Category Archives: Seattle Now and Then

Seattle Now & Then: Licton Springs

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THEN: Before it became a city park, Licton Springs was run as a health spa. The distant home, left-of-center, at the northeast corner of N. 97th Street and Densmore Avenue N., survives in Jean Sherrard’s repeat. It can be found on the left above the Y in the Licton Springs Park pathway. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)
THEN: Before it became a city park, Licton Springs was run as a health spa. The distant home, left-of-center, at the northeast corner of N. 97th Street and Densmore Avenue N., survives in Jean Sherrard’s repeat. It can be found on the left above the Y in the Licton Springs Park pathway.  And the house on the hill  can also be found below just above Jean’s salutations, my response  and Ron’s llinks.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)
NOW: Jean Sherrard estimates that for his repeat he needed to move forty or fifty feet to the northeast to escape a planted woodland of park trees that now crowd the prospect taken by the city photographer for the 1945 photo of the Licton Mineral Springs health spa.
NOW: Jean Sherrard estimates that for his repeat he needed to move forty or fifty feet to the northeast to escape a planted woodland of park trees that now crowd the prospect taken by the city photographer for the 1945 photo of the Licton Mineral Springs health spa.

In The Seattle Times Sunday Magazine for September 24,,1978, the wit Tom Swint, then one of this newspaper’s humorist feature writers, confessed that while on his “daily walker around the Green Lake track, I have often wondered about the scud of beer suds that from time to time formed on the north shore.”  Jean Sherrard, the ‘repeater’ for this feature, confirms Swint’s observation.   In addition to walking around the lake, Jean also lives near its north shore and has seen the “suds.”  

By Louise Wittelsy
By Louise Wittelsy

The source for this froth was the mineral-rich springs that are a mere mile north of Green Lake.  The Native Americans named them Liq’tid, or Licton, for the maroon mud that once it was blended at the springs, sloshed south in a small stream to Green Lake.  What the Indians applied as a cosmetic, E.A. Jensen attempted to exploit as a natural panacea. In the 1930s Jensen opened a spa at the springs that as the sign in the 1945 “then” reads, “Home of Licton Mineral Springs Thermal Baths Relief for Rheumatism Neuritis Arthritis Asthma.”  Jensen installed a steam plant to make these cold springs hot for soaking. 

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We chose this week’s subject to thank public historian Mimi Sheridan for her prolific contributions to Seattle cultural heritage.  Jean has posed her right-of-center in his “now” repeat of the 1945 Seattle Municipal Archive photograph.  Almost anyone who researches local history will have learned from Mimi, who has proved to be something of a renaissance woman.  Her delving and delivering has become a great local resource on subjects of local heritage, big subjects and small, from the Seattle waterfront to countless local landmarks. 

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Mimi has also enriched our understanding of many neighborhoods, including the one that rings the restful green Licton Springs Park from the Aurora Avenue’s stuttering speedway on the west to the Northgate commercial parking lot on the east.   Apropos the Springs, you may wish to take the time to read Mimi Sheridan and Carol Tobin’s historical study of the greater Licton Springs neighborhood.  Here’s the link:  http://www.lictonsprings.org/localin/history.html   On the fate of the Springs we learn that “the City of Seattle annexed the area and sought acquisition of the property in a 1954 park bond. “  It was approved in 1960.  

Twenty years ago Mimi Sheridan earned her degree in Urban Planning and Historic Preservation from the University of Washington. About a year ago a life-changing plan came to her in a flash. She calls it her “Saul on the road to Damascus” moment.  Mimi, who moved to Seattle from California in 1973, has now returned to it, choosing Monterey, which she reminds us, was the “first capitol of Alta California.”  While she has left much for us to learn, we will still miss Mimi. 

BELOW:  The House on the Hill at the northeast corner of N. 97th Street and Densmore Avenue North as seen in the featured NOW AND THEN at the top.

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WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Yup.  Ron has found a few repeats that keep to the neighborhood – with one exception for you to find.   Ron has also added a clue at the bottom with a 1946 aerial of the then still future park.  You will find both spa and the home “as clue” at 97th and Densmore.   A clue to the last clue: it is near the upper-right corner.

Then: The thousands of skaters on Green Lake in this late January 1916 view could not have known that the skating would soon be over, one of the victims of the Big Snow of 1916. Courtesy Fairlook Antiques

This rare glimpse of the rapid Ravenna Creek’s fall through Cowen Park was photographed not long before the stream that had had “topped off” Green Lake into Lake Washington’s Union Bay for thousands of years was shut off in 1911. (Photo courtesy of Jim Westall)

Temporarily untended the Good Shepherd orchard awaits its fate, ca. 1978.

THEN: Midwife Alice Wood Ellis, far right, joins her mother and two children on the front lawn of their half-finished home in the East Green Lake neighborhood, ca. 1901. Courtesy Carol Solle

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THEN: Like violence in a classic Greek play, the carnage suggested by this 1934 crash scene on the then new Aurora speedway was kept off stage, either behind the city’s official photographer, or in the county morgue. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.)

THEN: Chalk-written real estate notices to the sides of Seattle’s Aurora Speedway in 1937 prelude by several decades the profession’s book and computer listings and the expectation of some that an agent will now be driving a Mercedes. (Courtesy, Washington State Archives, Bellevue Community College branch.)

4719 Thackeray Place NE. The 1938 WPA tax photo.

THEN: Far-left, Playland’s Acroplane, a carni’ flight-simulator, stands admired by future pilots in 1932. Behind them sprawls the amusement park’s fated Fun House. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Julia and Richard Ballinger owned a “gas-powered” rowboat to reach their summer home on their namesake Lake Ballinger. This 1911 view looks east from near the tracks of the Seattle-Everett Interurban. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Roosevelt Way bustling after the war. This subject first appeared in The Seattle Times on July 7, 1946. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

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1946 AERIAL  – Wherein you may find both the spa and the home-as-clue.  

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Seattle Now & Then: A Room with a View – Atop the WAC Roof

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THEN: We give this panorama from the roof of the Washington Athletic Club a circa date of 1961, the year that Horizon House, a First Hill retirement community, first opened its doors to residents at Ninth Avenue and University Street. The high-rise L-shaped Horizon stands top-center. (Lawton Gowey)
THEN: We give this panorama from the roof of the Washington Athletic Club a circa date of 1961, the year that Horizon House, a First Hill retirement community, first opened its doors to residents at Ninth Avenue and University Street. The high-rise L-shaped Horizon stands top-center. (Lawton Gowey)  CLICK TO ENLARGE
NOW: From the WAC roof Interstate-5 is mostly hidden behind One and Two Union Squares and beneath the Convention Center and Freeway Park.
NOW: From the WAC roof Interstate-5 is mostly hidden behind One and Two Union Squares and beneath the Convention Center and Freeway Park.

A few weeks ago Jean and I were invited to the Washington Athletic Club (WAC) to give an illustrated lecture on how we go about delivering these weekly “repeats.”  It is Jean’s and my tenth anniversary – about.  With both text and pictures, I began this weekly feature in the winter of 1982.  Jean rescued me in 2005 when he started helping with the “nows.” By then we were old friends. Now he does all the repeats.  I both thank and need him.

