Category Archives: Seattle Now and Then

Seattle Now & Then: The Swedish Club

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The first “permanent home for the Swedish Club at 1627 Eighth Avenue – between Pine and Olive Streets – was built in 1901-2. After a half-century in Seattle’s greater-retail neighborhood, the Club moved to its abiding home on Dexter Avenue overlooking Lake Union from Queen Anne Hill. (Courtesy, Stan Unger)
NOW: First replaced by another of the neighborhood’s many parking lots, the old home site of the Swedish Club is now reflecting the neighborhood from the glass curtain sides of a Hyatt Hotel.

Swedish Club, west side of 8th Avenue near Olive Street,

I’m pulled into this clutter of storefront commerce and small hotels that extend through about half of the west side of 8th Avenue between Pine and Olive Streets. Photographed in 1938, the year of my nativity, it offers attractions that I remember from my youth first in Grand Forks, North Dakota and then – beginning in 1946 – in Spokane.  Following Locksmith Snyder’s many keys and services, far left, are the 35 cent haircuts available from the Eighth Avenue Barber at 1619 8th Avenue, and Jackson C. Clifford’s Red Front Cigar Store, at 1621.  After that comes the modest front door to the Olive Court Apartments.   There Mrs. Sigrid Fales is in charge, equipped with a telephone.  Most likely, Sigrid was originally from Northern Europe, and as Scandinavian as her nearby neighbors directly across 8th Avenue, the Viking Tavern and Krono Coffee Shop, both at 1622 Eighth Ave.  And next door to Sigrid is her grandest neighbor, The Swedish Club.

The rear of the Swedish Club on July 6, 1924. Broadway High School is on the Capitol Hill horizon, far right. The rear of the Swedish Baptist Church at the northwest corner of Pine and 9th is also on the right but only two blocks distant. (CLICK to ENLARGE)
Looking south down the alley with the Swedish Club and one modern Ford from the 1950s.  A comparison with the earlier photo of the rear – the one sitting on top of this one – will confirm that they are the same although divided by about a quarter-century.   I once owned a Ford like this one – a used one.  
The front of the “old club” approaching its end on Eighth Avenue.  This too has its Ford.

“The Club,” as its many members called it, was the best evidence that downtown Seattle had its own “Snooze Junction” or corner, a variation on Ballard.  From the beginning the Swedish Club was an institutional reminder of the left homeland.  It was a profound and shared nostalgia that ran through its many banquets for fondly remembered traditional gatherings, and its choral concerts, dances, and opportunities for mixing and courting.  Also in a less secular line, neighborhood’s Gethsemane Lutheran, Swedish Baptist, First Covenant, Reformer Presbyterian, and others churches, were all Scandinavian  sourced congregations.

Looking north across Pine Street’s intersection with 8th Avenue. The Swedish Club is down the block and hidden behind hotel on the left. We feature this photo in an earlier Pacific and will interrupted this feature with the clipping.

This detail from a 1925 map includes the Swedish Club on 8th Avenue and a number of other structures that have appears in past features. East is on the top.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

The club was first organized on August 12, 1892 by recently arrived Swedes.  They were young and living in Belltown’s Stockholm Hotel.  It was a name chosen to attract them.  In spite of the economic crash or panic of 1893 and following, the club flourished, largely because there were so many migrating Swedes.  (Migrating Norwegian’s and Danes had their own clubs.)  Using the often generous contributions from members of the burgeoning Swedish community, the Club built its home here on 8th Avenue on its own terms.  Andrew Chilberg, the Seattle-based vice consul for both Sweden and Norway was a charter member and the Club’s first president.  He was also founder of the Scandinavian-American Bank: Seattle’s Scandinavian godfather.  Chilberg bought the property for the Club’s construction and half-century of use.  N.D. Nelson the partner in Frederick and Nelson Department Store, also helped with the club’s financing and first construction, as did Otto Roselead, the contractor for both the Swedish Club and the Swedish Hospital.  The dark brick façade with its ornamental banding and spiral scrolls or volutes, both seen in the feature photo, were soon added to the original frame structure when the neighborhood was regraded.

The Swedish Club in the 1950s.
Looking north on Eighth Avenue through its intersection with Olive Way. A municipal photographer standing on a roof directly across 8th Avenue from the Club recorded this in 1932 for some official reason.

The diverse flips in needs and interests that have understandably followed through the club’s now century and a quarter of service are typical for cultural institutions that have their origins in other hemisphere’s.  It has been long since members were more likely to join classes to learn Swedish than English.  Now sponsored group flights to the homeland are fast and for many affordable.   (Thanks to Club president Christine Leander for lots of help with this.)

The Swedish Club’s new home on Dexter Avenue in 1961. With the lights on and overlooking Lake Union it was designed to perform like a glowing ornament for those across the lake on Capitol Hill.

WEB EXTRAS

In the Hyatt’s glass curtains, from a slightly less oblique angle, we find a reflection of the lovely Camlin Hotel, recently featured in this column:

Camlin cubist reflection

Anything to add, fellahs?  Lots of past but not lost features Jean – all but two are from the neighborhood or near it but one of the two is named Anderson.  Let us hope that our readers CLICK TO ENLARGE.

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898. Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Built in 1910, Ballard’s big brick church on the northwest corner of 20th Avenue NW and NW 63rd Street lost the top of its soaring tower following the earthquake of Nov. 12, 1939.

THEN: Werner Lenggenhager's recording of the old St. Vinnie's on Lake Union's southwest shore in the 1950s should remind a few readers of the joys that once were theirs while searching and picking in that exceedingly irregular place.

THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

THEN: First dedicated in 1889 by Seattle’s Unitarians, the congregation soon needed a larger sanctuary and moved to Capitol Hill. Here on 7th Avenue, their first home was next used for a great variety of events, including a temporary home for the Christian Church, a concert hall for the Ladies Musical Club, and a venue for political events like anarchist Emma Goldman’s visit to Seattle in 1910. (Compliments Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Lawton Gowey looks north through the tail of the 1957 Independence Day Parade on Fourth Avenue as it proceeds south through the intersection with Pike Street. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN:

THEN: Built quickly in the winter of 1906-07, the Prince Rupert Hotel faced Boren Avenue from the third lot north of Pike Street. About fifty-five years later it was razed for the I-5 Freeway. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The city’s north end skyline in 1923 looking northwest from the roof of the then new Cambridge Apartments at 9th Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: The scene looks north through a skyline of steeples toward the Cascade neighborhood and Lake Union, ca. 1923.

Then: Photographed from an upper story of the Ford Factory at Fairview Avenue and Valley Street, the evidence of Seattle's explosive boom years can be seen on every shore of Lake Union, ca. 1920. Courtesy of MOHAI

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

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THEN: With her or his back to the Medical-Dental Building an unidentified photographer took this look northeast through the intersection of 6th and Olive Way about five years after the Olive Way Garage first opened in 1925. (Courtesy, Mark Ambler)

THEN: Named for a lumberman, and still home for the UW’s School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, the upper floor’s high-ceilinged halls, including the Forest Club Room behind Anderson Hall’s grand Gothic windows, were described for us by the department’s gregarious telephone operator as “very popular and Harry Potterish.” (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Tied momentarily to the end of the Union Oil Co dock off Bay Street, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship Maud prepares to cast-off for the Arctic Ocean on June 3, 1922. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Through its two decades — 1892 to 1913 — at the northeast corner of Cherry Street and Third Avenue, the Seattle Theatre was one of the classiest Seattle venues for legitimate theater as well as variety/vaudeville

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Around the corner from the club, a flatiron where Howell Street originates out of Olive just east of 8th Avenue. (We did a feature on this long ago but have misplaced the clip. It happens.)

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Nearby El Goucho in 1961 in preparation, flexing its beef for Century 21.

