Seattle Now & Then: Wallingford Call

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Looking east through Wallingford’s central intersection of N. 45th Street and Wallingford Avenue in 1925. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The “repeat” was recorded earlier this fall.

This week we hope to encourage our readers, and especially the Wallingfordians among them, to join our welcoming cadre at the Good Shepherd Center, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., on Saturday, January 6, 2:30-4:00 o-clock for a lively introduction to the newly formed Historic Wallingford.  It’s about time.

Portland Poet Claire Sykes visits Wallingford

We embrace Wallingford, the Seattle neighborhood that looks south to the Seattle skyline while sitting comfortably with its feet in the foot-bath of Lake Union.  It is a neighborhood of mostly modest homes and always has been. It’s a stable place to tenderly raise a family while still being close to almost everything.  Did you know that “surveys show” that Wallingford residents are often considered learned by reason of their proximity to “higher education.”  Having lived in Wallingford for more than thirty years, I’m counting on it. I hope to have picked up on some of the smarts regularly pushing west over Interstate-5 from the atmosphere circulating above the University of Washington.  (Note: one does not move into Wallingford from that direction without also battling the air and audio pollutants contributed by the freeway.)

QFC, formerly the Food Giant, adding a story and safer parking in 2009.

The neighborhood’s first homebuilders promoted it as Wallingford Hill, and north of N. 45th Street, it surely does rise high above its eastern border, the freeway.  But Wallingford is uncertain about its northern limits.  By now, after waves of planners, promoters and Green Lake advocates have massaged the neighborhood’s shoulders, its north end is generally set at N. 50th Avenue.  This is mildly embarrassing, because the Wallingford Addition was first platted north of N. 50th in the southeast Green Lake neighborhood, although Wallingford Avenue does run the entire inter-lake journey north-south from Green Lake to Lake Union.

Above the Times sampler on Wallingford’s 45th Street in 1925. Below repeats of the same properties about a dozen years ago. (Well, I forget when the Blue Star on Stone Way opened, and these were part of the neighborhood exhibit I mounted for its walls.  The film “Singles” is running at the Guild 45.  It was released in the early 1990s, but this showing at the neighborhood’s theatre was probably not its first run, especially given that the film was shot in Seattle.  You remember.  Note that this week’s featured photo appears top-left in the top montage from 1925.) CLICK TO ENLARGE

First printed in The Times Rotogravure Pictorial Section on October 25, 1925, this week’s featured photo looks east on N. 45th Street to Wallingford Avenue.  The still-standing apartment house at the northwest corner was blessed with tenants James and Carrie Straker. The steadfast Strakers lived in one of the eight apartments and ran their mixed hardware store and auto supply (see signs) for 45 years at the same address, 1720 N. 45th Street.  Note, that while N. 45th is busy, the namesake arterial that crosses it is at rest, at least when compared to Stone Way, Wallingford’s next north-south arterial to the west. Stone Way is still considered by some Fremont folk as Wallingford’s western border. It largely lost this distinction to Aurora Avenue in the 1930s with the building of both the Aurora high bridge and its speedway cut through Woodland Park.

Wallingfordians planting extra produce for the hungry, and with these women behind it, the hungry got the harvest.
Good Shepherd seen from the Tilth garden in January and May 2007.
Lincoln High School enlarged to the north (left) but still without paved streets.
A Gasworks sunset with Capitol Hill glowing behind it above the east shore of Lake Union., ca. 2000.   CLICK TO ENLARGE
Latona School. The salvaged front door to the otherwise razed brick wing on 42nd Street. . It was moved to the corner. The school’s restored clapboard part appears in part through the terracotta passage. The photograph dates from September 6, 2006. I videotaped much of the changes on this campus with interviews for one of the several films-videos for which there may well be too little time left to fulfill. Such as it is.
The restored Latona School with the next addition attached to its south side, center-right. This photo was taken from near the arch shown above.

With the Good Shepherd Center, Lincoln High School, the Gas Works, and, maybe your home – perhaps a bungalow – Wallingford is landmark-rich.  There will be plenty of parking at the Good Shepherd Center on the afternoon of Saturday, January 6.

