Sundsten's Barks

Perhaps among our many enthused readers is a bark expert who will share the names with John and the rest of us, starting top-left, moving right and numbered one through 12.
Perhaps among our many enthused readers is a bark expert who will share the names with John and the rest of us, starting top-left, moving right and numbered one through 12.

We have pulled some more morphology from John Sundsten, the anatomist collector. John confesses that he does not know the names – neither scientific nor popular – for many of the trees whose barks he has recorded here. We admire his candor. “I am a good anatomist and a lousy naturalist. Some of them have names indicated with a brass plaque, but most do not. I just like bark. I like bark texture and bark color. You may write that barks are my friends. I shot them with my little camera last month while strolling around the lake counterclockwise in the early morning.” The U.W. scientist wonders, “There seem to be a lot of ladies with dogs and old couples at that time of day. Are there then two kinds of people? Clockwise and anticlockwise people, and what does their choice of walking around Green Lake say about right and left brain function, or no brain function, which is probably true for me. The barks go into folders, and I have a lot of other folders, ones with trees and animals and masks (mine) and oysters and such. It is like getting in the stuff for the long winter to come. And I presume some day it will.” John adds, “It occurs to me that I have a folder with about twenty Green Lake Park benches.” We may be seeing some Sunsten seats here soon.

John concludes, “I’ve included a long shot. It came out well, I think.”  And we agree.

john-arbor-web

Leave a Reply