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Seattle Now & Then: Parades at 4th and Pine

(click to enlarge photos)

WE INTERRUPT Here at the TOP, but BELATEDLY –   with something we promised in The Times PacificNW printing of this feature but failed to fulfill – until now.  It is a look up Fourth Avenue before its and Denny Hill’s regrade.  We insert this photo (shot from the southwest corner of Fourth and Pike)  for a comparison between it and this Sunday’s featured photo of the parade scene, now the second photo below.  The tardy and intruding photo at the top looks north on Fourth Avenue, on the left, and the nearly new Westlake shortcut to Lake Union, on the right.  Pine Street passed left-right behind the triangular HOTEL PLAZA that was wedged between Fourth and Westlake.   Therefore, the first block showing in the parade shot is the same block as the first hillside block that ascends Denny Hill behind and to the left of the Hotel.  Get it?   It once got steep north of Pine but no more since the hill was flushed away.

THEN: Fewer than fifty years before this 1953 parade was photographed on Fourth Avenue, the block between Pine and Stewart Streets negotiated, barely, one of the steepest streets on Denny Hill.
NOW: On Saturday January 20, last, the second annual women’s march made its turn here from Pine Street north on to Fourth Avenue for its last leg to Seattle Center.

Here we compare Jean Sherrard’s confident and colorful farrago of the recent Women’s March with a manly marching band heading south on Fourth Avenue sixty-five years ago.  Its baton-wielding leader is entering the crosswalk of Fourth’s intersection with Pine Street. We have not found the name for this marching band, but hope that the uniforms might be clue enough for an astute PacificNW reader to let us all know.  We do know the occasion. It is the Memorial Day parade of May 30, 1953.

The same east side of Fourth Avenue only fifty-two years earlier during the 1911 Potlatch Parade. The Carpenters Hall was built by the local for the carpenters union and was also home for the Hotel Ritz.

The block-long line of businesses on the east side of Fourth includes, right-to-left, the Ben Paris, Raff’s Shoes, the Hotel Ritz, the Up & Up Tavern, Sherman Clay Co. music store, and last, at the southeast corner of Fourth and Olive Way, the still floating Mayflower Hotel.  On the out-of-frame west side of Fourth, the Bon Marche Department Store was a block-long point of prestige for its neighbors.

Years later the Mayflower Hotel at the southeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Olive Way and next to it the modernized front of the Sherman Clay Music Store.

Raff’s Shoes was, I think, an economy chain.  I remember purchasing a pair of Raff loafers at its Spokane branch, also in the early 1950s.  (I may still have them in storage.)  Carpenters Local No. 131 built the Hotel Ritz in 1906.  It continued to serve as a parody of the Parisian Ritz until well after WWII.  Next door to the north, the Sherman Clay Company was Seattle’s music mecca, selling not only instruments but concerts and tickets to them.  The coast-wide chain began in San Francisco around 1870.  In 1929, when the ornate home on Fourth was about to open, its Seattle manager ironically boasted – just before the Great Depression – “It will be more than a store. It will be a very real Cathedral of Music.”  Here on its marquee in 1953, more neon flash is given to radios than to pianos.  The Seattle store closed in the fall of 2013.  It was the last of the chain.

A Seattle Times clipping for Sherman Clay from July 25, 1920.

We’ll conclude this little cityscape sketch with the once very popular Ben Paris, the combo sporting goods store/restaurant on the far right.  We’ll quote from notes Seattle Time’s humorist Emmett Watson shared before his passing in 2001.  Emmett interviewed his friend Guy Williams, a wit and legend among local promoters and publicists.  Emmett asked Guy and Ivar Haglund, the fish restaurateur who sat next to him, “Where did you guys hang out in the 1930s?”  Guy answered, “Ben Paris.  Everyone was going there.  You could cash your check – if you had one.  Get your shoes shined.  Shoot snooker.  Play cards.  Get a roast beef sandwich with plenty of gravy.  I mean that was one great place . . . There’s been nothing quite like it. There wasn’t a phony thing about it. There were fighters in there, newspaper guys, politicians  Ivar answered “Oh, that was wonderful!”

The Whittelsys caught by a candid camera on April 17, 1937. Through the years of this feature we have used a few Whittelsy cityscape snapshots. The public works department employee and his poet wife lived on the north end of Capitol Hill.

WEB EXTRAS

My contribution this week, a few random shots from the Women’s March.

