All posts by jrsherrard

Just a guy, ya know…

Rogues’ Christmas list of stories

Pre-show at Taproot Theatre

We had a lovely evening at the Taproot Theatre and I received a number of requests for a list of the readings performed by our stellar cast. Here they are in order:

  • ‘Christmas in Qatar’ by Calvin Trillin (read by Paul Dorpat)
  • ‘You Better Not Cry’ (an excerpt) by Augusten Burroughs (Jean Sherrard)
  • ‘Christmas Every Day’ by William Dean Howells (Kurt Beattie)
  • ‘A Christmas Spectacle’ by Robert Benchley (Kurt)
  • ‘The Three Wise Guys’ by Sandra Cisneros (Bill Ontiveros)
  • ‘Christmas Cracker’ by Jeanette Winterson (Marianne Owen)

Our wonderful house band, Pineola, performed intro and interim music. I’ll update their set list when I can get it.

There’s only one more chance to catch this program: next Saturday at the Rainier Arts Center in Columbia City. But this show’s only available to Town Hall members. What a fine time to show your support and join Town Hall –  then join us for the party on Saturday!

‘Rogues’ Christmas’ – This Year at the Taproot Theatre

Northgate Santa, 1952. He knows when you are sleeping…

Greetings, all! FYI, this evening’s performance will not be held at the usual Town Hall location, which is closed for remodel and reconstruction! All Town Hall events are now sprinkled throughout the city in many different venues. Ours is at Greenwood’s Taproot Theatre. For direction and info on parking, please click here.

Thanks for the suggestion to clarify this, Clay Eals!

Seattle Now & Then: Grading Fremont

The head of a terrifying 30-foot tall Santa – Northgate Mall, 1952

A note from Jean:
Before continuing on to this week’s column, please excuse Paul and me for a shameless plug of our upcoming event. Sunday evening, we will return with our annual celebration of literature and music ‘A Rogues’ Christmas’, a part of ACT Theatre’s Short Stories Live series (usually held at Town Hall, but moved this year to the Taproot Theatre during reconstruction). 

(Now, as always, please click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Looking West circa 1911 from Fremont’s bridge to the improved Northern Pacific Railroad’s double-track line on the left, and work-in-progress on raising Ewing Avenue twenty feet with fill behind a new concrete retaining wall. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Sculptor Mark Stevens’ 65-foot-high brushed-stainless steel sculpture named Monsruang aka Jewels of Heaven, is held to the six story corner tower of the Epi Building.
Artist Mark Stevens perched high on his sculpture Jewels of Heaven.
The base of Steven’s work above a Fremont Street Fair.

For his contemporary repeat Jean Sherrard has moved a few feet north of this week’s featured “then.” The brick Google Building at the southwest corner of Fremont Avenue and 43rd Street, got in his way. While both views look west from the north end of the Fremont Bridge, the historical photographer stood a few feet south of Jean’s prospect to include, on the left, the then new double trackage of the Northern Pacific Railroad. The construction confusion on the right hides the work-in-progress on the grade separation between the railroad tracks and the line of false-front businesses on the north side of Ewing Street.

Looking east on the Northern Pacific Railroad’s double tracks through Fremont on June 25, 1917, a year following the dedication of the Lake Washington Ship Canal. Ewing Street, aka 34th Avenue, is atop the concrete retaining wall on the left.
At its west end the start of the 34th Street concrete wall less than a block east of the trolley car barn (on the left) dated December 11, 1936 with Phinney Ridge on the horizon.
Ewing Street (34th) west from Fremont. Note the we presume dangerous door on the second floor facade of Star Plumbing, left-of-center. 
Seen from Queen Anne Hill, concluding work on the Fremont “High Bridge” in 1911. Compare the line of store fronts on Ewing Street just left of its intersection with the north end of the new bridge at the center of the subject..
Also from Queen Anne, but about five years earlier with the low bridge still serving and many of the same storefronts on Ewing (left-of-center) at their original elevation. A copy made from one of real photo artist Q. A. Oakes’ many postcards of Seattle subjects snapped in the first years of the 20th Century. You might expect to find this look into Fremont  for sale in a drug store or at a tobacco stand.

The businesses showing in this first block west of Fremont Avenue as far north as Evanston Street are from left-to-right, a dye works, a pool hall, a café, a real estate, loans and insurance office, the New York Laundry (which in a 1910 Times classified was looking for an “experienced ladies’ clothes ironer”), and the Star Plumbing and Sheet Metal Works. The plumbing store shows two small windows on its second floor with a door between them that oddly or imprudently opens to neither steps nor a balcony. This is surely a vestige of this business row when Ewing Street was at its original elevation, nearly twenty-feet lower than it stands here. Continuing to the right (east) the business lineup is stocked with more community necessities: a bar, an undertaker, a store for shoes and another for home furnishings.