Seattle Now & Then: Olympia Beer on the Waterfront

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THEN: Nearly new, the Holden Warehouse on the left, and the bottling plant for Olympia Beer each take half of the block on the east side of Railroad Avenue between Virginia and Pine Streets.
NOW: The fence here is meant to temporarily keep traffic and pedestrians out of the seawall reconstruction zone at the shared waterfront foot of both Pine and Stewart.

The ambiguity of this waterfront corner is revealed by its signage.  In Jean Sherrard’s “now” the city’s green Pine Street sign only seems to rest on the wire fence in the foreground above the cyclist peddling the red bicycle.  Rather, it stands at the northeast corner of Alaskan way and – what? This is the point where both Pine Street and the linked Stewart Street, Olive Way and E. Olive Street, begin their forty-plus block course or two-plus miles east from the central waterfront (soon interrupted by the Pike Place Public Market) through Seattle’s slim waistline to Lake Washington

Here are  parts of two Sanborn real estate maps showing the point where Stewart Street reaches the waterfront – or nearly. The larger detail on the left is from 1905. The smaller one to the right dates from 1893 when there were still a good selection of sheds and shacks between First (or Front Street) and the tides.  The 1905 detail shows the north portal of the Great Northern Railroad tunnel.   I names the footprint of the concrete plant that was used for the construction of the tunnel’s thick walls and curved ceiling.  The 1905 detail includes the footprint of Holden’s Warehouse that shows in the featured photograph and what it describes as a “platform, partially burned.,”  That is the half-block where soon the Olympia Brewery’s bottling plant would be built.  Below: three years later – a detail from the 1908 Baist Real Estate Map.
Detail from the 1908 Baist Real Estate Map.

Although hard to read in this printing, there is also a sign for Stewart Street fixed to the southwest corner façades of the Olympia Brewery Bottling Works in the featured “then” photograph at the top.  The sign is just above the last wagon on the right, which puts it at the northeast corner of Stewart Street and Railroad Avenue. Perhaps for excitement or distraction during the Great Depression the last street name was changed from Railroad Avenue to Alaskan Way.  Some contending choices were Cosmos Quay, Sea Portal Avenue, Commerce Way, and one that came close to winning the contest, Seatlaska Way.

The north portal then (about 1904) and now (about 1984), The concrete mixing plan is evident in the lower photo to the right of the tunnel.   The HOTEL YORK is still standing on the left horizon.  [The York is described and pictured in or with the 13th clip that follows the feature’s lead text.] Because of the shaking that accompanied the building of the tunnel and  later its use, the York was condemned and razed sometime soon after this photograph was snapped by some member of the Duffy family.    
Hidden behind the Bottling Works was the north portal to the Great Northern Railroad’s tunnel beneath the city. The carving of the hole and blasting of about a dozen squatter’s shacks that were in the way began on April Fools Day 1903.  [See the clip below for a photo and description of this opening.]  The about mile-long tunnel was completed on January 2, 1905. The building of the Holden Warehouse on the left of the feature photo at Virginia Street soon followed and in the spring of 1906 the Virginia Street Dock across Railroad Avenue was built as a near twin to the Gaffney Dock its neighbor to the south.  (They are out of frame to the left.) As piers 62 and 63, both were ultimately cleared of their warehouses for creation of the concert pier that is now being improved for the new Waterfront Park.

The Gaffney and Virginia Street Piers, side-by-side.

Olympia brewer Leopold Schmidt’s bottling plant for his Olympia Beer was also built soon after the clearing of the tunnel’s north portal site of its buildings for mixing concrete and the narrow-gauged railroad used for moving the glacial till and other diggings extracted during the construction of the tunnel.  Throughout the month of August 1908 Olympia Beer inserted display ads in the local papers offering added meaning to its slogan, “it’s the water.”  This water, however, was not from the brewery’s vaunted artesian wells but from Seattle’s Green River watershed.  The ads are headed, “About Bottles” and continue  “First we soak the bottle in a cleaning solution, then it is rinsed, next it is washed three times inside, twice outside and again rinsed.  Then it is examined before being filled and if not absolutely clean it is rejected.”

A small display adver. pulled from The Times for December 10, 1907.
Appeared in The Times for August 21, 1912.

The work of cleaning bottles for beer was short-lived here.  Prohibition began in Washington State on January 1, 1916.  The delivery horse teams were sold and their teamsters laid off. By the time Olympia Beer was again filling its bottles in 1934 with more spirited waters, the brewery’s building at the mouth of the tunnel had been home to other businesses, most notably Belknap Glass, one of the city’s larger manufacturers of plate glass.

A 1934 – 1936 comparison of this part of the waterfront looking south from the Lenora Street overpass before and after the construction of the seawell between Mansion and Borad Streets.  .
Looking north from the Pike Street viaduct that used to cross here. By consulting the parked cars you might judge the accuracy of the caption that dates this Ca. 1945.   Note the armory on Western Avenue between Virginia and Lenora, upper-right.  

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?  Yes Jean, more of more from the waterfront side of the neighborhood.

THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market. It had already been scheduled for demolition. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/bell-st-bridge-then-web1.jpg?w=1165&h=699

THEN: Steel beams clutter a freshly regraded Second Avenue during the 1907 construction of the Moore Theatre. The view looks north toward Virginia Street.

THEN: An early-20th-century scene during the Second Avenue Regrade looks east into its intersection with Virginia Avenue. A home is being moved from harm's way, but the hotel on the hill behind it would not survive the regrade's spoiling. Courtesy of Ron Edge.

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: A circa 1920 look north along the tiled roofline of the Pike Place Market’s North Arcade, which is fitted into the slender block between Pike Place, on the right, and Western Avenue, on the left. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: The Hotel York at the northwest corner of Pike Street and First Avenue supplied beds on the American Plan for travelers and rooms for traveling hucksters. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The driver, lower left, leads his team towards First Avenue up a planked incline on Madison Street. (Courtesy MOHAI)

THEN: Frank Shaw’s late winter composition of waterfront landmarks at the foot of Madison Street in 1963. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: This post-1889 waterfront block of sheds and ships was replaced in 1911 by the Grand Trunk Pacific Dock, described at the time as “the largest wooden finger pier in North America.” The exception was Fire Station No. 5 on the left at the foot of Madison Street. A brick station replaced it in 1913. (Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: The ruins left by Seattle’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, included a large neighborhood of warehouses and factories built on timber quays over the tides. Following the fire the quays were soon restored with new capping and planking. A close look on the far-right will reveal some of this construction on the quays underway. (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)

THEN: Following the city’s Great Fire of 1889, a trestle was built on University Street, between Front Street (First Avenue) and Railroad Avenue (Alaskan Way). By the time Lawton Gowey photographed what remained of the timber trestle in 1982, it had been shortened and would soon be razed for the Harbor Steps seen in Jean Sherrard’s repeat. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: From boxcars and rooftops to the planks of Railroad Avenue, excitement builds for the ceremonial re-enactment of the S.S.Portland’s 1897 landing with its “ton of gold” on the Seattle waterfront, the city’s first Golden Potlatch Celebration. [Courtesy, Michael Maslan]

THEN: F. Jay Haynes recorded this ca. 1891 look up the Seattle waterfront and it’s railroad trestles most likely for a report to his employer, the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)

THEN: A circa 1912 look at the Wall Street finger pier from the foot, not of Wall, but Battery Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Pier 70 when it was still Pier 14, ca. 1901, brand new but not yet "polished." Courtesy, Lawton Gowey

THEN: Tied momentarily to the end of the Union Oil Co dock off Bay Street, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship Maud prepares to cast-off for the Arctic Ocean on June 3, 1922. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: Mark Tobey, almost certainly Seattle’s historically most celebrated artist, poses in the early 1960s with some Red Delicious apples beside the Sanitary Market in the Pike Place Market. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

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Listed from The Seattle Times, March 3, 1912.