Coming down Pine
Cellphone photos abound
Wonder Woman marches too, impervious to cold and rain

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Anything more to add, kids?  Sure PaPa Jean, and more of the same or similar.  By now many of these should be familiar to our readers, recalling now that “repetition is the mother of all learning. (Our mothers taught us that.”  We will include at the bottom (or near it) MORE PARADES with terse captions.   First, Ron’s pulls of nearby and recent features.

THEN: With feet nearly touching the Madison Street Cable Railway’s cable slot, five “happy workers” squeeze on to the front bumper of an improvised Armistice Day float. (Photo courtesy Grace McAdams)

THEN: Thanks to Pacific reader John Thomas for sharing this photograph recorded by his father in 1927. It looks north across Times Square to the almost completed Orpheum Theatre. Fifth Avenue is on the left, and Westlake on the right.

THEN: Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill. Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner. (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: This rare early record of the Fourth and Pike intersection was first found by Robert McDonald, both a state senator and history buff with a special interest in historical photography. He then donated this photograph - with the rest of his collection - to the Museum of History and Industry, whom we thank for its use. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: A motorcycle courier for Bartell Drugs poses before the chain’s Store No. 14, located in the Seaboard Building at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Pike Street, circa 1929. (Courtesy Bartell Drugs)

THEN: Looking west on Pike Street from Fourth Avenue, the variety in the first block of this retail district includes the Rhodes Bros. Ten Cent Store, Mendenhall’s Kodaks, Fountain Pens and Photo Supplies, Remick’s Song and Gift Shop, the Lotus Confectionary, Fahey-Brockman’s Clothiers, where, one may “buy upstairs and save $10.00”. (Courtesy, MOHAI)

THEN: Lawton Gowey looks north through the tail of the 1957 Independence Day Parade on Fourth Avenue as it proceeds south through the intersection with Pike Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

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First appeared in Pacific, June 1, 2008
This ca. 1882 look south on Commercial Street (First Ave. S.).was photographed from the Occidental Hotel and like it everything in  photograph was destroyed during the 1889 Great Fire, except, of course, for the ruins.

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First appeared in Pacific May 11, 1986.  Hence the NOW above it thirty-one years old.  I shot is from a window in my friend and mentor CLICK CLICK to ENLARGE

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A circus parade looking north on Second Avenue from near Spring Street. The Denny aka Washington Hotel is on the horizon. We have long ago written a feature about this photograph but it is not yet scanned in toto, i.e. with text and the “now.”.

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POTLATCH PARADES SAMPLER

1912, First Ave. S. and Washington Street.
Potlatch Dad’s Day parade, looking north on 2nd Ave. to Marion Street.
1912 Potlatch parade totems, looking north on Fourth Avenue from near Virginia Street, the parade’s review stand is on the right and Denny School at the northeast corner of 5th and Battery on the horizon.

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1911 Potlatch parade with nearly new Central Building. Courtesy Michael Maslan
Fruit Harvest Float on Fourth Avenue, 1911 Potlatch Parade.

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PREPAREDNESS DAY PARADE, JUNE 10, 1916 (Warming for WWI)

DOUBLE-CLICK to ENLARGE. The Seattle Union Record’s take on preparations for the 1916 Preparedness Day Parade. This may remind you of Trump’s proposed military parade.
Looking north on First Ave. fro Seneca Street. We did a feature on this too, but like many others it is not yet scanned in toto.

A rare example of a pre-Jean NOW. I shot this for the Sept 17, 2006 feature. By then Jean and I were momentarily mixing the responsibility of the “nows.” Soon after this he would “take it over.”

The 1916 Preparedness Parade in Pioneer Square aka Place.

INDEPENDENCE DAY ON PIONEER PLACE (aks Square) ca 1900

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MORE MILITARY PARADING

Looking south on 4th Avenue over Stewart Street and Olive Way beyond it. The Time Square building – once the home of this newspaper – enters, barely, on the far right. I once knew the occasion for this marching and hope to sometime know again.
A Word War I hoopla to recruit investors more than soldiers – it seems, at least, from the banner on the side of the parading tank.  This was among a handful of Wesbster and Stevens prints that Old Seattle Paperworks proprietor John Hanawalt shared with me early on in my search for regional historical photos.   Thanks again John.  His shot is still busy on the Public Market’s lower level.

FAUX MILITARY PARADING

Looking south on Second Avenue through the Knights Templar arch built at the intersection with Marion Street, 1925.. 

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TWO PRESIDENTS OF THESE UNITED STATES

President Harding in Belltown.
More of Harding on July 27, 1923. Not feeling well he died in San Francisco a week later on August 2, 1923. (Courtesy, U.W.Northwest Collection aka Special Collections. )
Pres. Harry Truman in Seattle for his 1948 campaign. 

