and Occidental Street draws a warm path through the scene’s center.

Looking east on Mill Street (Yesler Way) a few months earlier than the featured photo. Note that the distant east end of the Occidental Hotel (right-of-center) is in an earlier stage of construction than is t he featured photo.

The featured “then” at the top we have picked to ponder with Jean’s now is not “on spot.”  Rather, it was recorded a half-block west on Yesler Way.  I chose this “then” for a list of reasons, including repeat photography.   At the photograph’s center stand two of the landmarks that Seattle rapidly raised in 1883-84, early boom years for the growing town that in 1881 first took the prize for numbered citizens in Washington Territory.  This developing strip of Victorian landmarks on Mill Street (Yesler Way) continues south from this intersection on Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) and especially north on Front Street (First Ave.)  (If you wish to explore the blog dorpatsherrardlomont you will find many opportunities to keyword-explore all with the help of past now-and-then features and books compiled from them.)

Lawton Gowey looks east from a spot close to that taken by the photographer of the featured photo. Lawton visited the site on February 7, 1961.

This look into Pioneer Square, or Pioneer Place as it was first named, shows the photographer W.F. Boyd’s stamp on its flip side. Boyd arrived in Seattle not long before he recorded this view.  Beside his centered stamp there are additional messages written by other hands on the back, including “Photo taken day before fire,” meaning the Great Fire of June 6 1889.  But it cannot be. Instead we have chosen to date this circa 1887, largely on a lead from Ron Edge, who pointed out the work-in-progress extending the Occidental Hotel (with the flagpole and mansard roof) to fill the entire flatiron block bordered by Mill Street, James Street and Second Avenue.

Looking northwest thru Pioneer Place at the Yesler-Leary Building when it was new, ca. 1884.

An item copied by Michael Cirelli  from an 1883 feature in the Seattle Weekly Chronicle on August 23, 1883. . It is one of the many discoveries he shared from his enthused study of Seattle’s pioneer history. [CLICK TO ENLARGE]
Another grand construction stands center-left: the Yesler-Leary Building, with its showplace tower topped by a weather vane, at the northwest corner of Front and Mill Streets.  One of our “other reasons” for picking this “then” on Mill Street is the brick building in the shadows on the scene’s far right.  We ask readers smarter than we to name this three-story pre-fire landmark.  [Soon after we made this request, Ron Edge, a frequent contributor to this blog, came forward – or up – with the answer.  Continue on for both his correct identification and his evidence.]

While I have never seen any face-on photograph of this south side of Mill Street, west of First Ave., it does appear in a Seattle1884 birdseye map and in that year’s Sanborn map as well.  But neither of these early sources give it a name or address.  Perhaps it is the Villard House*, listed in the 1884 city directory at 15 Mill Street and “near the Steamboat Wharf,” aka Yesler’s Wharf.  C.S. Plough, the proprietor, dauntlessly advertised it with a mondo boast, “The Villard is the best and cheapest hotel in the city.”

  • RON EDGE’S 11TH HOUR DISCOVERY:  NOPE – NOT THE VILLARD HOUSE, BUT RATHER THE SCHWABACHER BUILDING.   
Here the “mystery” structure is revealed in a detail pulled by Ron Edge from a 1887 panorama taken of the city from Denny Hill. The SCHWABACHER BUILDING, not the Villard Hotel, is circled by Ron. Compare this facade to the one depicted in the 1884 etching above it. Note here, far left, the slender spire of the Yesler-Leary Building at the northwest corner of Front Street (First Ave.) and Mill Street (Yesler Way.)
RON EDGE also found this new report in the July,8,1883 Post-Intelligencer (its forebear) on the construction of the Schwabacher Building. As the frame for this clipping reveals, Ron copied this from a scan open to the public on-line in the Library of Congress.

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JEAN ASKS – ANYTHING TO ADD LADS.

Anything to add, lads?   Beyond what is revealed just above, Ron Edge’s 11th hour identification of the three-story brick building on the far of the week’s feature, we have more of our weekly same, which is more past feature’s from the neighborhood.

THEN: In Lawton Gowey’s 1961 pairing, the Smith Tower (1914) was the tallest building in Seattle, and the Pioneer Square landmark Seattle Hotel (1890) had lost most of its top floor. (by Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Seen here in 1887 through the intersection of Second Avenue and Yesler Way, the Occidental Hotel was then easily the most distinguished in Seattle. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: With the clue of the ornate Pergola on the right, we may readily figure that we are in Pioneer Square looking south across Yesler Way.

