All posts by Clay Eals

For Emmett Watson, ‘Lesser’ is more

This caricature of the legendary Seattle newspaper columnist Emmett Watson by the equally legendary former Seattle Post-Intelligencer cartoonist Bob McCausland appeared in Watson’s 1988 Lesser Seattle wall calendar.

The following story, an interview of longtime Seattle newspaper columnist Emmett Watson, appeared Dec. 16, 1987, in the West Seattle Herald/White Center News. More than 30 years later, Watson’s comments have a lot of resonance given today’s development boom. The interviewer, Clay Eals, was editor of the papers at the time. The story is reprinted here by permission of Robinson Newspapers. To see the story as printed, click here or scroll to the bottom.

For Watson, ‘Lesser’ is more

Columnist comes home Saturday to sign calendars
By Clay Eals

One of the West Side’s more famous/notorious native sons returns to his home turf this weekend.

He comes hat in hand, however, looking for holiday shoppers who are having trouble finding just the right item for those remaining on their lists.

It helps if the toughies on the list are from Seattle – now or sometime in the past.

That’s because Watson is pushing his new Lesser Seattle wall calendar for 1988. It’s a fanciful look at the not-so-attractive aspects of the Queen/Emerald City as detailed by Seattle’s consummate newspaper columnist. The $9.95 calendars also feature more than a dozen caricatures of Watson by ex-Seattle Post-Intelligencer cartoonist Bob McCausland.

Watson will sign copies of the calendar at Pioneer West Book Shop, 4510 California Ave. S.W. in the Junction, from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday.

Those who miss him there can find him scribbling his signature Saturday afternoon from 1 to 4 at Frederick and Nelson downtown.

Watson, who spent his youth in West Seattle, was one of the dignitaries featured in the West Side Story history book published this year by the West Seattle Herald and White Center News.

The history book is on sale at the News-Herald office, 3500 S.W. Alaska St., during the holiday season. It also is on sale at Pioneer West Book Shop, along with Watson’s calendar, and Watson will sign both on Saturday for those who are interested.

Watson, who lives next to the Pike Place Market, sat down for an hour to reflect on the mythical Lesser Seattle organization and on West Seattle earlier this month, over a cup of coffee at his favorite haunt, Lowell’s cafeteria in the market. Here is an edited transcript of the interview:

You’ve had Lesser Seattle around for quite a while.

Yeah, and a couple of times guys have come to me and said they wanted to market it, and I said no. But Fred Brack, a freelance writer, he does those cookbooks with Tina Bell, Taste of Washington, he’s a hell of a reporter and writer, worked for Sports Illustrated and the Washington Post, in fact he even had a hand in hiring Carl Bernstein. Anyway, he was trying to figure out a way to make some dough.

So we talked about it, and I had to go to the (Seattle) Times to get the OK, and I did, and we began to fool around with it. We already had those T-shirts out, sweatshirts and stuff, so we knew the designer, a guy named Tim Girvan, and Tim is one of the hot young designers in the country. Nice guy. I don’t know why Tim fooled with us. I think he just liked the concept of it.

So he went to working on it, then we got Bob McCausland out of retirement. (The caricatures) are all new. Some of them look like the old ones, but he did ’em all new. He really outdid himself.

Then I sat and wrote the stuff and took about two months or so to get it out.

With the flood of calendars on the market, what is this one’s appeal?

It’s a novelty calendar. We tried to get some tongue-in-check fun into it. That’s all Lesser Seattle is anyway, a tongue-in-cheek spoof.

There’s a serious message in it, too. A lot of people feel that way about the city. They don’t want it to balloon up. See, at the rate they’re going, why, they’re going to really make the streets deserted around here with all those high-rises. High-rises just wipe out a whole block of shops. And now we’re getting these elaborate plazas and a bunch of upscale shops that the ordinary person can’t afford. See, Third Avenue’s going to be wiped out.

Do you have any answers for the situation?

It’s too late now. Hell, they got so many new high-rises going in. They’ve got about four going up right now, and to some people that’s OK. I don’t like it that way. I like it the way it was on Third Avenue with the cigar store and the pool hall right around the corner. That’s all being moved out.

Does the character of a city stem from its downtown?

All you have to do is imagine what Seattle would be like if we didn’t have the Pike Place Market. Really.

Do you get into painting outlying areas with the Lesser Seattle swath?

Oh, yeah, we talk about Lesser Poulsbo, Lesser Winslow.

How about Lesser West Seattle?

Oh, I don’t know. Is it growing over there? It’s very much of a mix over there. I don’t know how dramatic the bridge has been, but it looks like it would have an impact. What I’d say there probably is, “Tear down the bridge.”