The Lake Union Outlet marked on an 1893 Map. The canal to Salmon Bay still serpentines like a creek – Ross Creek it is, named for a family with a claim on booth sides of their waterway to the west of Fremont. Note that here Fremont Avenue is still named Lake.  Ewing Street is marked with tracks for the Seattle and Northern Railway, which first reached Fremont in 1887 as the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern. 
A dozen years later – or so – in the 1904-5 Sanborn Real Estate Map,  Ewing still has its tracks, Fremont has replaced the name of Lake Avenue with its own, and the storefronts on the north side of Ewing are snug (mostly) and in line with their footprints. With both Ewing and Fremont Ave. the businesses are still at their original elevation.
Side-by-side details of the outlet from both the 1908 (on the left) and 1912 Baist Real Estate Maps. In the interim the concrete retaining ball along the south side of Ewing has been built and holds the street to its new elevation. CLICK TO ENLARGE
A Goggle-Earth look at the outlet and yellow-line markings for Ewing/34th Street, to the left (west) and right (east) of the Lake Washington Ship Canal.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

Ewing Street was named for Henry Clark Ewing, a precocious real estate agent who came to Seattle with his parents as a fourteen-year-old in 1886 and was building his own real estate office within ten years. In the biographical section of Seattle and Environs, judge and pioneer historian Clarence Hanford describes Ewing as one who “has acquired a wonderfully intimate knowledge of realty values and his judgment of such carries as much significance as that of any other man’s in Seattle.” Ewing’s significance reached Fremont in the late 1880s with his own street name. However, beginning in 1923 the street remembered Ewing only south of the canal where it was kept in the mostly residential Lower Queen neighborhoods. On the industrious Fremont side of the canal Ewing and its historical connotations were surrendered for another street-grid number, North 34th Street.

Looking north into Fremont from the Queen Anne side along the line of the new but still temporary timber bridge on Fremont Avenue.

I feel safe in ascribing the date for the featured view as sometime between 1910-1912. On Sept. 2, 1910, The Seattle Times reported “work was begun this morning on the new Fremont Avenue viaduct across the Lake Washington Canal site just below Lake Union.” We note that the bridge is called a viaduct in The Times report and the canal merely a site. Committed canal cutting between Lake Union and Shilshole Bay began in 1911 and continued into 1916. (Remember, we celebrated its centennial last year.) Although about two stories taller than the first bridge at Fremont, the new “viaduct” was much longer and so actually resembled a viaduct while reaching new and higher grades at both ends. Also in 1911, the north shore of Lake Union received a second temporary bridge – a lower

A Seattle Times clipping from April 1, 1911, construction work on the Stone Way Bridge seen from the Queen Anne side with the Westlake Trestle at the bottom.

pile-driven viaduct that reached across the northwest corner of the lake from Westlake to the foot of Stone Way. The Stone Way Bridge was razed in 1917, soon after the viaduct on Fremont was replaced by “the busiest bridge in America”, the bascule span on Fremont Ave. that we still cross and/or wait to cross. (Note the second Edge Link below on the opening of the Fremont Bridge.)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, blokes?  Yes Jean – more older neighborhood/vicinity features.

17web

THEN: From the Fremont Bridge, this subject looks northwest across the torrent that followed the washout of the Fremont Dam in the early afternoon of March 13, 1914. Part of the Bryant Lumber and Shingle Mill appears left-of-center. The north end of the Stone Way Trestle appears in the upper right corner. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: This panorama could have used a tower (or drone) to better survey the size of the June 1, 191l, crowd gathered in Fremont/Ross to celebrate the beginning of construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

https://i1.wp.com/pauldorpat.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/fairview-se-lake-union1.jpg

THEN: One of a few photographs recording from different prospects the Fremont trolley car barn on Dec.11, 1936. North 35th Street, on the right, was originally named Blewett for Edward and Carrie Blewett. In 1888 the couple, fresh from Fremont, Nebraska, first named and promoted Fremont as a Seattle neighborhood. That year Fremont also got its lumber mill. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: If I have counted correctly this ca. 1930 Fremont Baptist Orchestra is appointed with three cellos, eleven violins and violas, two saxophones, two clarinets, one coronet, one oboe, one flute and two members who seem to be hiding their instruments. (courtesy Fremont Baptist Church)

Built for the manufacture of a fantastic engine that did not make it beyond its model, the Fremont factory’s second owner, Carlos Flohr, used it to build vacuum chambers for protecting telescope lenses. Thirty feet across and made from stainless steel the lens holders were often mistaken for flying saucers. (photo courtesy Kvichak marine Industries.)

edgewater-nef-40-then-mr

THEN: One of a few photographs recording from different prospects the Fremont trolley car barn on Dec.11, 1936. North 35th Street, on the right, was originally named Blewett for Edward and Carrie Blewett. In 1888 the couple, fresh from Fremont, Nebraska, first named and promoted Fremont as a Seattle neighborhood. That year Fremont also got its lumber mill. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The rear end of the derailed trolley on N. 35th Street appears right-of-center a few feet east of Albion Place N. and the curved track from which the unrestrained car jumped on the morning of August 21, 1903. (Courtesy, Fremont Historical Society)

THEN: With his or her back to the original Ballard business district, an unnamed photographer looks southeast on Leary Way, most likely in 1936.