THEN: For the first twenty years of his more than 40 years selling tinware and other selected hardware, Zilba Mile's shop looked south across Yesler Way down First Ave. S, then known as Commercial Street.

Then: The Pacific House, behind the line-up of white-gloved soldiers, might have survived well into the 20th Century were it not destroyed during Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889. Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry

THEN: The Lebanon aka Jesse George building at Occidental and Main opened with the Occidental Hotel in 1891. Subsequently the hotel’s name was changed first to the Touraine and then to the Tourist. The tower could be seen easily from the railroad stations. It kept the name Tourist until replaced in 1960 with a parking lot. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

THEN: A winter of 1918 inspection of some captured scales on Terrace Street. The view looks east from near 4th Avenue. (Courtesy City Municipal Archives)

THEN: Frank Shaw’s pre-preservation visit to First Avenue South on February 26, 1961. He looks north from Main Street. (photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: Looking north-northeast from the corner of Main Street and Occidental Avenue two or three weeks after the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy the Museum of History and Industry – MOHAI)

THEN: The original for this scene of a temporary upheaval on Mill Street (Yesler Way) was one of many historical prints given to the Museum of History and Industry many years ago by the Charles Thorndike estate. Thorndike was one of Seattle’s history buffs extraordinaire. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN:Ruins from the fire of July 26, 1879, looking west on Yesler’s dock from the waterfront. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: F. Jay Haynes recorded this ca. 1891 look up the Seattle waterfront and it’s railroad trestles most likely for a report to his employer, the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)

THEN: The Phoenix Hotel on Second Avenue, for the most part to the left of the darker power pole, and the Chin Gee Hee Building, behind it and facing Washington Street to the right, were both built quickly after Seattle’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy: Museum of History and Industry.)

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Seattle Now & Then: Dairy Men at Dreamland

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Thanks to Larry Lowry who long ago shared with me this grand photograph of Dreamland. He noted, “My grandfather, Waverly Mairs, was the ice cream maker at the old Seattle Dairy.” Perhaps, Waverly is also in the photograph.
NOW: The Eagles Auditorium replaced Dreamland in 1925. In 1983 the Auditorium was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. It became the home of ACT Theatre in 1996

Once cameras could be used comfortably out-of-doors, one of the sustaining services promoted by commercial photographers was portraits for families posing on the porch or front yard and businesses that grouped owners with their employees in front of the shop or factory that supported them.   This week’s feature has both, with a variation.

Pulled from The Seattle Times for August 20, 1934

The man in the dark suit nearest the camera is probably Syvert Stray, proprietor of the Seattle Dairy. He is standing beside, we assume, his wife Lillian, while holding onto the high wagon chair where his daughter poses for the professional photographer.  Down the line are the horses and drivers for Stray’s five milk wagons. The twist in this group portrait is that the subjects here are not posing beside the

Shot from the roof of the Cambridge Apartment-Hotel, the Seattle Dairy is boldly signed – right-of-center – at the front of the dairy’s factory on the south side of 8th Avenue.  The dairy is one of the exceptions – it was built of bricks.  (The accompanying details from the 1908 and 1912 Baist maps show the dairy only  in the later one at 1415 Eighth Avenue.   Most of the Dreamland roof shows upper left and beside it, to the right, the Unitarian Church with its clipped tower. (By the time of the above photo the Unitarians had moved up to Capitol Hill.)  Surely one of the two gas stations are a McKales, and under the management of the milkman Stray and his son. 
Details of Baist Maps, 1908 on the left beside 1912.   {CLICK to ENLARGE]
For comparison with the two Baist maps above here is a detail from the ever-helpful 1925 Kroll map of the Seattle Business Section.  University Street is on the far right, followed by Union, Pike, Pine Streets leading to the split where Howell Street begins off of OLive Street (or Way).    Eagles Hall is marked at its corner of Union and Seventh one block to the left from the details’ east border  (far-(right) with University Street.   Seattle Dairy can also be bound on Eighth Ave. “behind” the Eagles. 

company’s office and/or livery on Eighth Avenue. Rather they are around the corner from it on Union Street.  The reason is obvious.  They are sharing the splendor of a new and magnificent neighbor.  This is the showy south façade of Dreamland, a hall that filled the northeast corner of Seventh Avenue and Union Street.