Back-lit and posing in the Good Shepherd’s pergola on August 9, 2008..
The Pergola’s surrounds on November 2, 2008 still dappled with fallen plums.
Foodland at the northeast corner of 45th Steet and Wallingford Avenue. {Click to Enlarge)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Again and again from Ron Edge and myself – Ron First with the more recently published links picked from the blog.  Some, we hope, will be familiar to you.

THEN: Looking west down Ewing Street (North 34th) in 1907 with the nearly new trolley tracks on the left and a drainage ditch on the right to protect both the tracks and the still barely graded street from flooding.  (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)

foodland-from-school-then-mr

guild-45

Temporarily untended the Good Shepherd orchard awaits its fate, ca. 1978.

4719 Thackeray Place NE.  The 1938 WPA tax photo.

THEN: The Latona Bridge was constructed in 1891 along the future line of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge.  The photo was taken from the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway right-of-way, now the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. The Northlake Apartment/Hotel on the right survived and struggled into the 1960s.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The historical view looks directly south into the Latona addition’s business district on Sixth Ave. NE. from the Northern Pacific’s railroad bridge, now part of the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Long-time Wallingford resident Victor Lygdman looks south through the work-in-progress on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge during the summer of 1959.  Bottom-right are the remnants of the Latona business and industrial district, including the Wayland Mill and the Northlake Apartments, replaced now with Ivar’s Salmon House and its parking. (Photo by Victor Lygdman)

THEN: From 1909 to the mid-late 1920s, the precipitous grade separation between the upper and lower parts of NE 40th Street west of 7th Ave. NE was faced with a timber wall. When the wall was removed, the higher part of NE 40th was shunted north, cutting into the lawns of the homes beside it. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The 1906-07 Gas Works at the north end of Lake Union went idle in 1956 when natural gas first reached Seattle by pipeline. In this photo, taken about fifteen years later, the Wallingford Peninsula is still home to the plant’s abandoned and “hanging gardens of metal.” (Courtesy: Rich Haag)

Then: The thousands of skaters on Green Lake in this late January 1916 view could not have known that the skating would soon be over, one of the victims of the Big Snow of 1916. Courtesy Fairlook Antiques

edgewater-nef-40-then-mr

THEN: The rear end of the derailed trolley on N. 35th Street appears right-of-center a few feet east of Albion Place N. and the curved track from which the unrestrained car jumped on the morning of August 21, 1903. (Courtesy, Fremont Historical Society)

THEN: Roosevelt Way bustling after the war.  This subject first appeared in The Seattle Times on July 7, 1946.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: sliver of the U.W. campus building called the Applied Physics Laboratory appears on the far right of this 1940 look east towards the U.W. campus from the N.E. 40th Street off-ramp from the University Bridge. While very little other than the enlarged laboratory survives in the fore and mid-grounds, much on the horizon of campus buildings and apartments still stand. (Courtesy, Genevieve McCoy)

 

 

======

======

======

======

It is now a quarter century since I joined Frank before the home in which he was raised on Wallingford’s Eastern Avenue.

======

======

CLICK TO ENLARGE

GASWORKS from Queen Anne Hill, 1959.
ca. 1912
Grandmas Cookies look over the closed gas plant near the beginning of its dismantling. Note the rising hill on the left of this Wallingford Peninsula.
For one of the Gasworks last post-gas but pre-park uses, the Butterfat Band performs a rock version of Humpty Dumpty, with the “lesser” cloth rendering of a “Universal Worm” hanging beside them from the tank, all of it done for a scene in the film SKY RIVER ROCK FIRE, a movie still in production forty years later! (Frankly, it needs funding.)
The Butterfat Volunteer Chorus
First appeared in The Times on the Sunday of November 26, 2006.

======

A multiplied detail of a Wallingford Landscape incision built from a digital slice of its ground cover.

======

A Wallingford detail. And a quiz. Can you identify its corner?

 

Seattle Now & Then: Husky Stadium, 1920

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The Husky Stadium’s basic horseshoe bleachers were barely completed in time for the transcontinental visit of the Dartmouth College team on Nov. 27, 1920. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
NOW: Half time at this years Husky Utah Utes game on Nov. 18.

