Tag Archives: Main Street

Seattle Now & Then: The Seattle Fire, Three Weeks Later

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Looking north-northeast from the corner of Main Street and Occidental Avenue two or three weeks after the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889.  (Courtesy the Museum of History and Industry – MOHAI)
THEN: Looking north-northeast from the corner of Main Street and Occidental Avenue two or three weeks after the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. (Courtesy the Museum of History and Industry – MOHAI)
NOW: The two-story brick structure that was built on the corner a few years following the Great Fire housed the Carrolton Hotel upstairs and a variety of small businesses at the street level.  The building was razed first for parking in the 1960s.  In 1971 the parking lot was transformed with cobble stones as a part of Occidental Park.
NOW: The two-story brick structure that was built on the corner a few years following the Great Fire housed the Carrolton Hotel upstairs and a variety of small businesses at the street level. The building was razed first for parking in the 1960s. In 1971 the parking lot was transformed with cobble stones as a part of Occidental Park.

I am writing this on June 6, 2015, the 126th anniversary of Seattle’s Great Fire.  Most likely you are reading it about one month later.  That places you closer to the 126th anniversary of this subject, which in 1889 was still Seattle’s primary business district, reduced to charred rubble.   The scene was photographed, I surmise, late in the month of June or perhaps even in early July.

Some of the same tents and brick piles show in this view that looks northeast across Main Street to Second Ave. (Occidental Ave.).  The County Courthouse at Third and Yesler appears on the right and the Yesler Mansion on the east side of Third, high-center.  Part of Central School at Madison and 6th Ave. , fills the upper-left corner.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)
Some of the same tents and brick piles show in this view that looks northeast across Main Street to Second Ave. (Occidental Ave.). The County Courthouse at Third and Yesler appears on the right and the Yesler Mansion on the east side of Third, high-center. Part of Central School at Madison and 6th Ave. , fills the upper-left corner. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
The corner of Second (Occidental) and Main appears, in part, upper-left in this look to the southwest from the front porch of the King County Courthouse, later to known as the Katzenjammer Kastle during its long run as  Seattle's city hall. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
The corner of Second (Occidental) and Main appears with tents, far-left, in this look to the southwest from the front porch of the King County Courthouse, later to known as the Katzenjammer Kastle during its long run as Seattle’s city hall. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
The Post-Fire ruins and tents, this time from the Katzenjammer tower.  Mill Street (Yesler Way) crosses to the right from the lower-left corner.  Jefferson Street meets it from the lower-right corner. West Seattle is on the horizon. "Our corner" of Main and Second (Occidental) is upper left, below the tall ships.
The Post-Fire ruins and tents, this time from the Katzenjammer tower. Mill Street (Yesler Way) crosses to the right from the lower-left corner. Jefferson Street meets it from the lower-right corner. West Seattle is on the horizon. “Our corner” of Main and Second (Occidental) is upper left, below the tall ships.  The temporary tent that crowds bottom-left in the photo above this one, appears here also at the bottom, right-of-center.  A contemporary repeat for this would be taken high in the trees along the west border of City  Hall Park.

With the help of the many surviving photographs of the ruins, it is easy to determine from what prospect this scene was recorded.  The unnamed photographer stood on Main Street looking north by northeast over Main Street’s northwest corner with Second Avenue (later renamed Occidental.) It is a typical post-fire cityscape that reveals a layering of ruins, temporary tents, and some of the surviving city blocks that were not among the 35 or so destroyed by the conflagration in its seven hours of wind-driven destruction.

First Methodist at the southeast corner of Marion and Third.
First Methodist at the southeast corner of Marion and Third. [CLICK to ENLARGE]

Of the ten or so landmarks with towers that break the First Hill horizon we’ll note but three.  First, far left, stands the Gothic spire of First Methodist Church at the southeast corner of Third Avenue and Marion Street.  Next, at the scene’s center and farther up the hill, are the two towers of Central School on the south side of Madison Street, where now passes the Seattle Freeway (I-5) ditch.  Much closer to the photographer, to the left of the scorched power pole, the Yesler mansion faces Third Avenue, on the north side of Jefferson Street.  It was saved with a combination of soaked blankets spread on the roof and volunteers who extinguished the flying embers. Nearby, just right of the same power pole, another battle on the shingles saved the King County Courthouse. After the murder trail then underway was adjourned by Judge Hanford, buckets of water were lifted with a rope borrowed from the flagpole to drench the roof. 