DREAMLAND at the northeast corner of 7th Avenue and Union Street.
The Dreamland interior on November 17, 1911..

This ornate landmark could have held a hundred horses but never did.  Rather, it was made for entertainments and engagements. From its arching roof to the hardwood floor this big room was made for dancing, skating, conventions, banquets and shows of many sorts.  It was often decorated with streamers hanging from the ceiling.  Dreamland was also the political platform of choice for progressives, labor unions, and political campaigning.  The dances thrown here were big ones. And the sweating populist spectator sports of boxing and wrestling could fill the place.

Dreamland’s adver. for its opening in 1906.

From its beginning, Dreamland was promoted primarily as a roller skating rink. The opening was “by invitation” on October 14, 1906, for the Monday Night Skating Club.  The following night it was promoted in The Times as “the ideal rink for discriminating skaters… with Prof. Chas L. Franks and his daughter Lillian “performing as Champion Fancy Skaters.”  Stray, Dreamland’s dairyman neighbor, was also into roller skating, sponsoring a competitive team in the Seattle Roller Hockey League.

“Give a little, Take a little,”  Stray gets a deal on a new Rothweiler

In 1915, after Stray bought a Rothweiler truck, an illustrated advertisement of the purchase appeared in The Times.  Like the milk wagons Stray was replacing, his new truck was partially covered with a sign naming his dairy. Stray’s spirit for internal combustion developed into his second entrepreneurial passion, as director of McKale’s Inc., a small chain of stylish service stations.  The number one McKale’s was on the northwest corner of Union Street and Eighth Avenue, two doors from Stray’s Seattle Dairy.

A McKales on Broadway, ca. 1937. This is the intersection with Roy Street where Broadway “splits” to either side of McKales. From here going north it is still Broadway on the west and 10th Avenue East on the east.

Born in Christiansun, Norway, in 1871, the seventeen-year-old Syvert reached the U.S. in 1888 and Seattle in 1902.  Prior to his death in 1934 Stray was a life member in The Fraternal Order of Eagles, whose elegant aerie replaced Dreamland at Seventh Avenue and Union Street in 1925.  Since 1997, it is a corner where the play has continued with ACT Theatre.

A flyer for the first Eagles light-show concert, a benefit for FUS, the Free University of Seattle on January 14,  1967.    We were  “busted” by the police department’s dance squad, a good-cop bad-cop combo, for violating a “shadow dancing” ordinance from 1929.  We convinced the team to let the show go on if we turned the lights up, which we did – sort of.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, dreamers?  Yup Jean, Ron Edge is now laying upon us a few recent and relevant features and I’ll follow them with some older ones

THEN: The city’s north end skyline in 1923 looking northwest from the roof of the then new Cambridge Apartments at 9th Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: We give this panorama from the roof of the Washington Athletic Club a circa date of 1961, the year that Horizon House, a First Hill retirement community, first opened its doors to residents at Ninth Avenue and University Street. The high-rise L-shaped Horizon stands top-center. (Lawton Gowey)

9th-&-Union-1937-tax-pix-THEN-mr

THEN:

THEN: In the 32 years between Frank Shaw's dedication picture and Jean Sherrard's dance scene, Freeway Park has gained in verdure what it has lost in human use.

THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

tsutakawa-1967-then

THEN: A circa 1923 view looks south on Eighth Avenue over Pike Street, at bottom left.

THEN: Looking north-northeast from a low knoll at the southwest corner of Seneca Street and Seventh Avenue, circa 1916. By 1925, a commercial automobile garage filled the vacant lot in the foreground. [Courtesy, Ron Edge]

THEN: The Metropolitan Tract's Hippodrome was nearly new when it hosted the A.F. of L. annual convention in 1913.

THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898. Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN: Built in 1909-10 on one of First Hill’s steepest slopes, the dark brick Normandie Apartments' three wings, when seen from the sky, resemble a bird in flight. (Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The “then” photo looks southeast across Union Street to the old territorial university campus. It was recorded in the Fall of 1907, briefly before the old park-like campus was transformed into a grand commercial property, whose rents still support the running of the University of Washington. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

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CALL CODA COLLECT

A Seattle Times Clip from May 10, 1911.
Clip from The Seattle Times for June 11, 1929.