So far, how is the Lesser Seattle sentiment appealing to people through the calendar?

We were hoping that people would get carried away and buy four or five of them and send them to their relatives as sort of a tongue-in-cheek joke. And that’s happened. They give ’em to friends who have moved away. I always sign ’em, “Come back soon. Lesser Seattle welcomes you back.”

I was signing at Union Station the other night, and a lot of younger people bought ’em for their parents. There is that feeling. People don’t like to see Seattle get big.

Memories are funny things. We all think back on what it was like in the ’50s and the ’40s and ’30s, and I guess it’s kind of a growing-up process. We look back with nostalgia and fondness. I suppose it was just as hard to find a parking place in those days as it is now, but it doesn’t seem like it, y’know? People don’t like to have their lives disrupted.

Has Lesser Seattle had any tangible effect on the way things develop?

No, if anything, it’s probably counterproductive. I don’t think it has that much influence anyway. But people enjoy it because it’s a vehicle for saying a lot of things, like denouncing the high-rises.

And why do we want a Super Bowl here? All we’re going to do is get a bunch of drunken football fans in here for a week, and we’re going to subsidize them with free rent and parties. God, I really hate to see that. You just fall on your face in front of ’em and say, “Please come.” It’s just one big bash.

Anyway, you can always take off on it and use it that way.

Coming to West Seattle for a calendar signing, do you look forward to seeing people you know?

I was amazed when I did the book over there (five years ago) at how many people showed up who I’d forgotten, people I’d gone to school with.

West Seattle always was sort of a city in itself. See, when I grew up, we had the streetcar like everybody remembers, and it was a fair task to go downtown or to the U district. You had to ride that thing on those trestles, and it would take you 45 minutes to get downtown, and another 40 minutes to get to the U district.

I used to do that when I went to college. It was a bit of an isolation, and I’m convinced there are many, many families who grew up in West Seattle and never left, never went to any other part of the city.

West Seattle was also semi-country, really, and that wasn’t all that long ago. In the ’30s, there were an awful lot of wooded areas. In those days, as kids, we just ran loose. Back behind (James) Madison Junior High, there were little paths and trails, and you could walk almost clear to the Junction that way.

You once wrote, “I have never known anyone who moved to West Seattle for the sheer status of it, only because they liked it.”

I think that’s true. I really. You never got the feeling that there was any Highlands or Broodmoor mentality in it. At least I never did.

The people who had enough money would get beach property in those days. West Seattle always struck me as a mix, because you had people with real money down on the beach: the Schmitz family, the Colman family down along Fauntleroy. But then not very far away from that, very close, would be a middle-class and blue-collar neighborhood.

About Admiral Way and 45th, 46th, a lot of that is still with us. Once in a while, when I was recovering from my heart attack, I’d go over and go for walks around there, and it’s amazing how little of it has changed. A lot of rehabs everywhere. But the same kinds of people were there.

What do you remember best about West Seattle?

Well, I was born on Duwamish Head, and in college I lived with my brother and sister up on 35th. You could see down, and it was always kind of industrial, but I don’t think as kids we appreciated a lot of that. We didn’t think too much in terms of views. We thought too much of our own little problems.

Several years later, you get away from it, you go back over there, and Holy Toledo, the views.

The Dec. 16, 1987, interview as printed.

Seattle Now & Then: Seattle Transfer, 1893

(click to enlarge photos)

In this 1893 image showcasing Seattle Transfer Company, a few steeds are blurry, oblivious to the need to stand still for the exposure. (Ron Edge collection)
South of the Chinatown International District, cars replace horses in this westerly view along South Charles Street from Seventh Avenue South. Rising from where tideflats used to wash are the tan Inscape building (formerly U.S. immigration) and, behind it, CenturyLink Field. (Jean Sherrard)

(Published in Seattle Times online on May 16, 2019,
and in print on May 19, 2019)

How to haul goods in the 1800s? By horse, of course
By Clay Eals

Today, we think nothing of hauling boxes, baggage and all manner of business and household goods with motor vehicles. But 130 years ago, a mere blink of an eye in the world’s history, vehicle power was of the four-legged variety.

One firm providing equine infrastructure, founded in 1888, was the Seattle Transfer Company. Its barn and warehouse stood at the edge of southern tideflats that soon would be filled by the city’s massive regrades and dredging, a process that took decades.