Appeared first in Pacific, March 21, 2002.
Appeared first in Pacific, March 21, 2002. [CLICK to ENLARGE]

By the 10th of June, four days following the fire, over one hundred permits had been issued to erect temporary tents.  Like those shown here, most of the tents were stretched on sturdy frames and anchored to heavy planks.  Months later some of these canvas quarters were still standing and being used as store fronts. 

Looking south to a tideflats lined with rows of pilings placed speculatively as property lines in the hopes that the first state legislature would look upon them such squatters and jumpers markings as keys to owning the land below the tides.   Second Avenue - now Occidental - is right-of-center.  Much of the neighborhood is well along with the construction of brick business blocks, but a neighborhood cluster of temporary tents endures too.  [Courtesy MOHAI]
Looking south to a tideflats lined with rows of pilings placed speculatively as property lines in the hopes that the first state legislature would look upon such squatters and jumpers markings as keys to owning the land below the tides. Second Avenue – now Occidental – is right-of-center. Much of the neighborhood is well along with the construction of brick business blocks, but a cluster of temporary tents endures too. [Courtesy MOHAI]

Most of the pre-fire neighborhood south of Yesler Way was built of wood.  Brick structures were rare.  So the orderly piles of bricks here [in the featured photo at the top] encroaching on the street, right-of-center, is – or was – an inviting mystery.  Except that almost certainly these bricks were salvaged from the wreckage of the large but short-lived Squire Building, here at the northwest corner of

A circa 1888 panorama of the neighborhood  south of Mill (Yesler Way) taken from near 6th and Washington before the 1889 fire.  Some day we will determine if the brand new and short-lived
A circa 1888 panorama of the neighborhood south of Mill (Yesler Way) taken from near 6th and Washington before the 1889 fire. Some day we will determine if the brand new and short-lived Squire Building is among the larger business blocks showing right of center.
A detail from the 1888 Sanborn Real Estate Map showing the northwest corner of Main and 2nd (Occidental), bottom-right, prepared for the construction of the three-story tall Squire Block, the source also of our brick piles after the Great Fire.
A detail from the 1888 Sanborn Real Estate Map showing the northwest corner of Main and 2nd (Occidental), bottom-right, prepared for the construction of the three-story tall Squire Block, the source also of our piles of salvaged bricks at the corner of Main and Second (Occidental) after the Great Fire.
A Pioneer Square neighborhood detail from a 1925 real estate map.  We have centered the detail on the Ca
A Pioneer Square neighborhood detail from a 1925 real estate map. We have centered the detail on the Carrolton Hotel at the northwest corner of Occidental and Main.

Main Street and Second Ave. (Occidental).  In the 1888 Sanborn real estate map this corner lot is captioned “Excavation for Brick Block to be three stories.”  For his research on Pioneer Square neighborhood structures, Greg Lange found in the 1889 Polk Directory more than thirty tenants renting quarters in Watson Squire’s namesake block. Once the fire, heading south, reached Yesler Way around six pm, Watson’s renters must have already started gathering what they could before scrambling up First Hill.

A hand-color look north on Second Ave. (Occidental) in the mid-1870s from near Washington Street.  The Occidental Hotel, between Mill (Yesler Way) and James Street, interrupted the grid.
A hand-color look north on Second Ave. (Occidental) in the mid-1870s from near Washington Street. The Occidental Hotel, between Mill (Yesler Way) and James Street, interrupted the grid.  Jeweler-photographer Bob Bradley did the coloring directly on the 35mm slide, most likely in the 1950s.

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MORE POST-FIRE RUINS, TENTS & RECONSTRUCTION

The serviceable ruins of the Dexter Horton Bank (Seattle First National) show at the bottom-center at the northwest corner of Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) and Washington Street.  Some of the skyline here can be found in the top featured view too.
The serviceable ruins of the Dexter Horton Bank (Seattle First National) show  bottom-center at the northwest corner of Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) and Washington Street. Some of the skyline in this West Shore magazine rendering can be found in the top featured view on top.
The Dexter Horton bank before the '89 fire, at the northwest corner of Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) and Washington Street.
The Dexter Horton bank before the ’89 fire, at the northwest corner of Commercial Street (First Ave. S.) and Washington Street.
And after.
And after.  For more on this bank, see the last of Ron’s links at the bottom.