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: An Elks Carnival, 1902

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: An unidentified photographer looks southeast through the intersection of Third Avenue and Union Street during Seattle’s first-ever multi-day summer festival, the Elks 1902 Seattle Street Fair and Carnival. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
NOW: In 1903, a year following the Elks’ fair, the southeast corner of Third Avenue and Union Street was given to the Beaux-Arts construction of Seattle’s Central Post Office. It was demolished in 1958 and replaced with the glass-curtain facility still used today.

The arch standing here at the southeast corner of Union Street and Third Avenue was short-lived, like every other ceremonial ornament contrived for the Seattle Street Fair and Carnival, assembled and produced by the Seattle Elks Lodge for thirteen sunny days in August 1902.  This arch, the only rustic one, was the odd one of four built for the fair. It was a vernacular showpiece with a somewhat exotic shape, covered overall with cedar shakes, making it regional, while wrapping it with electric lights made it modern.

Elks Carnival ticket booth on Union Street, west of 3rd Avenue.

The other three arches, by contrast, were all-white, reminders of the also temporary Beaux Arts architecture of Chicago’s 1893 Columbia Exposition.  The two largest spanned First and Second Avenues widely enough to permit electric trolleys to pass through. With their ornamental splendor, the three classical arches were also unwitting

1902 Elks arch at the intersection James Street and Second Avenue – looking north on Second. Seattle Hotel is on the left and the Collins Building (still standing) is on the right.

premonitions of Seattle’s own World’s Fair, its 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition.  One of the three crossed Union Street about a half-block behind – west – of the unnamed photographer.  With two booths asking for the ten-cent admission, it served the fair as the main ticket gate to the fenced celebration.

Elks arch on First Avenue looking south on First..
1902 Elks carnival arch at First Avenue and Columbia, looking east on Columbia.

The dime paid for everything that was spread about on the acres selected from the former University of Washington campus. The off-campus Third Avenue block between Union and University Streets was also lined with booths, and Union Street as well, from

1902 Elks on Third too – looking south on Third Ave. with Union to the back.

the ticket booth east into the old campus that was covered with tents such as the one seen on the far right of this week’s ‘then’ photograph.  And nearly everything was enveloped in strings of electric lights.  The Elks promised that the grounds at night would be “almost as light as day.”  Some of the exotic thrills inside the fenced tents were an “Arabian trainer in a den of lions,” a “cage of leopards,” “Jabour’s Oriental Carnival and Menageries Company,” and “a troupe of 160 Orientals, Turks, Assyrians, Egyptians, East Indians, Japanese,” in addition to “dozens of unusual things.” The Elks fair was also distinguished and promoted by daily parades through the city streets.  One of the attractions was a “ladies band with eighteen pieces.”

Looking east on Union from Third Avenue during the 1902 Elks fair. The Armory stands mid-block, left-of-center.

Although exceptionally civic-minded, the Plymouth Congregational Church, on the far right at University Street, was not inside the fenced fair grounds.  The Armory, the structure with the long roof half-hidden behind the arch, was.  Among its many well-promoted events was a contest in the “pretty booth” with prizes for the prettiest girl and the handsomest boy and also “the largest and fattest baby 16 months old.”  The judge was a local doctor who prudently fled the Armory following the contests.

This particular chubby baby is a laughing hoax and not the prize-winner noted in the text. We known nothing at all about this baby but that we hope its parents fed him both well and less.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lodge members?  Yes Jean, and we remain faithful to your designs.  Before putting forward Ron’s links we will add three more illustrations of the southeast corner of Third Ave. and Union Street: from top-to-bottom, the corner cleared, building the Post Office, the modern class-curtain post office proposed by its architects.   Their rendering looks considerably better than the thing itself, however, we recall the Latin aphorism on taste (that we may have misspelled).    “De gustibus non desputandum est. ” or “taste is not debatable” except that is surely is debated.