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The day before our WAC lecture, Jean took the opportunity of visiting the club’s roof, thereby extending his practice of illustrating Seattle from its high-rises.  This time Robert Laurent, our gracious host and the Club’s Senior Event Manager,  accompanied him.  This Sunday’s “then” is one of the three historical photos that Jean carried with him.  (The other two – or three – are included here below this introduction.)  None of them was named, dated or credited, although I suspect another old friend, Lawton Gowey did the recording.  Lawton also explored the city on its sidewalks and from its roofs, and he (since deceased) and I shared at least three abiding interests: London history, the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and historical ephemera of Seattle, which we regularly exchanged.

Lawton Gowey's municipal driver's permit, 1976
Lawton Gowey’s municipal driver’s permit, 1976
St. James tower - not from WAC but for comparison.
St. James tower – not from WAC but for comparison.

Like any high-rise panorama, this one is both stacked and stocked with stories, of which we can only touch a very few.   First, far right in the “then,” the twin towers of St. James Cathedral (1907) transcend the First Hill horizon.  In the “now,” one of the two towers peeks through the slot of First Hill that is revealed between the Park Place Building (1972) and One Union Square (1981).  Left-of-center, its neighbor, the Two Union Square (1987-88) reaches fifty-six stories and is the third highest building in Seattle.  Together, One and Two hide most of the horizon revealed in the “then.”   

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On the left, Eagles Auditorium (1924-5), home of ACT Theatre since 1993, fills the southwest corner of Seventh Avenue and Union Street, and to the east its terra cotta skin approaches the green glass of the Washington State Convention and Trade Center (1985-88).  From internal evidence the historical pan barely predates the Seattle Freeway section of Interstate-5.  Consequently, there is no Freeway Park, which in Jean’s “now” is knit with both the Park and the Center and the autumnal-toned landscape seen between the two Union Squares.  Instead, the “then” gives us a spread of the parking lots and small hotels that once sat on a few of the thousands of parcels of Seattle properties cleared for the freeway.

With the Federal Courthouse as 5th and Madison at the bottom, this aerial looks north-northeast at a stretch of freeway construction where I-5 curves from the city's grid as it approaches the western flank of Capitol Hill. A few of the surviving buildings noted in the paragraph below can be found here as well.
With the Federal Courthouse at 5th and Madison at the bottom, this aerial looks north-northeast at a stretch of freeway construction where I-5 curves from the city’s grid as it approaches the western flank of Capitol Hill. A few of the  buildings noted in the paragraph below can be found here..  These include the Exeter, Normandie, Cambridge, Van Siclen (the top of it), Fourth Church of Christ (now Town Hall), Horizon House, a touch of Virginia Mason Hospital, the Marlborough and the Panorama, and the northwest corner of the Nettleton (far-right)..

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For a reader’s game of hide and seek, we will name a few more of the built landmarks that appear in either the “then” or “now” panoramas or in both: the Exeter, Normandie, Cambridge, Van Siclen, Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist, now Town Hall since 1999, Horizon House, both Virginia Mason and Swedish Hospitals, the side-by-side Marlborough and Panorama, Nettleton, and – giving these away – the new blue and salmon colored Meridian Tower, which rises behind the spreading Electra apartments on the left.  The concrete Electra was built in 1949 as one of Seattle’s largest mid-century moderns and converted to condominiums in the 1990s.

WEB EXTRAS

Here’s a few more shots from the WAC rooftop:

Robert Laurent (r) with Jack (who has all the keys!)
Robert Laurent (r) with Jack (who has all the keys!)
A panorama looking northwest
A panorama looking northwest
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West, with knobs
From the top of WAC looking northwest
From the top of WAC looking northwest (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry, AKA MOHAI)
Find the Camlyn!
Find the Camlyn, Pedro – above and below!
From the top of WAC, looking north to Lake Union and Wallingford.
From the top of WAC, looking north to Lake Union and Wallingford. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI)
Looking south with Sixth Ave. on the left and Fifth on the right. Landmarks include Plymouth Congregational Church, the Y.W.C.A., the Smith Tower, far right, and Harborview Hospital on the far-left horizon.
Looking south with Sixth Ave. on the left and Fifth on the right. Landmarks include Plymouth Congregational Church, the Y.W.C.A., the Smith Tower, far right, and Harborview Hospital on the far-left horizon. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI)

And the WAC from below:

The Washington Athletic Club from below
The Washington Athletic Club street view

Anything to add, boys?  Yes sir.  First a now-then clip on WAC that we managed in 1999.  That we will follow with a harsh of features Ron Edge has flavored for the neighborhood.   We may conclude by reaching beyond these horizons with some pans we think classic, including at the bottom Seattle’s first, the Sammis 1865 pan of the pioneer town.

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First appeared in The Times on August 22, 1999.
First appeared in The Times on August 22, 1999.

THEN: Of the three largest Seattle roofs – the Alki Point Natatorium, a grandstand section of the U.W.’s Denny Field, and the St. James Cathedral dome - that crashed under the weight of the “Northwest Blizzard” in February 1916, the last was the grandest and probably loudest. It fell “with a crashing roar that was heard many blocks distant.” (Courtesy Catholic Archdiocese.)

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN: In the 32 years between Frank Shaw's dedication picture and Jean Sherrard's dance scene, Freeway Park has gained in verdure what it has lost in human use.

THEN: The scene looks north through a skyline of steeples toward the Cascade neighborhood and Lake Union, ca. 1923.

THEN: The home at bottom right looks across Madison Street (out of frame) to Central School. The cleared intersection of Spring Street and Seventh Avenue shows on the right.

THEN: Both the grading on Belmont Avenue and the homes beside it are new in this “gift” to Capitol Hill taken from the family album of Major John Millis. (Courtesy of the Major’s grandchild Walter Millis and his son, a Seattle musician, Robert Millis.)

THEN: The brand new N&K Packard dealership at Belmont and Pike in 1909. Thanks to both antique car expert Fred Cruger for identifying as Packards the cars on show here, and to collector Ron Edge for finding them listed at this corner in a 1909 Post-Intelligencer. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN: The Perry Apartments is nearly new in “postcard artist” M. L. Oakes look at them south on Boren to where it intersects with Madison Street. (Courtesy John Cooper)

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THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898. Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

 

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THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)

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THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

THEN: First dedicated in 1889 by Seattle’s Unitarians, the congregation soon needed a larger sanctuary and moved to Capitol Hill. Here on 7th Avenue, their first home was next used for a great variety of events, including a temporary home for the Christian Church, a concert hall for the Ladies Musical Club, and a venue for political events like anarchist Emma Goldman’s visit to Seattle in 1910. (Compliments Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Built in 1887, the Minor-Collins Home at the northeast corner of Minor Avenue and Cherry Street was one of the grandest and longest surviving pioneer mansions on First Hill. (Courtesy Historic Seattle)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: This detail from the prolific local photographer Asahel Curtis’s photograph of the Smith/Rininger home at the northwest corner of Columbia Street and Summit Avenue dates from the early twentieth century when motorcars, rolling or parked, were still very rare on the streets of Seattle, including these on First Hill. (Courtesy, Historic Seattle)

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THEN: A.J. McDonald’s panorama of Lake Union and its surrounds dates from the early 1890s. It was taken from First Hill, looking north from near the intersection of Terry Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The city’s north end skyline in 1923 looking northwest from the roof of the then new Cambridge Apartments at 9th Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Built in 1909-10 on one of First Hill’s steepest slopes, the dark brick Normandie Apartments' three wings, when seen from the sky, resemble a bird in flight. (Lawton Gowey)

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THEN: The Seattle Central Business District in 1962. I found this panorama mixed in with the Kodachrome slides photographed by Lawton Gowey. It was most likely taken by my helpful friend Lawton, who died in 1983, or Robert Bradley, Lawton’s friend in the then active Seattle Camera Club. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

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First appeared in Pacific, August 6, 1995
First appeared in Pacific, August 6, 1995

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First appeared in Pacific, October 12, 2008
First appeared in Pacific, October 12, 2008

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First appeared in Pacific, November 2008.
First appeared in Pacific, November 2008.