To burnish its reputation, Seattle Transfer probably could have fared no better than to pose its fleet, staff and stock for the camera of Frank La Roche. In 1893, the year of our “then,” the city was four years on either side of arguably the two most momentous events of its early days – the Great Seattle Fire of 1889 and the 1897 onset of the northern Gold Rush, for which Seattle served as the jumping-off point. La Roche, arriving in Seattle after the fire, would earn fame by traveling more than 100 times to Alaska and the Yukon to capture 3,000 images of Klondike fever.

Here, in La Roche’s warm sepia, we look west to find 57 gents (and five tykes) with an equal number of top hats, bowlers and other chapeaux, even a straw skimmer. Most of the men sit on 27 lanterned rigs pulled by at least 33 horses.

By 1900 and fueled by the Gold Rush, Seattle Transfer employed 79 men and 85 horses. In Seattle and the Orient/Souvenir Edition, a 184-page book published by The Seattle Times and sold for 25 cents, the firm elicited praise: “The company has the right – in fact, are the only people in Seattle who have it – of boarding all incoming vessels and trains and soliciting baggage.” With no intended distaste, the book also noted how the firm dispatched the waste of its charges: “All the refuse is carried to the rear of the building and from there dumped into the Sound, the waters of which rise with each succeeding tide.”

Seattle Transfer did garner attention for more savory, constructive deeds. In 1898, when New York Evening Telegram readers balloted with nearly 300,000 coupons to proclaim firefighter F.A. Louis and rail conductor R.C. Dodge “the most popular men in the American metropolis,” their prize was a celebrated trip through Seattle to the Klondike. Seattle Transfer handled their 16 pieces of excess baggage.

One year later, in what The Seattle Times termed “a most peculiar accident,” two horses fell into and were imprisoned for nearly 10 hours inside a sewer excavation at Pike Street and Broadway. Who rode to the rescue with a block and tackle to extricate the steeds? Hi ho, Seattle Transfer!

WEB EXTRAS

For even more great history, check out our Seattle Now & Then 360 version of the column!

Here, in chronological order, are eight clippings from The Seattle Times online archive (available via Seattle Public Library) and Seattle and the Orient/Souvenir Edition that were helpful in the preparation of this column. Click on any clipping to enlarge it. –Clay

Dec. 11, 1895, Seattle Times, page 11
April 27, 1897, Seattle Times, page 2
Feb. 23, 1898, Seattle Times, page 10
May 28, 1899, Seattle Times, page 23 (juxtaposed with “Manhood Restored” ad)
Sept. 17, 1899, Seattle Times, page 5
1900 “Seattle and the Orient” excerpt
April 7, 1904, Seattle Times, page 14
Jan. 30, 1905, Seattle Times, page 12

Anything else to add, gents?

Here’s a few more from the general neighborhood.  Oh have so many more to pull and share – after we complete our first vacation in 38 years.  It is a vacation we hope to survive.

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(ABOVE:  Pouch in Pompei – by Genevieve McCoy)

 

Book wins two awards! RSVP to attend AKCHO ceremony April 30 at Northwest African American Museum

Great news: Paul Dorpat’s and Jean Sherrard’s recently released coffee-table book Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred won two awards this month!

The first award is from the Independent Publisher Book Awards (the IPPYs), with a ceremony in Chicago. The second award is from the Association of King County Historical Organizations — and you can join us at the presentation early next week. For details, read on!

Tuesday, April 30, 2019
AKCHO Virginia Marie Folkins Award

The Association of King County Historical Associations (AKCHO) has awarded Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred its Virginia Marie Folkins Award for 2019. The award is presented to authors and/or sponsoring organizations of an outstanding historical publication.

The award is to be presented from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 30, 2019, at the annual AKCHO awards ceremony at the Northwest African American Museum, 2300 S Massachusetts St, Seattle. Doors open at 5 p.m. and galleries will be open for viewing. Light refreshments will be served from 5:15 to 6:30 p.m.

Please RSVP to jromeo@cwb.org or call Judie at 206-465-1798 by Wednesday, April 24, 2019, to attend this free event. See event details, including driving instructions, at our Awards page. We hope to see you there!

Wednesday, April 10, 2019
Independent Publisher Book Awards
Bronze for West-Pacific / Best Regional Non-Fiction

The Independent Publisher Book Awards (known as the IPPYs) has announced that Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred won a 2019 bronze award for the West-Pacific region in the category of Best Regional Non-Fiction. The award was announced at the annual awards ceremony in Chicago.

———

Events

So far, as you can see from our Events page, we have completed 30 events since the book’s launch last October, including one on March 27, 2019, at the Washington Athletic Club:

Paul Dorpat chats with Washington Athletic Club members at March 27, 2019, presentation.

All but four of the presentations were videotaped, so if you want to see or re-live any of them, just go to the Events page and click away.