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FULL DISCLOSURE 

Below we insert a copy of the original print from which this Sunday’s featured photo was cropped and retouched (i.e. polished).  [Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry, aka MOHAI]

 

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Seattle Now & Then: The Church on the Corner (of Boren & Pine)

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: In 1938, the likely year of this tax photo, the First Swedish Methodist Church at the north east corner of Boren Avenue and Pine Street was one of several Protestant congregations in the greater Cascade Neighborhood that were built around Scandenavian immigrant communities. (Courtesy Stan Unger)
NOW: Of the ten overpasses between downtown and the First Hill-Capital Hill area this is the only site where two streets, Boren and Pine, intersect directly above the I-5 freeway.
A Times clip from May 5, 1961

On May 6, 1961, the Central Church of Christ was awarded $61,500 for their sanctuary and its lot at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pine Street.  The jury’s award was $11,000 more than the $50,000 offered by the state’s highway department and $6,500 less than the church’s lawyers requested.

The Swedish Methodist’s frame church at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pine Street survives in this pre-freeway aerial of the neighborhood. It appears right-of-center near the top.

Earlier, on October 20, 1960, another jury had awarded $67,500 for the three lots on the northwest corner of the same intersection.  The decision was only a little more than half of the $112,000 that owner Roy De Grief’s appraisers claimed they were worth. A review of a few of the hundreds of other properties litigated for their involuntary conversions from home, business or institutional real estate into pavement and freeway landscape reveals that divergent evaluations between what was requested and what was given were commonplace during the construction of the Seattle Freeway, as it was first named.

A Seattle Times clipping from Nov. 6, 1952

The Church of Christ moved into the church with the truncated tower on the corner of Boren and Pine late in 1952.  Its members could not have known than that in eight years they would lose their sanctuary when the entire intersection was bought out by the state’s highway department for what the courts agreed was a public works necessity: a north-south Seattle freeway.  It was the Seattle Swedish Methodists – aka Calvary Methodist – who built the church

Times clipping: April 14, 1906

in 1905. Their long-serving pastor, Francis Ahnlund, was born in Norland, Sweden, in 1880, and immigrated to America in 1901.  He answered the church’s call in 1919, moving from San Francisco to the Seattle congregation and preaching on this corner until 1951 when his health forced him to retire after 32 years of service.  That longevity was a record for the Methodist-Protestant denomination. A year later Ahnlund died at home.

A Times clip from July 5, 1924
A Times clip from ca. 1935.

As was the practice of many congregations built by and around immigrant communities, Ahnlund regularly led services in both English and the language of the ‘old country,’ which the older parishioners understandably found both more comforting and inspiring.  The two were often split between the morning and vesper services.

Seattle Times clipping from October 9, 1937

Francis and Elizabeth Ahnlund cultivated a family of both faith and finesse.  They had three daughters, two of whom, Sylvia and Norma, were adept organists who helped keep Calvary a “singing church.”  Perhaps as something of a tribute to their father, two of the daughters also married preachers.

Seattle Times – Sept. 17, 1938
Times Obituary for Francis Ahnlund, March 12, 1952

The Church on the corner was built in 1905-06 at a cost of $12,000, seated more than 500 persons, and was originally topped by a steeple that extended high above the box tower.  By the likely year of this tax photo, 1938, the steeple was gone.  It was, of course, not removed by the earthquake of November 12, 1939. The early 1960s cutting of the Freeway here was deep. The difference in elevation between the sidewalk shown in the “now” and the freeway pavement below it is fifty feet. The original street grade was somewhere in between the bridge and the ditch.

Aerial of the I-5 construction by Roger Dudley.
Lawton Gowey
A clip from The Seattle Times, August 5, 1962.
A detail from the Dudley aerial (shown above) with the intersection of Pine St and Boren Avenue standing above the freeway about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the subject.  The church, of course, is long gone, but its neighbor west on Boren, the Olive Tower, stands upper-left. The long 8th Avenue overpass between Seneca and Pike Streets appears, in part, near the bottom.  It is on my once-upon-a-time oft-used shortcut thru downtown.  

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, guys?  More neighborhood features Jean.  As our Web Master,  Ron and I are hoping you do not tire of our weekly clutters.

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Built quickly in the winter of 1906-07, the Prince Rupert Hotel faced Boren Avenue from the third lot north of Pike Street. About fifty-five years later it was razed for the I-5 Freeway. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The Ballard Public Library in 1903-4, and here the Swedish Baptist Church at 9th and Pine, 1904-5, were architect Henderson Ryan’s first large contracts after the 20 year old southerner first reached Seattle in 1898. Later he would also design both the Liberty and Neptune Theatres, the latter still projecting films in the University District. (Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

THEN: In the 32 years between Frank Shaw's dedication picture and Jean Sherrard's dance scene, Freeway Park has gained in verdure what it has lost in human use.

THEN: We give this panorama from the roof of the Washington Athletic Club a circa date of 1961, the year that Horizon House, a First Hill retirement community, first opened its doors to residents at Ninth Avenue and University Street. The high-rise L-shaped Horizon stands top-center. (Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The scene looks north through a skyline of steeples toward the Cascade neighborhood and Lake Union, ca. 1923.

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

THEN: Looking east on University Street towards Ninth Avenue, ca. 1925, with the Normandie Apartments on the left.

THEN: The brand new N&K Packard dealership at Belmont and Pike in 1909. Thanks to both antique car expert Fred Cruger for identifying as Packards the cars on show here, and to collector Ron Edge for finding them listed at this corner in a 1909 Post-Intelligencer. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry.)

THEN: Built in 1909-10 on one of First Hill’s steepest slopes, the dark brick Normandie Apartments' three wings, when seen from the sky, resemble a bird in flight. (Lawton Gowey)

THEN:

THEN: Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill. Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner. (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

THEN: Revelers pose on the Masonic Temple stage for “A Night in Old Alexandria,” the Seattle Fine Art Societies annual costume ball for 1921. (Pic courtesy of Arthur “Link” Lingenbrink)

BOREN-&-University-Denny-&-Ainsworth-Homes-THEN-mr

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

THEN: We give this panorama from the roof of the Washington Athletic Club a circa date of 1961, the year that Horizon House, a First Hill retirement community, first opened its doors to residents at Ninth Avenue and University Street. The high-rise L-shaped Horizon stands top-center. (Lawton Gowey)

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First appeared in Pacific, November 28, 1992.

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Seattle Now & Then: The UW South Campus – Oars and Oceanography

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THEN: Following the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition on the U.W. Campus, the AYP’S Tokio Café was converted into a crew house for the University’s already popular rowing crews. (Courtesy: Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: For his “repeat” Jean moved about three-hundred feet west from our more precise repeat, the U.W.’s now landscape-enshrouded Oceanography Building (aka the Old Ocean Building, 1931), to the same department’s newer but by now middle-age Oceanography Teaching Building (1969) on the right and its similarly-designed Marine Sciences Building, on the left. We wish to thank University School of Medicine cardiologist Douglas Stewart and his rowboat for delivering Jean to the north side of Portage Bay. The doctor also made note of the department’s historic research vessel docked there, the Clifford A. Barnes, named for the distinguished professor of oceanography from 1947 to 1973. Our friend the cardiologist knows his vessels.
A Japanese art auction from the fall of 1909 and the fading of the Fair, or Expo.

This week we visit the University of Washington’s South Campus. The “then” photo looks north from Portage Bay to the south façade of what was built as the Tokio Café for Seattle’s first world’s fair, the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition (AYP). The Tokio was the most southerly of the attractions that opened on the Exposition’s carnival named the Pay Streak, which reached as far as the bay. Practically all the Streak’s approximately fifty attractions were either exotic, like the Tokio, or eccentric, like the Upside Down House.