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And NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT – A PIONEER PARADE IN RITZVILLE, WA.  Jean recorded the “now” for our book (now long out of print) of “Washington State Then and Nows”.  Jean is currently at work on a fourth volume of SEATTLE NOW AND THENs, except it wont be titled so.  Here’s Ritzville on our visit a few years back.  To catch the red-suited marching band, Jean’s NOW is a bit wider than the THEN.

Ritzville’s Pioneer Tower and Modern Art at Washington and Main.

 

 

Happy New Year!

(as always, click to enlarge photos)

While the lunar new year (of the dog!) doesn’t actually begin until this coming Friday, festivities were begun today in the International District. Your faithful Now & Then operative was there to record a few repeat photos, but got caught up in the fun…

Using his 21′ extension pole, Jean shot high above the crowd looking west towards the King Street station
Lion dancers about to parade through the streets. Firecrackers are crackling behind Jean’s back.
Minutes later, Mayor Jenny Durkan arrives to kick off the celebration. Her young, somewhat tentative companion helped feed the lions

Seattle Now & Then: Cornish School Construction, 1921

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Cornish School under construction in 1921 at its new campus at Harvard Avenue and E. Roy Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The arts academy’s “purpose-built” home is named Kerry Hall for the philanthropist Mrs. A.S. Kerry, who co-founded the Music and Art Foundation that ran Cornish School as a non-profit.
Cornish, a few years later aka “in the 1920s.”

11th Hour investing in Cornish construction. An adver clip from The Times for March 14, 1921.
Advers from June 30, 1921 include the announcement that the Cornish move off Broadway to Harvard would be delayed but for only a few days.
A clip from The Times for July 10, 1921
Another Times clip from July 10, 1921.
The Times summary of some of the events connected with the school’s dedication.  A Times clip from July 24,1921.
Nellie Cornish

Construction for the new campus of ‘The Cornish School for Drama, Music, Dance’ began on the first day of 1921.  The work was rushed forward so that the school could open early in September, on time for the still young institution’s eighth season.  Perhaps predictably, in late summer agents with homes to sell or apartments to rent in the neighborhood enhanced with this new landmark, began running classifieds for their properties with the message “near Cornish School” in both The Times and The Post-Intelligencer.  That enticing landmark is under construction in this week’s “then,” although its bricks are not yet adorned with the ornamental tiles and stucco skin that still define its Spanish Colonial lines.

Cornish was founded in 1914 on Capitol Hill in the Booth Building at the SE corner of E. Pine and Broadway, less than a mile south of its new campus. (see below)  After a year, in the summer of 1915, it featured two studios, five teachers and eighty pupils.  The growth was impressive. Five years later when the enlarged and relocated academy was being planned and the cash to build it first pursued, the school held twenty-seven studios serving 1,154 pupils, led by twenty-six teachers.  These halls of ivy then sometimes surely resonated with the reflecting sounds of rehearsing students.  (I remember well that joyful, on the whole, noise in the early 1970s when I taught filmmaking to Cornish students, most of whom, like myself, could not afford to make films.)

This school of “allied arts” was founded by its namesake, the confident pedagogue-pianist Nellie Cornish.  As late as the 1970s the often-convivial tone of her directions were still remembered by some as sometimes comedic.  For instance, at one of the Sunset Club’s Masquerades Nellie proved her sense of humor when she won the “funniest costume” award.  Cornish also frequently gave lectures, many of them before the city’s applauded Ladies Musical Club.  (Would that there then had been smart phones with digital recorders.)

The Roy Street entrance to the Women’s Century Club served for about a quarter century as the  popular door into Jim Osteen and Art Bernsstein’s (respectively, left and right), Harvard Exit Theatre.

For the featured photographs at the top both photographers aimed northwest from the fortunately irregular Capitol Hill intersection of E. Roy Street and Harvard Avenue.  Following the Cornish example, this part of the Capitol Hill neighborhood became sophisticatedly snug when joined by the Woman’s Century Club and the Rainier Chapter of the D.A.R. (both built in 1925), and architect Arthur Loveless’s charming Studio Building.  Historylink’s principal founder, Walter Crowley, describes the last in his National Trust Guide to Seattle (1998), as a “delightful mimic” of England’s Cotswold villages.  Crowley notes that to the north and west of this prospect are the admired homes that make this Seattle’s only residential preserve, the Harvard-Belmont Landmark District.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, boys?  For sure Jean, and Ron will start again with some recent* features  and I’ll follow with some scans from older clippings. (*Since we started the blog about  ten  years ago.  Jean will know, but he sleeps.)