Please know that more events are forthcoming. Presentations are set for Tuesday, May 7, and Tuesday, May 14. For details, see the Events page!

———

Thanks!

Thanks to everyone who has helped make Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred such a successful tribute to the public historian who has popularized Seattle history via more than 1,800 columns over 37 years, Paul Dorpat!

— Clay Eals, editor, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred

Join us Thursday night in Burien for next event!

The events

Paul flings a baseball hat as the prize for a history question during his Jan. 24 event with Jean at Aegis Living of West Seattle. Click the photo to see video!

Already this month, we have had two book events (including one at Aegis Living of West Seattle, seen above), and five more are scheduled from now through May. The next one is 7 PM this Thursday evening, Jan. 31, at Lake Burien Presbyterian Church, sponsored by the Rotary Club of Burien/White Center. Stay tuned on the events page of our website!

Books on display December 14, 2018, in Ballard. Photo by Gavin MacDougall

You can re-live an event or experience it anew! Videos of 21 of the book’s 25 events from November and December 2018 are posted on the events page of our website.

The media

Peggy Sturdivant and the photo she took to accompany her column. (From left) Ken Workman (great great great great grandson of Chief Seattle), Paul Dorpat, Jean Sherrard and Clay Eals. Click it to see the column.

This month, longtime Westside Seattle columnist Peggy Sturdivant provides a unique look at one of our recent events in Ballard. To see links to all the print and broadcast media coverage of the book so far, click here.

The blurbs

A total of 25 Seattle notables have weighed in on Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. Here are two samples:

———

Anne Frantilla

Longtime readers of “Seattle Now and Then” will love perusing these 100 greatest hits for their favorites.

New readers will be entertained not only by the fascinating corners of Seattle’s history but also by Dorpat’s sense of humor and Sherrard’s sharp eye.

Anne Frantilla,
Seattle city archivist

———

Kji Kelly

Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred inspires Seattleites to utter the all-too-familiar statement, “I remember when…”

We can hope that this work inspires more of us to put down our phones, raise our heads, look at the ever-changing urban landscape and ask a more substantive, less sentimental question: ”What can we do to ensure that Seattle does not destroy its own soul?”

Kji Kelly,
executive director, Historic Seattle

———

For the rest of the blurbs, check out our blurbs page.

The blog

You already are subscribed to this blog (better known to all of us as PaulDorpat.com), but have you considered signing up someone else or offering him or her the opportunity?

Now it’s easier than ever. Just go to the home page, and in the upper left corner enter an email address and click the green “Subscribe” button (as shown in the black box here). That’s all it takes.

As you know, each subscriber receives regular updates with links that lead to scores of photos that supplement each week’s “Now and Then” column in The Seattle Times!

How to order

Want to order a book online? It’s easy. Just visit our “How to order” page. You can even specify how you want Paul and Jean to personalize your copy. Books will reach your mailbox about a week after you order them.

As Jean looks on, Paul signs a book for Nancy Guppy of The Seattle Channel’s “Art Zone.”

Thanks!

Big thanks to everyone who has helped make this book a successful tribute to the public historian who has popularized Seattle history via more than 1,800 columns for nearly 37 years, Paul Dorpat!

— Clay Eals, editor, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred

Snow foolin’: Paul fetes the flakes on the radio with KIRO’s Feliks Banel

Seattle’s Big Snow of 1880, as seen in “Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred.”

The media

MYNorthwest, the logo for KIRO, ESPN and KTTH radio.

Experience the fantasy of the flakes, as historian Feliks Banel interviews Paul for KIRO radio about the Big Snow of 1880, which is featured in Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. If you click here, you can read the Jan. 2, 2019, story, or you can listen to it as a five-minute audio piece.

To see links to all the print and broadcast media coverage of the book so far, click here. And to order Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred and have it delivered to your door, click here.

The blog

You already are subscribed to this blog (better known to all of us as PaulDorpat.com), but have you considered signing up someone else or offering him or her the opportunity?

Now it’s easier than ever. Just go to the home page, and in the upper left corner enter an email address and click the green “Subscribe” button (as shown in the black box here). That’s all it takes.

As you know, each subscriber receives regular updates with links that lead to scores of photos that supplement each week’s “Now and Then” column in The Seattle Times!

The events

Already we have scheduled four book events in 2019, from West Seattle to Burien to the Rainier Valley. The dates will be here before we know it — Jan. 24, Jan. 31, March 14 and March 23. Stay tuned on the events page of our website!

Books on display December 14, 2018, in Ballard. Photo by Gavin MacDougall

You can re-live an event or experience it anew! Videos of 19 of the book’s 23 events from November and December 2018 are posted on the events page of our website.

