Seattle Now & Then: The Boone Home

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Sometime around 1890, George Moore, one of Seattle’s most prolific early photographers, recorded this portrait of the home of the architect (and Daniel Boone descendent) William E. Boone.  In the recently published second edition of Shaping Seattle Architecture, the book’s editor, UW Professor of Architecture Jeffry Karl Ochsner, sketches William E. Boone’s life and career.  Ochsner adds, “Boone was virtually the only pre-1889 Fire Seattle architect who continued to practice at a significant level through the 1890s and into the twentieth-century.”   (Courtesy MOHAI)
THEN: Sometime around 1890, George Moore, one of Seattle’s most prolific early photographers, recorded this portrait of the home of the architect (and Daniel Boone descendent) William E. Boone. In the recently published second edition of Shaping Seattle Architecture, the book’s editor, UW Professor of Architecture Jeffry Karl Ochsner, sketches William E. Boone’s life and career. Ochsner adds, “Boone was virtually the only pre-1889 Fire Seattle architect who continued to practice at a significant level through the 1890s and into the twentieth-century.” (Courtesy MOHAI)
NOW: During its construction of Interstate-5, the state’s Department of Highways set free the springs of First Hill, a fluid dynamics that required more pumping, concrete and time than expected.
NOW: During its construction of Interstate-5, the state’s Department of Highways set free the springs of First Hill, a fluid dynamics that required more pumping, concrete and time than expected.

For Jean Sherrard to record his repeat of George Moore’s historical portrait of Mercy and William Boone’s big home required both prudence and pluck.  The latter took Jean to the edge of the concrete retaining wall that rises at least forty feet above the north-bound lanes of the Interstate Five Freeway.  But it was prudence that kept him from leaning over the edge to reach closer to the prospect that George Moore took in the early 1890s.  Both the home site and Moore’s position on Alder are now up in the air.

The Boone home is found in this early-1890s Sanborn map
The Boone home is found in this early-1890s Sanborn map at the center, to the right of the block number 325, and the footprint for the King Country Court House is across Seventh Avenue in block 326.   (Courtesy MOHAI)  [To read the map – try CLICKING it. ]

The Boone home was constructed at the northwest corner of 7th Avenue and Alder Street in 1885.  Boone was almost certainly the architect.  During the summer of 1886, The Post-Intelligencer reports in its popular “Brevities” section that the fifty-four year old architect, “while working on his residence yesterday, fell from a ladder and sustained severe bruises about the legs.  His injuries are not considered serious.”

The Boone home appears i this ca.1890 look east from the King Street Wharf to the First Hill horizon and the Construction there of the King County Court House.  The big home is in the half hidden in trees and its own dark covering at the lower-right (northwest) corner of the Court House.  The dark spreader leaning left from the mist on the right points directly at and on the Boone home.  The Terrace streets steps to the Court House seem to emerge from the smoke stack at the subject's center.
The Boone home appears in this ca.1890 detail, which looks east from the King Street Wharf to the First Hill horizon and the Construction there of the King County Court House. The big home is half hidden in the trees and its own dark covering at the lower-right (northwest) corner of the Court House. The dark spreader leaning left from the mast on the right points directly at and even on the Boone home. The Terrace streets steps to the Court House seem to emerge from the smoke stack at the subject’s center.  It was climbing those that in part inspired one of the most popular names for the first hill east of pioneer Seattle: Profanity Hill.
Another and only somewhat later of the Court House also from the King Street Wharf.  Here are the wide but long wooden steps up Terrace Street, on the left, another mast (but no pointing spreader) and the Boone home, also half-hidden in the landscape.
Another and only somewhat later detail of the Court House also from the King Street Wharf. Here too  are the wide but long wooden steps up Terrace Street, on the left, another mast (but no pointing spreader) and the Boone home, also half-hidden in the landscape.

Without committing itself to “First Hill,” the name with which we are accustomed, the January 29, 1886, issue of The Post-Intelligencer referred to the Boone residence as one of the “new buildings on the hill top.”  Well into the 1890s the more popular name for this most forward edge of the first hill behind the waterfront was Yesler Hill.  A name used in honor of Seattle’s pioneer industrialist – and employer – Henry Yesler.  From the time he built his first steam saw mill in 1852-3, it was assumed that he would eventually clear the hill of its timber.

King County Courthouse look northeast from the corner of Seventh Ave. and Alder Street.   The Boone home is out-of-frame to the left.
King County Courthouse look northeast from the corner of Seventh Ave. and Alder Street. The Boone home is out-of-frame to the left.

Sometime after the 1890-91 construction of the King County Courthouse, across 7th Avenue from the Boone home, a more playful place name, Profanity Hill, was inspired by the language used by lawyers and litigants who climbed the hill to deny and confess in the halls and chambers of the Courthouse.

The Yesler-Leary building design by Boone when he was new to Seattle.
The Yesler-Leary building designed by Boone when he was new to Seattle.
The Toklas and Singerman Department store at the southwest corner of Front Street (First Ave.) and Columbia Street, destroyed by the 1889 fire.
The Toklas and Singerman Department store at the southwest corner of Front Street (First Ave.) and Columbia Street, destroyed by the 1889 fire.
Henry and Sara Yesler's new mansion was one of the first of Boone's designs on settling in Seattle.  This view looks at it southeast across James Street (and its cable car tracks), and includes the new (in 1891) King County Court House on the  horizon.
Henry and Sara Yesler’s new mansion was one of the first of Boone’s designs on settling in Seattle. This view looks at it southeast across James Street (and its cable car tracks), and includes the new (in 1891) King County Court House on the horizon.   The Boone home is also on the First Hill horizon in the trees to the right of the Court House.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)

Married in California in 1871, William, a Pennsylvanian, and Mercie, originally from New York, came to Seattle for good in 1882.  That year he designed the landmark Yesler-Leary Building in Pioneer Square.  Like the Toklas and Singerman Department Store (Boone’s design from 1887), it did not survive the city’s Great Fire of 1889.  The mansion by Boone and partner then, the Californian George C. Meeker, was designed for Henry and Sara Yesler in the mid-80s just survived the greater fire ’89, but not its own on the morning of New Year’s Day, 1901.  A few of Boone’s landmarks that are still remembered, but lost, are Central School, Broadway High School, and the New York Block.

Central School, designed by Boone, seen looking southeast across the intersection of 6th Avenue and Madison Street.
Central School, designed by Boone, seen looking southeast across Madison Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues.  Note the Madison Street cable car tracks.
Broadway High School looking northwest over the intersection of Broadway Avenue and Pine Street, from the Odd Fellows Hall.
Broadway High School looking northwest over the intersection of Broadway Avenue and Pine Street, from the Odd Fellows Hall.
Boone's New York Block during its destruction, Nov. 15, 1923.
Boone’s New York Block during its destruction, Nov. 15, 1923.

William died in 1921 one year before his New York Block was razed for another and greater of the terra-cotta buildings that were then favored for the business district.  Mercie died in 1923. They were both ninety-one years old.  Although without children, Mercie was a leader in local charities, including the Seattle Children’s Home, whose first quarters her husband designed.

[We’ll add pictures of the first and second quarters for the Children’s Home.   Most likely it it the first of these that Boone designed – and  yet perhaps both.    The first was built on property at the southwest corner of Harrison and 4th Ave. N., that was given and chosen by David and Louisa Denny from their donation claim.  It is now part of Seattle Center.  The second and grander home is on Queen Anne Hill property that is still home for the charity, although now in a newer plant.   I worked there in 1966 as a house parent – the most demanding job I ever had.  It soon turned me to painting canvases – and  houses. ]

Seattle Childrens Home at 4th North and Harrison Street.
Seattle Children’s Home at 4th North and Harrison Street.
Seattle Children's Home on Queen Anne Hill.
Seattle Children’s Home on Queen Anne Hill.

WEB EXTRAS

Just paused for a bite in the I.D. and looked down King Street at our very own not-so-leaning tower with the Olympics looming behind.

And the spring rolls weren't bad either....
And the spring rolls weren’t bad either….

I had to include a detail from the clock tower – note the support struts in the windows below (for an interior, flip down through this post from the past).

Clock tower close-up
Clock tower close-up

Anything to add, lads?  Sure Jean but first such a luxurious recording or our tower.  It takes more than the right gear, light, atmosphere and mobility to record such a shot, it also requires meditation on that golden bar that mysteriously (we agreed) cuts through the tower and illuminates it’s golden clockworks, and so reminds us – some of us – that time is precious and we had better leave this scene and get with it.  Here at my desk I have a bowl of Narcissus Daffodils for sniffing the early Spring – while writing.

Again, here are a few relevant Edge-links (named for Ron Edge who pulled and grouped them).  Open these links and you will surely find other features with their own lists of relevant links and those links with theirs.   The lead photo for the top link looks from the west side of 7th Avenue (like Boone’s home) north across Jefferson Street, or almost two blocks north of the Boones.    The next link of the Sprague Hotel at Yesler and Spruce is about two blocks south of the Boones.   And, again, so on.