The Upside-Down-House at the AYP – one the Pay Streak.

[above: Looking west over the Pay Streak landing with Portage Bay on the left and the Cafe Tokio at the middle-distance center. The Pay Streak extends out-of-frame to the right. This was photographed on the expos’ New England Day. ]  (Courtesy, U.W. Libraries, Northwest Collection)

With the conclusion of the AYP the Pay Streak attractions were either razed or recycled.  The result was the barren corner of the campus shown here in the featured photo at the top to either side of the seemingly stranded café.  The Tokio, however, was saved.  The University’s athletics department was in need of a new crew house, for what was decreed

A distant detail of the Tokio Cafe turned into Crew House photographed from Capitol Hill. The similarly-sized structure to the left (west) of the crew house may be more crew quarters. The rows of distant tents stand on campus for a World War One related camp.
A 1909 Times clip on coed hopes for “Aquatics.”
The UIW Campus from Capitol Hill with Portage Bay between them. The saved Tokio Cafe stands at the north shoreline on the far right.   CKICK TO ENLARGE
A Seattle Times clip from Nov. 28, 1909 – Click to Enlarge
The popularity of rowing is expressed in the intention (or hope or plan) to give every student a chance at it. From the Seattle Times for March 25, 1910.

in the press as “now the leading sport at state university.”  Actually, rowing took football’s place at the top only after the latter’s playing season was over in November.  In any season, rowing coach Hiram Conibear and football coach Gil Dobie contended for the athletic department’s resources and the presses’ attentions.  To the delight of Conibear and his crews, the Japanese eatery was remodeled for both storing the shells and building the spartan, we imagine, living quarters for the elite students who were selected to train and repeat the smooth and powerful paddling that would ultimately propel them to victory on the waters of the world.

Forty years after the U.W. Crew’s victory in Berlin for the 1936 Olympics. Coxswain Bob Moch, crouches center-front. Behind him, left to right, are Don Hume, stroke; Joe Rantz, 7; George Hunt, 6; Jim McMillan, 5; John White, 4; Gordon Adam, 3, and Roger Morris, bow. Empty between Adam and Morris is an open space for the late Charles Day who pulled No.2 oar.
UW crew practicing on Lake Union before the Olympics of 1936

Before the opening of the Montlake Cut in 1916, the crew’s stroking was for the most part restricted to the smaller Lake Union.  On January 28, 1917, The Seattle Times reported, “The Washington crew will row on Lake Union until March 1, when it will row through the canal each afternoon and practice on Lake Washington.  Coach Conibear has issued a standing invitation to all who are interested in watching the boys work to go out in the coaching launch…” The Times report concludes with the last evidence that I could find of Conibear’s oaring kingdom abiding here in the converted cafe:  “The boathouse is at the foot of the Pay Streak of the Exposition.”

First appeared in Pacific on July 7, 2002 -CLICK to ENLARGE

Conibear and his crews soon abandoned the Tokio for another useful oddity.  This time a larger shell house was made from a seaplane hangar built by the navy to help with waterways surveillance during World War I.  Set at the eastern end of the Montlake Cut, it never accommodated planes, only shells.  In 1931 the Tokio’s footprint was covered by the University’s first

A Times clip from October 6, 1931 illustrating the laying of the cornerstone for the UW’s Oceanography Building on the former site of the Tokio Cafe at the Portage Bay foot of the AYP’S Pay Streak.
The aerial photographer Laidlaw recorded lots of revealing photos of the U.W. Campus, mostly in the 1930s. Here at the bottom-center, between Portage Bay and the U.W. golf course, stands the school’s new Oceanographic Building.  Courtesy, [MUSEUM OF HISTORY & INDUSTRY]
Another of MOHAI’s aerials by Laidlaw showing the South Campus when it was still a golf course. The new Oceanographic Building shows on the far left.

oceanographic laboratories built in the then popular Collegiate Gothic style with a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation.  Until 1947 the oceanographers shared the future south campus with grass and sand traps.  The 1947 ground-breaking for the University’s new School of Medicine began the ‘cultivation’ of the University Golf Club’s nine-hole course into a South Campus overflowing with doctors, nurses, oceanographers and other scientists.

WEB EXTRAS

Another heartfelt thanks to the good doctor, Doug Stewart! He rowed me around Portage Bay and we visited some faves…

The rowing cardiologist – talk about heart health!
Jensen’s Motor Boat Company – a family business devoted to restoration of classic boats
Hard at work on a Saturday morning
A pause at the yacht club to check out a classic tug; gorgeous lines, but given its condition, in need of a major restoration…

Anything to add, boys?  Surely more from the neighborhood Jean, and one analogy from Portland, Oregon.  Also, the bottom two links, those on the north end of the University Bridge and at Gasworks Park, include two of the video’s we managed to produce early last year (2016).

THEN: Pioneer Arthur Denny's son, Orion, took this photo of popularly named Lake Union John and his second wife, Madeline, sometime before the latter's death in 1906.

THEN: First designated Columbus Street in the 1890 platting of the Brooklyn Addition, and next as 14th Avenue to conform with the Seattle grid, ‘The Ave,’ still its most popular moniker, was renamed University Way by contest in 1919. This trim bungalow at 3711 University Way sat a few lots north of Lake Union’s Portage Bay. (Courtesy, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Archive)

montlake-f-roanoke

THEN: With great clouds overhead and a landscape 45 years shorter than now, one vehicle – a pickup heading east – gets this part of State Route 520 to itself on a weekday afternoon. (courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: For the four-plus months of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the center of commerce and pedestrian energy on University Way moved two blocks south from University Station on Northeast 42nd Street to here, Northeast 40th Street, at left.

THEN: When the Oregon Cadets raised their tents on the Denny Hall lawn in 1909 they were almost venerable. Founded in 1873, the Cadets survive today as Oregon State University’s ROTC. Geneticist Linus C. Pauling, twice Nobel laureate, is surely the school’s most famous cadet corporal. (courtesy, University of Washington Libraries)

THEN: Above Lake Washington’s Union Bay the Hoo-Hoo Building on the left and the Bastion facsimile on the right, were both regional departures from the classical beau arts style, the 1909 AYPE’s architectural commonplace. Courtesy John Cooper

Then Caption: Amateur photographer George Brown most likely took this view of Portland’s 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition from the north porch of the Washington State Building. Brown also played clarinet in Wagner’s popular concert and marching band, which was probably performing at the Expo. (pic courtesy of Bill Greer)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/wash-state-bldg-then-mr1.jpg?w=1109&h=633

THEN: An estimated 50 percent of the materials used in the old Husky Union Building were recycled into its recent remodel. The new HUB seems to reach for the roof like its long-ago predecessor, the AYP’s landmark Forestry building. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Looking east from the roof of the still standing testing lab, the Lock’s Administration Building (from which this photograph was borrowed) appears on the left, and the district engineer’s home, the Cavanaugh House (still standing) on the center horizon. (Photo courtesy Army Corps of Engineers at Chittenden Locks)

THEN: Named for a lumberman, and still home for the UW’s School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, the upper floor’s high-ceilinged halls, including the Forest Club Room behind Anderson Hall’s grand Gothic windows, were described for us by the department’s gregarious telephone operator as “very popular and Harry Potterish.” (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The Latona Bridge was constructed in 1891 along the future line of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge. The photo was taken from the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway right-of-way, now the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. The Northlake Apartment/Hotel on the right survived and struggled into the 1960s. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The historical view looks directly south into the Latona addition’s business district on Sixth Ave. NE. from the Northern Pacific’s railroad bridge, now part of the Burke Gilman Recreation Trail. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Long-time Wallingford resident Victor Lygdman looks south through the work-in-progress on the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridge during the summer of 1959. Bottom-right are the remnants of the Latona business and industrial district, including the Wayland Mill and the Northlake Apartments, replaced now with Ivar’s Salmon House and its parking. (Photo by Victor Lygdman)