The blurbs

A total of 25 Seattle notables have weighed in on Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. Here are two samples:

———

Dave Eskenazi

Seattle Now and Then: The Historic Hundred is a true treasure, an instant classic. This gorgeous volume expertly captures the singularity of Seattle past and present. Page after page after page thrill the senses with interesting and evocative images, accompanied by Paul Dorpat’s inimitable text. This book is an absolute must-have for anyone interested in Seattle, past and present. The dream team of Paul Dorpat, Jean Sherrard and Clay Eals has given us a beautiful and indispensable gift.

Dave Eskenazi,
Seattle baseball historian

———

Sheila Farr

Paul is the guru of Seattle history. He brings a formidable intellect to his research and an artist’s sensibility to its presentation. This is history told with charm and lightness — and, thanks to steadfast help from Jean — spiced with amazing photos, past and present.

Sheila Farr,
arts writer and former Seattle Times art critic

———

For the rest of the blurbs, check out our blurbs page.

How to order

Want to order a book online? It’s easy. Just visit our “How to order” page. You can even specify how you want Paul and Jean to personalize your copy. Books will reach your mailbox about a week after you order them.

As Jean looks on, Paul signs a book for Nancy Guppy of The Seattle Channel’s “Art Zone.”

Thanks!

Big thanks to everyone who has helped make this book a successful tribute to the public historian who has popularized Seattle history via more than 1,800 columns for nearly 37 years, Paul Dorpat!

— Clay Eals, editor, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred

‘Buy the book … and then walk around the city’ — advice from Paul’s and Jean’s KUOW interview

Paul Dorpat inscribes a book for Marcie Sillman, longtime KUOW-FM host, after their interview on Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018. See links below!

The events are over for 2018, but you can still purchase the new book by Paul Dorpat and Jean Sherrard, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. To order online, see below. Remember, you can specify a personal inscription by Paul and Jean — for a gift or for you!

Books on display December 14, 2018, in Ballard. Photo by Gavin MacDougall

The media

The latest media appearance for the book came at 12:45 PM yesterday, when an interview aired of Paul and Jean by Marcie Sillman of “The Record” on KUOW-FM. See links to the 15-minute edited version and to video of the full, half-hour interview here:

Paul Dorpat (left) and Jean Sherrard are interviewed for “The Record” on KUOW-FM by host Marcie Sillman (with producer Amina Al-Sadi in the background).

Here are samples from the interview, addressed to Seattle’s recent newcomers:

Referencing Paul’s more than 1,800 photo-history columns, Marcie asked Paul, “Do you contemplate the impact that this work has done on what direction the city might take?” Paul’s reply: “It occurs to me quite a bit. I think, ‘My gosh, this thing has been here consistently for nearly 40 years, and it has a lot of readers, and I know it’s had a lot of effect.’ So yes, I’m kind of proud of that.”

Marcie followed up: “So what would you say to the new employee who works in South Lake Union at that big behemoth of a company who’s just arrived in town, what should they know?” Paul replied, “That’s easy. I’d say buy the book. Buy several copies, not only for yourself but for your relatives in Peoria, Illinois.”

Jean added, “Buy the book, then walk around the city, because I think that there’s an awful lot of people who arrive, find a little space that they can call their own, and stop. But this is a city’s that’s walkable. You can stroll around many of these important historic places, and there’s a resonance that comes through. There’s enough that we can explore and discover. So … start walking.”

To see links to all the print and broadcast media coverage of the book so far, click here.

Events in 2019

Already we have scheduled three book events in 2019, with more to come. Stay tuned on the events page of our website!

Videos of the events!

Did you miss one of our book events this fall and would like to see it from the convenience of your computer? Or perhaps you attended an event and would like to re-live it? Or share it with a friend?

We have posted videos of 19 of the book’s 23 events on the events page of our website. The videos include this one from December 22, 2018, at the University Book Store (with Paul in Santa garb):

Paul and Jean speak Dec. 22, 2018, at University Book Store.

The blurbs

A total of 25 Seattle notables have weighed in on Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. Here are two samples:

———

Scott Cline

Paul Dorpat is a Seattle treasure, and now he has fashioned a graphical and textual delight that will grab you and not let go. It guides deeply into the city’s untidy past and emerges into its lustrous present. But beware! Once you pick up this book, don’t even pretend you will sleep until you turn the last page – and even then, you will be tempted to start over again.

