Seattle Now & Then: Third Avenue South

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: 1934 was one of the worst years of the Great Depression.  This look north on Third Avenue South through Main Street and the Second Avenue South Extension was recorded on Thursday, April 19th of that year.  Business was generally dire, but especially here in this neighborhood south of Yesler Way where there were many storefront vacancies.  (Courtesy Ron Edge)
THEN: 1934 was one of the worst years of the Great Depression. This look north on Third Avenue South through Main Street and the Second Avenue South Extension was recorded on Thursday, April 19th of that year. Business was generally dire, but especially here in this neighborhood south of Yesler Way where there were many storefront vacancies. (Courtesy Ron Edge)
NOW: After the Second Avenue Extension was cut through the neighborhood south of Yesler Way in 1928-29, Third Ave South continued to be little used except for the increased traffic crossing it.
NOW: After the Second Avenue Extension was cut through the neighborhood south of Yesler Way in 1928-29, Third Ave South continued to be little used except for the increased traffic crossing it.

The primary subject here is left-of-center, the four-story high sign for Alt Heidelberg Lager Beer painted on the south wall of the Ace Hotel, squeezed between Third Avenue South, seen here, and the Second Avenue Extension. The original negative for this subject is dated April 19, 1934, one year and twelve days after legal 3.2 beer (percentage of alcohol) began flowing from bottle to glass in twelve states, including Washington.

A Blatz adver pulled from The Seattle Times for
A Blatz adver pulled from The Seattle Times for Oct, 26, 1933

In the scramble among breweries to win the taste of newly liberated drinkers, Blatz Brewery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, began shipping trainloads of its Alt Heidelberg into the hinterlands.  Ornamented with a Gothic type style, the label spoke of the German brewing traditions (including facial scars from student duels). The Milwaukee marketers sometimes used the German “Alt” in place of the English “Old” to emphasize the venerable quality of its brew.  However, with the lifting of prohibition, Heidelberg, like every other beer, was rushed through brewing with such speed that it was bottled nearly “green.”

The original 5×7 inch negative for this subject (at the top) is one of several hundred photographs made in the 1930s, mostly of billboards and a few murals like this one, that were installed by roadside billboard barons Foster and Kleiser.  (Here follows four others from the neighborhood, the last of which looks across the Second Avenue Extension and west along Main Street on July 8, 1929, when the Extension was nearly new.)

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Looking West on Main Street and across the nearly new Second Avenue Extension.
Looking West on Main Street and across the nearly new Second Avenue Extension. Westerman is the name of the Foster and Kleiser client who ordered the sign at the scene’s center.

Almost certainly the company photographer drove to the featured scene in the Straight 8 model 1930 Dodge (if I have pegged it right) that seems to be bearing down on him or her, but which is actually parked driverless in the southbound lane of Third Avenue, a few feet south of Main Street.

Our only evidence for dubbing this a 1930 Dodge.  The restored Dodge (in color) is identified as from 1930. (Courtesy, World Wide Web)
Our only evidence for dubbing this a 1930 Dodge. The restored and spiffy Dodge (in color) is identified as from 1930. (Courtesy, World Wide Web and thanks to the owner)
A. Curtis's 1930s record of the City County Building after eight stories (capped with a jail) were added.  (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
A. Curtis’s 1930s record of the City County Building after four stories (capped with a jail) were added. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
Adding those stories.
Adding those stories.

Above the Dodge and three blocks to the north, Third Avenue almost reaches the City County building, right-of-center, before turning left to follow the city’s grid through the central business district north of Yesler Way.  North was the preferred direction for businesses to build and/or move even before the pioneer Frye family chose to stay in this most historic district and construct its namesake hotel on the south side of Yesler Way at Third Avenue in 1909.  The big block letters of its neon signs top the scene.

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The interior of the Frye Hotel.  (We have assumed this from context.  It came with the exterior view above it.)
The interior of the Frye Hotel. (We have assumed this from context. It came with the exterior view above it.)

Minutes before the photographer snapped this (the top) shot on an unseasonably warm spring day – it reached 79 degrees – the Young Men’s Republican Club met for lunch in the Frye.  That evening the Paramount Theatre opened a mixed fare of film and six vaudeville acts.  The Hollywood star Frederic March was featured on the screen in “Death Takes a Holiday,” which was followed by “Beauty, Boneless and Brainless,” an on-stage acrobatic performance.  Also that Thursday, The Seattle Times printed under the header “Romance on Rocks,” some scandalous news about the daughter of the local celebrity Presbyterian preacher, the Rev. Mark Matthews.  Gwladys, her name, who was then living in San Francisco and teaching French, had filed for divorce.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

Yes Jean and again with Ron Edge’s help.  Here or below we have found five links with more features on the neighborhood’s heritage – for the  most part.  We have among these additions what may be a first: a feature that includes among its own extras the primary or lead photo for this week’s feature.  Inevitably some weekend we will put up a feature that includes a feature that like this one includes a repeat of the lead photo of that Sunday’s first feature but then more, a link within it that repeats the same photograph for a third time.  For this we offer no apology in advance, remembering mother’s advice – again and again – that “repetition is the mother of all learning.”  How many times did she advise, “Don’t leave  your wet bathing suit on the bus.”

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STATION No. TEN

A 2-story headquarters for the Seattle Fire Department was constructed at the northwest corner of Third Avenue S. and Main Street in 1903, and so in line with today’s featured photo, had the station and its  corner survived the 1928/29 extension of Second Avenue.  The cutting was done in order to give Second a straight line to the train stations, which were most important then.    In order below are three photographs of the fire station.  The first is the earliest, before a top floor was added in 1912 – the third floor that can be found in both of the remaining photos of this trio.   For the second record, a municipal photographer stands very near the prospect taken in 1934 by the Foster and Kleiser photographer.   We date it from about 1911.  The last of the three shows the fire station during the early preparations for the slicing work of the Extension as it cut through the neighborhood south of Yesler Way.  Many of the diminished buildings were saved – in part.  Not, however, the fire station.

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The Central Business District recorded from the Great Northern Railroad Depot's tower about 1930, and certainly after the Second Avenue Extension, south of Yesler Way.  Third Avenue leads up from center-bottom of the photograph.
The Central Business District recorded from the Great Northern Railroad Depot’s tower about 1930, and certainly after the Second Avenue Extension, south of Yesler Way. Third Avenue leads up from center-bottom of the photograph. The Frye Hotel, the City County Building and the Smith Tower are easily found.  The billboard photographer of the featured photo at the top stood in the afternoon shadows at the bottom of this subject.
Especially this month, Jean has been busy shooting repeats of now-and-then exhibit he is preparing for the foyer of TOWN HALL.  The unveiling will be this coming October Third, a Friday evening on which he and I will also be lecturing in the hall on what we have carefully (or loosely) titled, "First Hill and Beyond."  Please Come.  The very  illustrated lecture starts at 7:30, and you can be confident the Jean and I will be interrupting each other throughout.  Questions follow.  The Sherrard repeat printed here reveals the carving made by the 1928-29 Second Ave. Extension very well.  It a "now" for A.Curtis' ca. 1913 look south from the top of the Smith Tower when it first possible to reach its imaginatively counted 42nd floor.
Especially this month, Jean has been busy shooting repeats of the now-and-then exhibit he is preparing for the foyer of TOWN HALL. The unveiling will be this coming October Third, a Friday evening on which he and I will also be lecturing in the hall on what we have carefully (or loosely) titled, “First Hill and Beyond.” Please Come. The very-illustrated lecture starts at 7:30, and you can be confident the Jean and I will be interrupting each other throughout. Questions will follow. The Sherrard repeat printed here reveals very well the carving made by the 1928-29 Second Ave. Extension.. It is a “now” for A.Curtis’ ca. 1913 look south from the top of the Smith Tower when it was first possible to reach its imaginatively counted 42nd floor. (Remember to click – or even double-click – both shots, above and below.)
The developing tideflats and the Great Northern and Union Pacific stations on Jackson Street.  The tower of the fire station at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Avenue is seen near the bottom of the photograph, right-of-center.
The developing tideflats and the Great Northern and Union Pacific stations on Jackson Street. The tower of the fire station at the northwest corner of Main Street and Third Avenue is seen near the bottom of the photograph, right-of-center.