THEN: The Sprague Hotel at 706 Yesler Way was one of many large structures –hotels, apartments and duplexes, built on First Hill to accommodate the housing needs of the city’s manic years of grown between its Great Fire in 1889 and the First World War. Photo courtesy Lawton Gowey

THEN: On his visit to the Smith Tower around 1960, Wade Stevenson recorded the western slope of First Hill showing Harborview Hospital and part of Yesler Terrace at the top between 7th and 9th Avenue but still little development in the two blocks between 7th and 5th Avenues.  Soon the Seattle Freeway would create a concrete ditch between 7th and 6th (the curving Avenue that runs left-to-right through the middle of the subject.)  Much of the wild and spring fed landscape between 6th and 5th near the bottom of the revealing subject was cleared for parking.  (Photo by Wade Stevenson, courtesy of Noel Holley)

THEN: Harborview Hospital takes the horizon in this 1940 recording. That year, a hospital report noted that "the backwash of the depression" had overwhelmed the hospital's outpatient service for "the country's indigents who must return periodically for treatment." Built in 1931 to treat 100 cases a day, in 1939 the hospital "tries bravely to accommodate 700 to 800 visits a day."

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OTHER BOONE DESIGNS

The Marshall-Walker Block (built 1890-91) on the right at the southeast corner of Main Street and First Avenue South.   Long the home of the Elliott Bay Book Store, Allied Arts, and Jim Faber's office.  Jim wrote "The Irreverent Guide to Washington State, although he was himself a saint.
The Marshall-Walker Block (built 1890-91) on the right at the southeast corner of Main Street and First Avenue South. Long the home of the Elliott Bay Book Store, Allied Arts, and Jim Faber’s office. Jim wrote “The Irreverent Guide to Washington State,” although he was himself a saint.
Plymouth Congregational Church, northeast corner of University Street and Second Avenue.   You will find many stories that include it, if you key word them with this blog.
Plymouth Congregational Church, northeast corner of University Street and Second Avenue. You will find many stories that include it, if you key word them with this blog.
The Wa-Chong Building in the old Chinatown at the northeast corner of Second Avenue and Washington Street, before the Second Ave. Extension.  Part of the building survives.  Here the Frye Hotel towers above and behind it.
The Wa-Chong Building in the old Chinatown at the northeast corner of Second Avenue and Washington Street, before the Second Ave. Extension. Part of the building survives. Here the Frye Hotel towers above and behind it.
The Territorial Insane (they still called them in 1886-7 when it was bu ilt)) Asylum in Steilacoom.
The Territorial Insane (they still called them in 1886-7 when it was bu ilt)) Asylum in Steilacoom.

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BEFORE THE BOONES and AFTER

A panorama of Seattle seen from First Hill and painted in the 1870s.  It hangs in the New  York Public Library - either from the wall or in storage.
A panorama of Seattle seen from First Hill and painted in the 1870s. It hangs in the New York Public Library – either from the wall or in storage.  Church in the shows and near the center of the canvas is the First Baptist Church at the corner of James and 4th Avenue, now site of the Seattle City Hall.  Yes that’s the Olympics and not the Cascades, but how sweet it is to be so surrounded.
The First Hill Horizon in 1881 from Pioneer Place (Square) during the 1881 memorial service for the slain President Garfield.  In the past decade the hill was cleared of its forest and in the following decade it will be filled with homes, like the Boones, and institutions, like the Court House.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
The First Hill Horizon in 1881 from Pioneer Place (Square) during the 1881 memorial service for the slain President Garfield. In the past decade the hill was cleared of its forest and in the following decade it was filled with homes, like the Boones, and institutions, like the Court House. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
The encroaching 1-5 Freeway, upper-left, and Yesler Terrace Housing, upper right.   The corner of Yesler Way and 7th Avenue is bottom-right with the old City Light transfer station to the west (left) of it.
The encroaching 1-5 Freeway, upper-left, and Yesler Terrace Housing, upper right. The corner of Yesler Way and 7th Avenue is bottom-right with the old City Light transfer station to the west (left) of it.
Freeway Construction showing the construction of the retaining wall below what was 7th Avenue.
Freeway Construction showing the construction of the retaining wall below what was 7th Avenue.
Freeway construction, recorded by Frank Shaw on April 16, 1964.
Freeway construction, recorded by Frank Shaw on April 16, 1964.   Shaw looks south thru – or nearly thru – the former site of the Boone home at the northwest corner of Alder and Seventh.

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Now up the stairs to Nighty-bears – leaving proof-reading until tomorrow.  It’s nearly 3am.

Daffodiles and dessert, formerly on Julie Pashkiss' kitchen table.
Daffodils and dessert recently on artist Julie Paschkis’s’ kitchen table.   And those napkins are also of her design.

 

Seattle Now & Then: The Stetson and Post Block

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN:
THEN: The photographer David Judkins arrived here in 1883 and recorded this portrait of “Seattle’s first apartment house” sometime soon after. (Courtesy MOHAI)
NOW: The First Interstate Center, renamed the Wells Fargo Center, was completed in 1983, the centennial for Seattle’s first apartment house.
NOW: The First Interstate Center, renamed the Wells Fargo Center, was completed in 1983, the centennial for Seattle’s first apartment house.

This quintet of front doors, beneath a central tower shaped like a bell and a mansard roof that billows like a skirt in a breeze, was long claimed to be Seattle’s first apartment house.  (It might, however, be better to call these row houses, each with its own front door.) The group was built at the northeast corner of Second Avenue and Marion Street in 1883*, a busy year in which Seattle also acquired street numbers and fifty-nine new neighborhood additions.  It was also easily the largest city in the territory, with a census count that year of 6645 over Tacoma’s 3108, Port Townsend’s 1300 and the 1169 living in Spokane.

* We have learned in the first hour of posting this blog that it also slogs.  The date of construction is off.   First Dennis Andersen, the regional authority on architectural history, sends from Portland this letter to me here in my Wallingford basement.  Dennis writes  “Great image of the Stetson-Post townhouse row!  But perhaps a small edit for the date, from the Seattle PI. ‘July 30, 1881, p.3 col 1: ‘Moving in. The resident block of Stetson and Post, on Second Street, is now ready for occupancy.  Mr. Post’s family have moved into the building on the south.   Governor Ferry’s family have got the carpets down and are preparing to move into the one selected by them.  The finishing touches are being put on the other three, and they will be occupied soon’.”  Thanks again, Dennis.  Next, Ron Edge (who also put up the links below, most of them on row housing ) found another PI citation in the National Archives, this one from September 29, 1880, and we attach it directly below.    Thanks again, Ron.

An entrance into the construction of the Stetson-Post "town-house row" clipped from the September 29, 1880 issue of the Post-Intelligencer.
An entrance into the construction of the Stetson-Post “town-house row” clipped from the September 29, 1880 issue of the Post-Intelligencer.
The Stetson-Post row is easily distinguished in this 1882 photo by Watkins about one-fourth of the way in (to the right) of the left border.  Watkins took his panorama - this is but one part - from the King Street Coal Wharf.  The new Ocean Dock is under construction in the foreground.
The Stetson-Post row is easily distinguished in this 1882 photo by Watkins about one-fourth of the way in (to the right) of the left border. Watkins took his panorama (this is but one part of many) from the King Street Coal Wharf. The new City Dock is under construction in the foreground.
1884 Sanborn map with the Stetson-Post row lower-left.
1884 Sanborn map with the Stetson-Post row lower-left.

Both “Stetson & Post Block” and “French Row Dwellings” are hand-written across the structure’s footprint in the 1884 Sanborn real estate map.  It is named for its builders, George W. Stetson and John J. Post.  Renting a shed on Henry Yesler’s wharf in 1875, and using Yesler’s hand-me-down boiler, the partners first constructed a gristmill for grinding grain into feed and flour, but soon switched to

Early intelligence of the partners Stetson and Post published in the Post-Intelligencer for February 8, 1878.
Early intelligence of the partners Stetson and Post published in the Post-Intelligencer for February 8, 1878.
Stetson and Post Mill photographed from the King Street Coal Wharf.
Stetson and Post Mill photographed from the King Street Coal Wharf.

making doors and window sashes.  By 1883 they had the largest lumber mill over the tideflats then still south of King Street. The Stetson & Post mill was equipped for shaping wood into the well-ornamented landmark that was their then new terrace here at Third and Marion.

It seems like this view of the row was photographed from about the same time as the featured photo on top - but what year?  Our approximation 1884.
It seems like this view of the row was photographed from about the same time as the featured photo on top – but what year? Our approximation: 1884.  Note the home far left at the northeast corner of Madison Street and Second Ave, the home first of Dr. and Mayor Weed and later of John Leary, who moved from Stetson-Post with Weed moved out – most likely to his home at the northwest corner of Union and First Ave., or Front Street as it was then still called.
The Weed-Leary home at the northeast corner of Madison and Second.  Compare the bay window here on the Madison Street side, with that in the same home showing on the left of the photograph printed above this one.  It has been "elaborated" - extended up to enclose the top floor too.
The Weed-Leary home at the northeast corner of Madison and Second. Compare the bay window here on the Madison Street side, with that in the same home showing on the left of the photograph printed above this one. It has been “elaborated” – extended up to enclose the top floor too.

The Seattle city directory for 1884 has the partners living in their stately building, along with Thomas Burke, perhaps the most outstanding among the city’s “second wave” of pioneers. Other tenants were the dry goods and clothing merchants Jacob and Joseph Frauenthal, who had their own business block near Pioneer Square. The lawyer and future Judge Thomas Burke had his office in the Frauenthal Block.