Scott Cline,
former Seattle city archivist

———

Tom Douglas

As someone who likes to put new restaurants into old buildings, I appreciate the way every urban ziggurat has a unique story to tell. Naturally, this means I’m also a longtime fan of Paul Dorpat’s photo-history column in the Seattle Times magazine. Seattle is morphing with dizzying speed into a future self, our streets blocked by cranes and our sidewalks teeming with tech workers. What we all need is to take a breath and pick up a copy of this remarkable book. Pour a drink, settle into your favorite chair, and let Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred build you a bridge, photo by photo, to the shared past of who we are and where we come from.

Tom Douglas,
Seattle restaurateur

———

For the rest of the blurbs, check out our blurbs page.

How to order

Want to order a book online? It’s easy. Just visit our “How to order” page. You can even specify how you want Paul and Jean to personalize your copy. Books will reach your mailbox about a week after you order them.

As Jean looks on, Paul signs a book for Nancy Guppy of The Seattle Channel’s “Art Zone.”

Thanks!

Big thanks to everyone who has helped make this book a successful tribute to the public historian who has popularized Seattle history via more than 1,800 columns for nearly 37 years, Paul Dorpat!

— Clay Eals, editor, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred

Tomorrow: last chance to meet Paul and Jean and get a book inscribed before Christmas

The Seattle Municipal Railway streetcar #511 passes the University Book Store in this 1939 “then” view from the book.

Can you find the University Book Store in this 1939 “then” view from the book?

Come find the University Book Store from 3 to 6 PM tomorrow (Saturday, December 22, 2018), when you will find Paul Dorpat and Jean Sherrard for their final book event before Christmas.

The event, at 4326 University Way NE, will be have a drop-in format with two brief presentations sprinkled between the inscription duties for their new book, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred.

The event is free, and you have the opportunity to purchase the book and have it personally inscribed by Paul and Jean. It’s a sure way to obtain the book in time for gift-giving, as the time has passed when a book ordered by mail will arrive before December 25.

Books on display December 14, 2018, in Ballard. Photo by Gavin MacDougall

Videos of the events!

Did you miss one of our book events this fall and would like to see it from the convenience of your computer? Or perhaps you attended an event and would like to re-live it? Or share it with a friend?

We have posted videos of 18 of the book’s 22 events on the events page of our website. The videos include this one from December 16, 2018, at the Bothell Library, co-sponsored by the Bothell Historical Museum:

Video: Dec. 16, 2018, Bothell Library, 1:44:53

The media

The latest media appearance came  at 11 a.m. Monday, December 17, 2018, when Jean appeared on a six-minute segment on KING-TV’s New Day Northwest, hosted by Margaret Larson:

Jean is interviewed by Margaret Larson on KING-TV’s New Day Northwest on Dec. 17, 2018.

To see links to all the print and broadcast media coverage of the book so far, click here.

The blurbs

A total of 25 Seattle notables have weighed in on Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. Here are two samples:

———

Kurt Armbruster

Historian Paul Dorpat has been a Seattle treasure for decades, and his latest book, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred, presents highlights from his rich and revealing career, peeling back the layers of Seattle’s myriad existences. In his warm and engaging style, Dorpat offers rare glimpses into the city’s soul and tells its ever-intriguing story with new and often unexpected detail. A crowning achievement and a must-have for all who live in and love the Queen City of Puget Sound.

Kurt Armbruster,
author, Before Seattle Rocked

———

David Brewster

They say there are two kinds of cities: anywhere cities and somewhere cities. This splendid book poses the question, paired historic photo after ingeniously paired modern photo, of whether Seattle has traded in somewhere-ness – a rooted, distinctive, peculiar place – for anywhere-ness. It coyly avoids an answer, but there is plenty of material for enriching the debate, and maybe some suggestions for reversing a tidal wave of blandness. More than that, Dorpat sneaks in a huge amount of Seattle history, sweetened with wit and his eye for the offbeat. No Seattle history book ever went down more easily. But watch out: It also sticks to your ribs!

David Brewster, founder of Seattle Weekly,
Town Hall, Crosscut and Folio: The Seattle Athenaeum

———

For the rest of the blurbs, check out our blurbs page.

How to order

Want to order a book online? It’s easy. Just visit our “How to order” page. You can even specify how you want Paul and Jean to personalize your copy. Books will reach your mailbox about a week after you order them.

Want a book in time for Christmas? Come to tomorrow’s event at University Book Store! (See above.)

As Jean looks on, Paul signs a book for Nancy Guppy of The Seattle Channel’s “Art Zone.”

Thanks!

Big thanks to everyone who has helped make this book a successful tribute to the public historian who has popularized Seattle history via more than 1,800 columns for nearly 37 years, Paul Dorpat!

— Clay Eals, editor, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred

We’re in Bothell Sunday, on KING-TV next Monday, in the U District Dec. 22 — and now: event videos!