THEN: From 1909 to the mid-late 1920s, the precipitous grade separation between the upper and lower parts of NE 40th Street west of 7th Ave. NE was faced with a timber wall. When the wall was removed, the higher part of NE 40th was shunted north, cutting into the lawns of the homes beside it. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The Gothic University of Washington Campus in 1946 beginning a seven-year crowding with prefabricated dormitories beside Frosh Pond. In the immediate background [on the right] is Guggenheim Hall. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)

THEN: The first house for Delta Gamma at N.E. 4730 University Way. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Samuel McKnight’s early 1890s panorama of Lake Union also looks north into most of Seattle’s seventeen square-mile annexation of 1891, when the city limits were pushed north from McGraw Street to 85th Street. Fremont, Edgewater, the future Wallingford, Latona, and Brooklyn (University District) were among the neighborhoods included. (Courtesy, Dan Kerlee)

THEN: The 1906-07 Gas Works at the north end of Lake Union went idle in 1956 when natural gas first reached Seattle by pipeline. In this photo, taken about fifteen years later, the Wallingford Peninsula is still home to the plant’s abandoned and “hanging gardens of metal.” (Courtesy: Rich Haag)

THEN: sliver of the U.W. campus building called the Applied Physics Laboratory appears on the far right of this 1940 look east towards the U.W. campus from the N.E. 40th Street off-ramp from the University Bridge. While very little other than the enlarged laboratory survives in the fore and mid-grounds, much on the horizon of campus buildings and apartments still stand. (Courtesy, Genevieve McCoy)

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First appeared in Pacific on June 7, 1998.

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First appeared in Pacific, February 2, 2003

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First appeared in Pacific Feb. 18, 2001.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

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CLUES FOR FINDING THE TOKIO FOOTPRINT 

On the far right of the Google-Earth aerial shot a red line has been placed in line with the former AYP Pay Streak’s commercial promenade and now – for part of the away – the drive that circles inside the campus.  CLICK CLICK TO ENLARGE
A detail of the Tokio Cafe’s roofline showing some of the south facade of the Architecture Building that still stands and serves near the 40th Street entrance to the campus..

Seattle Now & Then: Finding Kikisoblu (aka ‘Princess Angeline’)

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Pioneer Seattle photographer Frank LaRoche’s revealing record of Princess Angeline’s last home is also stocked with clues for finding its location. We have put helpful aids – like a map – in the blog pauldorpat.com. [Courtesy, the Museum of History and Industry]
NOW: Ron Edge shows his back to the spot where Princess Angeline posed on the porch of her new home in the early 1890s. By Ron’s figuring the princess’ home, had it been preserved as a monument with all else the same, would now be protected inside the Market’s new covered parking lot, but not her porch. It would be taking the weather with the small copse of bamboo that has found a break in the built neighborhood about 130 feet north of the Pike Street Hill Climb.

The Northern Pacific Railroad’s photographer F. Jay Haynes included Princess Angeline’s home site during his 1890 visit to Seattle. Soon after his visit Angeline’s new cabin was built for her directly north of this her older one. The shed was removed but not, apparently, the stump that here crowds it on the right. (Courtesy, Murray Morgan)
A “Rosetta Stone” snapshot framed in a circle that shows the remnants of Angeline’s First Cabin and behind it the front facade of her Second cabin, which was also her last.

This Sunday we, Jean Sherrard, myself, and especially Ron Edge, our collector-cartographer with a devotion to details, hope to convince you that we have discovered the correct location for the footprint of Princess Angeline’s home. Angeline, many of our readers will know, was the daughter of our city’s namesake Chief Seattle. Born around 1820, she was in her prime by the time Euro-American settler-interlopers first arrived here to stay in the early 1850s.  The princess got on well with the city’s founders, and it was one of them, Catherine Maynard, who gave her the royal name.  Catherine, a nurse and wife of the village physician, Doc Maynard, explained that her new name better fit her elevated status. (Although surely the princess’s native name, Kikisoblu, was as euphonious as Angeline.)

Angeline supported herself washing clothes and weaving baskets, which she sold. She also posed for pictures, both candid street shots and prepared portraits.  The latter, like the Edwin J. Bailey portrait shown here, were snapped in studios where the native princess was sometimes – although not here – posed with a mix of props and backdrops that promoted her authenticity.  Through Seattle’s first half-century, the princess was easily the most popular subject hereabouts, and when she could, she charged a fee for posing.

The princess also accepted help and may have expected it.  She enjoyed a free grocery tab at Louch’s Market on First Avenue, which was not far from her home, whose true footprint we will now reveal with the help of photographs.  In 1890 the N.P. Railroad photographer, F. Jay Haynes, took what may be the earliest surviving photo of Angeline’s home.  I first used and misused it for this feature on May 13, 1984.  While Haynes did not peg his portrait of the Princess sitting near the front door of her seemingly windowless shed, I embraced the commonplace belief that her home was somewhere near the waterfront, between Pine and Pike Avenues, and probably closer to the latter.  My mistake was in making it a beach shack by interpreting Haynes’ prospect largely on the basis of the patch of horizon that shows to the left of Angeline’s shed. That is not the beach and Haynes was not looking west but nearly northwest through the neighborhood of small warehouses and squatters’ sheds that climbed the western slope of the now long gone Denny Hill.

We must thank Ron for this correction and also for introducing photographer Frank LaRoche’s setting of the Princess and her dog posing on the front porch of her new home, built for her in 1891 by the local lumberman Amos Brown. Printed to its full width, the LaRoche photograph reveals a wide swath of Belltown landmarks that lead us with the help of Ron’s triangulation to within a few feet of Angeline’s last home.  Although the princess died in 1895, her Amos Brown-made home survived and served at least as evidence until the printing of its footprint in Vol.2. page 127 of the 1905 Sanborn Insurance Map.  To follow Ron Edge’s revealing lines and to explore more photographic evidence of Angeline’s home and the neighborhood, please visit the web page pauldorpat.com.  It is so noted every Sunday, including this one, at the bottom of the feature’s text.

WEB EXTRAS

Just a few special treats to sweeten the (already sweet) pot. First off, a big thanks to David Peugh, through whose condo we were given access to the site; his son Jeff (pictured below) graciously escorted us.

An alternate NOW: Ron Edge with Jeff Peugh (r)
A bamboo thicket grows in the shadows above Ron’s shoulders
The ‘now’ view from Kikisoblu’s front porch; the Fix/Madore building (originally the Standard Furniture Co. Warehouse) on the left, the concrete walls of the Pike Place parking garage on the right, and the soon-to-disappear viaduct to the west.
Looking back east at the green cut from just in front of the viaduct with Ron Edge at the bottom of the steps…

Below, Paul presents the evidence which led Ron Edge to his discovery.

With this portrait I will imagine Angeline laughing at my clumsy mistake.

This is meant to be – or will be – a feature about our victory in locating the home site of the daughter of Chief Seattle for whom the pioneer settlers adopted the name Princess (and sometimes Queen) Angeline.  We have known with considerable confidence that her cabins – at least two of them for which we have photographs – were set somewhere near Pike Street, below what has been since 1907 the Pike Place Public Market.  But we wanted the footprint – or close to it.

Here from the rear is Angeline’s last home. The Miner Hotel, one of our landmarks that helped Ron Edge put  Angeline’s home in its proper place shows its corner tower, upper right.  The view looks south.   The tree on the left and the cabins there are clues as well.  

After assembling perhaps all available clues – maps and photos – Ron managed to find the home, or proper footprint, for this home, and Jean posed him, as it were, on the front porch of Angeline’s home for the NOW, where she posed with her dog more than once, for she for the boom years before her death in 1896 probably the most popular photographic subject in Seattle.