 

THEN: The Volunteer Park water tower was completed in 1907 on Capitol Hill’s highest point in aid the water pressure of its service to the often grand homes of its many nearly new neighbors. The jogging corner of E. Prospect Street and 15th Avenue E. is near the bottom of the Oakes postcard. (Historical Photo courtesy Mike Fairley)

THEN: Both the grading on Belmont Avenue and the homes beside it are new in this “gift” to Capitol Hill taken from the family album of Major John Millis. (Courtesy of the Major’s grandchild Walter Millis and his son, a Seattle musician, Robert Millis.)

broadway-widening-1blog

THEN: Looking across Capitol Hill’s Broadway Avenue during its 1931adjustments. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

Holy Names THEN

THEN: A circa 1923 view looks south on Eighth Avenue over Pike Street, at bottom left.

THEN: Most likely in 1902 Marcus M. Lyter either built or bought his box-style home at the northwest corner of 15th Avenue and Aloha Street. Like many other Capitol Hill addition residences, Lyter's home was somewhat large for its lot.

yesler-way-umpire-day

THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)

THEN: We have by three years or four missed the centenary for this distinguished brick pile, the Littlefield Apartments on Capitol Hill. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: An early portrait, circa 1911, of The Silvian Apartments, one of Capitol Hill’s abiding architectural jewels. (Courtesy, Bill Burden)

THEN: A carpenter’s jewel with Victorian ornaments recorded by a tax assessor’s photographer in 1936, nestles at 615 Eastlake beside the surviving Jensen Apartments, aka the O’Donnell Building, on the left. (Courtesy Stan Unger)

THEN: The ‘Seattle showplace’ Rhodes mansion on Capitol Hill, ca. 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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First appeared in Pacific on March 31, 2002

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First printed in The Times on March 3, 2002

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First appeared in Pacific on Sunday January 21, 1990.

Seattle Now & Then: Inside Dexter Horton’s Bank, 1882

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The bank’s namesake president, Dexter Horton, somehow missed this 1882 portrait of bank employees and officers. Horton may have been enjoying a president’s leisure – perhaps duck-hunting. Surely he was not golfing, the sport that first reached Seattle in the mid 1890s on a converted Wallingford cow pasture. [CLICK to ENLARGE]
NOW: In the early twentieth century the bank’s rebuilt and enlarge Dexter Horton Building at First South and Washington Street was renamed the Maynard, after another pioneer, David (Doc) Maynard. Later the Dexter Horton Bank moved north to greater financial glories in Seattle’s first financial district. [CLICK TO ENLARGE GREG LANGE]

THEN AGAIN: The sturdy frame – but not the roof – of the Dexter Horton Bank at the northwest corner of Washington and Commercial Streets was one of the  few survivors following the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. Details of the bank’s vault, shown in tact in this week’s featured photograph, can be seen on the back wall through the bank’s missing but still guarded front door.
The back of Peiser’s print, beside celebrating his talents (those you must read upside-down), has pasted to the back three labels explaining who has the original, the name of the subject, its date, and the blue pen revelation of the five men in the photograph, and the name and date (1953) of the person who donated it to the Museum.

Theodore Peiser, one of pioneer Seattle’s most gifted photographers, is recorded as arriving here in “the early 1880s.”  The various accounts run from 1880 to 1883. Part of the problem of tracking his arrival is that much of his earliest work was destroyed in the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. But not this print.  For this 1882 recording, Peiser has pressed his back against the front wall of Seattle’s first bank, the Dexter Horton at the northwest corner of Commercial (First Avenue South) and Washington Streets.

Roland Denny was a baby in his mother Mary’s arms when the “Denny Party” landed at Alki Point in the fall of 1851. Roland survived into the late 1930s and his last years were by habit celebrated with news stories and photographs on Founders Day.

On the back of the photo, the names of the five suited men are listed, four within the counter and one without. Not surprisingly, the formally attired two on the left were members of Seattle’s advantaged ‘One-Percent.’  Norval Latimer, far left, ultimately became the director of the bank.  Arthur Denny, often referred to as “the city’s founder,” stands at the center, his graying hair contrasting with the dark interior of the bank’s vault, seen through its steel-framed open door.  Denny’s position as vice-president lent the bank some status and no doubt allowed him to stay busy managing the sale of the hundreds of parcels or lots carved from his and his wife Mary’s 1852 donation claim, which included most of what is now the city’s Central Business District.