Books on display December 14, 2018, in Ballard. Photo by Gavin MacDougall

Still looking for that perfect holiday gift for someone who loves Seattle?

Join us for one of Paul Dorpat‘s and Jean Sherrard‘s illustrated talks about their new book, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred!

Besides the big October 28, 2018, launch on Paul’s 80th birthday, we have put on 20 events all over King County. It’s hard to believe, but only two more are left before Christmas:

  • Paul speaks during our December 11, 2018, event in Magnolia. Photo by Greg Shaw

    Sunday, December 16, 2018: Sunday, December 16, 2018: 2 PM, Bothell Historical Museum, at Bothell Library, 18215 98th Ave NE, Bothell

  • Saturday, December 22, 2018: 3-6 PM drop-in event with brief presentations, University Book Store, 4326 University Way NE, Seattle

The events are free, and you have the opportunity to purchase the book and have it personally inscribed by Paul and Jean.

Videos of the events!

Paul chats with an admirer December 14, 2018, in Ballard. Photo by Gavin MacDougall

Did you miss one of our book events this fall and would like to see it from the convenience of your computer?

Or perhaps you attended an event and would like to re-live it?

Either way, we have good news: We have posted videos of 17 of the book’s 21 events on the events page of our website.

The videos include this one from December 6, 2018, at the Museum of History and Industry, introduced by Leonard Garfield, executive director:

Video: Dec. 6, 2018, MOHAI, 1:02:36

The media

Coming up at 11 a.m. next Monday, December 17, 2018, is a segment on the book on New Day Northwest, KING-TV, hosted Margaret Larson. Don’t miss it!

To see links to all the print and broadcast media coverage of the book so far, click here.

The blurbs

A total of 25 Seattle notables have weighed in on Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. Here are two samples:

———

Paula Becker

This gorgeous volume showcases Seattle’s vibrant present and insistent past, offering proof that what our city is remains a product of what it was. Paul Dorpat’s multi-decade take on Seattle’s history continues to beguile, and Jean Sherrard’s thoughtful repeat photography enacts a powerful alchemy.

Paula Becker,
Seattle author and HistoryLink historian

———

John Bennett

I am always amazed at the original photographs that Paul comes up with. Jean’s spot-on “now” pictures are shot so precisely, making you appreciate the history and the change. I can hardly wait for my Historic Hundred!

John Bennett, West Seattle and
Georgetown preservationist

———

For the rest of the blurbs, check out our blurbs page.

How to order

Eager to place your order? It’s easy. Just visit our “How to order” page. You can even specify how you want Paul and Jean to personalize your copy. Mailed orders will reach mailboxes in about a week. Want a book for holiday gift giving? Order today for it to reach you in time.

As Jean looks on, Paul signs a book for Nancy Guppy of The Seattle Channel’s “Art Zone.”

Thanks!

Big thanks to everyone who has helped make this book a successful tribute to the public historian who has popularized Seattle history via more than 1,800 columns for nearly 37 years, Paul Dorpat!

— Clay Eals, editor, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred

Events in Tukwila, Magnolia, Ballard, Renton, Bothell — plus: Paul on Channel 9 in 1982!

Paul and Jean present Dec. 3, 2018, at Ivar’s Salmon House.

Still looking for that perfect holiday gift for someone who loves Seattle?

Join us for one of Paul Dorpat‘s and Jean Sherrard‘s illustrated talks about their new book, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred!

Besides the big October 28 launch on Paul’s 80th birthday, 17 events have taken place, and five more are on tap this coming week:

… and Paul and Jean provide personal inscriptions.

Click here to see all nine remaining events through mid-December. The events are free, and you have the opportunity to purchase the book and have it personally inscribed by Paul and Jean.

The media

In recent weeks, the book has garnered great media attention from:

Alaska Beyond, the magazine of Alaska Airlines

Page 165 of the December 2018 edition of Alaska Beyond, the magazine of Alaska Airlines

To see all the print and broadcast media coverage of the book, click here.

And a bonus!

Thanks to the generosity of veteran Seattle cinematographer and editor Tom Speer, we can see a five-minute segment aired on KCTS-TV in 1982, the same year Paul embarked on his “Now and Then” column for The Seattle Times:

Here is a five-minute segment aired on KCTS-TV in 1982. It was unearthed by veteran cinematographer and editor Tom Speer. Thanks, Tom!