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A NIGHTY-BEARS APOLOGY

Some users of this blog may have noticed that on going to bed, aka Nighty-Bears, I make promises that I do  not keep in the morning.  This is not because I get up at noon.  Rather I do not return to conclude the feature – as I certainly intended when blowing out the candle – because I am always distracted by other duties, ordinarily  joyful ones like getting our next feature off to the Times.  However, I will qualify.  Tomorrow after a late breakfast I hope to add a few more photos that are relevant to this feature, but failing that I’ll bring them (and the other abused codas) up with an addendum later on.  I do like addendums so, in part because it makes my high school Latin seem almost worth it.   Until then, Nighty Bears.

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RETURN TO CONTINUE SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Another look from the Tower to the former tideflats.  Lawton Gowey is the likely photographer, and circa 1960 would be close.  The I-5 Freeway is not yet scouring through the Beacon Hill greenbelt on the left, and the Kingdome (remember that?) is not around either.
Another look from the Tower to the former tideflats. Lawton Gowey is the likely photographer, and circa 1960 would be close. The I-5 Freeway is not yet scouring through the Beacon Hill greenbelt on the left, and the Kingdome (remember that?) is not around either.

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SECOND AVENUE EXTENSION 1928-29

Second Avenue South from an office floor in the Smith Tower.  Most likely this is a scene from the big snow of 1916.  Second is still a dozen years from being cut through the buildings on the left.
Second Avenue South from an office floor in the Smith Tower. Most likely this is a scene from the big snow of 1916. Second is still a dozen years from being cut through the buildings on the left.
From a higher floor in the Smith Tower, Second Avenue shows its first signs - with the bared wall at the center - of its being extended through the neighborhood.  The Municipal Archive negative is date, bottom-left, March 14, 1928.
From a higher floor in the Smith Tower, Second Avenue shows its first signs – with the bared wall at the center – of its being extended through the neighborhood. The Municipal Archive negative is date, bottom-left, March 14, 1928.
The completed Second Ave. extension recorded by a municipal photographer from the Smith Tower on June 11, 1929.
The completed Second Ave. extension recorded by a municipal photographer from the Smith Tower on June 11, 1929.

 FORTSON SQUARE AKA PIGEON SQUARE

The feature below was scanned from “Seattle Now and Then, Vol. 2,” which is long out of print.   It first appeared in Pacific on Sept. 23, 1984.  The book printing include the “before and after” views – above – of the Second Ave. Extension with some explanation on the second page of the feature. (Click to Enlarge)

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Late work on the Extension looking east-southeast with the Union Pacific depot on the right.
Late work on the Extension looking east-southeast with the Union Pacific depot on the right.
Although this copy of The Times clipping from Oct. 18, 1925 is too soft on focus to easily read, it still gives an impression of what the Second Avenue Extension's planners had in mind when they announced and illustrated their intentions.
Although this copy of The Times clipping from Oct. 18, 1925 is too soft on focus to easily read, it still gives an inflated  impression of what the Second Avenue Extension’s planners had in mind when they announced and illustrated their intentions.  On the right you will find Ye Olde Curiosity Shop’s founder J.E. Standley at his West Seattle home, which was lavishly decorated with totems and grandchildren.
The completed Extension looking north from the Union Station.  At some point the envision pylon, seen in the planner's illustration above, was sacrificed.  There are city-wide man other examples of how elegant or glorious first plans are ultimately cut back in local construction.  We should make a list.  Later.
The completed Extension looking north from the Union Station. At some point the envision pylon (or column), seen in the planner’s illustration above, was sacrificed. There are city-wide many other examples of how elegant or glorious first plans are ultimately cut back in local construction. We should make a list, but later if our funding holds out.

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MEANWHILE

NEAR

A page two clipping from The Seattle Times for April 19, 1934 recounting the efforts of U.W. students to hold an off-campus conference on the hot issue of war.
A page two clipping from The Seattle Times for April 19, 1934 recounting the efforts of U.W. students to hold an off-campus “All-University Conference on the hot issues of war.  [CLICK to Enlarge]
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NEARBY

A soft-focus recording of a moment in the neighborhood – or near it up Main Street near 8th Avenue, and so in what is now Yesler Terrace.   There is some focus in this snapshot but it is given to the distant landmarks like City Light’s station at 7th and Yesler – its ornate towers appear to the left of the right arm of the girl on top – and the crown of the King County Courthouse tower seen just left of the power pole, far right.  Don’t miss the dog.

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Seattle Now & Then: Wallingford Rising

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Looking west down Ewing Street (North 34th) in 1907 with the nearly new trolley tracks on the left and a drainage ditch on the right to protect both the tracks and the still barely graded street from flooding.  (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
THEN: Looking west down Ewing Street (North 34th) in 1907 with the nearly new trolley tracks on the left and a drainage ditch on the right to protect both the tracks and the still barely graded street from flooding. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
NOW: After visiting the site together, Jean and I are somewhat confident that it is Densmore Avenue that intersects with N. 34th Street in the historical scene.  However, in the event a reader can convince us that it is Woodland Ave. instead, one block to the west of Densmore, Jean has in reserved another repeat to cover it.
NOW: After visiting the site together, Jean and I are somewhat confident that it is Densmore Avenue that intersects with N. 34th Street in the historical scene. However, in the event a reader can convince us that it is Woodland Ave. instead, one block to the west of Densmore, Jean has in reserved another repeat to cover it.

This look west on Wallingford’s N. 34th Street was copied from an album of snapshots taken in 1906 and 1907.  Most are of the Seattle Gas Company’s many early-century sites, including the building then of its new factory on the north shore of Lake Union, since 1975 our Gas Works Park.  For this cityscape the unnamed photographer, almost certainly employed by the company, left its construction site beside the lake for a short climb north up what real estate agents sometimes referred to as the Wallingford Ridge, but more often the Wallingford district.

Looking east from the Fremont low bridge (one of them) to the dam at Fremont - the one that gave way in 1914. (Use the keyword search box to find the recent feature about that wipe out.)  This view dates from 1906 or 1907, and appears in the same Seattle Gas album (courtesy of Mike Maslan) as the featured photo at the top and a few more below.
Looking east from the Fremont low bridge (one of them) to the dam at Fremont – the one that gave way in 1914. (Use the keyword search box to find our recent feature about that wipe out.) This view dates from 1906 or 1907, and appears in the same Seattle Gas album (courtesy of Mike Maslan) as the featured photo at the top, and a few more below.
The Fremont low bridge (one of them) from its north side.  The use of the pile driver in the foreground is not explained.  The date on this one is.  It is April, 1907, and the same day that the featured photo (at the top) was recorded.
The Fremont low bridge (one of them) from its north side. The use of the pile driver in the foreground is not explained. The date on this one is April 27, 1907, the same day that the featured photo (at the top) was recorded.
Another from the Gas Company albums.  This looks east from the trolley bridge to the Wallingford peninsula with its "fresh" Gasworks still under construction in 1907.
Another from the Gas Company albums. This looks east from the trolley bridge to the Wallingford peninsula with its “fresh” Gasworks still under construction in 1907.

