Seattle Now & Then: August Engel Grocery, 1918-1922

(click and click again to enlarge photos)

THEN: In this photo, likely taken between 1918 and 1922, August Engel’s Grocery operates at 110 W. Republican St. (now 503 First Ave. W.). In the foreground is track originally built for the West Street & North End Railway Co. streetcar running from downtown to Ballard. To learn more about Queen Anne mom-and-pops, visit the Queen Anne Historical Society website and search for “grocery.” (Courtesy Hugh Engelhoff)
NOW: A cyclist rides where a streetcar used to run, as the all-brick Grex Apartments, built in 1930 according to the property record card held by the Puget Sound Regional Branch of Washington State Archives, take the place of August Engel’s Grocery. (Clay Eals)

(Published in the Seattle Times online on Jan. 30, 2020
and in the PacificNW Magazine print edition on Feb. 2, 2020)

Every Seattle mom-and-pop store stocked its own story
By Clay Eals

Do you recall a mom-and-pop grocery from your younger years, perhaps a favorite where you actually shopped?

For my grade-school friends and me on Mercer Island, that store was Bill Muncey’s Roostertail, owned by the hydroplane hero and nestled in the Shorewood apartments. The store provided no sustenance for our family dinner table. Rather, it was a measure of our maturity when our moms let us ride our bikes that far from home. Our bounty was five-cent packs of baseball cards. (I threw away the cardboard-tasting gum.)

The point is that a mom-and-pop evokes stories, and such stores – and stories – once dotted our cityscape. At the dawn of the Roaring Twenties, when our “Then” image was taken, Polk directories indicate that Seattle had nearly 1,000 identifiable grocers – one for every 315 residents.

This store, August Engel’s Grocery, specializing in dry goods, fronted on a private streetcar line running from downtown to Ballard, at the northwest corner of First Avenue West and West Republican Street in Lower Queen Anne.

Bellingham paralegal Hugh Engelhoff is Engel’s great-great grandson. When he submitted this photo for “Now & Then” consideration, a century-old story came along for the ride.

As family lore has it, August, a German immigrant who operated the store until his death in 1921 at age 73, also ran a grocery “down the street.”

“Whenever he had dissatisfied customers,” Hugh says, “he would tell them, ‘If you don’t like it, you can take your business elsewhere,’ and would direct them to his other store down the street.”

The photo hints at other aspects of the enterprise. A sign facing Republican promotes Olympic flour, cereal and feed from Northwest mills. Window lettering (“MJB Coffee WHY?”) reflects the coffeemaker’s intriguing national slogan. Sears & Roebuck Co. touts itself on the front bench, while banners announce a temporary move to precede a building project.

Keen insights on mom-and-pops fill detailed articles written by archivist Alicia Arter and Jan Hadley, board members of the Queen Anne Historical Society. Their interviews with store-owner families and ex-delivery boys affirm that neighbors patronized a store because of its mix of products, gossip and the grocer’s personality. Also popular were stores that offered credit and were near a butcher or bakery.

Mom-and-pops began to dissipate in the 1930s. The culprits? Depression-induced business failures, plus the onset of electric refrigeration, which brought larger stores with lower prices and longer open hours. Another factor – no surprise – was society’s deepening love affair with the convenience of cars, diminishing proximity as a top reason for where to shop.

Scattered mom-and-pop grocery stores still survive in Seattle. But reflecting our bigger-is-better modern mentality, across the street from the former Engel’s Grocery now stands a mega-Safeway.

WEB EXTRAS

To see Jean Sherrard‘s 360-degree video of the “Now” prospect and compare it with the “Then” photo, and to hear this column read aloud by Clay Eals, check out our Seattle Now & Then 360 version of the column.

The car in our “Then” is from 1915 or 1916, according to automotive informant Bob Carney. Our thanks to other helpers Mike Bergman and Rob Ketcherside.

Below are two additional photos plus nine clippings from The Seattle Times online archive (available via Seattle Public Library) and other newspapers that, among others, were helpful in the preparation of this column. Enjoy!

An undated photo of August Engel (Courtesy Hugh Engelhoff)
Here is an alternate, wider “Now,” which takes in the Safeway at right. (Clay Eals)
Sept. 21, 1886, Evening Telegraph
July 17, 1897, Pullman Herald
June 25, 1903, Evening Statesman
April 7, 1904, Evening Statesman
May 7, 1921, Seattle Times, page 3
May 11, 1921, Spokane Spokesman-Review
July 18, 1922, Seattle Times
Sept. 28, 1958, Seattle Times
Sept. 6, 1971, Seattle Times

 

One thought on “Seattle Now & Then: August Engel Grocery, 1918-1922”

  1. Oh boy! I’m in my 80’s and I was still delivering groceries and meats, on my bicycle, to customers in the 1950’s in New Jersey. Supermarkets were just beginning to arrive, but the merchants I worked for after school were still able to afford to send their kids to college, so they must have done well.
    Yes, nickel packs of gum were great because you also got 5 baseball trading cards and perhaps some of the NY Yankees. In those days, many of the Yankee players lived in my home town Leonia, NJ. I once delivered meat to Johnie Sien (sp) home up on Highland Avenue.

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