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First appeared in Pacific, August 25, 2002
First appeared in Pacific, August 25, 2002

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First appeared in Pacific, March 8, 1992
First appeared in Pacific, March 8, 1992

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First page to a now-then treatment of the 1919 General Strike. When we find page 2 we will insert it.
First page to a now-then treatment of the 1919 General Strike. When we find page 2 we will insert it.

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First appeared in Pacific, August 23, 1987
First appeared in Pacific, August 23, 1987

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A McDonald pan - one of many from the early 1890s.
A McDonald pan – one of many from the early 1890s.

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Another by the California photographer McDonald taken during his brief stay in Seattle in the early 1890s. [Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.]
Another by the California photographer A. J. McDonald taken during his brief stay in Seattle in the early 1890s. [Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.]
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A PANORAMA SAMPLER

Perhaps or probably the most revealing photograph taken of Pioneer Seattle. The photographer, Robinson, took it 1869 from a second window in Snoqualmie Hall at the southwest corner of Main Street and Commercial Street (First Ave. South).
Perhaps or probably the most revealing photograph taken of Pioneer Seattle. The photographer, Robinson, took it 1869 from a second window in Snoqualmie Hall at the southwest corner of Main Street and Commercial Street (First Ave. South).

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Seattle's first pan photographed by its first professional photographer Sammis. Dates 1865 it is interpreted below by pioneer historian Clarence Bagley.
Seattle’s first pan photographed by its first professional photographer Sammis. Dated 1865, it is interpreted below by pioneer historian Clarence Bagley.

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Peterson and Bros pan of Seattle in 1878 from Denny Hill.
Peterson and Bros pan of Seattle in 1878 from Denny Hill.  Second Avenue leaves the frame at the lower-right corner.  Compare with the 1884/5 pan below, also from Denny Hill.
From Denny Hill 1884/5.
From Denny Hill 1884/5.  Third Ave. leads to the bottom-center of the pan.
Looking south down Third Avenue from Denny Hill
Looking south down Third Avenue from the Washington Hotel on Denny Hill
Lake Union from Capitol Hill, early 1890s.
Lake Union from Capitol Hill, early 1890s.
A circa 1912-13 recording from the Smith Tower when it was still under construction.
A circa 1912-13 recording from the Smith Tower when it was still under construction.
A circa 1905 pan from the Alaska Building (1904)
A circa 1905 pan from the Alaska Building (1904)
From First Hill to Denny Hill, ca. 1905.
From First Hill to Denny Hill, ca. 1905.
1956 panorama from Harborview Hospital. The contemporary repeat dates from ca. 1990.
1956 panorama from Harborview Hospital. The contemporary repeat dates from ca. 1990. (Click Twice to Enlarge)
First Hill horizon taken by Watkins from a platform he constructed on top of Denny Hill's south summit.
First Hill horizon taken by Watkins from a platform he constructed on top of Denny Hill’s south summit.  Seneca Street reaches eighth-ninth avenues above where the dark copes of evergreens stands out at the upper-center of the subject.  [Courtesy, University of Washington Northwest Collection]

Seattle Now & Then: Jackson St. and First Avenue South

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THEN: This view looking east from First Avenue South on Jackson Street in 1904, is still four years short of the Jackson Street Regrade during which the distant horizon line near 9th Avenue was lowered by more than 70 feet. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: This view looking east from First Avenue South on Jackson Street in 1904, is still four years short of the Jackson Street Regrade during which the distant horizon line near 9th Avenue was lowered by more than 70 feet. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Most of the structures in the “then” photo survive in the “now” after more than a century of use.
NOW: Most of the structures in the “then” photo survive in the “now” after more than a century of use.

The oversized posters hanging in the first floor corner windows of the Wax and Raine Building, on the right, reveal the date for this look east on Jackson Street from First Avenue South.  (Granted, you can not read them at the print size offered here, but you can trust us.)  They promote the 1904 visit on August 24 and 25 of the Ringling Brothers Circus to Seattle’s exhibition grounds, located at what is now the High School Stadium in Seattle Center.  The circus came with one rhinoceros, two giraffes, and forty elephants. It was also the year that the earnest and still steady Wax and Raine Building first opened. 

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There is as yet no Wax and Raine Building showing here at the southeast corner of First and Jackson.    The view looks east on Jackson from the top level of the King Street Coal Wharf.  The spire puncturing the skyline belongs to Holy Names Academy (before their move to Capitol Hill), and the large west facade below the Academy is the home for the Washington Shoe Manufacturer at the southeast corner of Jackson and Occidental.  It appears in this week’s featured photo “behind” the Wax and Raine and also in the “now” photo where it has grown three more floors.   South School stand on the far right horizon.
Another of Jackson Street looking east from the King Street Coal Wharf in the early 1890s.
A wider angle on Jackson Street looking east from the King Street Coal Wharf in the early 1890s.

In our featured photo at the top, the lonely man standing in the company of a fire hydrant on that same southeast corner of Jackson Street and First Avenue South might be adopted as a symbol or sign for this sturdy street.  Aside from a few hotel lobbies, there is little sidewalk commercial bustle here.  Jackson Street was then primarily stocked with wholesalers and manufacturers at home in new quarters built in the early years of the twentieth century, most of which survive.  Perhaps the man on the corner is headed north for the big bar facing First Avenue inside the Jackson Building, out of picture on the left.  It was the sudsy

The Tumwater Tavern facing First Ave. South from the Rainier Hotel recorded, again, by the Webster and Steven Studio. It served as the editorial photographer for The Seattle Times for many years.
The Tumwater Tavern facing First Ave. South from the Jackson , home of the Capitol Hotel recorded, again, by the Webster and Steven Studio. Beginning early in the 20th-Century it served as the editorial photographer for The Seattle Times for many years.  (Courtesy;, Museum of History and Industry)
Another look at the Tumwater Tavern, here looking north on First across Jackson Street about 1911. This is one of a few negatives struck by the Public Works Dept. to show off the city's first decorative light standards, which used five bulbs on the primary arterials like both Jackson Street and First Avenue South.
Another look at the Tumwater Tavern, here looking north on First across Jackson Street about 1911. This is one of a few negatives struck by the Public Works Dept. to show off the city’s first decorative light standards, which used five bulbs on the primary arterials like both Jackson Street and First Avenue South.
Looking north on First S. across Jackson in the late 1890s and before the 1901 construction of the Jackson Building.
Looking north on First S. across Jackson in the late 1890s and before the 1901 construction of the Jackson Building.  (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)

home for Olympia Beer, the “it’s the water” that was Rainier Beer’s principal Puget Sound competitor.  The Jackson Building, construction in 1901 for the Capitol Hotel, is also distinguished by the loving attention it has since received.  Architect and preservationist Ralph Anderson restored the classical landmark in 1963.  It was the first renovation in what soon became a movement and a decade later the Pioneer Square Historic District.