If memory serves, that is Caroline Burke coming down the long stairway for her ride, perhaps.
If memory serves, that is Caroline Burke coming down the long stairway for her ride, perhaps.
Here from about 1887 (I'm growing increasingly anxious about dates) the Stetson-Post appears to the right of the grand mansard-roofed Frye Opera House.  Central School at 6th and Madison, appears on the far-right horizon (it burned down in 1888), and the dome of the Territorial University appears on the far left horizon.  The city's "Great Fire" of June 6, 1889 started in the joined buildings on the left with ten windows showing on the second floor. Budlongs Boat House in the forground was saved - being towed off-shore.
Here from about 1887 (I’m growing increasingly anxious about dates) the Stetson-Post appears to the right of the grand mansard-roofed Frye Opera House. Central School at 6th and Madison, appears on the far-right horizon (it burned down in 1888), and the dome of the Territorial University appears on the far left horizon. The city’s “Great Fire” of June 6, 1889 started in the joined buildings on the left with ten windows showing on the second floor. Budlongs Boat House in the foreground was saved by being towed off-shore. [CLICK to ENLARGE]
The south facade of Stetson-Post appears on the left in this late-1880s parade scene photographed from Peiser's "Art Studio."
The south facade of Stetson-Post appears on the left in this late-1880s parade scene photographed from Peiser’s “Art Studio.”
A Sherrard repeat of the Peiser.
A Sherrard repeat of the Peiser.
Looking back over Second Avenue at Peiser's Art Studio on the second lot south of Marion Street.  Note te tent roof rigged for lighting.
Looking back over Second Avenue at Peiser’s Art Studio on the second lot south of Marion Street. Note te tent roof rigged for lighting.

Following the city’s Great Fire of 1889, which the wooden row houses escaped, the city rapidly rebuilt in brick and stone, expanding in every direction, including up.  The Stetson & Post Block, which started as an elegant landmark visible from Elliott Bay, was soon hiding in the shadow of a seven-story business block, which was directly across Second Avenue, and named for Thomas Burke. The

The Burke Building northwest corner of Marion and Second, with a corner of Stetson-Post at the bottom-right corner. A. Wilse photographed this most likely in the late 1890s.  He returned to Norway in 1900.
The Burke Building northwest corner of Marion and Second, with a corner of Stetson-Post at the bottom-right corner. A. Wilse photographed this most likely in the late 1890s. He returned to Norway in 1900.

row houses then added commerce.  In place of the five grand stairways to the five apartments, five uniformly designed storefronts were built facing the sidewalk on Second.  And the city’s first row house or apartments (you choose) also changed it’s name to the New York Kitchen Block, after the restaurant that was its principal tenant.

The Stetson-Post with the commercial conversion of its stairs to shops.  This dates from 1906 when the Empire Building behind it here at the southeast corner of Madison and Second, was still under construction. [Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
The Stetson-Post with the commercial conversion of its stairs to shops. This dates from 1906 when the Empire Building behind it here at the southeast corner of Madison and Second, was still under construction. [Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
A look north on Second Ave. from the roof of the then new Hoge Building, with the Burke Building here on the left, and both the Stetson-Post and the Empire Building filling the block on its east side between Marion and Madison.
A look north on Second Ave. from the roof of the then new Hoge Building, with the Burke Building here on the left, and both the Stetson-Post and the Empire Building filling the block on its east side between Marion and Madison. [CLICK to ENLARGE]

As noted by now far above, the 1884 Sanborn real estate map calls these attached homes “French Row Dwellings.”  The Brits called them terraced housing. The many brownstones of New York are similarly arranged, and both San Francisco and Baltimore have rows of their architectural cousins – attached or semi-detached houses that are variations on a theme or several themes.  Perhaps the most distinguished of the French rows is in Paris, the Place des Vosges, a 17th century creation.

The Burke and Stetson-Post looking across Second Ave at each other, cira 1903.  The Empire is still four years in the future.
The Burke and Stetson-Post looking across Second Ave at each other, cira 1903. The Empire is still four years in the future.
The Golden Potlatch Parade of 1913, the "Dad's Day" floats are in the foreground.
The Golden Potlatch Parade of 1913, the “Dad’s Day” floats are in the foreground.
Two years earlier for the 1911 Golden Potlatch parade, the Afro-American float passed in front of the Stetson-Post.
Two years earlier for the 1911 Golden Potlatch parade, the Afro-American float passed in front of the Stetson-Post.
The Stetson-Post and the Empire Bldg made a background for Uncle Sam appearing also in the 1911 Potlatch parade. [Courtesy Michael Maslan]
The Stetson-Post and the Empire Bldg made a background for Uncle Sam appearing also in the 1911 Potlatch parade. [Courtesy Michael Maslan]

In 1919 the seventy-five-year-old George Stetson succumbed, as did his and John Post’s wooden block.  A dozen years earlier, the critic F. M. Foulser, writing a nearly full-page essay on “How Apartment Houses are Absorbing Seattle’s Increasing Population,” in The Seattle Times for December 8, 1907, imagined the Rainier Block (the last of Stetson & Post Block’s three names) as “some aristocratic little lady of by-gone days, who has been compelled to remain among the influx of vulgarly new associates . . . and drawing her skirts about her, remains in solitary retrospection.”  Some day, the essayist mused, “when the owner of the land on which ‘The Terrace of Past Memories’ stands, decides to accept the fabulous sum which is bound to be offered him, the old building will give way to a modern skyscraper.”  It took some time.  While the first replacement of 1919 gleamed behind terracotta tiles, it was, even when discounting the lost tower, still shorter than the row house.  The forty-seven floors of the First Interstate Center followed in 1983.

However hard to read, even with double mouse clicks perhaps, here's the full
However hard to read, even with double mouse clicks perhaps, here’s the full Foulser feature from the Seattle Times for December 8, 1907.
A fine if modest two-story (or three) terra cotta adorned Watson Moore Stockbrokers home succeeding the Stetson-Post aka N.Y. Kitchen Block  aka Rainier, here left-of-center.  The Empire Bldg is far left.
A fine if modest two-story (or three) terra cotta adorned Watson Moore Stockbrokers home succeeding the Stetson-Post aka N.Y. Kitchen Block aka Rainier, here left-of-center. The Empire Bldg is far left.
The First Interstate Bank was the last occupant of the corner, serving from a modern remodel of the ornate tile cover.  Lawton Gowey took this on July 26, 1981.
The First Interstate Bank was the last occupant of the corner, serving from a modern remodel of the ornate tile cover. Lawton Gowey took this on July 26, 1981.   And he recorded its wreckage below on February 2, 1982.
Looking east on Marion with the barely surviving south facade of the Interstate Bank at the center.  (Lawton Gowey, 2/5/1982)
Looking east on Marion with the barely surviving south facade of the Interstate Bank at the center. (Lawton Gowey, 2/5/1982)
In the fall of 1974 Frank Shaw framed the front door of the Pacific National Bank, precursor of the Interstate Bank at the northeast corner of Second Ave. and Marion Street.
In the fall of 1974 Frank Shaw framed the front door of the Pacific National Bank, precursor of the Interstate Bank at the northeast corner of Second Ave. and Marion Street, with the arch saved from the front entrance of the Burke Building with the construction of the Federal Building.

Z [The-Stetsonand-Post-Idea-build-practical-homes-WEB

A survivor, the Stetson and Post Mill Company began promoting a “new plan” of delivering a “home from the forest to you.”   It was a success.   The company explained, because of its “ability to furnish the materials at prices well within reach” This, they explained, was possible because “the company owns its own timber, windows, doors, frames etc., employs no solicitors and sells for cash direct from the forest.”   In 1926 Stetson and Post published a pattern book to encourage locals to build a variety of homes that were named, for the most part, after Seattle’s neighborhoods.  Below are two examples.  None of the forty-five or more “carefully devised plans” featured row-houses.

Z Stetson-and-Post-pattern-book-page-for-The-Greenwood-WEB

z Stetson-and-Post-pattern-book-page-for-The-Montlake-WEB

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Yes Jean Ron and I though it  most appropriate to feature a few past contributions that include some row houses.  The last feature picked is the first we did on subjects included in Diana James recent history of Seattle’s apartment houses.  It is titled, you will remember, SHARED WALLS.

And now we are going to climb the stairs to join the bears, so we will proof this after a good – we hope – night’s sleep.

THEN:  Louis Rowe’s row of storefronts at the southwest corner of First Ave. (then still named Front Street) and Bell Street appear in both the 1884 Sanborn real estate map and the city’s 1884 birdseye sketch.  Most likely this view dates from 1888-89.  (Courtesy: Ron Edge)

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Seattle Now & Then: The Gardner Home on Boren Avenue

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Built in the early twentieth century at the northeast  corner of Jefferson Street and Boren Avenue, Bertha and Frank Gardner’s residence was large but not a mansion, as were many big homes on First Hill.   (Courtesy Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
THEN: Built in the early twentieth century at the northeast corner of Jefferson Street and Boren Avenue, Bertha and Frank Gardner’s residence was large but not a mansion, as were many big homes on First Hill. (Courtesy Washington State Museum, Tacoma)
NOW: The Minor and James Clinic opened its new block-size brick home in 1988.
NOW: The Minor and James Clinic opened its new block-size brick home in 1988.