THEN: A.J. McDonald’s panorama of Lake Union and its surrounds dates from the early 1890s. It was taken from First Hill, looking north from near the intersection of Terry Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: James Lee, for many years an official photographer for Seattle’s public works department, looks south over Ballard’s Salmon Bay a century ago. Queen Anne Hill marks the horizon, with a glimpse of Magnolia on the far right. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Samuel McKnight’s early 1890s panorama of Lake Union also looks north into most of Seattle’s seventeen square-mile annexation of 1891, when the city limits were pushed north from McGraw Street to 85th Street. Fremont, Edgewater, the future Wallingford, Latona, and Brooklyn (University District) were among the neighborhoods included. (Courtesy, Dan Kerlee)

 

======

=====

First appeared in Pacific on May 28, 2000

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

REPUNZEL at the FRONT DOOR of the WEST TOWER

I snapped this while crossing the Fremont Bridge many years ago when the orange primer on the bridge was turning pink.   It was several years before Fremont glass artist Rodman Hiller convinced the powers that then were both downtown in City Hall and in Fremont,  ( perhaps then already “the center of the universe”)  to help him brighten the north facade of the west tower with shining neon tubes giving shape to a glowing likeness of Rapunzel the Teutonic beauty with blonde (or golden) hair that grew so fast and unrelenting that “before the tower” she wrapped it around herself.  She had no need for clothes, although with adolescence wore them for fear of arousing the loggers who worked for a very bad witch who owned the forest that Rapunzel and her parents lived beside.   And much else.  The hag paid well enough to keep the men chopping.  The forest surrounded a tower that was fated to move Rapunzel’s tale into it and toward tragedy if not into it.  As with most enduring tales there are versions.  With this one we need to both learn more and get some sleep.   We pause noting that at the age of about thirteen (about development one cannot be sure with fairy tales) Rapunzel was locked in a tower without doors and but one high window by a very very bad witch named Gothel who was easily one of the one percent of Bavaria and  who was owed something – Rapunzel – by Rapunzel’s parents, who were also her renters.  Rapunzel was named for the plant her mother craved when she was  pregnant.  Her father stole it at night from the only source, the witches garden, and was caught.  I have read that one does not censure the diet of a pregnant woman.   I’ll pause here back on bridge.  My capture of the blonde on the door to the north tower predates artist Hiller’s portrait installed and captured there by many years.   I’ll count them later following more study of the fable.

=====

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Kalakala at Low Tide

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Frank Shaw’s 1960’s stern-end exposure of the Kalakala, “the world’s first streamlined ferry.”
NOW: In spite of the heroic efforts of the Kalakala Foundation, the banged-up and bandaged beauty could not be saved, or Jean would have surely posed it in his “now.” The scrapping of the banged-up “Silver Slug” was completed in Tacoma during the cold first week of February 2015.

For occupying the attention of his two youngest sons, David and me, during long family road trips Dad devised and repeatedly replenished what we called “Pop’s Pop quizzes.”  On one such trip from Spokane to Seattle, I was able to easily answer Pop’s query, “What is the name of the world’s first streamlined ferry.”  That this then ten or eleven-year-old’s answer was correct is testimony to the widespread popularity of the feted Kalakala.

The Black Ball Line’s flagship ferry was the most popular man-made creation on Puget Sound until the raising of the Space Needle in 1962.  We have, perhaps inevitably, featured this ferry for “Now and Then” more than once.  For instance, on the Sunday of November 3, 1991, we showed her passing through the Chittenden Locks in 1947 for one of the ferry’s few visits into our fresh waterways.  Ordinarily, busy carrying both tourists and Naval shipyard workers back and forth to Bremerton, the Kalakala did not need our lakes.

We repeat this portrait of the “Flying Bird” in the clip with that title included below in the stream of features pulled from past Pacifics.

Of the many photographs or illustrations of this ferry that I have collected and/or copied, the over-the-shoulder portrait by Frank Shaw that we have chosen for our feature this week is one of my favorites for several reasons. We put it at the top.  By contrast, the clouded sky brightens the ferry’s silver shine.  The colored slide’s stern end view improves the ferry’s streamlined claim.  Still, the Kalakala’s less kind nickname, “The Silver Slug,” may have been inspired as much by this tapered stern as by the ferry’s bowl-shaped bow where two doors opened wide enough to admit the big trucks of its years, 1935 to 1967.

Perhaps the photographer’s most effective assistant for embellishing the streamlined qualities of the ferry was the low tide.  It drops some of the ferry’s vertical chunkiness, hiding it below Shaw’s prospect, the exposed deck of one of the two Northern Pacific piers are the foot of Yesler Way.  The N.P. was Colman Dock’s neighbor to the south. (In the PacificNW’s printing I mistakenly – and foolishly – named this pier, which served as stand for the photographer, the Grand Trunk Pier.  That, of course, was on the north side of Colman Dock.  My dyslexia seems to be increasingly settling into an early dementia.  Stay tuned.  I’m trying to remember my cane. It has no name that I can share.)