Ninety-seven years have passed between these two games? The game played “then” was the first in Husky Stadium, brand new in 1920 when the Dartmouth College Indians from Hanover New Hampshire beat the Huskies 28 to 7.

UW football team of 1920. Courtesy Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI

Besides a few points, the most important thing missing in 1920 was a bridge, a way for fans to readily get to the new stadium from the more populated south side of its intimate neighbor, the Lake Washington Ship Canal (1916).  For the Dartmouth game the Huskies graduate manager, Dar Meisnest improvised a row of barges that would only temporarily block shipping.  Meisnest was also a leading promoter for the Gothic Montlake Bridge first opened in 1925. It is the last of the bascules to span the canal.

Montlake Bridge construction, February 6, 1925. Courtesy Loomis Miller

Husky Stadium has also hosted a few performances without footballs.  In 1923 hundreds of local pastor-led Christian thespians staged a passion play before forty thousand on a stage that filled the

Preparing for the Wayfarer at the east end of the stadium.  Photo by Louis Whittelsy.
Wayfarer program

west end zone.  In 1927 Charles Lindbergh buzzed the stadium in his Spirit of St. Louis, and after landing at Sandpoint took the short ride to the stadium in a yacht for a “visit” with about 30,000 admirers.

Seattle Mayor Bertha Landes with Charles Lindbergh during his 1927 tour.

For lifting spirits on the home front, civilian-defense workers produced a mock “Bombing of Seattle” by a squadron of P-38 fighters firing blanks on faux but flammable homes and businesses built and ignited on the playing field (not by the fighters) for the spectacle of destruction.  The fake but fiery bombing of June 13, 1943 was well attended.

My photographs of the WWII stunt bombing having escaped me, I include above a wartime aerial of the stadium, upper-left, and the temporary student housing, center. For the faux fighting and also in 1943, or nearly, I include below a photograph of myself [p,d,] saving the world for democracy far from the front in the back yard of the Dorpat family home on Reeves Drive in Grand Forks, North Dakota. [CLICK  TO ENLARGE]

For his repeat Jean chose the Husky’s game with the Utah Utes on the Saturday night of November 18 last.  With the last minute victory of 33 to 30, Husky quarterback Jake Browning broke the UW career record for touchdown passes (now with seventy-seven.)  We wonder how many football games have been played on this gridiron since its 1920 loss to the Ivy League, and how many of those were won by the Pacific Northwest lads. Given the ripening now of another Husky centennial we expect that the athletic department’s public relations statisticians will to come forth with answers by 2020.

WEB EXTRAS

I took a few panoramic shots of the stadium in 2013 – back when there were day games! Here’s my fave:

Further back, wider angle, 2013

Anything to add, fellahs?  Yup – more of the same: neighborhood shots of yore pulled for your Horatian pleasures by Ron Edge and myself.

THEN: Pioneer Arthur Denny's son, Orion, took this photo of popularly named Lake Union John and his second wife, Madeline, sometime before the latter's death in 1906.

THEN: With great clouds overhead and a landscape 45 years shorter than now, one vehicle – a pickup heading east – gets this part of State Route 520 to itself on a weekday afternoon. (courtesy Lawton Gowey)

Walter Ross Baumes Willcox, the architect who planned this 1911 Arboretum aqueduct, went on to design another city landmark mades of reinforced concrete and ornamental bricks: the 1913 Queen Anne Boulevard retaining wall. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The Latona Bridge was constructed in 1891 along the future line of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge. The photo was taken from the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway right-of-way, now the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. The Northlake Apartment/Hotel on the right survived and struggled into the 1960s. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The historical view looks directly south into the Latona addition’s business district on Sixth Ave. NE. from the Northern Pacific’s railroad bridge, now part of the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Long-time Wallingford resident Victor Lygdman looks south through the work-in-progress on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge during the summer of 1959. Bottom-right are the remnants of the Latona business and industrial district, including the Wayland Mill and the Northlake Apartments, replaced now with Ivar’s Salmon House and its parking. (Photo by Victor Lygdman)