Judging from Asahel Curtis’s negative number 5479, inscribed at the bottom-right corner, this photograph of the home of Dr. and Mrs. Frank Gardner was taken on or very near 1906, the year which the King County tax records claim it was built.  A more likely date for the construction is 1905.  On the Society Page for The Seattle Times on March 10, 1905, Betha Gardner – then still more regularly called Mrs. Frank P. Gardner – is credited with hosting in her home, here at the northeast corner of Jefferson Street and Boren Avenue, the annual “at home” meeting for the “ladies of the Sorosis Club.” The Times added that “The subject of the afternoon will be the ‘Religion and Music of Russia.’”

This is NOT the clip
[CLICK TO ENLARGE] This is NOT the 1905 Times clipping noted above, but another from nine years later in which Bertha Gardner and her Sorosis Club are noted.   While enjoying a hide-and-seek for Gardner and her club  you will  survey a typical society page from The Seattle Times a century ago.   Besides the long list of club activities there are some commonplaces, like the sensational advertisement at the bottom-left corner, and the seeming promise for a stretched figure from the adver. top-right promoting I. Isbin & Co, a ladies tailors on Third Avenue, and another fountain of youth (for your face) at the bottom-right corner.  .
Sophie Gardner's portrait published in the Dec. 22, 1922 issue of The Seattle Times.
Bertha Gardner’s portrait published in the Dec. 22, 1922 issue of The Seattle Times.

Pennsylvanians Frank and Bertha Gardner first lived on Capitol Hill in a more modest home.  (Should you like to check it, you will find it surviving at 1629 13th Avenue.)  By First Hill’s often sumptuous standards, their second home was neither small nor grand with ten rooms, five upstairs and five down.  But the whole effect was pleasing in its symmetry, especially this west façade facing Boren Avenue, with its elegant but restrained ornamentation.  There was nothing here so assertive, for instance, as the central tower on the Granville Haller home, seen peeking around the corner at the left of the Cardner home.

At the top of the hill, Granville O. Haller's tower extended the superlatives of his big home at the northwest corner of James and Minor.
At the top of the hill, Granville O. Haller’s tower extended the superlatives of his big home at the northeast corner of James and Minor.
A helpful detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map - even without the street names.  The bigger red dot marks the northeast corner of Boren and Jefferson, the site  of the Gardner home, and the small dot rests beside the footprint for the Haller mansion at the northeast corner of Minor and  James.  [courtesy, Ron Edge]
A helpful detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map – even without the street names. The bigger red dot marks the northeast corner of Boren and Jefferson, the site of the Gardner home, and the smaller dot rests beside the footprint for the Haller mansion at the northeast corner of Minor and James. Note, the red footprint upper-left for the Colony Apartments.  It is one of the relevant Edge- links attached below.   An essay – or perhaps even two – treating on the Haller home “Castlemount” will also be found in one – or perhaps more – of the links below.  [courtesy, Ron Edge]

When the Haller home was built at the top of First Hill in 1883-5 at the northeast corner of Minor Avenue and James Street, some of the fir and alder forest that once covered the hill was still standing.  While clearing the site, Colonel Haller’s workers uncovered the skeletons of two Native Americans, casualties, perhaps, of the 1856 U.S. Navy’s howitzer bombardments at the hill during what is popularly called the “The Battle of Seattle” in 1856.  Known as the “old Indian Fighter,” Haller crassly kept the skulls in his tower for the amusement of the neighborhood’s children.

Boren-&-James-TAX-card-WEBThere is now a fine opportunity to study the diverse history of First Hill with Historic Seattle’s recently published book on the subject, whose title, while long, is both descriptive and pleasing to the ear: Tradition and Change on Seattle’s First Hill, Propriety, Profanity, Pills and Preservation.  Both Pill and Profanity have been popular names for Seattle’s First Hill or parts of it, as have Yesler and, more recently, even Goat.

The increasingly "Pill Hill" part of First Hill photographed from Haborview Hospital in 1956, the year Bertha Gardner died.   The Gardner home appears here directly below the large and dark three story (or four) apartment, upper-right.   Her physician husband's death precede Bertha's by many decades.  By 1956 she had moved to the University District.
The increasingly “Pill Hill” part of First Hill photographed from Haborview Hospital in 1956, the year Bertha Gardner died. The Gardner home appears here directly below the large and dark three story (or four) apartment, upper-right. Her physician husband’s death preceded Bertha’s by twenty-six years. By 1956 she had moved to the University District. [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

Bertha and Frank shared their comely First Hill home until 1930 when the doctor died at the age of sixty-one. At some time during the 1930s, Bertha was joined by her brother Wilmer Kahle, president of the Crescent Manufacturing Company; following his death in 1943, she sold the house.  We learn from her Times obituary of April 10, 1956, that at the time of her death she lived across from the UW campus in the Malloy Apartments on 15th Avenue NE, and that she had been a charter member of the Sorosis Club, and so dedicated to bringing together “representative women in art, literature, science, and kindred spirits.”

A Times clipping from Nov. 2, 1954 shows Bertha voting at
A Times clipping from Nov. 2, 1954 shows Bertha Gardner voting at the Wesley House polling station, which was one block south of her apartment in the Malloy, both directly across 15th Ave. from the U.W. campus.  Bertha is fourth from the right and fifth from the left.  The Churchill report on the left, may also be worth your time.  CLICK TO ENLARGE
The Campbell home at the southwest corner of James and Minor.  Their long front yard, which reached the block to Boren Avenue, was the Gardner's "next door" neighbor.
The Campbell home at the southwest corner of James and Minor. Their long front yard, which reached the block to Boren Avenue, was the Gardner’s “next door” neighbor.   Across Minor Ave stands the Phinney home, far left.   [Courtesy Lucy Campbell Coe]

WEB EXTRAS

Lots to add this week…eh, Paul?

Before we begin, however, I thought I would answer your request for more material with a feat of whimsical legerdemain. As you know, I teach drama and writing at Hillside Student Community. This past Friday, I took a few of my 5th and 6th graders on a field trip to the Woodland Park Zoo and through the miracle of photoshop, converted several into lion cubs.

Your students as metamorphs see wary, but not quite ready to leave the nest for the next step where it will be every cat for him or herself.   We do have seven links Jean.  Any reader who consults them thoroughly will find within most of the features we have done thru the years on subjects that border Boren.   There are more than a dozen of them – unless I am contradicted.   At the bottom we will ad a feature done first in 1985 about the Campbell home.  With its park-sized front lawn it took the entire north-half of the block on which the Gardners built there home about twenty years after Campbell, a hardware merchant, built his in the mid-1880s.   The youngest daughter, Lucy, was one of my earliest mentors on Seattle’s pioneer history.

And now for something completely different...
And now for something completely different…

Back to our regularly scheduled program. Take it away, boys.

THEN: First Hill’s distinguished Old Colony Apartments at 615 Boren Avenue, 1910.

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THEN: The Perry Apartments is nearly new in “postcard artist” M. L. Oakes look at them south on Boren to where it intersects with Madison Street. (Courtesy John Cooper)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/mrs-anderson-then-mr1.jpg?w=912&h=640

THEN:

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The Campbell home at the southwest corner of James (on the left) and Minor (behind it).
The Campbell home at the southwest corner of James (on the left) and Minor (behind it).

[Please note that the number 24 in the header refers to the chapter number in the book from which this was scanned, Seattle Now and Then, Volume Two, first published in 1987 - if memory serves.]
[Please note that the number 24 in the header above  refers to the chapter number in the book from which this text was scanned, Seattle Now and Then, Volume Two, first published in 1987 – if memory serves.]
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The clinic that replaced the home.  I took this sometime in the 1980s.  Perhaps the car is a clue.
The Minor an d James Clinic that replaced the home. I took this in 1985.

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Lucy Campbell Coe in her Washington Park Home ca. 1985 - with a student.
Lucy Campbell Coe in her Washington Park Home ca. 1985 – with a student.
Seen from Denny Hill, Seattle in 1885, the year of Lucy Campbell's birth.
[CLICK & CLICK TO ENLARGE] Seen from Denny Hill, Seattle in 1885, the year Jesse, the Campbells oldest of three children, was born.  On the right horizon stands the forest on Beacon Hill.  Both the Minor and tower-topped Haller First Hill mansions appear on the left horizon – remembering that the Campbells lived kitty-corner to the Hallers. both  at Minor and James.  The “other tower” is Coppins Waterworks at the southeast corner of 9th and Columbia.    Central School is temporarily near the center horizon.  It burned to the ground in 1888.  Second Ave. descends (in elevation only) from the lower-right corner.

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Protest in 1937

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Depression-era protestors climb Columbia Street sidewalk along-aside Seattle architect Harlan Thomas’s elegant Seattle landmark that opened in 1925 as home to the by then already forty-three year old Seattle Chamber of Commerce.  (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: Depression-era protestors climb Columbia Street sidewalk along-aside Seattle architect Harlan Thomas’s elegant Seattle landmark that opened in 1925 as home to the by then already forty-three year old Seattle Chamber of Commerce. (Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The Chamber moved from its landmark at 215 Columbia Street nearly a quarter-century ago.  Among it residents presently is SEIU Healthcare NW Training Partnership.
NOW: The Chamber moved from its landmark at 215 Columbia Street nearly a quarter-century ago. Among it residents presently is SEIU Healthcare NW Training Partnership.