Potland photographer Huntington's look north on Commercial Street from Jackson ca. 1880. Huntington's caption is printed directly below.
Portland photographer Huntington’s look north on Commercial Street from Jackson ca. 1881.  Hold the paper “properly” with the subject somewhat close to your eyes that hold  themselves somewhat cross-eyed and you may manage to pull the third dimension from this stereo.   Huntington’s caption is printed directly below.   Both are – again and again – used courtesy of the Museum of History and Industry.  Bless the MOHAI.   [click click to ENLARGE]

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An etching of Commercial Street looking north from Jackson Street ca. 1884.
An etching of Commercial Street looking north from Jackson Street ca. 1884. The Arlington Hotel, with the flag, is on the right.   The University Building, a box with a cupola, is on the horizon, left-of-center.

Through its first half-century First Avenue South was easily the busiest retailing strip in Seattle and was appropriately first named Commercial Street.  After its largely framed four-block-run from Yesler Way to the tide flats below King Street was consumed by the Great Fire of 1889, along with all else in Seattle’s original neighborhood, Commercial Street quickly returned to its varied enterprises.  In the roaring 90s, following the fire, Jackson Street

Great Fire (June 6, 1889) ruins looking north from Jackson street with Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) on the right. A McManus marketed this and several other photos of the ruins in July, 1889. By then much of the rubble was cleared away, the ruins razed, and the rebuilding begun.
Great Fire (June 6, 1889) ruins looking north from Jackson street with Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) on the right. McManus marketed this in 1912 and dated  it and several other photos of the ruins July, 1889. By then much of the rubble was cleared away, the ruins razed, and the rebuilding begun.
The Salvation Army band posing on Jackson Street in front of the Palace Theatre, possibly during or following a "battle of the bands" with the house orchestra. The subject looks east from Commercial Street (First Ave. S.).
The Salvation Army band posing on Jackson Street in front of the Palace Theatre, possibly during or following a “battle of the bands” with the house orchestra. The subject looks east from Commercial Street (First Ave. S.).

was a generous contributor to Seattle’s skid road neighborhood of bars and cheap lodgings, especially on its south side where it nearly reached the King Street train trestles above the tide flats.  During the 1890s, Salvation Army street bands trumpeted concerts that competed with house bands in the bars along Jackson Street.  This sawdust row of cheap lodgings and obliging bars was razed to make way for the manufacturing and wholesaling brick neighborhood shown at the top.

Below: THE PLUMMER HOME at the NORTHWEST CORNER of OCCIDENTAL AND JACKSON IN THE LATE 1870s.

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Occidental looking north from Jackson, ca. 1899.
Occidental looking north from Jackson, ca. 1899.

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Within a block of this intersection in the 1904 Sanborn Real Estate Map there are five hotels, a flour and feed warehouse, a ship chandler, a second-hand store, several machine shops of various sizes, a shirt factory, a printing press, a rubber factory, three plumbers’ supplies, a candy factory, a photo engraver, a bakery (in the alley behind the Capitol Building) and a saw shop, the latter promoted by the billboard, shaped like a circular blade, that sits atop the roof, right-of-center.   The blade also appears above the roof of the Luna Park bound electric trolley below, circa 1907.  Note as well the Washington Shoe Manufacturer sign left-of-center and the Wax and Raine Building on the right.

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WEB EXTRAS

I’m going to deviate from our usual pattern and include a few photos from the Hands Around Green Lake event that just concluded minutes ago.

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Anything to add, guys?  Certainly Jean.  Your “Hands Around Green Lake” diversion is most caressing.  Thanks much.   Living near the lake you have often shared some unique moments out of its vibrant life with us.  NEXT: Ron Edge has gathered an assortment of neighborhood features and strung them below.

THEN: Sitting on a small triangle at the odd northwest corner of Third Avenue and the Second Ave. S. Extension, the Fiesta Coffee Shop was photographed and captioned, along with all taxable structures in King County, by Works Progress Administration photographers during the lingering Great Depression of the late 1930s. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive’s Puget Sound Branch)

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THEN: Looking northwest from the 4th Avenue trestle towards the Great Northern Depot during its early 20th Century construction. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: 1934 was one of the worst years of the Great Depression. This look north on Third Avenue South through Main Street and the Second Avenue South Extension was recorded on Thursday, April 19th of that year. Business was generally dire, but especially here in this neighborhood south of Yesler Way where there were many storefront vacancies. (Courtesy Ron Edge)

THEN: In the older scene daring steel workers pose atop construction towers during the 1910 building of the Union Depot that faces Jackson Street.

When compared to most city scenes relatively little has changed in his view west on Main Street from First Avenue South in the century-plus between them. (Historical photo courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

Then: The Pacific House, behind the line-up of white-gloved soldiers, might have survived well into the 20th Century were it not destroyed during Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889. Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

THEN: Looking north-northeast from the corner of Main Street and Occidental Avenue two or three weeks after the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy the Museum of History and Industry – MOHAI)

THEN: The original for this scene of a temporary upheaval on Mill Street (Yesler Way) was one of many historical prints given to the Museum of History and Industry many years ago by the Charles Thorndike estate. Thorndike was one of Seattle’s history buffs extraordinaire. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)

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Appeared first in Pacific, June, 1, 2008
Appeared first in Pacific, June, 1, 2008

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First appeared, Nov. 9, 1999
First appeared, May. 9, 1999

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First appeared March 14, 1999
First appeared March 14, 1999

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Another Billboard negative, this one sighting west on Jackson from or thru the Second Avenue extension in 1934.
Another Billboard negative, this one sighting west on Jackson from or thru the Second Avenue extension in 1934.  (Note:  The address given at the base of the photograph refers to the position of the billboard not the camera.]
Six years later looking west on Jackson Street thru 4th Avenue on July 16, 1940.
Six years later looking west on Jackson Street thru 4th Avenue on July 16, 1940.

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First appeared in Pacific, Nov. 29, 1998
First appeared in Pacific, Nov. 29, 1998

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Not yet hidden behind the
Not yet hidden by the Was and Raine Building, the Jackson Building at the northeast corner of First Ave. S. and  Jackson Street stands out on the right.  The photograph was taken from the railroad overpass used by coal cars to reach the King Street Wharf bunkers.   
First appeared in Pacific June 29, 1997
First appeared in Pacific June 29, 1997  

Seattle Now & Then: The Yakima Canyon

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THEN: Hugh Paradise neither named nor dated his photograph looking down from a basalt cliff onto the Yakima River. (Courtesy, Byron Coney)
THEN: Hugh Paradise neither named nor dated his photograph looking down from a basalt cliff onto the Yakima River. (Courtesy, Byron Coney)
NOW: With some exploring, Jean Sherrard discovered that Paradise’s prospect was only a few feet off the Yakima Canyon Road, a State Scenic Highway.
NOW: With some exploring, Jean Sherrard discovered that Paradise’s prospect was only a few feet off the Yakima Canyon Road, a State Scenic Highway.
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The panoramic view from the same spot

I imagine that among PacificNW readers many have explored this magazine’s namesake surrounds via its many adventurous roads and highways.  And I’m confident that among these explorers, several will have driven to within a few feet of this week’s featured subject, but then missed it.  Jean Sherrard estimates that he has made about twenty visits to this basalt bluff above the Yakima River.  First, of course, he had to find it by studying the photographer-essayist Hugh Paradise’s featured photograph. At legal speed it takes about two-and-a-half hours from Seattle to reach the half-paved shoulder that Jean describes as “a little triangle squeezed between Washington State Route 821 and about a two-hundred-foot fall into the Yakima River.”  Sensibly, the Washington State Department of Transportation has set no “park here” signs marking Jean’s postage-stamp sized “parking lot.”  It can be by found following the ensuing instructions. 