THEN: An estimated 50 percent of the materials used in the old Husky Union Building were recycled into its recent remodel. The new HUB seems to reach for the roof like its long-ago predecessor, the AYP’s landmark Forestry building. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: On March 25, 1946, or near it, Wide World Photos recorded here what they titled “University Vet Housing.” It would soon be named the Union Bay Village and house the families of returning veterans. The first 45 bungalows shown here rented for from $35 to $45 dollars a month. It would increase to a “teeming conglomerate of 500 rental units.” With housing for both married students and faculty. The view looks north over a street that no longer exists. The homes on the right horizon face the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail on N.E. Blakeley Street near N.E. 45th Place. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

THEN: The Gothic University of Washington Campus in 1946 beginning a seven-year crowding with prefabricated dormitories beside Frosh Pond. In the immediate background [on the right] is Guggenheim Hall. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: First designated Columbus Street in the 1890 platting of the Brooklyn Addition, and next as 14th Avenue to conform with the Seattle grid, ‘The Ave,’ still its most popular moniker, was renamed University Way by contest in 1919. This trim bungalow at 3711 University Way sat a few lots north of Lake Union’s Portage Bay. (Courtesy, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Archive)

THEN: The 1906-07 Gas Works at the north end of Lake Union went idle in 1956 when natural gas first reached Seattle by pipeline. In this photo, taken about fifteen years later, the Wallingford Peninsula is still home to the plant’s abandoned and “hanging gardens of metal.” (Courtesy: Rich Haag)

THEN: sliver of the U.W. campus building called the Applied Physics Laboratory appears on the far right of this 1940 look east towards the U.W. campus from the N.E. 40th Street off-ramp from the University Bridge. While very little other than the enlarged laboratory survives in the fore and mid-grounds, much on the horizon of campus buildings and apartments still stand. (Courtesy, Genevieve McCoy)

=====

First appeared in Pacific, July 7, 2002]
By Robert Bradley

=====

Union Bay repose, easly 20th Century and years before the 1916 lowering of Lake Union for the ship canal.  Note, between the trees,  the ASUW boat house along the distant shore.  It is shown again, below.

=====

First printed in The Seattle Times on February 2, 2003

=====

=====

Part of the text pulled or copied from Chap. 89, Seattle Now and Then Volume Two. You can find it all on this blog – elsewhere – with a little searching.   CLICK TO ENLARGE

=====

First appeared in Pacific, June, 6, 2002.

=====

First published in The Sunday Times on February 7, 1993.

=====

=====

=====

=====

Appeared first in The Times on January 6, 2002.

=====

=====

First appeared in Pacific on November 6, 2002.

=====

Martha Owens, wife of long-time UW football coach Jim Owens, watches from the press box at half-time. A caption for the Seattle Times glossy continues, “Mrs. Owens keeps it simple. Although she is married to the coach and has been watching games for more than 20-years, Mrs. Jim (Martha) Owens isn’t sure she can tall an “I formation” form a single-wing.”

=====

HIS MARK BY FISH REMARKS ON UW FOOTBALL SUBSTITUTIONS IN 1947 [October 12, 1947]

I first talked with Seattle Times humorist Byron Fish a few weeks before his death. I knew and admired his wit largely from his features with The Times. Since then I’ve learned more about Byron from his family and from his work as Ivar Haglund’s first press agent, for the most part in the 1940s. Look for THE ILLUSTRATED IVAR later next year (2018 – or the year following) for a greater display of Fish’s fine fish humor.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

=====

 

 

=====

 

 

Rogues’ Christmas list of stories

Pre-show at Taproot Theatre

We had a lovely evening at the Taproot Theatre and I received a number of requests for a list of the readings performed by our stellar cast. Here they are in order:

  • ‘Christmas in Qatar’ by Calvin Trillin (read by Paul Dorpat)
  • ‘You Better Not Cry’ (an excerpt) by Augusten Burroughs (Jean Sherrard)
  • ‘Christmas Every Day’ by William Dean Howells (Kurt Beattie)
  • ‘A Christmas Spectacle’ by Robert Benchley (Kurt)
  • ‘The Three Wise Guys’ by Sandra Cisneros (Bill Ontiveros)
  • ‘Christmas Cracker’ by Jeanette Winterson (Marianne Owen)

Our wonderful house band, Pineola, performed intro and interim music. I’ll update their set list when I can get it.