On the featured – at the top – snapshot’s border (here cut away), a helping hand has dated the subject April 27, 1907.  North 34th Street was then called Ewing Street, and the photographer stands a few yards east of its intersection with Densmore Avenue. The neighborhood in the foreground is a roughed-up construction zone, as were most of the additions then north of the lake.  The mill town Fremont was an exception. The mill opened in 1888, and so was almost old in 1907. Using the trolley tracks on the left as a pointer, Fremont’s smoking lumber mill is seen across the northwest corner of Lake Union.

Click or “click click” to enlarge this melding of two pages from the 1908 Baist Real Estate Map (used often here.) Ewing and Densmore are easily found as is the Fremont Mill and, by then, the first high bridge too
Click or “click click” to enlarge this melding of two pages from the 1908 Baist Real Estate Map (used often here.) Ewing and Densmore are easily found as is the Fremont Mill and, by then, the first high bridge too
On this north shore map from the 1890s Wallingford is not  yet noted.  Rather, Edgewater stretches from Fremont as far east as Latona.
On this north shore map from the 1890s Wallingford is not yet noted. Rather, Edgewater stretches from Fremont as far east as Latona, which lies snug beside Brooklyn, an early name for the University District..

Edgewater, a name rarely used or even remembered today, was Fremont’s suburb to the east.  Far right – in the feature photo at the top –  the distant structures seen climbing Phinney Ridge to the left and right of the outhouse and behind the blossoming fruit trees, are a blend of Edgewater and Fremont residences.  At the beginning of 1907 most locals would have considered this intersection also part of Edgewater, although, because of the rails on the left, not for long.

A Wallingford car on Wallingford Ave., I believe.  At least I think it likely that the photographer's back is to Ewing Street.  If I can prove it later, we will make a celebrating addendum out of it.  Otherwise we will stick with the hunch or be effectively corrected. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
A Wallingford car on Wallingford Ave., I believe. At least I think it likely that the photographer’s back is to Ewing Street. If I can prove it later, we will make a celebrating addendum from it. Otherwise we will stick with the hunch or be effectively corrected. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

By February trollies to and from downtown Seattle were swaying on these tracks and along this rutted road.  Less than two blocks behind the photographer the tracks turned north up Wallingford Avenue, and thereafter nearly every agent who sold lots between Edgewater and the University District made a point of noting the conveniences offered by the Wallingford Car Line.  It was for that gently climbing and, for the passengers, effortless trip up the spine of Wallingford Ridge that the neighborhood took its name.  John Wallingford, the namesake developer, former city councilman, and Green Lake resident, was rarely remembered.

A detail of our featured neighborhood near Densmore and Ewing as recorded by Oakes, a purveyor of real photo postcards, from the Queen Anne side of Lake Union.  This dates from a few years later than 1907.
A detail of our featured neighborhood near Densmore and Ewing as recorded by Oakes (a producer and  purveyor of real photo postcards)  from the Queen Anne side of Lake Union. This dates from a few years later than 1907.
Here in the spirit of our Mr. Wallingford forgetfulness is the Seattle City Council in 1889 - or near it - with Wallingford sitting among them.  Alas I know longer remember which of these is our namesake, but I'm pretty sure that that is Mayor Moran in the middle, bottom row.  Moran was mayor during the city's Great Fire of 1889.
Here in the spirit of our Mr. Wallingford forgetfulness is the Seattle City Council in 1889 – or near it – with Wallingford sitting among them. Alas I no longer remember which of these is our namesake, but I’m pretty sure that that is Mayor Moran in the middle, bottom row. Moran was mayor during the city’s Great Fire of 1889.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

I like your title for this Jean, “Wallingford Rising.”  And I hope to now rise to your request and find some more photos, clips or features lying about.   First, Ron Edge will put up three (only) links, which will however include within them other links, and most of these will have something to do with the neighborhood widely cast to include Wallingford and Fremont with the Edgewater valley (or slump) between them.   Here’s Ron links.  Click to open.  Again,  I hope to find more – beginning my search now at 7:35 pm Saturday the Sixth.

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Four blocks north on Densmore,
Four blocks north on Densmore, the pioneer home of  Ted Carlson .  My good friend Stan James lived there for many years, and Easter Day breakfasts were a celebrated event for his family and a few friends. In a dark blue shirt, Stan stands below at the center.  Stan James was one of the best loved folk singers of the region.   You may have the pleasure of watching a YouTube of his singing, which was edited by Jean for this blog and posted some few days after Stan’s sudden – but ultimately expected – death by a heart attack in 2008 –  and in his chair.   Again, you can find the video of Stan and others by using the key word search offered above.

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The story of Stan's home as first published in Pacific on April 4, 1999.
The story of Stan’s home as first published in Pacific on April 4, 1999.
I visit the home site in 2010 and found the pioneer landmark replaced with this McMansion, which looks more comfortable than the James digs, which were drafty.
I drove by the home site at 3729 Densmore in 2010 and found the pioneer landmark replaced with this McMansion, which looks more comfortable than the James digs, which were drafty.

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NIGHTY BEARS

It is time once again to climb the stairs to Nighty Bears, which we always do also thinking of the world traveler Bill Burden, our California friend who first shared this chummy name for going to bed and who has recently moved to a country home beside the “gold rush river” of 1849, the American River.  Nighty Bears to William too.  For the record, tomorrow we intend to return with an illustrated feature on the Gasworks, another neighbor.

We close for the moment with this reminder that Wallingford's micro-climate, rising to the east and above the shade of Fremont, is a most temperate one.
We close for the moment with this reminder that Wallingford’s micro-climate, rising to the east and above the shades of Fremont, is a most temperate one.

Seattle Then & Now: The Youngstown Steel Mill

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: The Seattle Times in its lengthy coverage of the then new Seattle Steel in the paper’s Magazine Section for Sept. 10, 1905 – the year this photograph was recorded – noted that “the plant itself is a series of strong, substantial, cavernous sheds, built for use, not for beauty.”  (Courtesy, MOHAI, the Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: The Seattle Times in its lengthy coverage of the then new Seattle Steel in the paper’s Magazine Section for Sept. 10, 1905 – the year this photograph was recorded – noted that “the plant itself is a series of strong, substantial, cavernous sheds, built for use, not for beauty.” (Courtesy, MOHAI, the Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: For his repeat Jean Sherrard stood on the Youngstown neighborhood’s SW Yancy Street, a few feet east of SW Avalon Way, shooting north through an industrial park that in the 109 years separating the “then” from the “now” has grown in every available direction for the production of steel.
NOW: For his repeat Jean Sherrard stood on the Youngstown neighborhood’s SW Yancy Street, a few feet east of SW Avalon Way, shooting north through an industrial park that in the 109 years separating the “then” from the “now” has grown in every available direction for the production of steel.

Here (at the top) is print number 12,920, preserved in the library of the Museum of History and Industry’s collection of historical photographs.  Like many of the archive’s early prints, this factory scene is mounted with a generous border to protect it from ‘dog ears’ and other indignities.  On the border of the stiff board, with the identifying number, is printed the caption: “Exterior view of Seattle Steel Company shortly after it began operation in 1905.”

The Seattle Times 1905 celebration of the city's new manufacturer.  (This printing is included for the design and not the reading - it is too small.)
The Seattle Times 1905 celebration of the city’s new manufacturer. (This printing is included for the design and not the reading – out copy is too small and smudged.)
For comparison, another early look at the new Seattle Steel Mill beside Young's Cover.  This prospect looks to the northwest from near Andover Street and the outlet of Longfellow Creek into the tideflats of Young's Cove.  The tide is down.  (Courtesy, MOHAI - an early print from their Webster Stevens Collection.)
For comparison, another early look at the new Seattle Steel Mill beside Young’s Cover. This prospect looks to the northwest from near Andover Street and the outlet of Longfellow Creek into the tideflats of Young’s Cove. The tide is down. We note that his WS print is the same one used in the 1905 Times clip above.  The Webster and Stevens (WS) studio was employed then to do the editorial photography for the afternoon newspaper.   (Courtesy, MOHAI – an early print from their Webster Stevens Collection.)