The Seattle Chamber of Commerce building, its name signed with the luster of gold leaf lettering on each of the heftily-glassed dark doors on the left, is both physically and politically to the right of this cadre of about a dozen demonstrators marching east on Columbia Street up to Third Avenue.  Seven of the patrol are wrapped in professionally produced signs that resonate with depression-era concerns and commands.

As it turned out the Seattle Chamber of Commerce's full-page advertisement  for July 25, 1937 was premature.  The rise of the economy that was the trend in the beginning of July a month later began its moved in the other direction: down.
As it turned out the Seattle Chamber of Commerce’s full-page advertisement for July 25, 1937 was premature. The rise of the economy that was the trend in the beginning of July a month later began its moved in the other direction: down, which carried on for the  year of what is called the “Recession of 1937-1938″ in the Great Depression of 1929-1940.  BLOW THIS ONE UP with some clicks to read the Boomer’s optimism that rings in-with-and-under it  a a Real Presence of Commerce. 

The original negative is one of the great hoard of Post-Intelligencer photos that are protected by the white-gloved hands of Museum of History and Industry archivists.  It is numbered “PI22387” and, quoting MOHAI photographer Howard Giske, “It has a file date of July 15, 1937, on the old PI negative sleeve . . . good enough for me!”  Alas, with the help of skilled librarians in the Seattle Room of our central public library, we did not find it in the paper itself.

While it is not unusual for a busy daily to neglect a negative, we will hope that a Pacific reader might visit the central library, and after a more dogged microfilm search than ours, find that this subject of a silent and yet telling moment of protest on Columbia Street was also published and captioned on the pulp pages of the P-I during the summer of 1937.

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Meanwhile, for a better understanding of the subject, we recommend retired UW Archivist Richard Berner’s Seattle 1921-1940: From Boom to Bust, which covers local history during the bubbling 1920s up through the Great Depression of the 1930s. Berner notes (on page 409) that a recession, in the midst of the Great Depression, began in August 1937 when “Cutbacks in federal work relief funds coincided with unemployment levels that approached those of 1932-1933.” The timing is such that the event pictured in the ‘then’ photo, snapped in July by the P-I photographer, is prelude to the August recession.

The back cover with notable blurbs worth reading.
The back cover with notable blurbs worth reading.

The “red-baiting” that we usually associate with the Cold War was also commonplace during the Great Depression, when communists were thought to be behind every placard.  And here, far right, it seems they are.  We may have a “commie” in the picture!  Held like an umpire’s chest protector, a “newsboy” blandishes a copy of The Daily Worker, the Communist Party’s long-lived publication.  Unfortunately, the focus is too soft to read the front page, which by 1937 could have included the latest baseball scores. Might it be that this confrontation of the two dailies, the P-I and the Daily Worker, was reason enough for the former not to print this negative?  It is more likely that the bigger daily was distracted by the great mass of its own daily news.  Or that we have simply missed it.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Well, yes Jean, and we struggled over selections from past features of protest or those, again, of the neighborhood.   We get both in Ron Edge’s first link below.  The others keep to both for the most part, although we have included some of Berangere’s recent reports from Paris.  Following the eleven links attached below (and some of them will be very familiar to regular readers – like the Friends of the Market 1971 march in front of City Hall, which was the “top feature” here only two weeks past) we will continue with a few more neighborhood features.   Our ending this week will show Jean’s photos of the public art fixed to the front facade of the Chamber’s building on Columbia (although they have long since moved away).

CLICK TO OPEN

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971.  (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)

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THEN: Looking north from Columbia Street over the construction pit for the Central Building.  On the left is a rough section of the Third Avenue Regrade in the spring of 1907.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)

THEN: In this 1887 look up Columbia Street from the waterfront is the bell tower of the fire station, tucked into the hill on the right. It would soon fail to halt the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889. The station and everything between it and Elliott Bay were reduced to ashes, smoldering bricks and offshore pilings shortened like cigars. (courtesy, Kurt Jackson)

THEN: An Emergency Relief Administration wood pile took temporary quarters on the southeast corner of S. Alaska Street and 32nd Ave. S. in 1934.   (Courtesy, Northwest Collection, University of Washington Libraries.)

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The photograph above and the text below first appeared in Pacific May 15th, 1983 when the Times was sometimes still giving two page to this feature.  (Courtesy, UW Libraries)
The photograph above and the text below first appeared in Pacific May 15th, 1983 when the Times was sometimes still giving two page to this feature. (Courtesy, UW Libraries)
Again, from the 5/15/1983 printing of Pacific.  Imagine, now more than 30 years ago.
Again, from the 5/15/1983 printing of Pacific. Imagine, now more than 30 years ago.  The recommendation that the reader “(See feature 80)” refers to another now-and-then printed in the first of three Seattle Now and Then books.  You can find it in the book folder on the front page of this blog.
Fire Hill and Columbia Street seen from the Hoge Building at Second and Cherry.  When it was completed in 1911, the Hoge was the tallest in Seattle, until it was soon surpassed by the Smith Tower.
Fire Hill and Columbia Street seen from the Hoge Building at Second and Cherry. When it was completed in 1911, the Hoge was the tallest in Seattle, until it was soon surpassed by the Smith Tower.  Although the Rainier Hotel is gone, leaving a block of scarred dirt, many other structures survive here from the featured Warner photo at the top of the text above.

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4c. Moore-photo-waterfront-fm-bay-right-sec-to-columbia-WEB

If some smart readers still want a copy of "Washington Then and Now," the address has changed.  The new box is closer to home at the Wallingford  Post Office.  It is number 31636,  Seattle, WA 98103)
If some smart readers still want a copy of “Washington Then and Now,” the address has changed. The new box is closer to home at the Wallingford Post Office. It is number 31636, Seattle, WA 98103)
Looking back at Seattle from Elliot Bay early in 1887-88.  The Yesler Wharf that elbows thru the scene will be turned to a stubble of pilings by the Great Fire of June 6, 1889.  A year and a few week earlier Central School, the white box with tower on the left horizon at 6th and Madison, would by consumed by fire.  Columbia Street runs up to First Hill near the center of the panorama.
Looking back at Seattle from Elliot Bay  in 1887-88. Yesler Wharf that elbows thru the scene will be turned to a stubble of pilings by the Great Fire of June 6, 1889. A year and a few weeks earlier Central School, the white box with tower on the left horizon at 6th and Madison, would be consumed by fire. Columbia Street runs up First Hill near the center of the panorama. CLICK TO ENLARGE!
About ten years earlier, Peterson and Bros recorded this as part of a wide panorama of the city taken from the elbowed end of Yesler's Wharf. That's Yesler's log pond in the foreground.  First Hill has been recently logged off.  Columbia Street climbs it, right-of-center.  The log retaining wall holding Front Street (First Ave) above the tides was installed in 1876,
About ten years earlier, Peterson and Bros recorded this as part of a wide panorama of the city taken from the elbowed end of Yesler’s Wharf. That’s Yesler’s log pond in the foreground. First Hill has been recently logged off. Columbia Street climbs it, right-of-center. The log retaining wall holding Front Street (First Ave) above the tides was installed in 1876,

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5th-&-Columbia-duplex-12-4-1909-WEB

If you hide-and-seek for this duplex in one of the Columbia Street revealing photos above it, you will find it.
If you hide-and-seek for this duplex in one of the Columbia Street revealing photos above it, you will find it.

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8a. Post-Office-on-Columbia-lk-n--WEB

8b. POST-OFFICE-on-Columbia-tex-WEB

This subject appears as an extra with an essay in one of the eleven links offered near the top.
This subject appears as an extra with an essay in one of the eleven links offered near the top.  We show it here to also show the little Post Office, at the alley on the right.
Columbia Street, looking west thru Third Avenue during the latter's 1907 regrade.  The post office has moved on to First and University, and will soon be moving further into its headquarters at Third and Union.  The next photo is earlier and shows the P.O..
Columbia Street, looking west thru Third Avenue during the latter’s 1907 regrade. The post office has moved on to First and University, and will soon be moving further into its headquarters at Third and Union. The next photo is earlier and shows the P.O..
The Post Office is back, on the right beyond the alley.  The retail brick on the left was predecessor to the Chamber building.  The Boston Block just beyond it at the southeast corner of Columbia and Second Ave. , was built before the Great Fire of 1889 and after it packed with a great array of lawyers, salesmen, and the great array of desk duties involved in running a booming city.
The Post Office is back, on the right beyond the alley. The retail brick on the left was predecessor to the Chamber building. The Boston Block just beyond it at the southeast corner of Columbia and Second Ave. , was built before the Great Fire of 1889 and after it packed with a great array of lawyers, salesmen, and the great array of desk duties involved in running a booming city.
I took this repeat about a dozen years ago, which was two years or three before Jean took over the repeats.  Bless him.  Now we'll take a closer looks at those two sculptured panels that adorn the Columbia Street facade of architect Harlan Thomas' (with Thomas and Schack) Chamber of Commerce Building.
I took this repeat about a dozen years ago, which was two years or three before Jean took over the repeats. Bless him. Now we’ll take a closer looks at those two sculptured panels that adorn the Columbia Street facade of architect Harlan Thomas’ (with Thomas and Schack) Chamber of Commerce Building.
Jean's full-frontal of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce's facade facing Columbia Street, with fragments of its neighbor, the Central Building, reflecting in its windows on a sunny autumnal afternoon in 2014.  (Jean Sherrard)
Jean’s full-frontal of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce’s facade facing Columbia Street, with fragments of its neighbor, the Central Building, reflecting in its windows on a sunny autumnal afternoon in 2014. (Jean Sherrard)
The up-hill relief sculpture - to the east or left of the front door - by Moran Padelford, who designed and formed it for his masters degree in art at the UW.
The up-hill relief sculpture – to the east or left of the front door – by Moran Padelford, who designed and formed it for his masters degree in art at the UW.  It depicts indigenous crafts and so commerce too.
Sculptor Mildred Stumer's depiction of modern work - and so commerce.   (Jean Sherrard)
Sculptor Mildred Stumer’s depiction of modern work – and so commerce. (Jean Sherrard)