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Looking north on Post Alley (or Street or Avenue) from Mill Street (Yesler Way) following the Great Fire.
Looking north on Post Alley (or Street or Avenue) from Mill Street (Yesler Way) following the Great Fire.    [First appeared in Pacific on April 22, 2007.]
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Occidental Hotel ruins looking south from Front Street, (First Ave.) north of James Street.
Occidental Hotel ruins looking south from Front Street, (First Ave.) north of James Street.
First appeared in Pacific, June 6, 2004.
First appeared in Pacific, June 6, 2004.

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Yesler Wharf ruins looking east from the end of the dock.  Compare the line-up of ruined buildings
Yesler Wharf ruins looking east from the end of the dock. Compare the line-up of ruined buildings with those showing in two clippings up.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, fellas?   Yes Jean, but first Ron and I – and now the readers too – wish you and yours a happy farewell as you fly away to Europe with twenty-five (about) Hillside students and your protective cadre of instructors to visit first London and then Paris, and surely some of the same sites that you and I explored together in 2005.  I will send you – as you have instructed – some shots I took when first visiting the same cities as a teenager in 1955, for your intentions to repeat them now sixty years later – gadz.  Perhaps we can sneak them into Pacific – one or two of them.  It will depend, I think, on how sentimental the editors are feeling at the time of submission, and the pun is intended.   Bon  Voyage Jean and carry our love to Berangere, who, I know, will be helping you in Paris.  Often I’d just like to move there and follow BB around those ancient blocks with a bag of bon bons and one light weight digital camera.

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THEN: The ruins left by Seattle’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, included a large neighborhood of warehouses and factories built on timber quays over the tides.  Following the fire the quays were soon restored with new capping and planking.  A close look on the far-right will reveal some of this construction on the quays underway.  (Courtesy, Seattle Public Library)

THEN: Sitting on a small triangle at the odd northwest corner of Third Avenue and the Second Ave. S. Extension, the Fiesta Coffee Shop was photographed and captioned, along with all taxable structures in King County, by Works Progress Administration photographers during the lingering Great Depression of the late 1930s.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive’s Puget Sound Branch)

THEN: Seen here in 1887 through the intersection of Second Avenue and Yesler Way, the Occidental Hotel was then easily the most distinguished in Seattle.  (Courtesy Museum of History and Industry)

Seattle Now & Then: A Moveable Fiesta

 

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Sitting on a small triangle at the odd northwest corner of Third Avenue and the Second Ave. S. Extension, the Fiesta Coffee Shop was photographed and captioned, along with all taxable structures in King County, by Works Progress Administration photographers during the lingering Great Depression of the late 1930s.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive’s Puget Sound Branch)
THEN: Sitting on a small triangle at the odd northwest corner of Third Avenue and the Second Ave. S. Extension, the Fiesta Coffee Shop was photographed and captioned, along with all taxable structures in King County, by Works Progress Administration photographers during the lingering Great Depression of the late 1930s. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive’s Puget Sound Branch)
NOW: Jean Sherrard has followed the landmark adobe hut’s move of 1938 across the Second Ave. Extension.
NOW: Jean Sherrard has followed the landmark adobe hut’s move of 1938 across the Second Ave. Extension.

With this week’s “Now and Then” Jean and I have conspired, perhaps, to confuse you, although not for long.  On first glimpse it is evident that in the 76 years that separate our “then” from our “now,” their shared subject, an adobe hut at the corner of Main Street and the Second Ave. S. Extension, has endured.  However, on second glimpse, it is also certain that the hut’s milieu has pivoted.  We explain.

Before the Second Ave. Extension, looking south from the Smith Tower on March 14, 1928.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Before the Second Ave. Extension, looking south from the Smith Tower on March 14, 1928. (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Fourteen months later, June 11, 1929.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
Fourteen months later, June 11, 1929. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

In 1928 the long, wide, and straight path of Seattle’s Second Avenue, between Stewart Street and Yesler Way, was cut through to Jackson Street as the Second Ave. S. Extension.  Thereby, it was explained, “Seattle’s Market Street” (a little used nickname) might make a grand beeline to the railroad stations on the south side of Jackson. Of the fifteen buildings sliced into along the new route, three were entirely destroyed, including a fire station with tower that sat at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Avenue.  (Station No. 10’s own feature is attached below.)  The Extension ran right through that station’s former location, except for its northeast and southwest corners, which became small triangular lots on either side of the Extension.  (Here you may wish to find a map.  There’s a good one on the blog listed at the bottom.  We’ll make it easier and put both a detail below from the 1912 Baist Map and another from the sky: a detail of the corner and more in Seattle’s city-wide 1936 aerial.)