The rising smoke and steam of the featured photo on top confirm that the superheated work of transforming the industrial scraps, piled here on the south side of the factory, into useable steel is underway.  Much of it was rolled and stretched into bars used to strengthen concrete, like that used in Seattle’s first skyscraper, the then but one-year-old Alaska Building, which stands, both elegant and sturdy, at the southeast corner of Second Avenue and James Street.

A circa 1905 pan of the waterfront and business districts taken from the top of the Alaska Building when it was new.
A circa 1905 pan of the waterfront and business districts taken from the top of the Alaska Building when it was new.  CLICK to ENLARGE
The Alaska Building at the southeast corner of Second Avenue and Cherry Street.
The Alaska Building at the southeast corner of Second Avenue and Cherry Street.
William Piggott in his place, as rendered on page 180 of the 1906 book of sketches titled "Cartoons and Caricatures of Seattle Citizens"
William Pigott in his place, as rendered on page 180 of the 1906 book of sketches titled “Cartoons and Caricatures of Seattle Citizens.”   Most likely this ambitious tome was not produced by a “vanity press” with its contents paid for by the book’s subjects.  Pigot’s name is misspelled.

William Pigott, the factory’s founder, was variously described as a “devout Catholic” and “patriarchal capitalist.”  As soon as Pigott announced his factory plans in 1903, the small neighborhood on the west side of Pigeon Point began to boom with mill workers moving into new but modest homes.  Pigott first named it Humphrey after a town where he  had earlier lived and worked with steel, but he soon changed the name to Youngstown, after another patriarchal company town with rolling mills in Ohio.  Youngstown resisted

A clip from The Seattle Times for April 27, 1907 that elbows its way through some of the confusing complexities of annexation in 1907.
A clip from The Seattle Times for April 27, 1907 that elbows its way through some of the confusing complexities of injunctions and annexation in 1907.  CLICK TO ENLARGE

incorporation into its much larger neighbor to the west, West Seattle.  When Seattle did annex it in 1907, the unincorporated company town came along, most likely for the better sewerage and water.  By then Youngstown supported four saloons and a public school, the latter built by the mill.  The community also kept its eye on the frequently flooding Longfellow Creek that flowed and too often overflowed through it into Young’s Cove.

A Seattle Municipal Archive recording of the overflowing Longfellow Creek, recorded on Jan. 19, 1919.  The view looks north towards Andover Street, which is here built atop a low trestle as is approaches the creeks outflow into Young's Cove. [Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive]
A Seattle Municipal Archive recording of the overflowing Longfellow Creek, recorded on Jan. 19, 1919. The view looks north towards W.  Andover Street, which is here built atop a low trestle as is approaches the creeks outflow into Young’s Cove. [Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive]
And early look west into Youngstown from near Avalon Way.  Surely there are some bars among the businesses that line the south side of Andover Street.  The Pigeon Point "heights" are on the  horizon.  The photograph was taken by A. Curtis, or his studio, circa 1908.
And early look west into Youngstown from near Avalon Way. Surely there are some bars among the businesses that line the south side of Andover Street. The Pigeon Point “heights” are on the horizon. The photograph was taken by A. Curtis, or his studio, circa 1908.
Looking west from the dirt center of Andover that separates the wagon (or motorcar) planking on the left from the trolley tracks on the right.  Here about two blocks to the west, the company has built into Andover with a modest construction that resembles - at least - an office exterior to the plant proper, which here crowds Andover on the right.
Looking west from the dirt center of Andover that separates the wagon (or motorcar) planking on the left from the trolley tracks on the right. Here, about two blocks to the west, the company has built over the center-line of  Andover Street a modest construction that resembles – at least – an office sited exterior to the plant proper, which here crowds Andover on the right.   It is another prerogative of a “company town.”  The subject is dated from “about 1920.”
Like the subject directly above, this one also looks west on Andover, but also down on it form the neighborhood hotel.  The view is date 1919, and by then Pacific Coast Steel's Seattle plant was operating four open hearth furnaces.  It was easily the largest steel-making facility in the Pacific Northwest. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Like the subject directly above, this one also looks west on Andover, but also down on it form the neighborhood hotel. The view is date 1919, and by then Pacific Coast Steel’s Seattle plant was operating four open hearth furnaces. It was easily the largest steel-making facility in the Pacific Northwest. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
The footprint of the yet-to-be-build steel plan copied from the 1904 Kroll map.
The footprint of the yet-to-be-built  steel plant copied from the 1904 Kroll map.

Drawn “from plans only,” a captioned footprint of the factory was printed in the1904 Kroll Seattle real estate map.  The map names, left to right, the Stock House, the Heating House (with the smokestacks), the Rolling Mill, and running east-to-west, several attached wings named collectively the Run-out Building and Warehouse.  Beyond these the Kroll map notes, “Tide flats, being filled in.”  These Young’s Cove tidelands between Pigeon Point, on the east, and West Seattle, on the west, would be reclaimed and covered by the expanding factory. Longfellow Creek is now carried to Elliott Bay via a culvert beneath the fill.

Marked "1953" with a postit at the top, here fare below is the steel mill and Young's cover a mere half-century since Pigott devised him plans and began rounding up and purchasing permits and real estate to build Seattle Steel.  The mill is below the subject's center, and below Spokane Street too, which comes from the far right where it crosses the West Waterway before passing below Pigeon Point on its way to West Seattle, on the left.
Marked “1953” with a post-it at the top in Elliott Bay, here far below we find the crowded steel mill filling Young’s cove a mere half-century since Pigott devised his plans and began rounding up and purchasing permits and real estate to build Seattle Steel. The mill is below the subject’s center, and also below Spokane Street, which comes from the far right where it crosses the West Waterway before passing below Pigeon Point, wrapped in its greenbelt, lower-right,  on its way to West Seattle, on the left.   Note the verdant acres, bottom-center, where Longfellow Creek passes through the Youngstown neighborhood as far as Andover Street.  From there the creek has been redirected to reach Elliott Bay thru covered culverts.
A detail from a 1909 map of Seattle marking both Youngstown and Youngs cover.  Seattle Steel is noted with its footprint.  [Courtesy, Greg Lange]
A detail from a 1909 map of Seattle marking both Youngstown and Youngs cove. Seattle Steel is noted with its footprint. [Courtesy, Greg Lange]
The plant and the neighborhood in a detail pulled from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map.  Note how the tideflats of Youngs Cove have been drawn for sale, reclamation and development - to and by the steel manufacturers.
The plant and the neighborhood in a detail pulled from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map. Note how the tideflats of Youngs Cove have been drawn for sale, reclamation and development – to and by the steel manufacturers.

Many years ago I first featured Seattle Steel in the Pacific Northwest Magazine.  Here’s a clip of it from the Sunday Times.

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Pacific Northwest readers may recall the Pacific Magazine’s recent May 25th cover story on this factory. See it online at http://bit.ly/1y2SKBF.   Or click on the next image below.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

Yes Jean, and some of it is inserted above your request – or will be – illustrating this week’s text itself.   As for LINKS there is but one this week, and it reaches back merely a few weeks to the feature SPOKANE STREET from WEST SEATTLE.   Ron Edge will put it up next.  If explored, this single link will lead the dedicated reader to many more features – more than twenty of them – that relate to the neighborhood widely considered.

THEN: In 1852 many of Seattle’s first pioneers removed from Alki Point by dugout canoe for the deeper and safer harbor along the east shore of Elliott Bay (our central waterfront).  About a half-century later any hope or expectation that the few survivors among these pioneers could readily visit Alki Beach and Point by land were fulfilled with the timber quays and bridges along Spokane Street. (Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

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FOLLOWS

I found the prints below while doing research for a legal case years ago.  It had to do with responsibilities following damage from the flooding of the Longfellow Creek across Andover Street and into the industrial park, lighted like the inferno and spreading harrowing noises, now run by Nucor Steel Seattle.  The prints were all part of an exhibit, which, I figure, was shown at MOHAI, for it is, after all, a museum for both history and industry.