Asahel Curtis' look south to the canyon curve and cut above the Yakima River. (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
Asahel Curtis’ look south to the canyon curve and cut above the Yakima River. (Courtesy, Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
A Washington Dept of Highways snapshot taken somewhere along the canyon road, perhaps even from "our" cut.
A Washington Department of Highways snapshot taken somewhere along the canyon road, perhaps even of “our” cut.
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The cut next to the viewpoint

About four miles south of Ellensburg the now nearly century-old Yakima River Canyon Road, while keeping for the most part close to the river, follows the eroding trout stream’s serpentine cut through the Umtanum Ridge.  The Ridge takes up most of the skyline in the now-and-then photos.  The highway curves its way through about ten oxbows (that is twenty curves, some of them hairpins) on its way to the lower Yakima Valley. After about the eighth curve, the Canyon Highway reaches the landmark Red’s Fly Shop, which is actually a sumptuous lodge, and begins a half-mile climb to the unmarked Paradise/Sherrard petite parking place.  At the top if you suddenly enter a highway regrade that cuts through the bluff you were just ascending, you have gone a few feet too far.  Turn around and try again.

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The artist Hugh Paradise was born in 1912 in Montana and died in Seattle in 1979. His Post-Intelligencer obituary described him as a “retired free-lance writer and photographer, who resided in the Seattle area for over 40 years.”  I have studied and admired Paradise since a friend shared a few hundred of his negatives with me several years ago.  His name fits.  Paradise wrote short essays illustrated with his arcadian photographs for Sunset Magazine.  An

Hugh Paradise posing his wife Anne Marie Van Cleve at Grand Coulee.
Hugh Paradise posing his wife Anne Marie Van Cleve at Grand Coulee.

appreciative Sunset editor described him to me as “poetic.”  He married Anne Marie Van Cleve in 1942, whom he frequently posed in the middle-distance of the northwest landscapes that attracted him.  Paradise was also exceptionally smart.  He belonged both to Mensa and the Triple Nine Society, gregarious and inquiring societies for people with high intelligence scores.  His obituary describes his “major interest” as “the world about him.”

Scene in the Yakima River Canyon, photographed by Horace Sykes ca. 1947.
Scene in the Yakima River Canyon, photographed by Horace Sykes ca. 1947.

Hugh Paradise had a handicap, a breathing condition that prevented him from ranging far into the scenery he photographed. For this photo high above the Yakima, he was forced to stay near the side of the road. In the 1960s, this magazine’s predecessors, The Seattle Times “Charmed Land Magazine” and The Seattle Times “Color Rotogravure, the Sunday Pictorial Magazine,“ published several examples of Hugh Paradise’s intimate art.  While I never met him, I continue to collect him. 

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?

Starting with you Jean.  First dear readers,  we have encouraged Jean to include some of the photos he has taken during his many visits to the Yakima Canyon.  They are grouped directly below the feature text, that is, between it and this answer to Jean’s by now conventional question about “extras.”

Hey, Paul – here are a few selections of the canyon from over the years. The first set repeat Paradise’s shot in different weathers and seasons. The second are a handful that I dug up at the last minute. Enjoy.

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Ah but we have very little in the way of our own Times features that cover the state’s “dry side” subjects.  Choosing to pull neither text nor photos from “Building Washington,” the History of Washington State Public Works that we published years ago, which is filled with images from every corner of the state, we have played it convenient and  linked first a feature on the dedication of what we popularly call the Mercer Island Floating Bridge.  We do it for the sufficient reason that our featured photo looks to the east in the direction of Yakima, as do the second, third and fourth links below. For the last of these, this week, eleven links we shall pivot far north to the wet side of Alaska with the feature built on Jean’s recent visit to Juneau.  Following those we will sprinkle a few of the east side (of Washington State) subjects that we pulled three years ago for the “Our Daily Sykes” feature, which printed here a few hundred photographs taken by Horace Sykes, mostly in the 1940s, of his trips around Washington – and the West too – as a sensitive fire insurance adjuster with a good camera and eye for picturesque compositions.   And we will likely find a few other images that touch on Yakima, the river or the city too.

THEN: The Volunteer Park water tower was completed in 1907 on Capitol Hill’s highest point in aid the water pressure of its service to the often grand homes of its many nearly new neighbors. The jogging corner of E. Prospect Street and 15th Avenue E. is near the bottom of the Oakes postcard. (Historical Photo courtesy Mike Fairley)

THEN: Snoqualmie Falls appears in full force, probably during a spring runoff.

THEN: With his or her back to the east shore of Lake Sammamish an unidentified photographer recorded this Monohon scene in about 1909, the date suggested by the Eastside Heritage Center, by whose courtesy we use this historical record.

Then Caption: Amateur photographer George Brown most likely took this view of Portland’s 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition from the north porch of the Washington State Building. Brown also played clarinet in Wagner’s popular concert and marching band, which was probably performing at the Expo. (pic courtesy of Bill Greer)

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THEN:Carolyn Marr, Museum of History and Industry librarian and Anders Wilse expert, answers the joking caption on Councilman Reinhard’s pant leg with another example. “Wilse had a wry sense of humor. In one photo he took during the Great Northern Railroad construction project, a group of 4 men sit around a table playing cards with revolvers and glasses of liquid. He wrote on the photo ‘A Merry Christmas.’” (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: Darius Kinsey’s ca. 1914 panorama of the King County town of Cedar Falls (aka Moncton) set beside the unstable shore of Rattlesnake Lake. (Courtesy, Snoqualmie Valley Historical Society)

THEN: Photographer Frank LaRoche arrived in Seattle a few weeks after its Great Fire of 1889. Through the 1890s he made scores of round-trips to the Klondike, including this visit to the Juneau intersection of Seward Avenue and Front Street. (Museum of History and Industry)

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HORACE SYKES NEARBY THE RIVER

 First will show a few photos of Horace.  His home was above the beach in Magnolia.

Horace is on the far-right of this probably timed photo of his family gathered for a Christmas of uncertain date.
Horace is on the far-right of this probably timed photo of his family gathered for a Christmas of uncertain date.
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Horace , on the right, with a friend.  Both wear Washington Athletic Club stickers.
Somewhere on the Yakima River below the canyon.
Somewhere on the Yakima River below the canyon.
Somewhere on the Yakima
Somewhere on the Yakima
The Yakima Valley - farming with irrigation
The Yakima Valley – farming with irrigation
In the Yakima River Canyon
In the Yakima River Canyon
A Yakima Valley setting with Mt. Adams on the horizon.
A Yakima Valley setting with Mt. Adams on the horizon.
Thru his years of traveling the West, Horace Sykes came upon many spectacles.
Thru his years of traveling the West, Horace Sykes came upon many spectacles.
Somewhere on the dry side of the Cascades
Somewhere on the dry side of the Cascades
Nearby beside the Columbia River
Nearby beside the Columbia River
Where sheep may safely graze
Where sheep may safely graze
Another of the Yakima Canyon
Another of the Yakima Canyon
Horace visited Steptoe Butte several times.
Horace visited Steptoe Butte several times.
Steptoe Butte
Steptoe Butte
Mt. Adams on the horizon
Mt. Adams on the horizon
Horace's 1951 Chevy.
Horace’s 1951 Chevy in the state’s scablands – it seems..

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Red road moving thru a green landscape.
Red road moving thru a green landscape.