=====THEN: Looking north from Seneca Street on Third Avenue during its regrade in 1906. (Photo by Lewis Whittelsey, Courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Plymouth Congregational Church barely reached maturity – twenty-one years – when it was torn down in 1913 for construction of the equally grand but less prayerful Pantages Theatre, also at the northeast corner of Third Avenue and University Street. (Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: Sometime between early December 1906 and mid-February 1907 an unnamed photographer with her or his back about two lots north of Pike Street recorded landmarks on the east side of Third Avenue including, in part, the Washington Bar stables, on the right; the Union Stables at the center, a church converted for theatre at Pine Street, and north of Pine up a snow-dusted Denny Hill, the Washington Hotel. (Used courtesy of Ron Edge)

THEN: The “then” photo looks southeast across Union Street to the old territorial university campus. It was recorded in the Fall of 1907, briefly before the old park-like campus was transformed into a grand commercial property, whose rents still support the running of the University of Washington. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: A mix of workers, friends and guests pose together on the front porch of Sarah Frances Baker’s hotel at the northeast corner of Third Avenue and Marion Street in 1895. Built ten years earlier by Martin and Elisabeth Stacy as their first mansion, the warring couple never lived in it. Used in the early 1890s by the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, followed by Baker and her hotel, the Second Empire styled mansion’s last tenant was the Maison Blanc Restaurant, which was closed by fire in 1960. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Seattle’s new – in 1910-11 – cluster-ball street lighting standards stand tall in this ca. 191l look north on Third Avenue from Seneca Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

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Elks parading through Pioneer Square, 1902

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Seattle Now & Then: A Pioneer Place Welcome, 1908

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The prospect looks east on Yesler Way through its intersection with First Avenue. James Street enters the five-star corner left-of-center.
NOW: The post-1889 Great Fire Pioneer Building, far left, still holds to its landmark northeast corner of First Avenue and James Street. At least five of the brick landmarks showing in the 1908 photo are still in their place in 2018.

Jean and I first used this Pioneer Square classic years ago on the back cover of our now long out-of-print book, Washington State Then and Now (2007).  We described the crowded scene as a celebration connected with Seattle’s summer-long 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (AYP).  It seemed like a reasonable claim at the time, but it was wrong.  We missed both the subject’s evidence and lack of it.  There are no AYP signs or flags anywhere to be found.  But there is lots of patriotic bunting, especially American flags.

Fleet Week 1908 looking south on First Avenue from Madison Street.

The best clue for identifying the occasion is spelled out in the line of pennants hanging near the top, showing the last five letters for “WELCOME.” The location is Pioneer Square, when it was still more popularly called Pioneer Place, during the four-day visit of Pres. Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet.  Leaving the east coast in December 1907, it required fourteen months to circumnavigate the world with its military parade. Most likely the scene was photographed on May 26, 1908, following the completion of the Grand Parade for the welcomed visitors,  It started that morning, but in the photo the pedestrian celebrants cast afternoon shadows.

Fleet Week bunting adorning the Frederick Nelson Department Store, which was then at the northwest corner of Madison Street and Second Avenue. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)

The popularity of what Seattle called its “Fleet Week” was both overflowing and depleting. Crowd counters estimated that 400,000 watched the parade.  Downtown businesses were more than willing to decorate their facades with flags and patriotic festoons; many of the decorations were stunning. Five days before the parade The Seattle Times announced “Seattle Has A Bunting Famine.  Merchants were unable to supply another yard of acceptable decorating material to patriotic customers (and) Tacoma and Portland were unable to help.”

Another business block on the parade route, the Haller Building at the norhwest corner of Columbia and Second Avenue. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)

Most of the fleet’s admirers came from Puget Sound, and extra Mosquito Fleet steamers and passenger trains were enlisted to bring the eager hordes to witness “the largest sea-fighting machines in the world.”  The trains were often stuffed beyond standing room, and many seekers from distant communities were left standing on depot platforms.  Visitors who managed to reach Seattle often had to camp in the parks.  The temporary tent, showing left-of-center in the photograph, tries to help.  Its sign reads: “Free Information Bureau, Strangers Directed to Furnished Rooms.”

On Monday, May 25, The Times headlined “Thousands Visit Ships … With every detail outlined by the bright sunshine which followed the dreary rain of yesterday, the eleven huge, white fighting machines now at anchor in the harbor lay in stately majesty in a wide crescent that stretched from Smith’s Cove to the south end of the harbor.” Earlier, when the fleet headed north from their California visits, they inspired thousands of Oregon citizens to sortie to their coast expecting to see the dozen dreadnaughts steam by.  However as brilliant as the big ships could be reflecting the fleet’s “peacetime color, white,” the Oregonians saw nothing of the distant White Fleet, except its smoke darkening the horizon.