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Moveable Fiesta

 

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Sitting on a small triangle at the odd northwest corner of Third Avenue and the Second Ave. S. Extension, the Fiesta Coffee Shop was photographed and captioned, along with all taxable structures in King County, by Works Progress Administration photographers during the lingering Great Depression of the late 1930s.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive’s Puget Sound Branch)
THEN: Sitting on a small triangle at the odd northwest corner of Third Avenue and the Second Ave. S. Extension, the Fiesta Coffee Shop was photographed and captioned, along with all taxable structures in King County, by Works Progress Administration photographers during the lingering Great Depression of the late 1930s. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive’s Puget Sound Branch)
NOW: Jean Sherrard has followed the landmark adobe hut’s move of 1938 across the Second Ave. Extension.
NOW: Jean Sherrard has followed the landmark adobe hut’s move of 1938 across the Second Ave. Extension.

With this week’s “Now and Then” Jean and I have conspired, perhaps, to confuse you, although not for long.  On first glimpse it is evident that in the 76 years that separate our “then” from our “now,” their shared subject, an adobe hut at the corner of Main Street and the Second Ave. S. Extension, has endured.  However, on second glimpse, it is also certain that the hut’s milieu has pivoted.  We explain.

Before the Second Ave. Extension, looking south from the Smith Tower on March 14, 1928.  (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Before the Second Ave. Extension, looking south from the Smith Tower on March 14, 1928. (Courtesy Municipal Archive)
Fourteen months later, June 11, 1929.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
Fourteen months later, June 11, 1929. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

In 1928 the long, wide, and straight path of Seattle’s Second Avenue, between Stewart Street and Yesler Way, was cut through to Jackson Street as the Second Ave. S. Extension.  Thereby, it was explained, “Seattle’s Market Street” (a little used nickname) might make a grand beeline to the railroad stations on the south side of Jackson. Of the fifteen buildings sliced into along the new route, three were entirely destroyed, including a fire station with tower that sat at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Avenue.  (Station No. 10’s own feature is attached below.)  The Extension ran right through that station’s former location, except for its northeast and southwest corners, which became small triangular lots on either side of the Extension.  (Here you may wish to find a map.  There’s a good one on the blog listed at the bottom.  We’ll make it easier and put both a detail below from the 1912 Baist Map and another from the sky: a detail of the corner and more in Seattle’s city-wide 1936 aerial.)

Someone has drawn borders for the 1928 Second Ave. Extension through this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.  Yelser Way runs along the top, and Jackson Street the bottom.  Note, near the center, the Fire Department Headquarters, aka Fire Station No. 10. here at the northwest corner of Third Ave. South and Main Street.  (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
Someone has drawn borders for the 1928 Second Ave. Extension through this detail from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map. Yesler Way runs along the top, and Jackson Street the bottom. Note, near the center, the Fire Department Headquarters, aka Fire Station No. 10. here at the northwest corner of Third Ave. South and Main Street. (Courtesy, Ron Edge)
A detail from the 1936 aerial map-survey of Seattle.  Yesler Way is at the top, Jackson St. at the bottom, and the Second Avenue Extension clearly cuts between them.  The two triangles - east and west - are found just below the middle of the subject.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
A detail from the 1936 aerial map-survey of Seattle. Yesler Way is at the top, Jackson St. at the bottom, and the Second Avenue Extension clearly cuts between them. The two triangles – east and west – are found just below the middle of the subject. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
The Fiesta's original location...
The Fiesta’s original location. Third Avenue is on the right, and Main Street behind Jean..

In our “then,” the Fiesta Coffee Shop stands on the triangle on the east side of Second.  The buildings behind it are on Third Avenue.  In our “now,”  however, the adobe hut survives on the Extension’s west side as the Main Street Gyro, and the structures that surround it are mostly on Second Avenue and Main Street.  To record his “repeat,” Jean stood just off the curb on Main.

Another of the Foster and Kleiser billboard records, this one dated July 8, 1929, and so soon after the completion of the Second Ave. Extension.  The scene looks west on Main Street and across the freshly paved Extension.  As the company's caption makes clear, this negative we exposed for the billboard on the east facade of the Hotel Main advertising Westerman's Oversalls.
Another of the Foster and Kleiser billboard recordings, this one dated July 8, 1929, soon after the completion of the Second Ave. Extension. The scene looks west on Main Street and across the freshly paved Extension. As the company’s caption makes clear, this negative was exposed for the billboard on the east facade of the Hotel Main.  It advertises Westerman’s Lee Oversalls.
A tax photo from January 1, 1938, showing the Hotel Main and, on the right, the west triangle what appears to be a hut, connected, perphaps to Schneiderman's gas station, when it was still on this the west side of the Second Ave. Extension.
A tax photo from January 1, 1938, showing the Hotel Main and, on the right in the west triangle, appears to be a hut, connected, perhaps to Schneiderman’s gas station, when it was still on this the west side of the Second Ave. Extension.

Sometime during the warmer months of 1938, the small café was moved across the Second Ave. S. Extension as Betty’s Coffee Shop, in a trade of triangles between Harry Schneiderman and Betty. The small service station Schneiderman had built on the west triangle, he rebuilt on the east side as a modern Signal station with four pumps and two bays for repairs.  Under his name, which he signed below the station’s roofline, the one time center for the UW football team added, “I Ain’t Mad at Nobody.”

Harry "I ain't mad at nobody" Schneiderman's Signal Station snugged in the triangle on the east side of the Second Ave. Extension, on Oct. 4, 1938.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College branch)
Harry “I ain’t mad at nobody” Schneiderman’s Signal Station snuggled in the triangle on the east side of the Second Ave. Extension, on Oct. 4, 1938.  That is 3rd Ave. S. on the right. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College branch)

With the help of Bob Masin, the hut’s owner since 1980, we have figured that since the small café’s 1938 move across the Extension, it has had six names with six cuisines.  It began in 1938 as Betty’s Coffee Shop and continued so into the 1970s.  Masin remembers sitting as a child with his father and grandfather at the small counter watching Betty, always in her apron, serve the policemen standing in the aisle drinking coffee.  Following Betty’s came the Greek Villa, the Masada Café, the Penguin Café, the Main Street Teriyaki, and presently the Main Street Gyro.

The "east triangle" with the Boston Baked Beans log cabin in 1937.  Sometime soon after this tax photo was recorded the sides were flattened with plaster and the menu changed to Mexican.  The Ace Hotel at 312-318 Second Ave., was one of the buildings sliced thru with the 1928-29 Second Ave. S. extension. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, the branch on the Bellevue Community College campus.
The “east triangle” with the Boston Baked Beans log cabin in 1937. Sometime soon after this tax photo was recorded the sides were flattened with plaster and the menu changed to Mexican. The Ace Hotel at 312-318 Second Ave., was one of the buildings sliced thru with the 1928-29 Second Ave. S. extension. (Courtesy, Washington State Archive, the branch on the Bellevue Community College campus.

Returning now to the hut’s origins, the earliest tax photo (above) from 1937 shows it as a log cabin for the short-lived sale of New England Baked Beans and Brown Bread, and the tax card accompanying the photo has it built in 1934.  And so we may confidently make note that without leaving the corner, the café’s earliest move was from Massachusetts to Mexico when the logs were covered with adobe and the roof with red tiles for the also short-lived Fiesta Coffee-Shop.

WEB EXTRAS

Additions galore this week, lads?  Jean, Ron has put up a healthy seven links, and the first one looks north and directly through the new intersection of Third Ave. S., the Second Ave. Extension and Main Street.  Look close and you will find the Fiesta in the “east triangle” before it was moved to the other (west) side of the Second Ave. Extension.   [If this triangle business is not clear by now, I’m wringing my hands!]  The links will be followed by three or four other features that are not so recent as The Seven Below, but still are either of the neighborhood or one of the this feature’s subjects that being fast food, and want of food fast.