With his family Norval Latimer poses in the family car in front of the family mansion on the southwest corner of Terry Avenue and Columbia Street. The south tower of St. James Cathedral tops the photo on the right. Latimer’s driver sits beside him in the front seat. Norval didn’t drive.  Motorcars first arrived – barely – on Seattle Streets in 1900, eighteen years after Peiser photographed Latimer posing like a banker in his bank.  (Click to Enlarge)

To the right of the attentive Arthur is his dark-haired son Rolland, who was the bank’s teller. He was a mere baby when his parents and their entourage of settlers, the Denny Party, first landed at Alki Point in 1851. Behind Rolland is B. J. Biggs, the bank’s clerk.  Busy with Biggs, and facing him from this side of the bank’s impressive counter is Captain Norman Penfield.  Although posed here as a customer, Penfield was a partner with Arthur Denny and Dexter Horton in the Seattle Gas Light Company, and served as its builder and superintendent.  In the “now” photo, King County Archives Reference Specialist Greg Lange sits at the Sovereign bar comfortably close to Penfield’s position at the bank’s counter.

Greg Lange, earlier on First Ave. S., behind the counter of what was the Taylor Bowie Book Store. [Click to ENLARGE GREG LANGE]
Archivist Lange is a popular lecturer on how to do house history. He is also an expert on Pioneer Square history.  While in the featured photo he sits at the bar facing bartender Nat Mooter, Lange explained that following the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, Commercial Street was both lifted – about eight-feet at this corner – and widened from sixty-six feet to eighty-four.  Therefore, Lange is sitting at a basement elevation that is about the same as the street’s pre-fire elevation, while because of the street’s widening, his chair should be more properly moved east, somewhere under the sidewalk.

Lawton Gowey kept good track of the changes around Pioneer Square. Here he records the grand entrance to the Maynard Building. It has been freshly clean during the building’s restoration. The small “buttons” attached to the bricks between the open windows on the second and third floors are part of the retrofitting for earthquakes. Lawton dates this slide, June 14, 1974.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, kids?  Have we failed you yet Jean?   Or the readers – our readers Jean?

 

======When compared to most city scenes relatively little has changed in his view west on Main Street from First Avenue South in the century-plus between them. (Historical photo courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

https://i1.wp.com/pauldorpat.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/warshalls-then1.jpg

THEN: With the clue of the ornate Pergola on the right, we may readily figure that we are in Pioneer Square looking south across Yesler Way.

THEN: For the first twenty years of his more than 40 years selling tinware and other selected hardware, Zilba Mile's shop looked south across Yesler Way down First Ave. S, then known as Commercial Street.

Then: The Pacific House, behind the line-up of white-gloved soldiers, might have survived well into the 20th Century were it not destroyed during Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889. Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

THEN: F. Jay Haynes recorded this ca. 1891 look up the Seattle waterfront and it’s railroad trestles most likely for a report to his employer, the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)

THEN: The new sub H-3 takes her inaugural baptism at the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company’s ways on Independence Day, 1913. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Frank Shaw’s pre-preservation visit to First Avenue South on February 26, 1961. He looks north from Main Street. (photo by Frank Shaw)

tHEN: An unidentified brass band poses at the intersection of Commercial Street (First Ave S.) and Main Street during the 1883 celebration for the completion of the transcontinental Northern Pacific Railroad.

THEN: Local candy-maker A.W. Piper was celebrated here for his crème cakes and wedding cakes and also his cartoons. This sketch is of the 1882 lynching from the Maple trees beside Henry and Sara Yesler’s home on James Street. Piper’s bakery was nearby (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Seen here in 1887 through the intersection of Second Avenue and Yesler Way, the Occidental Hotel was then easily the most distinguished in Seattle. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The original for this scene of a temporary upheaval on Mill Street (Yesler Way) was one of many historical prints given to the Museum of History and Industry many years ago by the Charles Thorndike estate. Thorndike was one of Seattle’s history buffs extraordinaire. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN:Ruins from the fire of July 26, 1879, looking west on Yesler’s dock from the waterfront. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The Phoenix Hotel on Second Avenue, for the most part to the left of the darker power pole, and the Chin Gee Hee Building, behind it and facing Washington Street to the right, were both built quickly after Seattle’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy: Museum of History and Industry.)

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First appeared in Pacific, June 1, 2008

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First appeared in Pacific on March 16, 2003

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First appeared in Pacific on February 9, 2003.