Here highlighted in yellow is a sign of Princess Angeline’s enduring draw. The adver is from The Times of December 12, 1904, eight years after her death.  [click to enlarge]
One year later developer C.D. Hillman, is proud to imagine that the cabin in which Princess Angeline was born is on property he is offering for sale and and so is free for him to show in the neighborhood with his “Greasy Pole Climbing” for the year’s Independence Day Picnic on Mercer Island.

As if reflecting on the claims of the boomtown that surround her, she, it seems, needs no introduction, ca. 1903.   [click click to read]
MORE ANGELINE INTERLUDE – 

Included within the frame of this week’s featured photo are the helpful clues for locating the footprint of Angeline’s cabin.  They are listed in yellow upper-left.  Click to Enlarge.

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Both the number and inserted thumbnails should help you orient some of these parts/clues to those notes in the featured photo.  CLICK CLICK CLICK TO ENLARGE

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An unidentified photographer looks north thru (and above) the ruins of Angeline’s older home to the front south facade of her new home. This photo was obviously of great help in finding the footprint.

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Looking north from the roof of the Standard Furniture Co. Warehouse  with Western Avenue on the right.  The landmark tree is number two.   By this WW1 era shot Angeline’s home is gone.  Most of it – perhaps all – would have been out-of-frame to the  bottom.

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The red line is drawn down from the tenement on Front Street at Pine into Angeline’s last home.

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The neighborhood looking north along the waterfront from the King Street coal wharf in 1890.   Construction is nearly the as yet not built central tower of the Denny Hotel, upper-right, on the front hump of Denny Hill.  It straddles Third Avenue between Second and Fourth Avenues a few feet more than 100 feet above the regrades.

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Angeline’s back yard – again.

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Helpful details from both the 1893 and 1904 Sanborn Insurance Maps.   The red circle marks Angeline’s cabin.

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A Google Earth space shot superimposed on the 1904 Sanborn Insurance Map.

The Standard Furniture Co. Warehouse c1905 (now  the Fix/Madore building)

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And a few links to additional related features:

THEN: Pioneer Arthur Denny's son, Orion, took this photo of popularly named Lake Union John and his second wife, Madeline, sometime before the latter's death in 1906.

native-basket-seller-then-mr

THEN: A circa 1920 look north along the tiled roofline of the Pike Place Market’s North Arcade, which is fitted into the slender block between Pike Place, on the right, and Western Avenue, on the left. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: Mark Tobey, almost certainly Seattle’s historically most celebrated artist, poses in the early 1960s with some Red Delicious apples beside the Sanitary Market in the Pike Place Market. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

THEN:In late 1855 the citizens of Seattle with help from the crew of the Navy sloop-of-war Decatur built a blockhouse on the knoll that was then still at the waterfront foot of Cherry Street. The sloop’s physician John Y. Taylor drew this earliest rendering of the log construction. (Courtesy, Yale University, Beinecke Library)

THEN: In this April morning record of the 1975 “Rain or Shine Public Market Paint-in,” above the artists, restoration work has begun with the gutting of the Corner Market Building. (Photo by Frank Shaw)

THEN: Charles Louch’s grocery on First Avenue, north of Union Street, opened in the mid-1880s and soon prospered. It is possible – perhaps probable – that one of the six characters posing here is Louch – more likely one of the two suited ones on the right than the aproned workers on the left. (Courtesy RON EDGE)

THEN: The 1974 fire at the Municipal Market Building on the west side of Western Avenue did not hasten the demise of the by then half-century old addition of the Pike Place Market. It had already been scheduled for demolition. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Camlin Hotel

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: When it was new in the 1920s, the Camlin Hotel was described as “Seattle’s aristocrat among residential hotels.”
NOW: From its prospect on Ninth Avenue, between Pine and Olive Streets, the Camlin still shows its elegant head on high.
The Camlin lobby ca. 1931 when nearly new.

A 1930 panorama featuring a few of the Camlin’s hostelry neighbors. The Camlin here shines bright (its painted back side) right of center and behind the dark brick of Swedish Baptist Church at the northwest corner of 9th Avenue and Pine Street.

I have been charmed by this landmark since my first visit more than a half-century ago.  It was my oldest brother Ted and sister-in-law Klarese, both now deceased but then recent graduates of the nearly-new University of Washington Medical School, who treated me to a repast served by the Camlin Hotel’s Cloud Room, a “dinner in the sky”.  Although at about the same time, with the ascension of the Space Needle in 1962, the Camlin by comparison was not so

A Seattle Times glossy with Klarise Dorpat on the left.
Ted Dorpat from a Seattle Times glossy.

elevated.   The Cloud Room had by then nourished its reputation for both food and service.  For instance, for two years running, 1953 and 1954, the Cloud Room won awards from the then prestigious magazine Holiday.  The Camlin was one of but seventy-five restaurants on the American Continent selected by the magazine for its Annual Restaurant Award.

A clip from The Times for June 15, 1954.

A feeling for the Camlin’s size still depends upon where you stand.  Go to Ninth Avenue between Pine and Olive Streets and stand in front of the hotel’s entrance at 1619 9th Avenue.  Look up like Jean has done with his “repeat.” The ninety-one-year-old hotel, with its façade of patterned red bricks laced and banded with terra-cotta tile refinements, stands with its enduring charms before a spreading cluster of new nearby high-rises, which seem busy in a competition for a unique design.  From its upper floors the Camlin Hotel is still in unimpeded contact with the Capitol Hill horizon, Lake Union and the several neighborhoods of the North End.

A Murphy Bed adver for the nearly new Camlin in 1927.

More about the hotel and its Murphy comfort and convenience.  [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

When the Camlin first opened in 1926 there was as yet no plush restaurant on the top floor, rather there was a penthouse.  The Cloud Room first ventured on high in 1946. The conversion showed good post-war timing for a city that felt somewhat impoverished by its paucity of plush eateries.  This was especially true when Seattle was compared – as it still constantly is – with San Francisco.  From its elevated beginning, the Cloud Room was famous for special meetings and events, an ideal setting for a “bridge tea”, or the Quarterbacks Club, or a celebrity luncheon in 1948 for author Betty MacDonald and her then new book, The Plague and I.

A Times clip from July 7, 1948. Note that Ivar Haglund’s name has been spelled to better represent how his family and friends pronounced his name at the time or “then still.”  James Stevens, the author best known for his Paul Bunyan stories, was a good fiend of Ivar Haglund.  They got tipped on Ivar’s red wine and/or Steven’s whiskey and sang folk songs together, some of their own composition.

Edmund Campbell and Adolph Linden, locally noteworthy roaring-twenties entrepreneurs who developed the Camlin Hotel, chose the English Renaissance style for their ornate hotel designed by the well-known Portland, Oregon, architect Carl L. Linde.  The ornamentation of the Lind-designed Ambassador Apartments (1922) on 6th Avenue in Portland can be readily compared to the Camlin.

The entrance on 6th Avenue to Architect Carl L. Linde’s Ambassador Apartments (now Condos) in Portland, Oregon.
Alphone Linden, ca. 1929
A Seattle Times clip from August 12, 1936

The hotel’s name (have you figured?) is a neologism made by joining the first syllables in the partners’ last names.  Five years more and the partners would share something nearly as intimate: incarceration in Walla Walla.  By running and juggling the finances of not only the hotel, but also a bank, a network of radio stations and more, their 1920s ambitions eventually landed them behind bars for fraud.  After a few years of “paying their debt” they returned to their families and generally sturdy home lives in the mid-1930s.