Someone has drawn borders for the 1928 Second Ave. Extension through this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.  Yelser Way runs along the top, and Jackson Street the bottom.  Note, near the center, the Fire Department Headquarters, aka Fire Station No. 10. here at the northwest corner of Third Ave. South and Main Street.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
Someone has drawn borders for the 1928 Second Ave. Extension through this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map. Yesler Way runs along the top, and Jackson Street the bottom. Note, near the center, the Fire Department Headquarters, aka Fire Station No. 10. here at the northwest corner of Third Ave. South and Main Street. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
A detail from the 1936 aerial map-survey of Seattle.  Yesler Way is at the top, Jackson St. at the bottom, and the Second Avenue Extension clearly cuts between them.  The two triangles - east and west - are found just below the middle of the subject.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
A detail from the 1936 aerial map-survey of Seattle. Yesler Way is at the top, Jackson St. at the bottom, and the Second Avenue Extension clearly cuts between them. The two triangles – east and west – are found just below the middle of the subject. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
The Fiesta's original location...
The Fiesta’s original location. Third Avenue is on the right, and Main Street behind Jean..

In our “then,” the Fiesta Coffee Shop stands on the triangle on the east side of Second.  The buildings behind it are on Third Avenue.  In our “now,”  however, the adobe hut survives on the Extension’s west side as the Main Street Gyro, and the structures that surround it are mostly on Second Avenue and Main Street.  To record his “repeat,” Jean stood just off the curb on Main.

Another of the Foster and Kleiser billboard records, this one dated July 8, 1929, and so soon after the completion of the Second Ave. Extension.  The scene looks west on Main Street and across the freshly paved Extension.  As the company's caption makes clear, this negative we exposed for the billboard on the east facade of the Hotel Main advertising Westerman's Oversalls.
Another of the Foster and Kleiser billboard recordings, this one dated July 8, 1929, soon after the completion of the Second Ave. Extension. The scene looks west on Main Street and across the freshly paved Extension. As the company’s caption makes clear, this negative was exposed for the billboard on the east facade of the Hotel Main.  It advertises Westerman’s Lee Oversalls.
A tax photo from January 1, 1938, showing the Hotel Main and, on the right, the west triangle what appears to be a hut, connected, perphaps to Schneiderman's gas station, when it was still on this the west side of the Second Ave. Extension.
A tax photo from January 1, 1938, showing the Hotel Main and, on the right in the west triangle, appears to be a hut, connected, perhaps to Schneiderman’s gas station, when it was still on this the west side of the Second Ave. Extension.

Sometime during the warmer months of 1938, the small café was moved across the Second Ave. S. Extension as Betty’s Coffee Shop, in a trade of triangles between Harry Schneiderman and Betty. The small service station Schneiderman had built on the west triangle, he rebuilt on the east side as a modern Signal station with four pumps and two bays for repairs.  Under his name, which he signed below the station’s roofline, the one time center for the UW football team added, “I Ain’t Mad at Nobody.”

Harry "I ain't mad at nobody" Schneiderman's Signal Station snugged in the triangle on the east side of the Second Ave. Extension, on Oct. 4, 1938.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College branch)
Harry “I ain’t mad at nobody” Schneiderman’s Signal Station snuggled in the triangle on the east side of the Second Ave. Extension, on Oct. 4, 1938.  That is 3rd Ave. S. on the right. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College branch)

With the help of Bob Masin, the hut’s owner since 1980, we have figured that since the small café’s 1938 move across the Extension, it has had six names with six cuisines.  It began in 1938 as Betty’s Coffee Shop and continued so into the 1970s.  Masin remembers sitting as a child with his father and grandfather at the small counter watching Betty, always in her apron, serve the policemen standing in the aisle drinking coffee.  Following Betty’s came the Greek Villa, the Masada Café, the Penguin Café, the Main Street Teriyaki, and presently the Main Street Gyro.