 

Moonlight somewhere in the valley
Moonlight somewhere in the valley
Horace with his camera in a canyon, but more likely the Snake River that the Yakima.
Horace keeping limber with his camera in a canyon, but more likely the Snake River that the Yakima.

Seattle Now & Then: Broadway and Roy and The Deluxe

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THEN: Looking south on 10th Avenue E. to the freshly re-paved intersection where Broadway splits into itself and 10th Avenue North in 1932.
THEN: Looking south on 10th Avenue E. to the freshly re-paved intersection where Broadway splits into itself and 10th Avenue North in 1932.
NOW: The trolley tracks on Broadway and 10th Avenue North were removed in the early 1940s, and the gas stations at the intersection with Roy more recently.
NOW: The trolley tracks on Broadway and 10th Avenue North were removed in the early 1940s, and the gas stations at the intersection with Roy more recently.

Here is another Foster and Kleiser photo of a prominent business intersection in Seattle where the famous billboard company may have been planning, or merely hoping, for a giant-sized sign.  Let us imagine it on the roof above the Harrah Brothers grocery at the scene’s center. (The grocery fills the space behind the three plate glass windows shown above the motorcar moving south on 10th Avenue North.) 

A Harrah ad from 1925
A Harrah ad from 1925
Another from 1925
Another from 1925
An ambitious ad from either Harrah or Heaven run in The Times one Sept. 9, 1926.
An ambitious ad from either Harrah or Heaven run in The Times on Sept. 9, 1926.
On the home front during the First World Ware, the Harrah Bros agree with fourteen other prospering "food dealers" to six restrictions.
On the home front during the First World Ware the Harrah Bro. agree with  fourteen  other prospering “food dealers”  to six restrictions.

The Harrah brothers opened their new store on August 25, 1931. The “then” photograph is dated 1932, so the comely light brick business block, designed by architect Earl W. Morrison for the southwest corner of Broadway and Roy Street, is about a year old.  The Harrahs were not new on Broadway, having first settled on this North Broadway block about twenty years earlier.  The brothers ran their first Seattle Times classified ad in June 1910, when they were looking for a “first-class bread baker.”  A year later in an illustrated Times advertisement on April 14, 1911, the grocery’s new van was pictured. Below it the partners bragged in print that with their auto-delivery, “Harrah Bros. succeeded in supplying their patrons with Hot Cross Buns in time for breakfast this morning.”

From April 14, 1911 and in The Times.
From April 14, 1911 and in The Times.
The Harrah's make it to their Silver Anniversary two years into the Great Depression. [Click-Cllick to enlarge for reading!]
The Harrah’s make it to their Silver Anniversary two years into the Great Depression. [Click-Cllick to enlarge for reading!]

In 1934 this corner was disposed for a tavern by Washington State’s then new Liquor Control Board.  With prohibition recently over, the Board fancied it for a bar, and somehow convinced Berlin Cleaners, which was then holding the corner next door to Harrahs, to relocate two blocks south at 619 Broadway North, where a popular baked bean merchant name McCullock was persuaded by the sturdy board to move to the nearby Haynes Candy Store on Olive Way.  The confectionery had been swayed by the Liquor Board to move to a nearby and vacant storefront on E. Pine Street.  Despite the Board’s Machiavellian efforts, by 1939 this southwest corner of Broadway and Roy had been temporarily reformed from alcohol to ice cream.  However, in seven more years it reverted to spirits with the first of the De Luxe taverns.

Deluxe adver. from 1978 - about.
A Deluxe adver. from 1978 – about.  Note the Grant Wood are in the advertisement where t he farmer has been traded for the Deluxe chef, which we also share in the photo that follows.  It too dates from the ’70s, my last years on the Hill.   I first lived near the Deluxe in 1964, nearby on Summit Avenue.

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The Deluxe on September 12, 2006.
The Deluxe on September 12, 2006 with Victoria B. and friend.
Victoria, again, twenty-seven years earlier in the Harvard Exit Theatre, atanding at the doorway between the lobby and the "living room."
Victoria, again, twenty-seven years earlier in the Harvard Exit Theatre, standing at the doorway between the lobby and the “living room.”

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A page from the Century Club's 1937 tax card. courtesy Seattle Washington Archive, the branch that is on the Bellevue Community College campus.
A page from the Century Club’s 1937 tax card. courtesy Seattle Washington
Archive, the branch that is on the Bellevue Community College campus. (Click to Enlarge)

With “De” and “Luxe” joined, the Deluxe in Jean’s “now” opened in 1962 with Joe Rogel and Bernie Minsk the gregarious partners.  Sixty-four years later, Rogel’s son Barry is the owner.  Living nearby on Broadway while teaching film at the Cornish School in the 70s, I remember well both Joe and Bernie, and their hamburgers.  In 1970, the humorist and Times restaurant reviewer John Hinterberger described how “about 200 people streamed out of the Harvard Exit,

Posing at the front steps in the mid-70s, Jim Osteen and Art Berstain, the creator-owners of the Harvard Exit conversion of the Women's Century Club.
Posing at the front steps in the mid-70s, Jim Osteen and Art Berstain, the creator-owners of the Harvard Exit conversion of the Women’s Century Club.
My Broadway home in 1976-77 posing for CHAOS (Capitol Hill Arts On Show) promotion on the roof reached from our kitchen window. Our apartment had been passed along or down for many years from one Cornish student or instructor to another.
My Broadway home in 1976-77 posing for CHAOS (Capitol Hill Arts On Show) promotion on the roof reached from our kitchen window. Our apartment at the southeast corner of Broadway and Republican had been passed along or down for many years from one Cornish student or instructor to another.    It can be seen in the photo that follows, which was taken in the 1930s during the widening of Broadway. 
The roof on which we posed above was behind the Wiggly sign on the right.
The roof on which we posed two photos above was behind the Piggly-Wiggly Market sign on the right.

turned right and many streamed into the Deluxe Tavern; adjacent buildings with a symbiotic relationship.”  The still charmed and cosmopolitan neighborhood of Capitol Hill will, I figure, forever thank Joe, Bernie and Barry for their burly and buttered baked potatoes. [Long ago I drew for Joe and Bernie a bake potato adorned with butter and sour cream and imagined as a billboard on the roof of the tavern.  When & if found I will attach, or introduce with an addendum.]

THE CORNER TAX CARD FROM THE LATE 1930s Followed by two other tax photos of this west side of the 600 block on Broadway.

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BELOW:  TWO of the MCKALE SERVICE STATION, ACROSS ROY STREET from the CORNER STOREFRONT – The FUTURE DELUXE.

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WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, fellahs?  Surely Jean, more Edge Links of the neighborhood.

THEN: The Volunteer Park water tower was completed in 1907 on Capitol Hill’s highest point in aid the water pressure of its service to the often grand homes of its many nearly new neighbors. The jogging corner of E. Prospect Street and 15th Avenue E. is near the bottom of the Oakes postcard. (Historical Photo courtesy Mike Fairley)

THEN: The brand new N&K Packard dealership at Belmont and Pike in 1909. Thanks to both antique car expert Fred Cruger for identifying as Packards the cars on show here, and to collector Ron Edge for finding them listed at this corner in a 1909 Post-Intelligencer. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry.)

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THEN: With great clouds overhead and a landscape 45 years shorter than now, one vehicle – a pickup heading east – gets this part of State Route 520 to itself on a weekday afternoon. (courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The Dog House at 714 Denny Way was strategically placed at the southern terminus for the Aurora Speedway when it was new in the mid-1930s. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College Branch.)

THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)

THEN: Built in 1887, the Minor-Collins Home at the northeast corner of Minor Avenue and Cherry Street was one of the grandest and longest surviving pioneer mansions on First Hill. (Courtesy Historic Seattle)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: A.J. McDonald’s panorama of Lake Union and its surrounds dates from the early 1890s. It was taken from First Hill, looking north from near the intersection of Terry Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Samuel McKnight’s early 1890s panorama of Lake Union also looks north into most of Seattle’s seventeen square-mile annexation of 1891, when the city limits were pushed north from McGraw Street to 85th Street. Fremont, Edgewater, the future Wallingford, Latona, and Brooklyn (University District) were among the neighborhoods included. (Courtesy, Dan Kerlee)

THEN: A carpenter’s jewel with Victorian ornaments recorded by a tax assessor’s photographer in 1936, nestles at 615 Eastlake beside the surviving Jensen Apartments, aka the O’Donnell Building, on the left. (Courtesy Stan Unger)

THEN: The ‘Seattle showplace’ Rhodes mansion on Capitol Hill, ca. 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

Seattle Now & Then: The Big Stump

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THEN: Variously named the Giant Cedar Stump, the Big Arlington Stump, or just The Stump, this Snohomish Country roadside attraction was killed by a fire in 1893, reduced to stump size and tunneled in 1916, given a concrete base in 1922, and moved alongside the new Highway 99 in 1939, where it is shown here in 1940, long before its last move in 1971. (Courtesy Old Seattle Paperworks)
THEN: Variously named the Giant Cedar Stump, the Big Arlington Stump, or just The Stump, this Snohomish Country roadside attraction was killed by a fire in 1893, reduced to stump size and tunneled in 1916, given a concrete base in 1922, and moved alongside the new Highway 99 in 1939, where it is shown here in 1940, long before its last move in 1971. (Courtesy Old Seattle Paperworks)
NOW: Jean Sherrard’s opportune meeting with the stump late this summer was a lucky opening for one of Boyd Ellis’s early portraits of it to appear here.
NOW: Jean Sherrard’s opportune meeting with the stump late this summer was a lucky opening for one of Boyd Ellis’s early portraits of it to appear here.

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Surely some – maybe many – PacificNW readers will remember this magazine’s predecessor, The Seattle Sunday Times Rotogravure.  That weekend supplement covered regional stories that were illustrated – often lavishly – with sepia-toned photographs.  For instance, on June 18, 1939, the Rotogravure accompanied members of “A Seattle Camera Club … On a Picture Hunt” north on the then freshly-paved Pacific Coast Highway.  Their destination was Rosario Beach and anything picturesque along the way. This full-page feature was adorned with ten rotogravure illustrations, including one of the club members posing with their auto caravan beside this week’s subject, “the ancient, picturesque stump that has been preserved beside the highway near Arlington.”  

A page from The Seattle Times Rotogravure Magazine for June 16, 1939
A page from The Seattle Times Rotogravure Magazine for June 16, 1939.  DOUBLE CLICK TO ENLARGE

The camera club was following in the lustrous wake of Crown Prince Olav and Princess Martha of Norway, who, a few days earlier, had driven through this often sideswiped artifact without hitting it. Here, approaching the estuary of the Stillaguamish River and about mid-way on their ten-week tour of America, the attentive Royal Couple surely read the interpretive text framed in a triangle above the entrance to the tunneled trunk.  It reads, “Relic of a Vanquished Forest / Western Red Cedar / (Thuja Plicata Don) /Age 1250 years / Preserved at Request of Snohomish Co. Pioneers /A.D. Arlington, Washington 1922.”  

A page from
A page borrowed from the webpage for the Stillaguamish Valley Pioneer Museum in Arlington, WA.   (Google it)

Soon after the royals and the clubbies visited the stump, Boyd Ellis, Arlington’s well-collected postcard purveyor, recorded the historical photo in 1940 and numbered it 51 at the print’s bottom-right corner.  In his decades of exploring the northwest for marketable snapshots of landmarks and other roadside attractions, Ellis snapped at least a dozen exposures of this Giant Cedar Stump.  Our featured “then” is one of at least two stump portraits he took, posing the same auto (perhaps his) and ascribing to it the same print number.  Ellis’s work is so bountiful that it has spawned experts among his many collectors.

Another early Ellis log of the Arlington Stump.
Above: Another early Ellis log of the Arlington Stump .  Below: Ellis again and a while later.

Another

Goodbye to Ellis - for a while.
Goodbye to Ellis – for a while.

Jean’s  late-summer visit to the Arlington stump was not intended for a feature but for a roadside pause at Interstate-5’s Smokey Point Rest Area.  The highway department has the stump at “milepost 207 about eight miles north of Marysville.”  More to the point of the Big Cedar Stump’s heritage, the thousand-plus-years-old artifact has been associated with Arlington since the late 19th century when that town was abuzz with mills.  The Big Arlington Stump is about three and one-half miles from Arlington as the crow flies, and there are ordinarily plenty of crows hanging around highway rest areas.  Jean, of course, knew about the stump from Ellis’s photographs, which date from before the highway department moved the stump to this, its last home in 1971.  I will brag some by noting that I first stumbled upon the stump, and without injury, in the late 1960s when it was still beside the highway, about one mile north of the Smokey Point Rest Area where Jean found it.  I was headed for Vancouver and pulled over.

A view from spaceof the Smokey Point rest area along I-5 used courtesy of Google Earth.
A view from space of the Smokey Point rest area along I-5 used courtesy of Google Earth.

Not Boyd Ellis - but perhaps the oldest of the surviving portraits of the family car in the embrace of the Arlington Stump.
Not Boyd Ellis – but earlier and perhaps the oldest of the surviving portraits of a family car in the embrace of the Arlington Stump.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, guys?  Yes Jean with examples of suburban life, mostly.   We chose these, again, from past features that we have scanned.  Most of them are from after 2008 when we started blogging and scanning.  Since the Sunday Now and Then column began in the winter of 1982 there are many features relevant for whatever generalizations might be made for any given Sunday, we have, however not found the time to scan them all.   As for stumps and, for that matter, logs too, we have gathered a few, which we hope to include here with an addendum along the way (aka down the line.)

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THEN: Snoqualmie Falls appears in full force, probably during a spring runoff.

THEN: With his or her back to the east shore of Lake Sammamish an unidentified photographer recorded this Monohon scene in about 1909, the date suggested by the Eastside Heritage Center, by whose courtesy we use this historical record.

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN: Looking east from the roof of the still standing testing lab, the Lock’s Administration Building (from which this photograph was borrowed) appears on the left, and the district engineer’s home, the Cavanaugh House (still standing) on the center horizon. (Photo courtesy Army Corps of Engineers at Chittenden Locks)

THEN:

THEN: Far-left, Playland’s Acroplane, a carni’ flight-simulator, stands admired by future pilots in 1932. Behind them sprawls the amusement park’s fated Fun House. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Julia and Richard Ballinger owned a “gas-powered” rowboat to reach their summer home on their namesake Lake Ballinger. This 1911 view looks east from near the tracks of the Seattle-Everett Interurban. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: An Emergency Relief Administration wood pile took temporary quarters on the southeast corner of S. Alaska Street and 32nd Ave. S. in 1934. (Courtesy, Northwest Collection, University of Washington Libraries.)