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First appeared in Pacific, May 11, 1986 CLICK TO ENLARGE

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First appeared in Pacific, May 9, 1999

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First appeared in Pacific, February 27, 2000

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First appeared in Pacific, March 24, 2002

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First appeared in Pacific, May 29, 2007

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First appeared in Pacific on October 28, 2001.

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Seattle Now & Then: The Winslow Ferry Terminal, ca. 1950

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The gated ticket booths, posing here ca. 1950 at the Bainbridge Island Ferry Terminal, stand much closer to the landing ferries than now. (Courtesy John Cooper)
NOW: The long, covered passenger trestle from the end of the dock was prudently elevated for higher-tide ferry landings. Its roof was appreciated by both locals and day tourists headed for the shops of Winslow on a rainy day such as is pictured in our ‘Now’ photograph. Later the trestle-passing pedestrians were further protected from the winds off Eagle Harbor with the enclosing of the walkway.

Judging merely from the motorcars parked below the hanging Shell sign in J. Boyd Ellis’ real photo postcard, this is the Winslow ferry terminal about 1950.  By then, the Arlington photographer had given a quarter-century to touring the state snapping whatever it had to offer to stock his inventory of Washington landmarks and picturesque landscapes that were found in gift shops, news stands and drug stores across the state.  His son was still at it in the 1970s.

The ferry San Mateo arriving at Winslow during the summer of the World’s Fair, 1962.  Photo by Lawton Gowey.  [CLICK to ENLARGE]
the San Mateo approaching the Seattle waterfront, June 13, 1965.

I do not wonder that passing through ferry docks make me feel downright nostalgic.  In 1950 it was still three years or four before I first came ashore at Winslow, on a trip from Seattle with my oldest brother Ted and his best friend Fred for my first hiking trip into the Olympics.  From here we drove up the island to its north end where the then new Agate Pass Bridge reached the Kitsap mainland.   After a protracted campaign, the 1,229-foot span opened in 1950.  With this new short-cut up the island. the motor traffic on State Highway No. 305 swelled.  Today 305 can remind one of traffic on Seattle’s arterials, rather than an escape from them.

A clipping from the Seattle Times in 1900 promoting another Winslow, a schooner, sailing for Capt Nome that spring.
Not Bainbridge Isl. but nearby, the Whidbey Island switchboard, May 1916. CLICK TO ENLARGE

Also in 1950, the Leschi, the first car ferry on Lake Washington, made its last cross-lake steam from Seattle.  (Look below for a clipping on the Leschi at her Yesler Leschi terminal.)  A decade earlier when the ribbon was cut for the opening of the popularly named Mercer Island Floating Bridge on July 2, 1940, it was increasingly believed that the ferries on Puget Sound – by then most of them purchased from California after the 1937 opening of the Golden Gate Bridge – would be replaced with bridges such as another floating between West Seattle’s Lincoln Park and Vashon Island.  It was, of course, not to be.

A Seattle Times clip from June 27, 1951

We continue to wait through long line-ups for tickets at Puget Sound’s many terminals, including this one at Winslow, for what can be comforting cruises across Puget Sound. Winslow’s most devoted cruiser was surely E. L. Franks, one of three partners who started in 1902 the Eagle Harbor Transportation Co., running “mosquito fleet” steamers to Seattle and other Puget Sound ports. Forty-nine years later at age 88, he was still on the Winslow dock explaining to a Times reporter “Ferry riders are easy to get along with.”

We know neither which Bainbridge Isl. beach nor the date for the real photo postcard. First camping and then building on the islands beaches was already popular in the 1890s.

WEB EXTRAS

 

Anything to add, lads?   Surely Jean.  Ron Edge has aligned his contribution of recent and relevant features in an order that recommends a tour.   The order goes like this …..  It begins at the West Point lighthouse, an exposed prospect from which one can easily see – for the sake of relevance –  much of Bainbridge Island, From there the attentive reader will find him or her self on the southeast shore of Lake Union where deals can be had at the St. Vinnie, which is built low for a reason never explained.  Watch you head, which is exceedingly difficult to do.  Near by at the truest of southeast corners for Lake Union the reader will look back at the lake from an upper floor of what was once a Ford Manufacturing

Plant and then the home of a big printer.  (My first Seattle Now and Then book was printed therein.)  Next, the reader – if they follow our plan – will climb Capitol Hill by way of the Lakeview overpass pausing first to admire the charms of a little Gothic home on Eastlake.   Then on to Aloha and 15th pausing with a posing trolley, followed by a short walk to the nearby Volunteer Park and a climb up the curving stairway to the top of the Water Department’s brick standpipe and a look east over the neighborhood of oversized homes that are yet squeezed onto their lots.   Here’s a jump from the top of Capitol Hill to the widening of Broadway followed by a walk south to the home Seattle’s baseball team in the early 20th Century, near the top of First Hill.