Another lavish bunting hirty-five years earlie. The Arlington Hotel at the southeast corner of Main Street and Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) celebrates the 1883 visit to Seattle of the Northern Pacific (NPRR) entourage following rr-magnate  Henry Villard cross-country with the completion of the NP to Tacoma, which while a point of profound disappointment for Seattle was transcended by the end of the 1890s when the NP began giving full service to Seattle.

We’ve attached a direct closing here for the Fleet Week feature above with another below, a scene on Second Avenue , or beside it showing some of the crowd that paid for their bleachers seats here at the southwest corner of Second Avenue and Virginia Street.  (The prospect looks to the northwest.)  This added feature includes an array of Fleet Week images including photos of the fleet itself both on the way and in the bay.

THEN: About a year after he recorded this fashionable throng on Second Avenue celebrating the visit of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet in the spring of 1908, Frank Nowell became the official photographer for Seattle’s six-month-long Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exhibition in 1909.

WEB EXTRAS

Just for fun, on this lovely near-Spring day, let’s jump across town for a few cherry blossoms, seen from on high with my 21-foot pole. ‘Tis the season for Asian wedding photos – there were five or six sessions going on with tuxedoed grooms and blushing brides through the cherry trees! Enjoy! (A version of one of these shots will appear in a future column):

Anything to add, lads?  Fall to the Bottom for Seasonal Salubrious advice Jean.

THEN: Seen here in 1887 through the intersection of Second Avenue and Yesler Way, the Occidental Hotel was then easily the most distinguished in Seattle. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: With the clue of the ornate Pergola on the right, we may readily figure that we are in Pioneer Square looking south across Yesler Way.

THEN: For the first twenty years of his more than 40 years selling tinware and other selected hardware, Zilba Mile's shop looked south across Yesler Way down First Ave. S, then known as Commercial Street.

THEN: The Lebanon aka Jesse George building at Occidental and Main opened with the Occidental Hotel in 1891. Subsequently the hotel’s name was changed first to the Touraine and then to the Tourist. The tower could be seen easily from the railroad stations. It kept the name Tourist until replaced in 1960 with a parking lot. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Local candy-maker A.W. Piper was celebrated here for his crème cakes and wedding cakes and also his cartoons. This sketch is of the 1882 lynching from the Maple trees beside Henry and Sara Yesler’s home on James Street. Piper’s bakery was nearby (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The original for this scene of a temporary upheaval on Mill Street (Yesler Way) was one of many historical prints given to the Museum of History and Industry many years ago by the Charles Thorndike estate. Thorndike was one of Seattle’s history buffs extraordinaire. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN: A half-century after they reached the top of First Hill, electric streets cars and cable cars prepare to leave it. (Courtesy, The Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: This “real photo postcard” was sold on stands throughout the city. It was what it claimed to be; that is, its gray tones were real. If you studied them with magnification the grays did not turn into little black dots of varying sizes. (Courtesy, David Chapman and otfrasch.com)

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First appeared in Pacific, March 16, 2003

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HOSPITAL ZONE – QUIET PLEASE

 

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PAIN IN YOUR STOMACH

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EXTRA: SSS A SPRING SKIN WARNING for ERUPTIONS OF EVERY CONCEIVABLE KIND

PULLED forward for the coming season from the Times of June 20, 1904.  THIS WILL COST YOU NOTHING. 

More Market…

The Pike Place Market has been one of my stomping grounds since my early teens. Formative place – the first beer I actually purchased was in Post Alley’s long-gone Victrola Tavern at the age of 15 (still in costume as Laertes in a production of ‘Hamlet’ at the Stage One Theatre).

Yesterday, I watched the Pike Place Market Historical Commission at work and was impressed once again by their commitment to fostering and maintaining a thriving market, accessible and accountable to locals and tourists alike.

A few more photos, taken in glorious daylight saving time while the sun sets over a closing market.

Looking directly down Pike – the lovely Market steps descend to the waterfront
Lovely even in reverse
The Antwerpen Express out of Hamburg is towed into port
End of the day…

Now & Then here and now