THEN: A circa 1908 look northeast through the terminus of the Loyal Electric Street Railway line at the corner of now Northwest 85th Street, 32nd Ave. Northwest, and Loyal Way Northwest. (Courtesy, the Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Totem Place, at 1750 Palm Ave. S.W., was home for Joseph Standley proprietor of Ye Old Curiosity Shop on Colman Dock. His death notice in The Seattle Times for Oct. 25, 1940 described the 86-year-old “Daddy” Standley as “almost as much a part of Seattle’s waterfront as the waves that dash again the seaweall.”

THEN: Looking southeast from above Alki Avenue, the Schmitz Park horizon is serrated by the oldest trees in the city. The five duplexes clustered on the right were built 1919-1921 by Ernest and Alberta Conklin. Ernest died in 1924, but Alberta continued to live there until well past 1932, the year this photograph was recorded. (Seattle Municipal Archives.)

THEN: Darius Kinsey’s ca. 1914 panorama of the King County town of Cedar Falls (aka Moncton) set beside the unstable shore of Rattlesnake Lake. (Courtesy, Snoqualmie Valley Historical Society)

THEN: This look west from the West Woodland neighborhood toward Ballard comes by way of the Museum of History and Industry, with some help from both Ron Edge and West Woodland historian Susan Pierce.

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Above: Joined kaleidoscopes from my Wallingford Walks of 2006-10. Below: a Wallingfordian fall setting.
Above: Joined kaleidoscopes from my Wallingford Walks of 2006-10. Below: a Wallingfordian fall setting.

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Seattle Now & Then: The Society Theatre on Broadway

(click to enlarge photos)

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THEN: Capitol Hill’s Society Theatre first opened its doors in 1911. This record of it most likely dates from 1920, the first year in which the theatre could have shown the four films promoted with sensational posters near its front doors: the comedy “Mary’s Ankle,” “The Sagebrusher,” a western, “Silk Husbands and Calico Wives,” and “Everywoman,” a feminist allegory appropriately filmed in 1919, on the eve of women’s suffrage in the United States. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: Capitol Hill’s Society Theatre first opened its doors in 1911. This record of it most likely dates from 1920, the first year in which the theatre could have shown the four films promoted with sensational posters near its front doors: the comedy “Mary’s Ankle,” “The Sagebrusher,” a western, “Silk Husbands and Calico Wives,” and “Everywoman,” a feminist allegory appropriately filmed in 1919, on the eve of women’s suffrage in the United States. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The lively neon brilliance at its northwest corner lends a nostalgic glow to the Capitol Hill intersection of Broadway and John Street.
NOW: The lively neon brilliance at its northwest corner lends a nostalgic glow to the Capitol Hill intersection of Broadway and John Street.
Clip from The Seattle Times for Dec. 6, 1911
Clip from The Seattle Times for Dec. 6, 1911

On the eve of its dedication in late 1911, the Society Theatre at the northwest corner of Broadway and John Street was anticipated in The Seattle Times as “the most pretentious” of any of the neighborhood theatres then popping up on greater Seattle’s street corners.  The Society would have accommodations for “500 people in a structure 35 x 120 feet in dimension … (it) will cost about $6,000 complete and will be finished with ever-modern convenience for its patrons.  It will be a one-story building of frame and brick with an ornamental front, following the Spanish Mission style of architecture and composed of brick and stucco.” 

S.Times clip from Dec. 8, 1911
S.Times clip from Dec. 8, 1911
Seattle Times clip from Dec. 9, 1911
Seattle Times clip from Dec. 9, 1911

Built with speed, the Society opened its doors to its surely excited neighbors on Friday,  December 8, 1911, with “four reels of new films and two song specialists.”  For that first night, the Society’s “specialists” would “consist of a male duet and a song by a young woman soloist.  There will be no attempt at vaudeville, it is said.”  Most likely “it” was the Society’s manager, George W. Ring, who did the saying.  Up from Portland, Ring brought with him “a large expansive smile and several years experience in the moving picture game.”  Managing neighborhood theatres included promoting neighborhood values, such as chumminess and convenience. One of

The nearly new Society Theatre's foot print appears at the top (middle-right) in this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate map. Note how an early user has drawn in with pencil the future adjustment's on John at Belmont .
The nearly new Society Theatre’s yellow foot print appears at the top (middle-right) in this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate map. Note how a earlier user has drawn in with pencil the future adjustment’s on John at Belmont .

the Society’s “modern conveniences” almost assured that there would be no delays for re-threading the projector.  From the start, the Society had two, and both were Powers No. 6 moving picture machines.  On opening night the two Powers moved pronto from “Old Billy,” a “Selig film, dealing with the comic adventures of an old fire horse belonging to a fiddler,” to “An Aeroplane Elopement, a Vitagraph comedy-drama.”  Two “scenic films and two biograph comedies” and the specialists’ singing completed the inaugural bill.

From the Times in 1913
From the Times in 1913
1935
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Also in 1911, as a sign of the times, the Alhambra, one of downtown Seattle’s big stock and vaudeville theatre venues, converted to showing motion pictures exclusively.  In the same year the Pantages Theatre opened as a terra cotta-clad palace for presenting whatever played well, including vaudeville, stage plays, and film.  After many adjustments, in 1966 the Pantages (later renamed the Palomar) wound up as a parking garage – the big one at the northeast corner

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Circa 1946
Circa 1946
Circa, 1948
Circa, 1948

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of University and Third Avenue.  Up on the Hill, the Society changed its name to the Broadway in the early 1920s and continued to show films at its busy intersection until the winter of 1990.  Rite Aid Pharmacy, its next-door neighbor to the north on Broadway, took over its place by expanding into the corner, while keeping the “BROADWAY” part of the theatre’s vibrant neon marquee for promoting flu shots and such. 

Appeared in The Seattle Times for June 5, 1917
Appeared in The Seattle Times for June 5, 1917

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, kids?  Yes Jean, and most of them from or near the neighborhood.

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THEN: Looking across Capitol Hill’s Broadway Avenue during its 1931adjustments. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: An early portrait, circa 1911, of The Silvian Apartments, one of Capitol Hill’s abiding architectural jewels. (Courtesy, Bill Burden)

Holy Names THEN

THEN: The Volunteer Park water tower was completed in 1907 on Capitol Hill’s highest point in aid the water pressure of its service to the often grand homes of its many nearly new neighbors. The jogging corner of E. Prospect Street and 15th Avenue E. is near the bottom of the Oakes postcard. (Historical Photo courtesy Mike Fairley)

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THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)

THEN: Most likely in 1902 Marcus M. Lyter either built or bought his box-style home at the northwest corner of 15th Avenue and Aloha Street. Like many other Capitol Hill addition residences, Lyter's home was somewhat large for its lot.

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THEN: Both the grading on Belmont Avenue and the homes beside it are new in this “gift” to Capitol Hill taken from the family album of Major John Millis. (Courtesy of the Major’s grandchild Walter Millis and his son, a Seattle musician, Robert Millis.)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN:The front end damage to the white Shepherd Ambulance on the right is mostly hidden behind the black silhouette of either officer Murphy or Lindberg, both of whom answered the call of this morning crash on Feb. 18, 1955.

THEN: The ‘Seattle showplace’ Rhodes mansion on Capitol Hill, ca. 1916. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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First appeared in Pacific, March 3, 2002
First appeared in Pacific, March 3, 2002

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First appeared in Pacific, July 18, 1999

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From the May 8, 1921 Seattle Times
From the May 8, 1921 Seattle Times