In Wade Stevenso’s ca. 1959 recording from the Smith Tower, the Kalakala is resting in the slip between the two N.P. docks. Yesler Way reaches Alaskan Way (or leaves it) at the bottom left-center.    The Art Deco styled Colman Dock is right-center and to the left (north) of it is the Grand Trunk Pacific pier. The nothern end of Duwamish Head pushed into the frame upper-left.

With the sensational introduction of its modern service in the mid-1930s, the streamlined ferry was promoted with a modern makeover of its Colman Dock terminal with Art Deco touches. You will know, perhaps, that the Kalakala had been transformed from the burned shell of the Peralta, a fire-gutted San Francisco Bay ferry that was sold cheap to the Puget Sound Navigation Company.  Rebuilt here as the PSNC’s flagship it is also a moving monument to Deco design.

The Exchange Building on the left photographed by either Horace Sykes or Robert Bradley while walking the Alaskan Way viaduct in 1953 before it was opened to cars. Note that the 1959 glass-curtain Norton Building is as yet not behind it.  Typical of both Gowey’s and Bradley’s cityscapes the human who appear are not named.    These most likely are like both Breadley and Sykes members of the Seattle Camera Club.

At its center, Frank Shaw’s (or Robert Bradley’s ) waterfront glimpse also includes a second Art Deco landmark, the Securities Building. (sicAnd here falls a second mistake of fact put forth in this trending-pitiful feature.  Thanks to my friend Gavin MacDougall for catching that the Art Deco landmark on Marion St. is the Exchange Building and not the Securities, which is on the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Pike Street.   I have confused the names for these before – and may again.)  The Exchange Building still faces Marion Street from the full block between First and Second Avenues. In his contribution to the University Press’s book “Shaping Seattle Architecture,” Seattle architect-historian Grant Hilderbrand considers this 1929-31 landmark as “perhaps architect John Graham, Sr.’s finest work.”  The reader will surely enjoy a visit to the building’s lobby.  The Exchange Building still stands back-to-back and in contrast with the seventeen stories of International Style aluminum and glass curtain-wall construction of the Norton Building.  Built in 1959 it is considered by some to be Seattle’s first modern skyscraper.  The tops of both the Securities and Norton Buildings can be found in Jean’s repeat — just barely.

At the bay end of the slip between Ivar’s Pier 54 and the Grand Trunk Pier, on the right, the San Mateo ferry’s stack obscures the Smith Tower. Both the Exchange and Norton Buildings rise back-to-back on the left. Ye Olde Fire Station at the foot of Madison Street is behind the ferries. The year is 1962. Ivar successfully lobbied to have the brick station painted for the world’s fair – although he wanted fire engine red, which the design commission considered to bold. They chose a sort-of-red with a Spanish – or perhaps Italian – name. 
Another Fair-Year photo – from 1962 and a high deck of the passenger steamer Dominion Republic, which served as a “Botel” during the Century 21 Worlds Fair. From this prospect the Norton and Exchange buildings are on the far right.   The freshly painted, although still wearing Colman Dock, is across the slip from what is left of the northerly N.P. Dock: a parking lot,
Friend Lawton Gowey snapped this while either coming or going from Colman Dock on an unnamed ferry. The Elwha Ferry fills the center of his subject with the nearly new and still lonely SeaFirst tower holding the center. Here, again on on the right  are the Norton and Exchange Buildings
The Nortron Building late in its 1958-59 construction shot by Lawton Gowey from the southeast corner of Yesler Way and First Avenue South.
The Seattle Times September 28, 1958 clip on the awarding of the glass curtain-wall contract for the Norton Building’s construction. 

LAYING THE CORNERSTONE – SEPTEMBER 30, 1959

Much thanks to Dan Eskenazi for the use of these Roger Dudley photographs of the Norton Building’s cornerstone laying.
Fitting the cornerstone with blue collars at hand just in case.

ONE MONTH LATER THE NORTON GARAGE OPENS

=====

Later, LAWTON GOWEY LOOKS NORTH OVER THE SHOULDERS OF BOTH THE NORTON & EXCHANGE Buildings from the SMITH TOWER.

=======

WEB EXTRAS

Our good friend Clay Eals contributes the following:

“I understand that the focus of tomorrow’s “Now and Then” is on the “Then” of the Kalakala, not its “Now,” because, of course, the Kalakala no longer exists with integrity. But its large wheelhouse and drive train exist in the south parking lot of Salty’s on Alki, courtesy of the restaurant’s owner, Gerry Kingen, who salvaged them in Tacoma on the day in February 2015 that they were to be wholly scrapped. I’m attaching a fun photo I took on Feb. 23, 2015, of the downtown skyline as seen through the portholes of the wheelhouse as it sits at Salty’s on Alki. On one hand, it’s quite sad that the Kalakala is no longer intact, but on the other hand, it’s nice to have a couple of (large) remnants.
P.S. You can see many more photos of Kingen and the salvage operation on this page of the West Seattle Herald from Feb. 9, 2015: https://www.westsideseattle.com/west-seattle-herald/2015/02/09/slideshow-mv-kalakala-comes-saltys-alki. Scroll to the bottom for the slide show of photos by Kingen and the Herald’s Patrick Robinson and David Rosen to get the full view of the remnants.”
A shot of Seattle’s skyline through the extant Kalakala wheelhouse…