Pacific Coast Steel, about 1915 and after the large additions, left-of-center, were in place, reaching Andover Street on the far right.   Youngs Cove is still visited by the tides, and the photograph was taken over the Longfellow Creek outlet, and looking west to a West Seattle skyline that still mixes tall trees with new homes. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
Pacific Coast Steel, about 1915 and after the large additions, left-of-center, were in place, reaching Andover Street on the far right. Youngs Cove is still visited by the tides, and the photograph was taken over the Longfellow Creek outlet, and looking west to a West Seattle skyline that still mixes tall trees with new homes. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
This dark interior of the early plant's 12-inch rolling mill dates from about 1910.  We can imagine the mix of warm light from the furnaces with the cool blue light falling from the mill's high windows.
This dark interior of the early plant’s 12-inch rolling mill dates from about 1910. We can imagine the mix of warm light from the furnaces with the cool blue light falling from the mill’s high windows.

Ingots - all in a row - are here top cased in the open hearth pit, which was first opened soon after Pacific Steel too over Seattle Steel in 1911. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Ingots – all in a row – are here top cased in the open hearth pit, which was first opened soon after Pacific Steel too over Seattle Steel in 1911. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
An early crew at Seattle Steel takes a break from its heavy labor at the rolling mill.  [Courtesy, MOHAI]
An early crew at Seattle Steel takes a break from its heavy labor at the rolling mill. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
An example of the scrap still - on top - that the men with tongs - at the middle - turn into ingots - at the bottom - with the help of great heat.  [Courtesy MOHAI]
An example of the scrap steel – on top – that is turned into ingots – at the bottom – with the help of great heat and the men in the middle.  These, however, are not from Seattle or Pacific or Bethlehem Steel, but from a smaller Seattle competitor, Northwest Steel. [Courtesy MOHAI]
Work on constructing a factory "shed" to house a new rolling mill.  Dated 1920, by then Pacific Coast Steel's Seattle branch was the largest steel making facility in the Pacific Northwest.  [Courtesy MOHAI]
Work on constructing a factory “shed” to house a new rolling mill. Dated 1920, by then Pacific Coast Steel’s Seattle branch was the largest steel making facility in the Pacific Northwest. [Courtesy MOHAI]
Bethlehem Steel purchase Pacific Coast Steel late in 1929, the year, also, of William Pigott's death and the start of the Great Depression.  South (left) of Spokane Street there is nothing tidal in Youngs Cove to be found here. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Bethlehem Steel purchase Pacific Coast Steel late in 1929, the year, also, of William Pigott’s death and the start of the Great Depression. South (left) of Spokane Street there is nothing tidal in Youngs Cove to be found here. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Another aerial of Bethlehem Steel, this one looking to the southeast with Spokane Street on the left. It is dated tentatively ca. 1955.  Avalon Way is bottom right, and the climb on Andover east up to Pigeon Point is upper-left.  The building on the right, with the five mostly smoking stacks, housed the open hearth furnaces where scrap steel was transformed into "new old steel."  Soon after this aerial was recorded the plant would be closed for installation of electric steel making equipment, in 1958.  [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Another aerial of Bethlehem Steel, this one looking to the southeast with Spokane Street on the left. It is dated tentatively ca. 1955. Avalon Way is bottom right, and the climb on Andover east up to Pigeon Point is upper-left. The building on the right, with the five mostly smoking stacks, housed the open hearth furnaces where scrap steel was transformed into “new old steel.” Soon after this aerial was recorded the plant would be closed for installation of electric steel making equipment, in 1958. [Courtesy, MOHAI]
Steel framework in place during the construction of the electric furnace building in the late 1950s.  [Courtesy MOHAI]
Steel framework in place during the construction of the electric furnace building in the late 1950s when two 100-ton units were installed, doubling the plant’s annual ingot capacity from 250,000  to 500,000 tons.  [Courtesy MOHAI]
The lid is opened on a new electric furnace to accept its first "charge of scrap" in the company of men in hardhats and, it appears, some suits.  [COURTESY MOHAI]
The lid is opened on a new electric furnace to accept its first “charge of scrap” in the company of men in hardhats and, it appears, some suits. [COURTESY MOHAI]
The MOHAI caption for this print expresses itself. "Always a dramatic sight . . . steel poured from an electric furnace at Bethlehem's Seattle Plant."  [Courtesy, MOHAI]
The MOHAI caption for this print expresses itself. “Always a dramatic sight . . . steel poured from an electric furnace at Bethlehem’s Seattle Plant.” [Courtesy, MOHAI]
In 1972, Bethlehem built this "baghouse" air pollution control system adjacent to the electric furnace shop.  [Courtesy, MOHAI]
In 1972, Bethlehem built this “baghouse” air pollution control system adjacent to the electric furnace shop. [Courtesy, MOHAI]

Seattle Now & Then: End of the Line for Golden Gardens

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN:  A circa 1908 look northeast through the terminus of the Loyal Electric Street Railway line at the corner of now Northwest 85th Street, 32nd Ave. Northwest, and Loyal Way Northwest.  (Courtesy, the Museum of History and Industry)
THEN: A circa 1908 look northeast through the terminus of the Loyal Electric Street Railway line at the corner of now Northwest 85th Street, 32nd Ave. Northwest, and Loyal Way Northwest. (Courtesy, the Museum of History and Industry)
NOW: The city purchased the Loyal Heights trolley line in 1918, and then in 1923 purchased Golden Gardens Park.  The distinguished brick business block at the southeast corner of 32nd Ave. NW and NW 85th Street was built in 1928 and is home for both the Caffe Fiore, at the corner, and seen here across Loyal Way, since 2003 the also popular Cocina Esperanza.
NOW: The city purchased the Loyal Heights trolley line in 1918, and then in 1923 purchased Golden Gardens Park. The distinguished brick business block at the southeast corner of 32nd Ave. NW and NW 85th Street was built in 1928 and is home for both the Caffe Fiore, at the corner, and seen here across Loyal Way, since 2003 the also popular Cocina Esperanza.

With their two daughters, Priscilla and Loyal, Olive and Harry Treat arrived in Seattle in 1904 and promptly built the mansion that famously survives on Queen Anne Hill’s Highland Drive.  When they arrived the Treats were rumored to be the richest couple in town.  Unquestionably cosmopolitan, they had lived in New York, Chicago, Paris and London before curiously choosing this frontier boomtown.

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At thirty-nine, Harry, a graduate of Cornell University and the Harvard Law School, was an energetic capitalist ready to invest, but not downtown.  Treat instead purchased a mix of stump land and forest north of Ballard and named it Loyal Heights, after the younger daughter.  Treat soon chose the developer’s familiar tools used to promote remote real estate additions.  In 1907 he built both a trolley line through the saleable land and an alluring “pleasure park” at the end of the line.

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Less than two miles after leaving downtown Ballard, the rails reached the line’s terminus here at Northwest 85th Street, then the city’s northern border, and 32nd Ave. Northwest.  Through its last four blocks, the Loyal Heights Line broke through the addition’s conventional grid by way of the surviving diagonal, Loyal Way Northwest.  The terminus featured a loop that enabled the trolley to turn around. This northwest corner of Seattle was 300 feet above Puget Sound, and between it and a fine beach below was the steep virgin land that Treat groomed into Golden Gardens Park.