The blurbs

A total of 25 Seattle notables have weighed in on Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. Here are two samples:

———

Knute Berger

Paul Dorpat’s and Jean Sherrard’s Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred is a brilliant, time-traveling, stereoscopic view of Seattle. It is no work of simple nostalgia — it contrasts past and present through historic images and deep research that put you in Seattle of old alongside Sherrard’s superb new photography rooted in the colorful present. It shows the city as a continuum, provides context and records change. It should thrill Seattle-loving NIMBYs and YIMBYs alike, no mean achievement!

Knute Berger, Seattle author, Pugetopolis: A Mossback Takes on Growth Addicts, Weather Wimps and the Myth of Seattle Nice

———

Fran Bigelow

Paul and Jean have created a real treasure for all of us who love Seattle. Much more than a beautiful art book, this is a fascinating history of how Seattle has changed, and it arrives at the perfect moment when Seattleites are focused on that subject. This book entertains and answers questions, but it also makes us think about the future of our precious city.

Fran Bigelow,
Seattle chocolatier

———

For the rest of the blurbs, check out our blurbs page.

How to order

Eager to place your order? It’s easy. Just visit our “How to order” page. You can even specify how you want Paul and Jean to personalize your copy. Mailed orders will reach mailboxes in about a week, in time for holiday gift giving.

As Jean looks on, Paul signs a book for Nancy Guppy of The Seattle Channel’s “Art Zone.”

Thanks!

Big thanks to everyone who has helped make this book a successful tribute to the public historian who has popularized Seattle history via more than 1,800 columns for nearly 37 years, Paul Dorpat!

— Clay Eals, editor, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred

Events! Saturday on Mercer Island, Monday at Ivar’s Salmon House, Wednesday at Wooden Boats, Thursday at MOHAI

Jean cracks up at an observation by Paul on Nov. 25, 2018, at a book event at the Fremont Library, sponsored by the Fremont and Queen Anne historical societies

… And the events just keep on coming!

Join us for one of Paul Dorpat‘s and Jean Sherrard‘s illustrated talks about their new book, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred!

So far, besides the big October 28 launch on Paul’s 80th birthday, 13 events have taken place, and five more are on tap this coming week:

Paul points out an audience member who attended the 1968 Sky River Rock Festival and Lighter Than Air Fair, which Paul organized, during a book event on Nov. 27, 2018, at Horizon House. Jean (standing) and Clay Eals, the book’s editor, look on.

Click here to see all nine remaining events through mid-December. The events are free, and you have the opportunity to purchase the book and have it personally inscribed by Paul and Jean.

The media

In recent weeks, the book has garnered great media attention from:

Westside Seattle, “Seattle Time Travelers” column by Jean Godden

The launch of Seattle Now & Then, a new film by Berangere Lomont

KOMO-TV, “Eric’s Heroes,” with Eric Johnson

The Seattle Channel “Art Zone” with Nancy Guppy

Nancy Guppy of Art Zone on The Seattle Channel interviews Paul and Jean.

To see all the print and broadcast media coverage of the book, click here.

The blurbs

A total of 25 Seattle notables have weighed in on Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred. Here are two samples:

Marcellus Turner

Paul Dorpat and Jean Sherrard have published a selection of the best of their “Now and Then” columns from The Seattle Times written over several decades. These columns reveal, explore and share Seattle local history by paralleling vintage photographs from previous years with photographs and commentary on these same spaces and places today. In so doing, Dorpat and Sherrard are able to focus on recurring issues and complex ideas that have shaped our city. Their creation of a People’s History of the region has made our past and how we look at the present and design the future much more accessible to scholars, historians and people interested in Seattle “Now and Then.”

Marcellus Turner, Seattle city librarian

———

Lane Morgan

The best thing about writing Seattle: A Pictorial History with my dad back in 1982 was meeting Paul Dorpat. He and Murray were kindred spirits, delighting in the oddities and ironies of the city’s past and present and, in their overlapping ways, telling its story. Paul is a treasure, and this book is a fitting sampling and tribute to his work.

Lane Morgan, Seattle author, Greetings from Washington,
co-author, Seattle: A Pictorial History,
editor, The Northwest Experience anthologies

———

For the rest of the blurbs, check out our blurbs page.

How to order

Eager to place your order? It’s easy. Just visit our “How to order” page. You can even specify how you want Paul and Jean to personalize your copy. Orders will be mailed starting next Monday and will reach mailboxes about a week later, well in time for holiday gift giving.

As Jean looks on, Paul signs a book for Nancy Guppy of The Seattle Channel’s “Art Zone.”

Thanks!

Big thanks to everyone who has helped make this book a successful tribute to the public historian who has popularized Seattle history via more than 1,800 columns for nearly 37 years, Paul Dorpat!

— Clay Eals, editor, Seattle Now & Then: The Historic Hundred