There’s only one more chance to catch this program: next Saturday at the Rainier Arts Center in Columbia City. But this show’s only available to Town Hall members. What a fine time to show your support and join Town Hall –  then join us for the party on Saturday!

‘Rogues’ Christmas’ – This Year at the Taproot Theatre

Northgate Santa, 1952. He knows when you are sleeping…

Greetings, all! FYI, this evening’s performance will not be held at the usual Town Hall location, which is closed for remodel and reconstruction! All Town Hall events are now sprinkled throughout the city in many different venues. Ours is at Greenwood’s Taproot Theatre. For direction and info on parking, please click here.

Thanks for the suggestion to clarify this, Clay Eals!

Seattle Now & Then: Grading Fremont

The head of a terrifying 30-foot tall Santa – Northgate Mall, 1952

A note from Jean:
Before continuing on to this week’s column, please excuse Paul and me for a shameless plug of our upcoming event. Sunday evening, we will return with our annual celebration of literature and music ‘A Rogues’ Christmas’, a part of ACT Theatre’s Short Stories Live series (usually held at Town Hall, but moved this year to the Taproot Theatre during reconstruction). 

(Now, as always, please click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Looking West circa 1911 from Fremont’s bridge to the improved Northern Pacific Railroad’s double-track line on the left, and work-in-progress on raising Ewing Avenue twenty feet with fill behind a new concrete retaining wall. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Sculptor Mark Stevens’ 65-foot-high brushed-stainless steel sculpture named Monsruang aka Jewels of Heaven, is held to the six story corner tower of the Epi Building.
Artist Mark Stevens perched high on his sculpture Jewels of Heaven.
The base of Steven’s work above a Fremont Street Fair.

For his contemporary repeat Jean Sherrard has moved a few feet north of this week’s featured “then.” The brick Google Building at the southwest corner of Fremont Avenue and 43rd Street, got in his way. While both views look west from the north end of the Fremont Bridge, the historical photographer stood a few feet south of Jean’s prospect to include, on the left, the then new double trackage of the Northern Pacific Railroad. The construction confusion on the right hides the work-in-progress on the grade separation between the railroad tracks and the line of false-front businesses on the north side of Ewing Street.

Looking east on the Northern Pacific Railroad’s double tracks through Fremont on June 25, 1917, a year following the dedication of the Lake Washington Ship Canal. Ewing Street, aka 34th Avenue, is atop the concrete retaining wall on the left.
At its west end the start of the 34th Street concrete wall less than a block east of the trolley car barn (on the left) dated December 11, 1936 with Phinney Ridge on the horizon.
Ewing Street (34th) west from Fremont. Note the we presume dangerous door on the second floor facade of Star Plumbing, left-of-center. 
Seen from Queen Anne Hill, concluding work on the Fremont “High Bridge” in 1911. Compare the line of store fronts on Ewing Street just left of its intersection with the north end of the new bridge at the center of the subject..
Also from Queen Anne, but about five years earlier with the low bridge still serving and many of the same storefronts on Ewing (left-of-center) at their original elevation. A copy made from one of real photo artist Q. A. Oakes’ many postcards of Seattle subjects snapped in the first years of the 20th Century. You might expect to find this look into Fremont  for sale in a drug store or at a tobacco stand.

The businesses showing in this first block west of Fremont Avenue as far north as Evanston Street are from left-to-right, a dye works, a pool hall, a café, a real estate, loans and insurance office, the New York Laundry (which in a 1910 Times classified was looking for an “experienced ladies’ clothes ironer”), and the Star Plumbing and Sheet Metal Works. The plumbing store shows two small windows on its second floor with a door between them that oddly or imprudently opens to neither steps nor a balcony. This is surely a vestige of this business row when Ewing Street was at its original elevation, nearly twenty-feet lower than it stands here. Continuing to the right (east) the business lineup is stocked with more community necessities: a bar, an undertaker, a store for shoes and another for home furnishings.