A Times short Aug. 21, 1911 report on a planed Press Club Barn Dance at Treat's Golden Gardens.
A Times short Aug. 21, 1911 report on a planed Press Club Barn Dance at Treat’s Golden Gardens.
The Time July 7, 1921 report on the Southerners - one thousand of them! - plans to picnic at Golden Gardens.
The Time July 7, 1921 report on the Southerners – one thousand of them! – plans to picnic at Golden Gardens.
Works Progress Administration (WPA) depresson-time construction of steps to the Golden Gardens beach.  (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)
Works Progress Administration (WPA) depresson-time construction of steps to the Golden Gardens beach. (Courtesy, Municipal Archive)

The park name is signed on the banner far right at the rear of the trolley in the featured illustration at the top. The children posing beside it may include one or both of the Treat daughters.  And the driver of the carriage on the left may be Treat himself, an avid horseman.  To these eyes, at least, the profile of the one holding whip and reins resembles that of a Treat profile found on the Queen Anne Historical Society’s Website.  In the photo the developer is shaking hands with Buffalo Bill during the famous showman’s 1915 visit that included a special staging of his Wild West Show for, again, Loyal, the younger daughter.

A Times front page for July 31, 1922 report on the death of Harry Treat.
A Times front page for July 31, 1922 report on the death of Harry Treat.

In more than one posthumous description of Harry Treat as a horseman, it is claimed that “as a tandem and four-in-hand driver he had no superior in the West.” It is a mix of tragedy and irony that he died at the wheel, not the reins. In 1922, while pursuing mining opportunities in Canada, his last interest, Treat attempted to turn his motorcar around on a narrow mountain road and wound up plunging into a precipice.

MEADOW  POINT

Golden Gardens beach with Meadows Point beyond.  (Courtesy, MOHAI)
Golden Gardens beach with Meadows Point beyond. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
The beach a few years past.
The beach a few years past.
"Pleasure Meadows" as it appeared in The Times.
“Pleasure Meadows” as it appeared in The Times.

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?  Ron Edge has put up a few of his links.  Things are working fine at his home.  Otherwise here we hope to attend to these gilded pleasures tomorrow.  As you know Jean the computer crashed for a few hours earlier this evening.   But tomorrow we expect to carry on from the Golden Rule Bazaar, now at the bottom,  with a golden hodgepodge.

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THEN: Looking east from the roof of the still standing testing lab, the Lock’s Administration Building (from which this photograph was borrowed) appears on the left, and the district engineer’s home, the Cavanaugh House (still standing) on the center horizon. (Photo courtesy Army Corps of Engineers at Chittenden Locks)

Seattle Now & Then: The Arkona at First and Denny

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: In 1913, or near to it, an unnamed photographer recorded this view southeast across the Lower Queen Anne corner of Denny Way and First Avenue North. Out of frame to the left, the northeast corner of this intersection was home then for the Burdett greenhouse and gardens. By its own claim, it offered plants of all sorts, “the largest and most complete stock to choose from in the state.”   Courtesy, the Museum of North Idaho.
THEN: In 1913, or near to it, an unnamed photographer recorded this view southeast across the Lower Queen Anne corner of Denny Way and First Avenue North. Out of frame to the left, the northeast corner of this intersection was home then for the Burdett greenhouse and gardens. (We have include an advertisement for them below.)  By its own claim, Burdett offered plants of all sorts, “the largest and most complete stock to choose from in the state.” Courtesy, the Museum of North Idaho.
NOW: Jean discovered that the lower and larger panel of this correctly chosen window was stuck closed, so instead he extended his camera through a narrow opening to the side of the upper panel and recorded this view, which sees considerably farther south on First Avenue.  Thanks to archivist Julie Keressen at Seattle Municipal Archives for discovering that the part of Denny Way seen here was considerably widened to the south in the early 1920s.  A combination of that widening and Jean’s extended arm open up the view south on First Avenue and into Belltown.
NOW: Jean discovered that the lower and larger panel of this correctly chosen window was stuck closed, so instead he extended his camera through a narrow opening to the side of the upper panel and recorded this view, which sees considerably farther south on First Avenue. Thanks to archivist Julie Keressen at Seattle Municipal Archives for discovering that the part of Denny Way seen here was considerably widened to the south in the early 1920s. A combination of that widening and Jean’s extended arm open up the view south on First Avenue and into Belltown.

While Seattle was building long piers with landmark towers on the central waterfront and first staging Golden Potlatches, the week-long summer festivals that began in 1911, on city streets, an alert and now nameless photographer produced a collection of sharp negatives enamored with schooners, steamers and Potlatch parade floats.

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The window shot at the top, however, is unique for her or him.  From the northwest corner of First Ave. N. and Denny Way, the subject looks southeast from a fourth floor window – perhaps the photographer’s apartment.

This detail pulled from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map has Denny Way running along the bottom.
This detail pulled from the 1912 Baist Real Estate Map has Denny Way running along the bottom.  The Regent Apartments are show  – although not named – near the map’s lower-left corner at the northwest corner of Denny Way and First Ave. North.  Not counting the fire station (far right, on a site now supporting the Space Needle), there are eleven brick buildings (the red ones) scattered among the wooden ones in these 21 lower Queen Anne blocks. [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

The Regent Apartments were built in 1908.  From the prospect, here at the top, one got an unimpeded view of the razing of Denny Hill for the Denny Regrade until 1910, when the Raymond Apartments, whose rear wall is seen here kitty-corner and beyond the billboards, opened its 37 two-room units to renters.  The Regent was considerably larger with 59 units.  These two apartment houses were part of the earliest brick reconstruction of this “North Seattle” neighborhood that had been swiftly built of wood during Seattle’s first boom decades of the 1880s and 1890s.

The Regent, here renamed the Wm. Daniels apartments, rises above a trolley turning south onto First Avenue from Denny Way.
The Raymond Apartments, here renamed the Wm. Daniels Apartments, rise above a trolley turning west  onto Denny Way from First Avenue.  The reader may decide if the couple, clutching their purses and packages and watching the trolley, are preparing to board it or waiting for it to pass by, allowing them then to cross Denny Way..   The Regent/Arkona Apartments are just off the photo’s border to the left, behind them.
With his back to the Arkona, Lawton Gowey recorded this look down First Avenue on November 2, 1968.  The date is penned on its slide, but not for another of Gowey's cityscapes, the one immediately below.  (It was unlike him not to write a date down.)  We can tell from the distant skyline that the snap below is later than the one above.
With his back to the Arkona, Lawton Gowey recorded this look down First Avenue on November 2, 1968. The date is penned on this slide’s cardboard frame, but not for another of Gowey’s Kodachrome cityscapes, the one immediately below. (It was unlike him not to write down a date.) We can tell from the distant skyline that the snap below is later than the one above.
Ivars sign here still holds to the north facade of the
Ivars sign here still holds to the north facade of the Raymond Apartments.  Included below with the Link named  “Sharred Walls” is a feature on the Raymond – seen from the front.
The sign to Ivar's Fish Bar on Denny Way. The variety of menus was something he introduced with his fire drive-in in a converted Capitol Hill gas station on Broadway Avenue at Thomas Street in the 1950s.
The sign to Ivar’s Fish Bar on Denny Way. The variety of menus was something he introduced in the 1950s with his first drive-in housed in a converted Capitol Hill gas station on Broadway Avenue at Thomas Street..

The Regent’s managers did not promote this view south into the business district but rather that to the west.  A Dec. 15, 1912, classified ad for the Regent reads, “Commanding a view of the Sound and being within easy walking distance of the city, or excellent car service, this building is exceptionally well located.  The apartments are first class and modern in every respect.  Three rooms at $15 and $20.  Four rooms, $27.50 and $30.”