Anything to add, lads?  For sure slim Jean, more old features and most of them from the Seattle waterfront.  The first example will be the other Kalakala feature noted above.  It is scanned out of the paper.  After that the first seventeen of these are recent features pulled forth by Ron Edge from the blog, which has been around now for a decade or more.  They need to be clicked to open.  The rest are older features that were scanned as clippings.   They also need to be clicked for enlargements – to read them.

========

Kalakala on an excursion through the Chittenden locks on April 24, 1947. The war is over and it is now possible to move about freely.   CLICK to ENLARGE

=======

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

THEN: Looking south on First Avenue from its northwest corner with Madison Street, circa 1905. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The S. S. Suveric makes a rare visit to Seattle in 1911. (Historical photo courtesy of Jim Westall)

THEN: F. Jay Haynes recorded this ca. 1891 look up the Seattle waterfront and it’s railroad trestles most likely for a report to his employer, the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)

THEN: The Sprague Hotel at 706 Yesler Way was one of many large structures –hotels, apartments and duplexes, built on First Hill to accommodate the housing needs of the city’s manic years of grown between its Great Fire in 1889 and the First World War. Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey

THEN: A winter of 1918 inspection of some captured scales on Terrace Street. The view looks east from near 4th Avenue. (Courtesy City Municipal Archives)

THEN: Arthur Denny named both Marion and James Streets for his invalid brother, James Marion Denny, who was too ill to accompany the “Denny Party” from Oregon to Puget Sound in 1851. (Courtesy, Gary Gaffner)

THEN: In Lawton Gowey’s 1961 pairing, the Smith Tower (1914) was the tallest building in Seattle, and the Pioneer Square landmark Seattle Hotel (1890) had lost most of its top floor. (by Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The driver, lower left, leads his team towards First Avenue up a planked incline on Madison Street. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: The original for this scene of a temporary upheaval on Mill Street (Yesler Way) was one of many historical prints given to the Museum of History and Industry many years ago by the Charles Thorndike estate. Thorndike was one of Seattle’s history buffs extraordinaire. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

===============

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

==================================================

MORE MOORINGS

ANOTHER look at Colman Dock and the Kalakala early in 1955 from the upper deck of the Alaska Way Viaduct. Here the ferry is nestled at the southwest corner of the ferry terminal.

=====

This aerial, taken before the building of the viaduct, whose the Kalakala moored at the northwest corner of Colman Dock and the slip between the ferry terminal and the Alaska Pier, on the right, well-packed.
Ivar Haglund posing with his “gullfriend” in his Acres of Clams office at the southwest corner of Pier 54 with the Kalakala behind him in the slip beside the Grand Trunk Wharf.
The Kalakala in for service at the Lake Union Dry Dock.  CLICK TO ENLARGE
THE KALAKALA during its sad return to Lake Union for the few years it waited on its fate. Close to home and friends I attended three good parties on its decks here.   CLICK TO ENLARGE

=====

 

Seattle Now & Then: Queen Anne’s Scenic Conkling Place

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: This wide-angled panorama sights south on Queen Anne Hill from the corner of Conkling Place West and West Bertona Street. On the far left the Fremont bascule bridge is up and open. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Among the variety of home styles featured among the residences of the Queen Anne Park Addition are both the Spanish Colonial, and the Dutch Colonial, English Tudor and elegant small homes with towers that resemble miniature French castles.

Is it obvious that here is a work-in-progress?  Evidences of a new city addition in the throes of creation include the rough ground cover on the far right.  It is in need of a home.  A meandering clue is the fresh and hardly-stained concrete ribbon that has laid its eccentric path both beyond and behind the line of unfinished homes that cross thru the scene’s center. That the last two or three of the eight or nine homes built here all in a row are the least finished, at least suggests that most of the motorcars parked here belong to carpenters, realtors perhaps more than to prospective buyers.

The nearly new Queen Anne Park Addition revealed in a detail from the city’s 1929 aerial survey. The curving street that extends at the top from a then still patchy West Bertona Street thru the middle of the addition and detail from upper-left is the featured Conkling Place.  You are encouraged to compare these curves to the angles used in the earlier addition and shown in the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map below.

This is Conkling Place, named for the family of pioneer historian Thomas Prosch’s mother, Susan Conkling Prosch.  In the late 1890s Thomas Prosch wrote the Chronological History of Seattle that a century later historylink, the popular on-line encyclopedia of Washington history and heritage, used for the first factoid construction of its webpage.  Although the Prosch mansion was on the south slope of Queen Anne Hill, in the early 20th century the family purchased these acres near the northwest corner of the Hill.  They submitted the plans for their Queen Anne Addition to the city on September 27, 1909.

This detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate map shows the street and plot configurations for the Prosch’s Queen Anne Addition, and not yet the Queen Anne Park Addition with its fine curving lines.  (CLICK to ENLARGE)

The Conklin Place Jean Sherrard recently visited to repeat our featured “then”, begins at the corner of W. Bertona Street and 10TH Avenue West. Prosch’s Conklin was different, it was cut to the southwest with one long straight block to the center of the addition drawn but never developed.  Had it been fulfilled with homes they would have crossed through the footprints of first four or five residences standing here since 1926, the year this concrete was first given its serpentine pour.

A series of display ads for the Queen Anne Park Addition were placed in The Seattle Times in 1927 .This one dates from May Day.

It seems that the new developers were aesthetes allured by the poetic platting and curvilinear inclinations of the City Beautiful Movement.  They named their sensitive acreage the Queen Anne Hill Addition and started building along romantic lines diversely styled residences fit for their curving streets.  The developer’s model home, built in a Spanish style at 3042 10th Avenue West, survives well kept on the avenues pointed corner with West Etruria Street.  It stands one long block and a few feet south of Jean’s prospect above Conklin Place.  Should you decide to explore this unique addition you will discover that most of the homes showing here on Conklin Place in 1927 or 1928 still hold to their uniquely foot-printed lots.

The F.W. Keen Co. classified promotion for a home on Conkling Place. The ad was placed on March 8, 1936 in The Seattle Times. It was one of the pits of the Great Depression. Note that Keen still has “other homes and vacant building lots” in the Queen Anne Park addition.

On February 21, 1926 the F.W. Keen and Company announced in that the building of their new forty-acres residence addition on Queen Anne Hill was underway. “The plat was filed last week.  This is one of the last large close-in tracts suitable for platting.  It will contain 235 lots, with the streets laid out to take advantage of the natural contour of the ground.  The addition has been designated Queen Anne Park.”

To learn much more on the history of this neighborhood, we recommend an essay by the Queen Anne Historical Society’s Florence Halliesen.

WEB EXTRAS

For those enchanted by this lovely prospect, please know that the ‘Now’ view was accomplished with aid of my 21-foot extension pole. A blown-up detail reveals a portion of I-5 and Gasworks Park through the trees:

Conkling photo detail, upper left

Anything to add, kids?

Yes Jean but a little late.   I fell to sleep twice at my desk while preparing this and so was not able to coordinate with Ron Edge for more attractions before he he climbed his own stairs to his own nighty-bears.  (I think he embraces our bears although I do not remember asking him about the same.)  It is now 6am.   Ron is usually up by now.  I suspect that he will get the features he gathers into the blog before most of you (dear readers) have left your Sunday Times and visited this blog.   [These uninvited naps of mine are the “gift” of my increasingly ancient metabolism, I figure. ]  I do know that Ron also climbs stairs to reach his bed, unlike you who sleep on the same floor as  your gas oven.

=====

THE BELOW IS RESERVED FOR RON ONCE HE RISES. 

https://i2.wp.com/pauldorpat.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/crockett-7-w-row-then-mr1.jpg?resize=474%2C308&ssl=1

https://i1.wp.com/pauldorpat.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/queen-anne-top-then1.jpg?resize=474%2C258&ssl=1

montlake-f-roanoke

THEN: This panorama could have used a tower (or drone) to better survey the size of the June 1, 191l, crowd gathered in Fremont/Ross to celebrate the beginning of construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

17web

THEN: From the Fremont Bridge, this subject looks northwest across the torrent that followed the washout of the Fremont Dam in the early afternoon of March 13, 1914. Part of the Bryant Lumber and Shingle Mill appears left-of-center. The north end of the Stone Way Trestle appears in the upper right corner. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: Long thought to be an early footprint for West Seattle’s Admiral Theatre, this charming brick corner was actually far away on another Seattle Hill. Courtesy, Southwest Seattle Historical Society.

THEN: If I have counted correctly this ca. 1930 Fremont Baptist Orchestra is appointed with three cellos, eleven violins and violas, two saxophones, two clarinets, one coronet, one oboe, one flute and two members who seem to be hiding their instruments. (courtesy Fremont Baptist Church)

Built for the manufacture of a fantastic engine that did not make it beyond its model, the Fremont factory’s second owner, Carlos Flohr, used it to build vacuum chambers for protecting telescope lenses. Thirty feet across and made from stainless steel the lens holders were often mistaken for flying saucers. (photo courtesy Kvichak marine Industries.)

THEN: With his or her back to the original Ballard business district, an unnamed photographer looks southeast on Leary Way, most likely in 1936.

edgewater-nef-40-then-mr

THEN: For his May Day, 1901 portrait of the Seattle City Council, the photographer, Anders Wilse, planted them, like additions to the landscape, on the lawn somewhere in the upper part of Kinnear Park. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: The 1906-07 Gas Works at the north end of Lake Union went idle in 1956 when natural gas first reached Seattle by pipeline. In this photo, taken about fifteen years later, the Wallingford Peninsula is still home to the plant’s abandoned and “hanging gardens of metal.” (Courtesy: Rich Haag)

THEN: This look west from the West Woodland neighborhood toward Ballard comes by way of the Museum of History and Industry, with some help from both Ron Edge and West Woodland historian Susan Pierce.