The "east triangle" with the Boston Baked Beans log cabin in 1937.  Sometime soon after this tax photo was recorded the sides were flattened with plaster and the menu changed to Mexican.  The Ace Hotel at 312-318 Second Ave., was one of the buildings sliced thru with the 1928-29 Second Ave. S. extension. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, the branch on the Bellevue Community College campus.
The “east triangle” with the Boston Baked Beans log cabin in 1937. Sometime soon after this tax photo was recorded the sides were flattened with plaster and the menu changed to Mexican. The Ace Hotel at 312-318 Second Ave., was one of the buildings sliced thru with the 1928-29 Second Ave. S. extension. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, the branch on the Bellevue Community College campus.

Returning now to the hut’s origins, the earliest tax photo (above) from 1937 shows it as a log cabin for the short-lived sale of New England Baked Beans and Brown Bread, and the tax card accompanying the photo has it built in 1934.  And so we may confidently make note that without leaving the corner, the café’s earliest move was from Massachusetts to Mexico when the logs were covered with adobe and the roof with red tiles for the also short-lived Fiesta Coffee-Shop.

WEB EXTRAS

Additions galore this week, lads?  Jean, Ron has put up a healthy seven links, and the first one looks north and directly through the new intersection of Third Ave. S., the Second Ave. Extension and Main Street.  Look close and you will find the Fiesta in the “east triangle” before it was moved to the other (west) side of the Second Ave. Extension.   [If this triangle business is not clear by now, I’m wringing my hands!]  The links will be followed by three or four other features that are not so recent as The Seven Below, but still are either of the neighborhood or one of the this feature’s subjects that being fast food, and want of food fast.

THEN: 1934 was one of the worst years of the Great Depression.  This look north on Third Avenue South through Main Street and the Second Avenue South Extension was recorded on Thursday, April 19th of that year.  Business was generally dire, but especially here in this neighborhood south of Yesler Way where there were many storefront vacancies.  (Courtesy Ron Edge)

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irene_igloo

THEN: The Dog House at 714 Denny Way was strategically placed at the southern terminus for the Aurora Speedway when it was new in the mid-1930s.  (Photo courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College Branch.)

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A FIVE BALL CLUSTER at THIRD AVE. S. AND MAIN STREET, CA. 1911

(Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
(Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)   A corner of Fire House No. 10 shows across  Main Street on the left.  This appeared first in Pacific, October, 9, 1994.

5 BALL - Main-and-Third-5-ball-cluster-TEXT

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FIREHOUSE NO. 10

Both the Great Northern (with the tower) and Union Pacific Depots, are found on the far side of Jackson Street in this ca. 1913 look down from the new Smith Tower.  A second tower, appearing on the bottom-right, is part of Firehouse No. 10 at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Ave. South.  There is, of course, as yet no Second Ave. Extension.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Both the Great Northern (with the tower) and Union Pacific Depots, are found here on the far side of Jackson Street in this ca. 1913 look down from the new Smith Tower. A second tower, appearing on the bottom-right, is part of Firehouse No. 10 at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Ave. South. There is, of course, as yet no Second Ave. Extension. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Firehouse No.10 - and its tower - under construction in 1903.  Looking northwest to the northwest corner of Third Ave. and Main Street.
Firehouse No.10 – and its tower – under construction in 1903. Looking northwest to the northwest corner of Third Ave. and Main Street.

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Above and below, page 32 & 33 from Jim Stevenson's 1972 published sketchbook of Seattle firehouse with thumbnail  histories.  (Thanks to Jim!)
Above and below, pages 32 & 33 from Jim Stevenson’s 1972 published sketchbook of Seattle firehouses with thumbnail histories. (Thanks to Jim!)

Fire-#10-Stevenson-Sketch-WEB

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EAST ON MAIN FROM FIRST AVENUE

(Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
(Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
First appeared in Pacific, January 1, 2005.
First appeared in Pacific, January 1, 2005.

main-st-lk-e-fm-1st-NOW-WEB

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Militia Pacific-House-swC-2-Main-1886-MR then

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Militia Now Pacific-House-swC-Occidental_Main-NOW-WEB

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Bricks, stripes and lids copied from Main Street near Second Avenue and multiplied.
Bricks, stripes and lids found on  Main Street near Second Avenue and multiplied.