The 25-year-old Regent
The 15-year-old Regent was sold to California investors, and pictured in the January 28, 1923 Sunday Times. [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

In 1925, after the apartments were sold to a San Francisco investor for “a consideration of $110,000,” the name was changed to the Arkona. This was short-lived.  After John and Winifred Paul purchased the Arkona Apartments in 1927 for $150,000, they whimsically changed its name to Pauleze. Winifred died there in 1932, but Paul continued living in and managing their apartment house until 1957, when he too died, but not the punning name.  It remained the Pauleze until the late 1970s, when, for reasons we have not found, the name Arkona Apartments was revived.

Jack Paul's obituary as is appeared in The Seattle Times for Dec. 6, 1957.
Jack Paul’s obituary as is appeared in The Seattle Times for Dec. 6, 1957.

In the mid-1980s, with the help of Dave Osterberg, a friend who was then the development manager for Environmental Works, acting as guide for the transfer, the collection of negatives of which this subject was one, “came home” to Seattle from the Museum of North Idaho.  With a donation to the museum from Ivar Haglund, the negatives were purchased for the University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections.

A page from The Seattle Times for March 10, 1910, which includes an advertisement for The Burdett Company nursery that was across First Ave. North from the Regent's front door.  The detail from the 1912  Baist Map printed above reveals that this business filled most of the block north to John Street.
A page from The Seattle Times for March 10, 1910, which includes an advertisement for The Burdett Company nursery that was directly across First Ave. North from the Regent’s front door. The detail from the 1912 Baist Map printed above reveals that this verdant concern  filled most of the block north to John Street. CLICK TO ENLARGE
An early 20th Century look up First North from Denny Way.  My notes advise "about 1903."  If so then still five years before the construction of the Regent/Ankona.  The long lot on the far right is home for the
An early 20th Century look up First North from Denny Way. My notes advise “about 1903.” If so then still five years before the construction of the Regent/Ankona. The long lot on the far right is home for the Burdett nursery.
Here too we look north on First Avenue North thru Denny Way.  The Ankona is on the left, and here too Lawton has not dated his slide - unless he has and I missed it.  (That seems more likely.)  Here the traffic is two way, but not so in the Gowey slide directly below.
Here too we look north on First Avenue North thru Denny Way. The Ankona is on the left, and here as well Lawton has not dated his slide – unless he has and I missed it. (That seems more likely.) Here the traffic is two way, but not so in the Gowey slide directly below.  Time has passed there. 
With the Ankona on the left and still looking north on one-way First Ave. North with traffic heading north in 1971,
With the Ankona on the left and still looking north on one-way First Ave. North with traffic heading only north in 1971,

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, dear Paul?  At first – and perhaps last – look Ron and I have found a dozen  links to past features, all from within the still brief life of this blog: a few years.   They are packed with Queen Anne – both upper and lower – history.

The first of these twelve includes brief illustrated essays on sever other Seattle apartment houses, including the Raymond, which is the pie-shaped brick apartment at the corner of Warren and First that partially blocks the view from our window above into both the regrade and the central business district.  Following the links I’ll hang a some more images from the neighborhood, either before climbing to nighty-bears, or tomorrow.   Meanwhile there is enough included in the dozen links below to keep one engaged for a long as it once upon a time took one to sit thru “Meet the Press.”

THEN:  Louis Rowe’s row of storefronts at the southwest corner of First Ave. (then still named Front Street) and Bell Street appear in both the 1884 Sanborn real estate map and the city’s 1884 birdseye sketch.  Most likely this view dates from 1888-89.  (Courtesy: Ron Edge)

From 1954

THEN: The Dog House at 714 Denny Way was strategically placed at the southern terminus for the Aurora Speedway when it was new in the mid-1930s.  (Photo courtesy of Washington State Archive, Bellevue Community College Branch.)

THEN: Before this the first shovel of the last of Denny Hill was ceremonially dropped to the conveyor belt at Battery Street, an “initial bite of 30,000 cubic yards of material” was carved from the cliff along the east side of 5th Avenue to make room for both the steam shovel and several moveable belts that extended like fingers across the hill.  It was here that they met the elevated and fixed last leg of the conveyor system that ran west on Battery Street to the waterfront.  (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archive)

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Seattle Now & Then: Salmon Bay

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Captioned Salmon Bay, 1887, this is most likely very near the eastern end of the bay where it was fed by Ross Creek, the Lake Union outlet. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan Vintage Posters and Photographs)
THEN: Captioned Salmon Bay, 1887, this is most likely very near the eastern end of the bay where it was fed by Ross Creek, the Lake Union outlet. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan Vintage Posters and Photographs)
NOW: Beginning in 1903 and continuing even after the 1917 opening of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, both Ross Creek and the Salmon Bay shoreline were extensively reshaped for commerce and recreation.
NOW: Beginning in 1903 and continuing even after the 1917 opening of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, both Ross Creek and the Salmon Bay shoreline were extensively reshaped for commerce and recreation.

This picturesque pioneer snapshot was copied from a family album filled with prints, interpreted with terse captions hand-written on their borders. It reads simply “Salmon Bay, 1887,” a date used on several other photographs protected within the album’s covers.  If correct, then this is a rare early photographic record of Salmon Bay.

Appearing in the same Lowman album, this may be the same sail boat, although this was is not dated.  Aftern knowning this image since Michael Maslan first showed it to me, I did not until this afternoon notice that it is a detail made - in part - from the print that follows.  The negative for both is of course wider, at least to the right.  Still not date, but the subject is identified.  (Courtesy Michael Maslan)
Appearing in the same Lowman album, this may be the same sail boat – named the Pauline –  although this print is not dated. After knowing this image since Michael Maslan first showed it to me more than a quarter-century ago, I did not, until this afternoon, notice that it is a detail made – in part – from the print that follows. The negative for both is of course wider, at least it is wider to the right. Still no date, but the subject is identified. (Courtesy Michael Maslan)

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To the inevitable “where on Salmon Bay?” there are two choices.  The forested hill across the waterway must be either Queen Anne or the part of the Magnolia headland above where the Salmon Bay channel begins out of Shilshole Bay – near Ray’s boathouse.  Both sites would have required James Lowman, the owner of the photo album and probably both the camera and the sailboat, to reach the bay by sailing from the Seattle waterfront around the Magnolia peninsula. The voyage may well have begun at Yesler’s Wharf, which Lowman managed for his uncle, Henry Yesler.

This boat is for rowing on - the album notes - "On the lake."  It does not tell us what lake, although it is almost certainly either Union or Washington.
This boat is for rowing on – the album notes – “On the lake.” It does not tell us what lake, although it is almost certainly either Union or Washington.

 Jean and I chose the Queen Anne site, largely on the evidence of the timber trestle that runs beside the distant shoreline.  It was also in 1887 that the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad completed its line from the Seattle waterfront north through Interbay to Salmon Bay, and then east to Lake Union along Ross Creek, the lake’s outlet below the north end of Queen Anne Hill.  In 1887 there may have been some settlers’ docks beside Salmon Bay, but no extended trestles except this one.