WEB EXTRAS

Lots to add, I know, compadres! More will appear this evening… Here are a random few from The Camlin’s storied past. We’ll begin with a handful from the 1984 remodel:

And continue with several shots from the Cloud Room, including a couple from ‘The Fabulous Baker Boys’:

And a few more, including the infamous boat in the pool!  One could rent it for the night.

And now, take it away, Ron!

THEN: The scene looks north through a skyline of steeples toward the Cascade neighborhood and Lake Union, ca. 1923.

THEN: A circa 1923 view looks south on Eighth Avenue over Pike Street, at bottom left.

THEN: Built quickly in the winter of 1906-07, the Prince Rupert Hotel faced Boren Avenue from the third lot north of Pike Street. About fifty-five years later it was razed for the I-5 Freeway. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Built in the mid-1880s at 1522 7th Avenue, the Anthony family home was part of a building boom developing this north end neighborhood then into a community of clapboards. Here 70 years later it is the lone survivor. (Photo by Robert O. Shaw)

THEN: As explained in the accompanying story the cut corner in this search-lighted photo of the “first-nighters” lined up for the March 1, 1928 opening of the Seattle Theatre at 9th and Pine was intended. Courtesy Ron Phillips

THEN: With her or his back to the Medical-Dental Building an unidentified photographer took this look northeast through the intersection of 6th and Olive Way about five years after the Olive Way Garage first opened in 1925. (Courtesy, Mark Ambler)

THEN: Swedish Lutheran (Gethsemane) Church’s second sanctuary at the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and Steward Street circa 1920, photo by Klaes Lindquist. (Courtesy, Swedish Club)

THEN: The row house at the southwest corner of 6th Avenue and Pine Street in its last months, ca. 1922-23. (Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: A motorcycle courier for Bartell Drugs poses before the chain’s Store No. 14, located in the Seaboard Building at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Pike Street, circa 1929. (Courtesy Bartell Drugs)

THEN: Built in 1888-89 at the northeast corner of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street, the then named Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church marked the southeast corner of Denny Hill. Eventually the lower land to the east of the church (here behind it) would be filled, in part, with hill dirt scraped and eroded from North Seattle lots to the north and west of this corner. (Courtesy, Denny Park Lutheran Church)

THEN: The now century-old Norway Hall at the corner of Boren Avenue and Virginia Street opened in 1915, on May 17, Norwegian Independence Day. (Courtesy, Nordic Heritage Museum)

THEN: This 1939 glimpse east from Ninth Avenue follows Pike Street to the end of the about three-quarter mile straight climb it makes on its run from the Pike Place Market to its first turn on Capitol Hill.

THEN:

THEN: The city’s north end skyline in 1923 looking northwest from the roof of the then new Cambridge Apartments at 9th Avenue and Union Street. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)

9th-&-Union-1937-tax-pix-THEN-mr

THEN: Beginning with the Reynolds, three hotels have taken tenancy in this ornate three-story brick block at the northeast corner of Boren Avenue and Pike Street. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The “then” photo looks southeast across Union Street to the old territorial university campus. It was recorded in the Fall of 1907, briefly before the old park-like campus was transformed into a grand commercial property, whose rents still support the running of the University of Washington. (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

THEN: While visiting Seattle for some promoting, silent film star Wallace Reid shares the sidewalk at 4th and Olive with a borrowed Stutz Bearcat. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: Built in 1909-10 on one of First Hill’s steepest slopes, the dark brick Normandie Apartments' three wings, when seen from the sky, resemble a bird in flight. (Lawton Gowey)

THEN: Thanks again and again to Lawton Gowey for another contribution to this feature, this ca. 1917 look into a fresh Denny Regrade and nearly new “office-factory” at 1921 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey.)

THEN: Before this the first shovel of the last of Denny Hill was ceremonially dropped to the conveyor belt at Battery Street, an “initial bite of 30,000 cubic yards of material” was carved from the cliff along the east side of 5th Avenue to make room for both the steam shovel and several moveable belts that extended like fingers across the hill. It was here that they met the elevated and fixed last leg of the conveyor system that ran west on Battery Street to the waterfront. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: Looking north-northeast from a low knoll at the southwest corner of Seneca Street and Seventh Avenue, circa 1916. By 1925, a commercial automobile garage filled the vacant lot in the foreground. [Courtesy, Ron Edge]

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CLICK TO ENLARGE

A TIMES clip from November 7, 1926.

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WE DO NOT KNOW.   Once upon a time we believed that this was a scene from the Cloud Room.  Now we doubt it.  It is too early.  And where are the windows – for that mater where are the clouds?  These walls are dappled with other spirits, signed celebrities we think and there  are almost surely some of the same in the room too, for instance working the microphones on the table.  Does the animated woman on the right come with or chosen for sound effects.  Is she laughing or singing?  Why does she stand when place is crowded with sofas.  To us the room is wonderfully comfortable.  But what room is it and who is using it for what, we ask as happy humanists always with our eyes out for places packed with persons like these.  

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Seattle Now & Then: Lake Union Logs

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Looking north on Lake Union from some unidentified off-shore prospect near where Galer Street reached the Westlake Trestle. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: Logs have long since been replaced with marinas, house boats, and small maritime-based businesses along Westlake Avenue North.

Surely the subjects here are the logs, although their likely destination, the Western Mill at the south end of lake Union, is also visible.  A water tower, two stacks, and a few long factory sheds are bunched there. Scattered about to all sides are the mill workers’ generally small homes in the community that was started in 1882 by David Denny and his partners.

Above: The Western Mill photographed by LaRouche looking east over Westlake.  Below: My “repeat” of it about a dozen years ago taken from the second floor of the McKay Ford retailer.

The silhouette of the hotel named for his brother Arthur Denny (last week’s feature) rises on the horizon far right of the featured photo at the top, where it is considerably dimmed by the industrial haze contributed by a city rebuilding after its Great Fire of June 6, 1889.  The greatest teeming of timber for remaking the city were these logs temporarily parked below Queen Anne Hill.

Paving Weslake on landfill regraded along the base of Queen Anne Hill.
Westlake on August 14, 1933 looking north towards a billboard set near Crockett Street. (Do you remember what beer made Milwaukee famous? CLICK FOR YOUR ANSWER)
Also looking north on Westlake to a Foster and Kleiser billboard near Crockett Street, six years later on September 29, 1939.

The featured print at the top is part of a small collection contributed a few years back to the Museum of History and Industry.  The selection is distinguished by panoramas and other subjects wide enough to reveal a variety of landmarks.   The fifteen prints of this collection also expose the elaborate changes in the cityscape that quickly followed the fire.  The economic crash of 1893 slowed the growth, but beginning in 1897 inhibitions were effectively scattered by the Yukon Gold Rush.

Houseboat mailboxes on Westlake, 1970s
A few of the 1889 Seattle Great Fire ruins printed by John P. Soule, the probable photographer of the week’s featured photo of the logs off Westlake.

The year here is most likely 1890 or 1891. By photo-historian Ron Edge’s studied speculation, the photographer may well have been John P. Soule. One of the small collection’s three-part panoramas of the Seattle waterfront was taken from the King Street wharf, which, with its coal bunkers, was then one the largest structures in Seattle. Ron identified the same pan from the same spot recorded with only a few changes among the vessels. It was, it seems, also recorded on the same day and this time, signed by Soule, who is best known for his many photographs of the ruins left by the Great Fire. (CLICK WHAT FOLLOWS TO ENLARGE IT!!!)

For the photographer, my first hunch was Frank LaRoche, another skilled local with a proven lens and a penchant for recording panoramas. In 1890 LaRoche was hired by a tireless young developer named Luther Griffith to assemble an album of prints showing off his two-mile-long trestle to Fremont. Not by coincidence, Fremont was the name of the Kansas township where Griffith was born. The LaRoch album also features a few new landmarks, like the rebuilt central waterfront and Arthur Denny’s hotel.