 

 

=====

VIRETTA PARK, another City Beautiful addition for Seattle.

=====

Developer James Moore’s intended curve for his Capitol Hill Addition.

=====

A Queen Anne Hill curve made not for beauty but convenience with the joining of Phinney and and Greenwood Avenues at North 67th Street. (Courtesy, Gordon Miley)

=====

Not far from Queen Anne Park Addition and up the northern side of the hill, McGraw Street, with its picturesque bridge is laid more on a slant than a curve.

=====

Near the Queen Anne Park Addition, although long before it, Annie Craig’s front lawn on Florentia Street. (I too lived on Florentia – in 1966, a half-century ago.)

=====

The municipal trolley car barn at the north Queen Anne foot of 3rd Avenue west and now part of the Seattle Pacific University Campus and so contiguous to the east with the Queen Anne Park Addition.

=====

=====

Not so far away, the George Washington – aka Aurora – Bridge nearing completion with the tall ship Monongahela below it escaping entrapment in Lake Union.

=====

=====

=====

With the Fremont bridge up, a mid-late 1920s traffic jam on both Dexter Avenue and Westlake Avenue. This photograph was recorded by the municipal public works dept while building evidence for a new “high” bridge: the Aurora Bridge.

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

First appeared in Pacific on January 11, 1998.

=====

The south slope of Queen Anne Hill photographed from Phinney Ridge and so over the outlet to Lake Union. The acres developed for the Queen Anne Park addition are just out of frame to the right and not yet conceived as a “city beautiful” addition. Note the top floor of the Queen Anne High School above the horizon, center-left.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

=====

A hand-colored scene from Kinnear Park.

=====

Seattle Now & Then: The Swedish Club

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The first “permanent home for the Swedish Club at 1627 Eighth Avenue – between Pine and Olive Streets – was built in 1901-2. After a half-century in Seattle’s greater-retail neighborhood, the Club moved to its abiding home on Dexter Avenue overlooking Lake Union from Queen Anne Hill. (Courtesy, Stan Unger)
NOW: First replaced by another of the neighborhood’s many parking lots, the old home site of the Swedish Club is now reflecting the neighborhood from the glass curtain sides of a Hyatt Hotel.

Swedish Club, west side of 8th Avenue near Olive Street,

I’m pulled into this clutter of storefront commerce and small hotels that extend through about half of the west side of 8th Avenue between Pine and Olive Streets. Photographed in 1938, the year of my nativity, it offers attractions that I remember from my youth first in Grand Forks, North Dakota and then – beginning in 1946 – in Spokane.  Following Locksmith Snyder’s many keys and services, far left, are the 35 cent haircuts available from the Eighth Avenue Barber at 1619 8th Avenue, and Jackson C. Clifford’s Red Front Cigar Store, at 1621.  After that comes the modest front door to the Olive Court Apartments.   There Mrs. Sigrid Fales is in charge, equipped with a telephone.  Most likely, Sigrid was originally from Northern Europe, and as Scandinavian as her nearby neighbors directly across 8th Avenue, the Viking Tavern and Krono Coffee Shop, both at 1622 Eighth Ave.  And next door to Sigrid is her grandest neighbor, The Swedish Club.

The rear of the Swedish Club on July 6, 1924. Broadway High School is on the Capitol Hill horizon, far right. The rear of the Swedish Baptist Church at the northwest corner of Pine and 9th is also on the right but only two blocks distant. (CLICK to ENLARGE)
Looking south down the alley with the Swedish Club and one modern Ford from the 1950s.  A comparison with the earlier photo of the rear – the one sitting on top of this one – will confirm that they are the same although divided by about a quarter-century.   I once owned a Ford like this one – a used one.  
The front of the “old club” approaching its end on Eighth Avenue.  This too has its Ford.

“The Club,” as its many members called it, was the best evidence that downtown Seattle had its own “Snooze Junction” or corner, a variation on Ballard.  From the beginning the Swedish Club was an institutional reminder of the left homeland.  It was a profound and shared nostalgia that ran through its many banquets for fondly remembered traditional gatherings, and its choral concerts, dances, and opportunities for mixing and courting.  Also in a less secular line, neighborhood’s Gethsemane Lutheran, Swedish Baptist, First Covenant, Reformer Presbyterian, and others churches, were all Scandinavian  sourced congregations.

Looking north across Pine Street’s intersection with 8th Avenue. The Swedish Club is down the block and hidden behind hotel on the left. We feature this photo in an earlier Pacific and will interrupted this feature with the clipping.