Salmon Bay - and Magnolia - as the federal surveyors first drew it in the late 1850s.  Note where the bay is met by the creek near the right border.
Salmon Bay (although named Shilshole) – and Magnolia – as the federal surveyors first drew it in the late 1850s. Note where the bay is met by the creek near the number “13” close to the right border.  In this editing the borders for the first claims in Interbay and the future Ballard have been drawn in.
This helpful map drawn by the U.S. Dept of Commerce about a quarter-century ago, shows the shoreline of Salmon Bay before and after the filling of it behind the Chittenden Locks in 1916.  This is a detail from the larger map that also shows the changes for all of the canal and the lakes too.
This helpful map drawn by the U.S. Dept of Commerce about a quarter-century ago, shows the shoreline of Salmon Bay before and after the filling of it behind the Chittenden Locks in 1916. This is a detail from the larger map that also shows the changes for all of the canal and the lakes too.   CLICK IT!   Note the 8th Avenue railroad bridge  to the right of the shadowed crease in the map.
Looking west up the canal past an unidentified vessel to the railroad's 8th Avenue bridge, which was ordinarily open like the Great Northern bridge west of the Chittenden Locks.
Looking west up the canal past an unidentified vessel to the railroad’s 8th Avenue bridge, which was ordinarily open like the Great Northern bridge west of the Chittenden Locks.
Looking east at the same tug-guided vessel heading for the lakes.
Looking east at the same tug-guided vessel heading for the lakes.
Another look west along the completed canal with the 8th Ave. railroad bridge showing on the left and Ballard beyond it. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
Another look west along the completed canal with the 8th Ave. railroad bridge – here down – seen on the left and steaming Ballard beyond it.  The south entrance to the Fremont Bridge is far right. (Courtesy, MOHAI)
I confess to not having studied this charming waterway with the rigor required to confirm that it is what it claims to be: the outlet for Lake Union heading west to Ballard; that is Ross Creek.  The mill we see on the dim horizon is then one of Ballard's and the little bridge perhaps the first one built for the railroad (first the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern) in 1887 before it was replaced ultimately with the 8th Ave. bascule.
I confess to not having studied this charming waterway with the rigor required to confirm that it is what it claims to be: the outlet for Lake Union heading west to Ballard; that is Ross Creek. The mill we see on the dim horizon is then one of Ballard’s and the little bridge perhaps the first one built for the railroad (first the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern) in 1887 before it was replaced ultimately with the 8th Ave. bascule.
The first Army Corp decreed digging of the canal between Fremont and Ballard, and early, 1903.  The creek was "regularized" but the funding insufficient to do much more.  This scene like the one above it (we think) looks west.  (Courtesy, Army Corps of Engineers)
The first Army Corp decreed digging of the canal between Fremont and Ballard, and early, 1903. The creek was “regularized” but the funding insufficient to do much more. This scene like the one above it (we think) looks west. (Courtesy, Army Corps of Engineers)
The shaped ditch looking back at the still low Fremont Bridge with Lake Union dam just beyond, circa 1903.
The shaped ditch, looking back at the still low Fremont Bridge with the Lake Union dam just beyond it, circa 1903. (Courtesy, Army Corps of Engineers)
James Lowman in his "chamber of commerce prime."
James Lowman in his “chamber of commerce prime.”  (Courtesy, The Rainier Club)
Copied from the family album, the Lowman Mansion at the southeast corner of Boren Avenue and Marion Street in 1894. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
Copied from the family album, the Lowman Mansion at the southeast corner of Boren Avenue and Marion Street in 1894. (Courtesy, Michael Maslan)
The album's caption names the dogs on the Lowman's front porch but not the women.
The album’s caption names the dogs on the Lowman’s front porch but not the women.
Looking to the northeast towards the Lowman Home from the corner of Boren and Columbia in 1896.
Looking to the northeast towards the Lowman Home from the corner of Boren and Columbia in 1896.  (Courtesy – like all those form the Lowman Album – of Michael Maslan)
A page from the Lowman Family Album.
A page from the Lowman Family Album, FOLLOWED BY SIX MORE.
This illuminated tableau has some classical allusion that is, at least, lost on me, although it surely pleases me.
This illuminated tableau has some classical allusion that is, at least, lost on me, although it surely pleases me and, I suspect, you too.   Lowman was one of the founders of The Seattle Theatre.

album Lowman-He-loves-me-He-loves-me-not-WEB

album-[The-Three-Graces]-3-women-stand-over-painting-interiror,-maslanWEB

Album-Boy-sits-in-parlor-WEB Album-woman-and-boy-w-dog-WEB

In 1946, after greeting his 89th birthday with a morning visit to his barber, James Lowman returned to his First Hill mansion, The Seattle Times reported, to spend “several hours . . . reminiscing over a volume containing pictures of Seattle’s pioneer residences.  In it is a picture of his home.”  Somewhere between “very likely” and “highly possible,” the album that Lowman lost himself in was the one uncovered by friend Michael Maslan, a collector and dealer in vintage photographs and posters.

Lowman ritually pouring tea for his wife.
Lowman ritually pouring tea for his wife.

In the early 1980s Mike shared the Lowman album with me for copying and study.  I have often used it in these pages.  Included are pictures of Mary Emery Lowman, whom James married two years after he, we assume, photographed this Salmon Bay scene.  Perhaps Mary is sitting in the sailboat and being courted.  She would have been 24 years old.  Married in 1889, they lived together for a half-century on First Hill, until Mary’s death in 1939.  Still living in his mansion, James died eight year later at age 90.

A friend, most likely, posing in costume and in the album.
A friend, most likely, posing in costume and in the album.
The unintended effects of a double exposure - in the album.  (Courtesy again of Michael Maslan)
The unintended effects of a double exposure – in the album. (Courtesy again of Michael Maslan)

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

Jean I hear the pacing of soft pads with retracted claws signaling me to nighty-bears.   It is 3am, but Ron Edge will be up soon – most likely around 5am – and put up, I believe, no less than NINE relevant links.   Early Sunday afternoon I’ll return for proofreading and  with two features printed now long ago in the Times, and one of them also in the second Seattle Now and Then volume.  Both are short essays on two more of Lowman’s nature subjects – Lake Union shorelines – and like our feature at the top, both are dated from or in 1887.

THEN: A Seattle Street and Sewer Department photographer recorded this scene in front of the nearly new City-County Building in 1918.  The view looks west from 4th Avenue along a Jefferson Street vacated in this block except for the municipal trolley tracks.  (Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archive)

THEN: Looking east from the roof of the still standing testing lab, the Lock’s Administration Building (from which this photograph was borrowed) appears on the left, and the district engineer’s home, the Cavanaugh House (still standing) on the center horizon. (Photo courtesy Army Corps of Engineers at Chittenden Locks)

17web

THEN: From the Fremont Bridge, this subject looks northwest across the torrent that followed the washout of the Fremont Dam in the early afternoon of March 13, 1914.  Part of the Bryant Lumber and Shingle Mill appears left-of-center.  The north end of the Stone Way Trestle appears in the upper right corner. (Courtesy, Seattle Municipal Archives)

FREEMONT CAR BARN ADDENDUM, Aug. 7, 2014

THEN: One of a few photographs recording from different prospects the Fremont trolley car barn on Dec.11, 1936.  North 35th Street, on the right, was originally named Blewett for Edward and Carrie Blewett.  In 1888 the couple, fresh from Fremont, Nebraska, first named and promoted Fremont as a Seattle neighborhood. That year Fremont also got its lumber mill. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)
THEN: One of a few photographs recording from different prospects the Fremont trolley car barn on Dec.11, 1936. North 35th Street, on the right, was originally named Blewett for Edward and Carrie Blewett. In 1888 the couple, fresh from Fremont, Nebraska, first named and promoted Fremont as a Seattle neighborhood. That year Fremont also got its lumber mill. (Courtesy, Lawton Gowey)

In response to our last blog feature, the one about the Fremont Car Barn and the rest, an old friend and officer in these trenches, archivist Ernie Dornfield, answered our question regarding what was the use of those ghost-colored solid forms in the otherwise vacant lot between the house on the left of the subject and the car barn beyond both?   Here’s Ernie’s letter plus a “grab” from this computer’s screen of a City Archive photograph that shows one of those “gray things” being installed.   If you follow his advice and access the city clerk’s information service you will find many more and even much more beyond gray concretions.

THE DORNFIELD LETTER – please CLICK TO ENLARGE

Ernie-Dornfield's-letter-about-gray-slabs-GRAB-WEB

THE ARCHIVES’ ON LINE EXAMPLE – please CLICK

City-Clerk-Online-Info-grab-Concrete-slabsWEB-

 

 

Now & Then here and now

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