The Lake Union Outlet marked on an 1893 Map. The canal to Salmon Bay still serpentines like a creek – Ross Creek it is, named for a family with a claim on booth sides of their waterway to the west of Fremont. Note that here Fremont Avenue is still named Lake.  Ewing Street is marked with tracks for the Seattle and Northern Railway, which first reached Fremont in 1887 as the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern. 
A dozen years later – or so – in the 1904-5 Sanborn Real Estate Map,  Ewing still has its tracks, Fremont has replaced the name of Lake Avenue with its own, and the storefronts on the north side of Ewing are snug (mostly) and in line with their footprints. With both Ewing and Fremont Ave. the businesses are still at their original elevation.
Side-by-side details of the outlet from both the 1908 (on the left) and 1912 Baist Real Estate Maps. In the interim the concrete retaining ball along the south side of Ewing has been built and holds the street to its new elevation. CLICK TO ENLARGE
A Goggle-Earth look at the outlet and yellow-line markings for Ewing/34th Street, to the left (west) and right (east) of the Lake Washington Ship Canal.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

Ewing Street was named for Henry Clark Ewing, a precocious real estate agent who came to Seattle with his parents as a fourteen-year-old in 1886 and was building his own real estate office within ten years. In the biographical section of Seattle and Environs, judge and pioneer historian Clarence Hanford describes Ewing as one who “has acquired a wonderfully intimate knowledge of realty values and his judgment of such carries as much significance as that of any other man’s in Seattle.” Ewing’s significance reached Fremont in the late 1880s with his own street name. However, beginning in 1923 the street remembered Ewing only south of the canal where it was kept in the mostly residential Lower Queen neighborhoods. On the industrious Fremont side of the canal Ewing and its historical connotations were surrendered for another street-grid number, North 34th Street.

Looking north into Fremont from the Queen Anne side along the line of the new but still temporary timber bridge on Fremont Avenue.

I feel safe in ascribing the date for the featured view as sometime between 1910-1912. On Sept. 2, 1910, The Seattle Times reported “work was begun this morning on the new Fremont Avenue viaduct across the Lake Washington Canal site just below Lake Union.” We note that the bridge is called a viaduct in The Times report and the canal merely a site. Committed canal cutting between Lake Union and Shilshole Bay began in 1911 and continued into 1916. (Remember, we celebrated its centennial last year.) Although about two stories taller than the first bridge at Fremont, the new “viaduct” was much longer and so actually resembled a viaduct while reaching new and higher grades at both ends. Also in 1911, the north shore of Lake Union received a second temporary bridge – a lower

A Seattle Times clipping from April 1, 1911, construction work on the Stone Way Bridge seen from the Queen Anne side with the Westlake Trestle at the bottom.

pile-driven viaduct that reached across the northwest corner of the lake from Westlake to the foot of Stone Way. The Stone Way Bridge was razed in 1917, soon after the viaduct on Fremont was replaced by “the busiest bridge in America”, the bascule span on Fremont Ave. that we still cross and/or wait to cross. (Note the second Edge Link below on the opening of the Fremont Bridge.)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, blokes?  Yes Jean – more older neighborhood/vicinity features.

17web

THEN: From the Fremont Bridge, this subject looks northwest across the torrent that followed the washout of the Fremont Dam in the early afternoon of March 13, 1914. Part of the Bryant Lumber and Shingle Mill appears left-of-center. The north end of the Stone Way Trestle appears in the upper right corner. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: This panorama could have used a tower (or drone) to better survey the size of the June 1, 191l, crowd gathered in Fremont/Ross to celebrate the beginning of construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

https://i1.wp.com/pauldorpat.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/fairview-se-lake-union1.jpg

THEN: One of a few photographs recording from different prospects the Fremont trolley car barn on Dec.11, 1936. North 35th Street, on the right, was originally named Blewett for Edward and Carrie Blewett. In 1888 the couple, fresh from Fremont, Nebraska, first named and promoted Fremont as a Seattle neighborhood. That year Fremont also got its lumber mill. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: If I have counted correctly this ca. 1930 Fremont Baptist Orchestra is appointed with three cellos, eleven violins and violas, two saxophones, two clarinets, one coronet, one oboe, one flute and two members who seem to be hiding their instruments. (courtesy Fremont Baptist Church)

Built for the manufacture of a fantastic engine that did not make it beyond its model, the Fremont factory’s second owner, Carlos Flohr, used it to build vacuum chambers for protecting telescope lenses. Thirty feet across and made from stainless steel the lens holders were often mistaken for flying saucers. (photo courtesy Kvichak marine Industries.)