Another of the many many hundreds of bus stop shots taken in 1976-7 looking west across Broadway above its intersection with Republican Street.

And that is surely enough.   There are fifteen more links to add to the seven just noted.  When the reader comes to the end, aka Number Twenty-Three, titled “Gothic Row on Western” she or he will  have had some intimate brushings with retired cultures and landmarks through a swath that for the most runs back and forth from the north-central waterfront to the tops of Capitol and First Hills.

mountaineers-westpt-curt-mr2

THEN: Werner Lenggenhager's recording of the old St. Vinnie's on Lake Union's southwest shore in the 1950s should remind a few readers of the joys that once were theirs while searching and picking in that exceedingly irregular place.

Then: Photographed from an upper story of the Ford Factory at Fairview Avenue and Valley Street, the evidence of Seattle's explosive boom years can be seen on every shore of Lake Union, ca. 1920. Courtesy of MOHAI

THEN: A carpenter’s jewel with Victorian ornaments recorded by a tax assessor’s photographer in 1936, nestles at 615 Eastlake beside the surviving Jensen Apartments, aka the O’Donnell Building, on the left. (Courtesy Stan Unger)

THEN: Most likely in 1902 Marcus M. Lyter either built or bought his box-style home at the northwest corner of 15th Avenue and Aloha Street. Like many other Capitol Hill addition residences, Lyter's home was somewhat large for its lot.

THEN: The Volunteer Park water tower was completed in 1907 on Capitol Hill’s highest point in aid the water pressure of its service to the often grand homes of its many nearly new neighbors. The jogging corner of E. Prospect Street and 15th Avenue E. is near the bottom of the Oakes postcard. (Historical Photo courtesy Mike Fairley)

THEN: Looking across Capitol Hill’s Broadway Avenue during its 1931adjustments. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

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THEN: The brand new N&K Packard dealership at Belmont and Pike in 1909. Thanks to both antique car expert Fred Cruger for identifying as Packards the cars on show here, and to collector Ron Edge for finding them listed at this corner in a 1909 Post-Intelligencer. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

THEN:The early evening dazzle of the Roosevelt Theatre at 515 Pike Street, probably in 1941. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

Great railroad signs, theatre signs and ranks of neon were still the greatest contributors to night light at 4th and Westlake in 1949. (Photo by Robert Bradley compliment of Lawton and Jean Gowey)

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THEN: Looking south from Pine Street down the wide Second Avenue in 1911, then Seattle’s growing retail strip and parade promenade. (courtesy of Jim Westall)

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First appeared in The Times, February 1, 2004

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First appeared in The Times, May 4, 2008

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First appeared in Pacific November 19, 2000

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First printed in Pacific, November 10, 2004

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First appeared in Pacific, May 9, 1999.

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Seattle Now & Then: Poulsbo’s Front Street

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Poulsbo’s Front Street in the 1920s.
NOW: Today’s Front Street shows off some of Poulsbo’s post-war Scandinavian embellishments.

One of our first now-then features for 2018 begins with a book and a town.  The chosen book is for lovers of our state and good writing.  Once in your hands or waiting in a library, you may want to open Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State for one or more of those wonderfully absorbed little reads that visit us before slumber.   The 1941 classic state guide is filled with more than 650 pages of skillfully interpreted visits to our state’s communities. Alas, it is also long out of print, but like many other cherished tomes, you may find it in a used bookstore.  Poulsbo, our town of choice, has a few.

Today, to quote from the guide, this “picturesque fishing village on Liberty Bay” has a population of about 9,000.  In the 1950 reissue (its last revision) of the WPA – funded guide, Poulsbo’s population is set at 639, an accounting done probably with the help of the 1950 federal census. Federal depression-time funds were also paying salaries to the book’s many out-of-work skilled authors.  Using well-calibrated distances traveled on state and federal highways, Poulsbo, part of Tour 9A, is first reached on page 572.

Poulsbo is introduced as stretching “along the sinuous shoreline of Liberty Bay. Substantial frame and brick buildings line the main street.”  Poulsbo’s main street is named Front, and is seen here in the 1920s looking into the long curve from its intersection with Jensen Way N.E.  (This refers to the featured photo at the top, and not the one that follows, below.)