This detail from a 1925 map includes the Swedish Club on 8th Avenue and a number of other structures that have appears in past features. East is on the top.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

The club was first organized on August 12, 1892 by recently arrived Swedes.  They were young and living in Belltown’s Stockholm Hotel.  It was a name chosen to attract them.  In spite of the economic crash or panic of 1893 and following, the club flourished, largely because there were so many migrating Swedes.  (Migrating Norwegian’s and Danes had their own clubs.)  Using the often generous contributions from members of the burgeoning Swedish community, the Club built its home here on 8th Avenue on its own terms.  Andrew Chilberg, the Seattle-based vice consul for both Sweden and Norway was a charter member and the Club’s first president.  He was also founder of the Scandinavian-American Bank: Seattle’s Scandinavian godfather.  Chilberg bought the property for the Club’s construction and half-century of use.  N.D. Nelson the partner in Frederick and Nelson Department Store, also helped with the club’s financing and first construction, as did Otto Roselead, the contractor for both the Swedish Club and the Swedish Hospital.  The dark brick façade with its ornamental banding and spiral scrolls or volutes, both seen in the feature photo, were soon added to the original frame structure when the neighborhood was regraded.

The Swedish Club in the 1950s.
Looking north on Eighth Avenue through its intersection with Olive Way. A municipal photographer standing on a roof directly across 8th Avenue from the Club recorded this in 1932 for some official reason.

The diverse flips in needs and interests that have understandably followed through the club’s now century and a quarter of service are typical for cultural institutions that have their origins in other hemisphere’s.  It has been long since members were more likely to join classes to learn Swedish than English.  Now sponsored group flights to the homeland are fast and for many affordable.   (Thanks to Club president Christine Leander for lots of help with this.)

The Swedish Club’s new home on Dexter Avenue in 1961. With the lights on and overlooking Lake Union it was designed to perform like a glowing ornament for those across the lake on Capitol Hill.

WEB EXTRAS

In the Hyatt’s glass curtains, from a slightly less oblique angle, we find a reflection of the lovely Camlin Hotel, recently featured in this column:

Camlin cubist reflection

Anything to add, fellahs?  Lots of past but not lost features Jean – all but two are from the neighborhood or near it but one of the two is named Anderson.  Let us hope that our readers CLICK TO ENLARGE.

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898. Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Built in 1910, Ballard’s big brick church on the northwest corner of 20th Avenue NW and NW 63rd Street lost the top of its soaring tower following the earthquake of Nov. 12, 1939.

THEN: Werner Lenggenhager's recording of the old St. Vinnie's on Lake Union's southwest shore in the 1950s should remind a few readers of the joys that once were theirs while searching and picking in that exceedingly irregular place.

THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

THEN: First dedicated in 1889 by Seattle’s Unitarians, the congregation soon needed a larger sanctuary and moved to Capitol Hill. Here on 7th Avenue, their first home was next used for a great variety of events, including a temporary home for the Christian Church, a concert hall for the Ladies Musical Club, and a venue for political events like anarchist Emma Goldman’s visit to Seattle in 1910. (Compliments Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Lawton Gowey looks north through the tail of the 1957 Independence Day Parade on Fourth Avenue as it proceeds south through the intersection with Pike Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN:

THEN: Built quickly in the winter of 1906-07, the Prince Rupert Hotel faced Boren Avenue from the third lot north of Pike Street. About fifty-five years later it was razed for the I-5 Freeway. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The city’s north end skyline in 1923 looking northwest from the roof of the then new Cambridge Apartments at 9th Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: The scene looks north through a skyline of steeples toward the Cascade neighborhood and Lake Union, ca. 1923.

Then: Photographed from an upper story of the Ford Factory at Fairview Avenue and Valley Street, the evidence of Seattle's explosive boom years can be seen on every shore of Lake Union, ca. 1920. Courtesy of MOHAI

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

MINOR-&-THOMAS-P-patch-THEN-mr

9th-&-Union-1937-tax-pix-THEN-mr

THEN: With her or his back to the Medical-Dental Building an unidentified photographer took this look northeast through the intersection of 6th and Olive Way about five years after the Olive Way Garage first opened in 1925. (Courtesy, Mark Ambler)

THEN: Named for a lumberman, and still home for the UW’s School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, the upper floor’s high-ceilinged halls, including the Forest Club Room behind Anderson Hall’s grand Gothic windows, were described for us by the department’s gregarious telephone operator as “very popular and Harry Potterish.” (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Tied momentarily to the end of the Union Oil Co dock off Bay Street, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship Maud prepares to cast-off for the Arctic Ocean on June 3, 1922. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Through its two decades — 1892 to 1913 — at the northeast corner of Cherry Street and Third Avenue, the Seattle Theatre was one of the classiest Seattle venues for legitimate theater as well as variety/vaudeville

=====

=====

=====

Around the corner from the club, a flatiron where Howell Street originates out of Olive just east of 8th Avenue. (We did a feature on this long ago but have misplaced the clip. It happens.)

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

CLICK CLICK o ENLARGE

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

======

=====


=====

=====

=====

=====

=====

Nearby El Goucho in 1961 in preparation, flexing its beef for Century 21.