edgewater-nef-40-then-mr

THEN: One of a few photographs recording from different prospects the Fremont trolley car barn on Dec.11, 1936. North 35th Street, on the right, was originally named Blewett for Edward and Carrie Blewett. In 1888 the couple, fresh from Fremont, Nebraska, first named and promoted Fremont as a Seattle neighborhood. That year Fremont also got its lumber mill. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The rear end of the derailed trolley on N. 35th Street appears right-of-center a few feet east of Albion Place N. and the curved track from which the unrestrained car jumped on the morning of August 21, 1903. (Courtesy, Fremont Historical Society)

THEN: With his or her back to the original Ballard business district, an unnamed photographer looks southeast on Leary Way, most likely in 1936.

THEN: A.J. McDonald’s panorama of Lake Union and its surrounds dates from the early 1890s. It was taken from First Hill, looking north from near the intersection of Terry Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: James Lee, for many years an official photographer for Seattle’s public works department, looks south over Ballard’s Salmon Bay a century ago. Queen Anne Hill marks the horizon, with a glimpse of Magnolia on the far right. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Samuel McKnight’s early 1890s panorama of Lake Union also looks north into most of Seattle’s seventeen square-mile annexation of 1891, when the city limits were pushed north from McGraw Street to 85th Street. Fremont, Edgewater, the future Wallingford, Latona, and Brooklyn (University District) were among the neighborhoods included. (Courtesy, Dan Kerlee)

 

======

=====

First appeared in Pacific on May 28, 2000

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

REPUNZEL at the FRONT DOOR of the WEST TOWER

I snapped this while crossing the Fremont Bridge many years ago when the orange primer on the bridge was turning pink.   It was several years before Fremont glass artist Rodman Hiller convinced the powers that then were both downtown in City Hall and in Fremont,  ( perhaps then already “the center of the universe”)  to help him brighten the north facade of the west tower with shining neon tubes giving shape to a glowing likeness of Rapunzel the Teutonic beauty with blonde (or golden) hair that grew so fast and unrelenting that “before the tower” she wrapped it around herself.  She had no need for clothes, although with adolescence wore them for fear of arousing the loggers who worked for a very bad witch who owned the forest that Rapunzel and her parents lived beside.   And much else.  The hag paid well enough to keep the men chopping.  The forest surrounded a tower that was fated to move Rapunzel’s tale into it and toward tragedy if not into it.  As with most enduring tales there are versions.  With this one we need to both learn more and get some sleep.   We pause noting that at the age of about thirteen (about development one cannot be sure with fairy tales) Rapunzel was locked in a tower without doors and but one high window by a very very bad witch named Gothel who was easily one of the one percent of Bavaria and  who was owed something – Rapunzel – by Rapunzel’s parents, who were also her renters.  Rapunzel was named for the plant her mother craved when she was  pregnant.  Her father stole it at night from the only source, the witches garden, and was caught.  I have read that one does not censure the diet of a pregnant woman.   I’ll pause here back on bridge.  My capture of the blonde on the door to the north tower predates artist Hiller’s portrait installed and captured there by many years.   I’ll count them later following more study of the fable.

=====

 

Our Johnny is dead

Didier  at the Kiosk Place Monge

My first record was  offered for Christmas , it was a Johnny Hallyday’s 45 rpm with the  famous song “Teenage idol”  (“l’idole des jeunes “).  In the sixties, he brought in the french musical landscape a sacred wind of youth, Rock and Roll and America .

For 60 years of career , his songs have been always in the mood of the time, he became a monumental and popular singer.

We have been all singing so loud on our moped “Que je t’aime ” “Nous avons tous quelque chose du Tennessee”…

Mon  premier disque était celui de Johnny, c’était la célèbre chanson  l’idole des jeunes. Dans les années 60 , il apporta dans le paysage musical français un sacré vent de jeunesse, de Rock and Roll et d’Amérique.

Nous avons tous chanté a tue-tête “Que je t’aime” ” Nous avons tous quelque chose du Tennessee”

Johnny I photographed in 1987 during  a rehearsal

Johnny, que j’ai photographié  en 1987 pendant une répétition

Now & Then here and now