THEN: 1934 was one of the worst years of the Great Depression.  This look north on Third Avenue South through Main Street and the Second Avenue South Extension was recorded on Thursday, April 19th of that year.  Business was generally dire, but especially here in this neighborhood south of Yesler Way where there were many storefront vacancies.  (Courtesy Ron Edge)

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THEN: The Dog House at 714 Denny Way was strategically placed at the southern terminus for the Aurora Speedway when it was new in the mid-1930s.  (Photo courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College Branch.)

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A FIVE BALL CLUSTER at THIRD AVE. S. AND MAIN STREET, CA. 1911

(Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)
(Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)   A corner of Fire House No. 10 shows across  Main Street on the left.  This appeared first in Pacific, October, 9, 1994.

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FIREHOUSE NO. 10

Both the Great Northern (with the tower) and Union Pacific Depots, are found on the far side of Jackson Street in this ca. 1913 look down from the new Smith Tower.  A second tower, appearing on the bottom-right, is part of Firehouse No. 10 at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Ave. South.  There is, of course, as yet no Second Ave. Extension.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Both the Great Northern (with the tower) and Union Pacific Depots, are found here on the far side of Jackson Street in this ca. 1913 look down from the new Smith Tower. A second tower, appearing on the bottom-right, is part of Firehouse No. 10 at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Ave. South. There is, of course, as yet no Second Ave. Extension. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Firehouse No.10 - and its tower - under construction in 1903.  Looking northwest to the northwest corner of Third Ave. and Main Street.
Firehouse No.10 – and its tower – under construction in 1903. Looking northwest to the northwest corner of Third Ave. and Main Street.

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Above and below, page 32 & 33 from Jim Stevenson's 1972 published sketchbook of Seattle firehouse with thumbnail  histories.  (Thanks to Jim!)
Above and below, pages 32 & 33 from Jim Stevenson’s 1972 published sketchbook of Seattle firehouses with thumbnail histories. (Thanks to Jim!)

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EAST ON MAIN FROM FIRST AVENUE

(Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
(Courtesy, Museum of History and Industry.)
First appeared in Pacific, January 1, 2005.
First appeared in Pacific, January 1, 2005.

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Militia Pacific-House-swC-2-Main-1886-MR then

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Militia Now Pacific-House-swC-Occidental_Main-NOW-WEB

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Bricks, stripes and lids copied from Main Street near Second Avenue and multiplied.
Bricks, stripes and lids found on  Main Street near Second Avenue and multiplied.

Seattle Now & Then: ‘Friends of the Market’ Protest at City Hall

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971.  (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)
THEN: Friends of the Market president, architect Victor Steinbrueck, leads a cadre of Friends marching for Market preservation in front of the Seattle City Hall most likely on March 18, 1971. (Photo by Tom Brownell from the Post-Intelligencer collection at MOHAI)
NOW: A new city hall was completed in 2003.  Since most of the municipal departments were housed nearby in the 66-floor Seattle Municipal Tower, the new and smaller City Hall serves primarily the mayor, city council, and the city’s law department.
NOW: A new city hall was completed in 2003. Since most of the municipal departments were housed nearby in the 66-floor Seattle Municipal Tower, the new and smaller City Hall serves primarily the mayor, city council, and the city’s law department.

Friends of the Market president and UW architect Victor Steinbrueck, holding the placard  asking, “Is Phyllis Lamphere a Friend of the Market?”, marches ahead of his conserving coterie past the front door of City Hall. This protest, one of several City Hall pickets staged by the Friends in February and March of 1971, was most likely performed on Thursday, March 18. Other signs keep to the message: “Urban Renewal Unfair to Pike Place Market” and “City Hall + Investment Syndicate = Urban Removal.” Fittingly, whether intended or not, the style of the signs’ calligraphy resembles the brushwork listing the prices of produce on the cards still regularly seen in the Market’s stalls .

An earlier photo of Friends marching in front of the Seattle Municipal Building - A Seattle Times clipping from Feb. 5, 1971.
An earlier photo of Friends marching in front of the Seattle Municipal Building – a Seattle Times clipping from Feb. 5, 1971.

On the first Saturday following this parade, its prime target, councilperson Phyllis Lamphere, protested in The Times that she was indeed “a friend of the (Pike Place) market” and then went on to suggest that, as The Times reporter put it, her “Renewal opponents may themselves be the real enemies of the public market, because without rehabilitation, ‘the market will be unable to meet conditions of Seattle’s (building) code.’”  Other signs carried in front of City Hall those contesting days of 1971 advised, “Don’t subsidize luxury apartments,” “Removal is not Renewal,” and “The Pike Place Market is Seattle’s History.”

The Seattle Municipal Building looking east on Cherry Street from above 3rd Avenue.  It was constructed from 1959 to 1961 from plans created by a Dallas-based firm named McCammon Associates.  As at least the story goes it was a variation on the firm's earlier designs for a hotel.  For someone who can imagine the pun, the Dalles firm also worked on the plans in association with Damm, Daum and Associates.
The Seattle Municipal Building looking east on Cherry Street from above 3rd Avenue. It was constructed from 1959 to 1961 using plans created by a Dallas-based firm named McCammon Associates. As at least the story goes, it was a variation on the firm’s earlier designs for a hotel. For someone who can hear the pun, the Dalles firm also worked on the plans in association with Damm, Daum and Associates.   The building replacement by the new City Hall showing in detail with Jean’s “now” photos was, for many, an admired development
A circa 1960 aerial of the Municipal Building Construction with its parking lot to the rear.
A circa 1960 aerial of the Municipal Building Construction with its parking lot to the rear.
A fountain that runs beside the stairway off 4th Avenue into the new city hall.
A fountain that runs beside the stairway off 4th Avenue into the new city hall.

Post-Intelligencer photographer Tom Brownell took the protest photo at the top.  We chose it because it also shows the Fourth Avenue façade of the City Hall (1961) that was by then widely understood to be modeled on the cheap after a Texas hotel.  Among the prudent fears of the Friends was that the then expected millions from federal sources for urban renewal would be used to replace the funky charms of the Pike Place Market with modern hotel-motel reminders like City Hall.  The federal funding was announced on May 15th, and the next day the Friends announced their plans to gather citizen signatures for a proposal to designate most the Market for preservation.  Fifteen-thousand legal signatures were needed to get it on the November ballot.  The disciplined campaigners gathered more than 25,000 in three weeks.  The November 1971 election was won just as readily, with a landslide 76,369 yesses over 53,264 nos.

Seattle Times clipping from November 15, 1964
Seattle Times clipping from November 15, 1964  CLICK TO ENLARGE

When the Friends of the Market was first formed in 1964, it was an arts movement intent on saving the Pike Place Public Market from “sterile progress.”  Mark Tobey, one of Seattle’s best-known artists, was a member.  Proceeds from his then new book, The World of the Market, benefited the Friends.  When the picketing began in the winter of 1971, Tobey was quoted in The Times: “I hope (the market) will only be restored, and not improved through progressive planners.”

Looking up the steps of City Hall
Looking up the steps of City Hall
The City Hall tower from 4th Avenue
The City Hall tower from 4th Avenue
The view NW from the plaza below City Hall
The view NW from the plaza below City Hall
A view from Smith Tower
A view from Smith Tower

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, lads?   Yes Jean a few links arranged by Ron and an excuse.   This “Saturday-before” has been filled with other events and entertainments and so we (I) did not pull up more neighborhood links to past features that have not here-to-fore appeared in the blog.  But Jean this excuse is righteous, for, as you know, the afternoon we spent in the SeaTac city hall delivering a lecture on the history of Highline and more was often enough delightful.   Before passing on to Ron’s links, here is an feature that first appeared in The Times on March 6, 1983, about fourteen months after these weekly  now-and-thens first appeared in Pacific.

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THE FIRST BAPTIST FACING THE FATEFUL FOURTH AVE. REGRADE

Looking thru the upheaval of regrades on both Fourth Avenue and James Street
Looking thru the upheaval of regrades on both Fourth Avenue and James Street

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Lawton Gowey's look up Fourth and over James Street on May 19, 1982, with City Hall on the right.
Lawton Gowey’s look up Fourth and over James Street on May 19, 1982, with City Hall on the right.

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CITY HALL CIRCA 1886

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THEN: The clerk in the city's old Engineering Vault attends to its records. Now one of many thousands of images in the Seattle Municipal Archives, this negative is dated Jan. 30, 1936. (Check out www.cityofseattle.net/cityarchives/ to see more.)

https://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/1-future-courthouse-site-1937-web1.jpg?w=807&h=521

THEN: A winter of 1918 inspection of some captured scales on Terrace Street.  The view looks east from near 4th Avenue.  (Courtesy City Municipal Archives)

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle Now & Then: A Home on ‘The Ave’

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: First designated Columbus Street in the 1890 platting of the Brooklyn Addition, and next as 14th Avenue to conform with the Seattle grid, ‘The Ave,’ still its most popular moniker, was renamed University Way by contest in 1919. This trim bungalow at 3711 University Way sat a few lots north of Lake Union’s Portage Bay.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Archive)
THEN: First designated Columbus Street in the 1890 platting of the Brooklyn Addition, and next as 14th Avenue to conform with the Seattle grid, ‘The Ave,’ still its most popular moniker, was renamed University Way by contest in 1919. This trim bungalow at 3711 University Way sat a few lots north of Lake Union’s Portage Bay. (Courtesy, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Archive)
NOW: Both University Way and 15th Ave. E. were redirected for the UW’s expanding Health Sciences and Fisheries Departments.  Here Jean Sherrard stands with his back to the 265,000 square William H. Foege Building, the new home of the UW’s Department of Genome Sciences.
NOW: Both University Way and 15th Ave. E. were redirected for the UW’s expanding Health Sciences and Fisheries Departments. Here Jean Sherrard stands with his back to the 265,000 square William H. Foege Building, the new home of the UW’s Department of Genome Sciences.