The photograph above of stringing trolley wire above Luther Griffith’s Westlake Avenue Trestle was taken by LaRoche and is copied from the album the photographer made of the project for the developer.  (CLICK TO ENLARGE)
Approaching the penultimate turn on Westlake’s approach to the Fremont Bridge, and before the completion of the Aurorea (aka George Washington) Bridge ).
The last turn on Westlake befor crossing the Fremont Bridge. This “high bridge” was built in 1911-12, and served until the 1915-17 construction of the Fremont Bascule Bridge.  Fremont and Phinney Ridge are on the far north side of the bridge.  

The Stone Way bridge was built in 1911 to help handle north-end traffic during the construction of a new Fremont Bridge. This view looks north over both the Westlake Trestle and the Stone Way Bridge.  It was dismantled in 1917 after the opening of the Fremont Bascule Bridge.

 

Construction on the north pier of the Fremont Bascule Bridge.

The trestle to Fremont was built wide enough to handle promenading pedestrians, wagons, and most importantly, electric trolleys.  After they began running here in the fall of 1890, the trolleys pretty much put a stop to the “mosquito fleet” of small steamers that had delivered settlers and their goods to the growing neighborhoods on the north shore of the lake.  These included, west-to-east, Fremont, Ross, Edgewater, Latona (not yet Wallingford), Brooklyn (not yet the University District), Ravenna and Yesler.  The northeast corner of Lake Union – and so Portage Bay as well – got its own trolley service along the east side of Lake Union in 1891.   Some of this east side line was built on piles, and some on land.  Railroad ties were easier to lay beside the kinder grades of the future Eastlake and Fairview Avenues.

Mrs Brown playing at the enclosed beach behind (to the west) of the Westlake Trestle at the Southwest corner of Lake Union ca. 1902.  CLICK WHAT’S BELOW TO ENLARGE IT

First appeared in Pacific on March 21, 1999.
A ca. 1928 late-afternoon rush hour traffic jam at the south end the Fremont Bridge, and effective evidence for the need of another bridge – a high one, the Aurora Bridge.
Useful Junk Dance in Fremont June 19, 1979.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, fellahs?  We shall not disappoint professor, and we may well repeat.   CLICK ON THE BELOW.

THEN: This Webster and Stevens studio photo dates from either late 1917 or early 1918. The grand Frederick and Nelson Department store, rising above Fifth Avenue, has not yet reached its sumptuous Sept. 3. 1918 opening. In the foreground, the much smaller but also elegant flatiron building, bordered by Pine Street, in the foreground, and Westlake and Fifth Avenues to the sides, was razed and replaced also in 1918 by a three story retail block on the same flatiron footprint. (Courtesy, the Museum of History & Industry)

17web

THEN: One of a few photographs recording from different prospects the Fremont trolley car barn on Dec.11, 1936. North 35th Street, on the right, was originally named Blewett for Edward and Carrie Blewett. In 1888 the couple, fresh from Fremont, Nebraska, first named and promoted Fremont as a Seattle neighborhood. That year Fremont also got its lumber mill. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

THEN: The rear end of the derailed trolley on N. 35th Street appears right-of-center a few feet east of Albion Place N. and the curved track from which the unrestrained car jumped on the morning of August 21, 1903. (Courtesy, Fremont Historical Society)

THEN: From the Fremont Bridge, this subject looks northwest across the torrent that followed the washout of the Fremont Dam in the early afternoon of March 13, 1914. Part of the Bryant Lumber and Shingle Mill appears left-of-center. The north end of the Stone Way Trestle appears in the upper right corner. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

THEN: Samuel McKnight’s early 1890s panorama of Lake Union also looks north into most of Seattle’s seventeen square-mile annexation of 1891, when the city limits were pushed north from McGraw Street to 85th Street. Fremont, Edgewater, the future Wallingford, Latona, and Brooklyn (University District) were among the neighborhoods included. (Courtesy, Dan Kerlee)

THEN: Photographed in the late 1950s, the floating restaurant’s huge on deck hooligan got no competition as yet from the Space Needle (1962) in breaking the horizon.

Another Foster and Kleiser billboard portrait. This looks north on Westlake to Pine Street. {This stands on its own – nothing to click.]

Great railroad signs, theatre signs and ranks of neon were still the greatest contributors to night light at 4th and Westlake in 1949. (Photo by Robert Bradley compliment of Lawton and Jean Gowey)

THEN: Werner Lenggenhager's recording of the old St. Vinnie's on Lake Union's southwest shore in the 1950s should remind a few readers of the joys that once were theirs while searching and picking in that exceedingly irregular place.

THEN: Pioneer Arthur Denny's son, Orion, took this photo of popularly named Lake Union John and his second wife, Madeline, sometime before the latter's death in 1906.

Then: Photographed from an upper story of the Ford Factory at Fairview Avenue and Valley Street, the evidence of Seattle's explosive boom years can be seen on every shore of Lake Union, ca. 1920. Courtesy of MOHAI

THEN: Like violence in a classic Greek play, the carnage suggested by this 1934 crash scene on the then new Aurora speedway was kept off stage, either behind the city’s official photographer, or in the county morgue. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive.)

THEN: Looking west from the southwest corner of 6th Ave. N. and Mercer St. to the trolley barn and yards for the (renamed in 1919) Seattle Municipal Railway in 1936. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)

THEN: This portrait of the Seattle Gas Company’s storage tank dates from the spring of 1907, which explains its somewhat steeper topography. Between 1908 and 1911, both Republican Street, here on the right, and 9th Avenue N. were lowered to a grade close to that of Westlake Avenue, which is behind the photographer.

THEN: The 1906-07 Gas Works at the north end of Lake Union went idle in 1956 when natural gas first reached Seattle by pipeline. In this photo, taken about fifteen years later, the Wallingford Peninsula is still home to the plant’s abandoned and “hanging gardens of metal.” (Courtesy: Rich Haag)

Built for the manufacture of a fantastic engine that did not make it beyond its model, the Fremont factory’s second owner, Carlos Flohr, used it to build vacuum chambers for protecting telescope lenses. Thirty feet across and made from stainless steel the lens holders were often mistaken for flying saucers. (photo courtesy Kvichak marine Industries.)

THEN: If I have counted correctly this ca. 1930 Fremont Baptist Orchestra is appointed with three cellos, eleven violins and violas, two saxophones, two clarinets, one coronet, one oboe, one flute and two members who seem to be hiding their instruments. (courtesy Fremont Baptist Church)

THEN: This Webster and Stevens studio photo dates from either late 1917 or early 1918. The grand Frederick and Nelson Department store, rising above Fifth Avenue, has not yet reached its sumptuous Sept. 3. 1918 opening. In the foreground, the much smaller but also elegant flatiron building, bordered by Pine Street, in the foreground, and Westlake and Fifth Avenues to the sides, was razed and replaced also in 1918 by a three story retail block on the same flatiron footprint. (Courtesy, the Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: William O. McKay opened show rooms on Westlake in July of 1923. After fifty-seven years of selling Fords, the dealership turned to the cheaper and more efficient Subaru. Now reconstructed, the old Ford showroom awaits a new tenant.

THEN: A carpenter’s jewel with Victorian ornaments recorded by a tax assessor’s photographer in 1936, nestles at 615 Eastlake beside the surviving Jensen Apartments, aka the O’Donnell Building, on the left. (Courtesy Stan Unger)

THEN: This panorama could have used a tower (or drone) to better survey the size of the June 1, 191l, crowd gathered in Fremont/Ross to celebrate the beginning of construction on the Lake Washington Ship Canal. (Courtesy, Museum of History & Industry)

THEN: The home at bottom right looks across Madison Street (out of frame) to Central School. The cleared intersection of Spring Street and Seventh Avenue shows on the right.

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