Jean and I have lost our notes for the date and booster’s name of this community sprucing, but we imagine on hints from the printed dress and other sartorial clues that this is from the 1950s when the locals were feeling some fervor for painting the town.  And now  we expect letters. 

For his repeat from the same prospect, Jean Sherrard had to settle for an early winter mist.  He missed last year’s white Christmas by one day.  A comparison of the “now” with the “then” reveals why the well-preserved Poulsbo attracts visitors to admire the old world charms of its towers, gables, rustic murals, half-timbered decorations, well-wrought balconies and flower baskets like those, we imagine hanging in Valhalla. As Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State continues, it surely presages some changes:  “Farms crowd the town from the hillsides.”  Now there are also developmentsThe Guide’s demographic claim of 1950 no longer apply.  It reads, “Approximately 90 percent of the persons living at present along the bayshore are Norwegians.” Today, visitors to Poulsbo may wish to study its residents and calculate their own statistic.

An earlier look down Poulsbo’s Front Street that comes with its own caption. “Front Street on a busy day at the intersection of Jensen Way. Note the oil lamp on the post at left.  The bridge in the foreground was replaced by a  culvert, thus dating the picture as 1912.”  [Yes, the sentence just completed requires some evidence that “supplies” its “thus” with its conclusive certainty about the date, 1912.  We probably misplaced it years ago when we published our book “Washington Then and Now.” ]

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Here we will interrupt our Poulsbo anecdotes of  yore with Jean’s breaking news: his part in today’s parade from Capitol Hill to Seattle Center.   Along the way Jean managed to repeat a 1950s parade shot showing a uniformed band reaching the intersection of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street where today’s parade made its 90 degree turn to the north on its last happy leg to Seattle Center.  We will feature that repeat in an upcoming now-then.  

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Again, we strolled amongst the marchers today to capture another Now & Then classic. We’ll drop in a few photos here from a drizzly but energized day:

Coming down Pine Street into town
The first several thousand marchers approach 4th and Pine
A clever rebus…
Many wonderful women, one Wonder Woman!
As always, cell phones capture the moment

Anything to add, fellahs?   Alas not much on Poulsbo.  Although we do have several kitsap-related clippings among our about 1800 features those have not yet been scanned.  (Any volunteers are welcome.)  Instead we will visit some suburbs  (including distant ones like Oregon and Dakota) and wander along the waterfront hinting at our yearning to cross the Sound.  We will also favor a Scandi tone to much of it.

THEN: Tied momentarily to the end of the Union Oil Co dock off Bay Street, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship Maud prepares to cast-off for the Arctic Ocean on June 3, 1922. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

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THEN: The S. S. Suveric makes a rare visit to Seattle in 1911. (Historical photo courtesy of Jim Westall)

Then Caption: Amateur photographer George Brown most likely took this view of Portland’s 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition from the north porch of the Washington State Building. Brown also played clarinet in Wagner’s popular concert and marching band, which was probably performing at the Expo. (pic courtesy of Bill Greer)

THEN: Twenty years ago the Mukai Farm and Garden on Vashon Island was designated a King County Landmark. (Courtesy, Vashon Maury Island Heritage Association)

THEN: For his May Day, 1901 portrait of the Seattle City Council, the photographer, Anders Wilse, planted them, like additions to the landscape, on the lawn somewhere in the upper part of Kinnear Park. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: Captioned Salmon Bay, 1887, this is most likely very near the eastern end of the bay where it was fed by Ross Creek, the Lake Union outlet. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan Vintage Posters and Photographs)

THEN: Built in 1910, Ballard’s big brick church on the northwest corner of 20th Avenue NW and NW 63rd Street lost the top of its soaring tower following the earthquake of Nov. 12, 1939.

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: James Lee, for many years an official photographer for Seattle’s public works department, looks south over Ballard’s Salmon Bay a century ago. Queen Anne Hill marks the horizon, with a glimpse of Magnolia on the far right. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: This panorama could have used a tower (or drone) to better survey the size of the June 1, 191l, crowd gathered in Fremont/Ross to celebrate the beginning of construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: Hugh Paradise neither named nor dated his photograph looking down from a basalt cliff onto the Yakima River. (Courtesy, Byron Coney)

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POSTSCRIPT:

“One Hot Hotel,” the last title above, is a reminder that in newspapers of size, like The Seattle Times, there are title specialists who are thought to be especially clever in dragging readers into the copy.   Sometimes these specialists are, indeed, very clever.   However, often they are mildly pathetic victims of the restraints in humor that come with any publication that runs on advertising.

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