If, for a moment, one squints the eyes and suspends disbelief, this little home on ‘The Ave’ may seem palatial, with guarding turrets, left and right, and a sunlit dome at the rear.  Alas, as well arranged as they are for illusions, those accouterments belong to mills near the north shore of Portage Bay, which most likely are closed down. This is a scene from 1937, set in the unwanted languor of the Great Depression.

Page one (of two)  of the W.P.A. tax card summarizing the qualities of 3711 University Way in 1937.  (Courtesy, Washington State Archives)
Page one (of two) of the W.P.A. tax card summarizing the qualities of 3711 University Way in 1937. (Courtesy, Washington State Archives  CLICK TO ENLARGE)
Remembering first that University Way is still named 14th Avenue in 1912, and remembering also that the W.P.A. tax card information is sometimes mistaken about any structure's construction date, then it seems that the footprint printed here on Block 35 Lot 25 & 26 of the Brooklyn Addition may be our featured home at 3711 14th Avenue, and in 1912, still three years before the date of origin given to it by the tax card.  It has the rough shape of the house itself, and on tax cards rough is all one needs.
Remembering first that University Way is still named 14th Avenue in 1912, and remembering also that the W.P.A. tax card information is sometimes mistaken about any structure’s construction date, then it seems that the footprint printed here on Block 35 Lot 25 & 26 of the Brooklyn Addition may be our featured home at 3711 14th Avenue, and in 1912, still three years before the date of origin given to it by the tax card. This  foot print (a half dozen narrow lots north of North Lake Ave.) has the rough shape of the house itself, and on tax cards rough is all one needs to make bold claims.

The subject is pulled from the Works Progress Administration’s photographic survey of every taxable structure in King County. With help only from these property record cards, city directories, and The Seattle Times archives, we can deduce that Clara and Ferdinand Krummel lived here in 1937 with their teenager Paul, and perhaps one or both of their daughters.  Paul was among the 586 seniors graduating from Roosevelt High School in 1938, and the ceremony was nearby in the UW’s Hec Edmundson Pavilion.  Four years more and the enlisted Paul would be completing a course in aviation mechanics in Texas.  In the spring of 1944, the intentions of the eighteen-year-old Gertrude A Nerdig to marry the soldier were published by The Times.

This somewhat soft panorama of the University District was photographed in 1915-16 when the bungalow at 3722 University Way (then still named 14th Ave. NE) was either being constructed or the first resident were moving in.
This somewhat soft panorama of the University District was photographed in 1915-16 when the bungalow at 3711 University Way (then still named 14th Ave. NE) was either being constructed or the first residents were moving in.   The photographer’s prospect above Portage Bay puts her or him in line with the backyard of the home, which is at least part hidden in the trees that stand about one-fourth of the way into the subject from its left border.  To help out, 15th Ave., the western border of the campus climbs from the bay eventually along the left side of the  campus grove, which have been considerably pruned since then.  Fifteenth seems to be heaving for that single tall tree on the horizon.   The “Ave.” or 14th Avenue then, is one block to the west (left) of 15th Avenue.  On the far right the ditch that will be the Montlake Cut is being prepared behind the coffer dam, which was opened or severed in October of 1916 to allow the waters of Lake Union to fill the cut before Lake Washington was lowered through a dam at the east end of the cut to the level of Lake Union.  CLICK TWICE to ENLARGE.

Two years later, in 1946, The Times printed a short obituary for Ferdinand, the then 76-year-old father, describing him as a German immigrant and a retired baker.  In the 1930 Polk City Directory the Krummels were living in Ballard and proprietors of the American Girl Bakery at 5431 Ballard Avenue.  Most likely the Krummel’s closing of their bakery and move to this modest home in the University District had something to do with both the Great Depression and their age.

An earlier view of "town and gown" - the University District and the University - from 1909 showing off part of the campus remade for the Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exposition.  Continuing our brief custom of showing distant looks at our featured home hidden in the trees, in this 1909 look we might have found it behind the first tree rising here from the center,
An earlier view of “town and gown” – the University District and the University – from 1909 showing off part of the campus remade for the Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exposition. Continuing our brief custom of showing distant looks at our featured home hidden in the trees, in this 1909 look we might have found it behind the first tree rising here from the center, or hidden, in part, behind the smoke of the lumber mill’s burner,  the same mill (but open) that features in the WPA subject as a faux sun room attached, it seems, to the rear of 3711 The Ave.
This keyed map (but not the keys of a computer) speculates on when the empty lots and worn residences in the University District would be developed with what it does not indicated.  But note that the purple blocks, which include our home site, are expected to go first and be "renewed" in ten years of the map's drawing, which was about 1963.  The map came to me through Cal, the one-time "Mayor of the University District."
This keyed map (but not by the keys of a computer) speculates on when the empty lots and worn residences (“properties obsolete or blighted”) in the University District would be developed, but with what is not indicated. Note that the purple blocks, which include our home site in the “lower district,” are expected to be “renewed” in ten years of the map’s decidedly circa 1963 drawing. The map came to me through Calmar McCune, the one-time “Mayor of the University District.”    And now in a half-century later many of the black blocks are getting their working-over too.

The WPA card describes this bungalow as built on a footprint of 875 square feet and divided into five rooms.  The card has University Way made of bricks, and the neighborhood’s “use” as “residential-industrial,” as this photo’s melding of mill and domicile is a clear witness.  Like almost everywhere then, the neighborhood’s “status” is listed as “static.”  This stasis was disrupted in the 1960s when the UW began buying up much of the “lower district.”

Five blocks up the Ave, from our featured home, and two years later on September 29, 1939, there are a few bricks to be seen here south of 42nd Avenue, those protecting the trolley rails.  The intended subject is - again - the Foster and Keiser billboard on the left.
Five blocks up the Ave, from our featured home, and two years later on September 29, 1939, there are a few bricks to be seen here south of 42nd Avenue, those protecting the trolley rails. The intended subject is – again – the Foster and Keiser billboard on the left.

The tidy accommodations of the home at the top were built in 1915 (or so claims the tax card), but demolished in 1962 or 1963, and so did not reach their golden anniversary.  Paul Krummel, however, kept on until March 3, 2014. In his obituary in The Times, one of his grandchildren describes him as “a loving husband who was often seen holding his wife’s hand.”  Another adds that he “loved to dance and had a great sense of humor.”

THE KRUMMEL’S NEIGHBORS IN THE 3700 BLOCK IN 1937

Next door at 3709 University Way.  Note the "sun room" on the right.
Next door at 3709 University Way. Note the “sun room” on the right.
3737 University Way
3737 University Way
3764 University Way
3764 University Way
Reaching the corner and 3772 University Way in 1937.  (Courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Puget Sound Branch - like the rest.)
Reaching the corner and 3772 University Way in 1937. (Courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Puget Sound Branch – like the rest.)
3731 University way in 1937, and below also 3721 but in 1955 after eighteen years of wear.
3731 University way in 1937, and below also 3721 but in 1955 after eighteen years of wear.
3731 University Way, May 31, 1955
3731 University Way, May 31, 1955

WEB EXTRAS

I have to comment, Paul, it’s rare to capture you in one of these photos, but there you are in this week’s ‘Now’ whistling your happy tune! Anything to add?  Yes Jean, beginning with a question in return.  Can you name the tune?   Otherwise, as is our way, Ron Edge starts our response with several CLICKABLE links to other features from the past that treat on “The Ave,” and all of them have subjects within them that elaborate on your and my long-lived interest in, to repeat, both “Town and Gown” north of Portage Bay (and extending south of the bay to include the now razed Red Robin Tavern.)  At the bottom, if time allows before our climb to  “Night-Bears” (The copyright is guarded with pillows.) we will include more on The Ave.

THEN: For the four-plus months of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the center of commerce and pedestrian energy on University Way moved two blocks south from University Station on Northeast 42nd Street to here, Northeast 40th Street, at left.

http://sherrlock.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/wash-state-bldg-then-mr1.jpg?w=1075&h=614

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VARSITY INN

The Varsity Inn and trolley platform at the northeast corner of University Way and 42nd Avenue.
The Varsity Inn and trolley platform at the northeast corner of University Way and 42nd Avenue.
First appeared in Pacific, July 30, 1995.
First appeared in Pacific, July 30, 1995.

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Circa 1994
Circa 1994
From one of those street fairs - probably in the 1980s.  I'll know but later.  As one of my last rites I am now organizing my 55 years of collecting: my archive.  Peace to me and my dust.
From one of those street fairs – probably in the 1980s. I’ll know later. As one of my last rites I am now organizing my 55 years of collecting: my archive. Peace to me and my dust.   Good night Jean – ah but you are long gone to bed.  Good night Berangere – ah but you are long up for a Sunday morning in Paris. 

Now & Then here and now

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