Seattle Now & Then: The Post-Fire Post-Intelligencer

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: In the late afternoon and evening of Seattle’s Great Fire day, June 6, 1889, Leigh and Lizzie Hunt’s home at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Columbia Street was, within a few hours, arranged to accommodate the family’s business, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper.   (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
THEN: In the late afternoon and evening of Seattle’s Great Fire day, June 6, 1889, Leigh and Lizzie Hunt’s home at the northwest corner of Fourth Avenue and Columbia Street was, within a few hours, arranged to accommodate the family’s business, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper. (Courtesy Lawton Gowey)
NOW: The parking garage, at what was the Hunt’s corner, was built in 1923 and survives as an unheated shelter for a few dozen cars.  This Central Business District corner is valued by the taxman at more than four-and-one-half thousand times the value of this reinforced concrete “improvement.”  The Rainier Club, its neighbor across Four Avenue, can be glimpsed on the right.
NOW: The parking garage, at what was the Hunt’s corner, was built in 1923 and survives as an unheated shelter for a few dozen cars. This Central Business District corner is valued by the taxman at more than four-and-one-half thousand times the value of this reinforced concrete “improvement.” The Rainier Club, its neighbor across Fourth Avenue, can be glimpsed on the right. The figure making his way down Columbia is production tech/designer/inventor/wunderkind David Verkade.

One of the five men posing beside The Seattle Post-Intelligencer’s office may well be Leigh Hunt, who with his wife Lizzie was the owner of both the newspaper and the house. The latter became the P-I’s temporary quarters after the city’s Great Fire of June 6, 1889, destroyed the paper’s office and plant at the corner of Mill Street (Yesler Way) and Post Avenue (aka Post Alley). Before the sign was even in place, the P-I began publishing, here at the northwest corner of Columbia Street and Fourth Avenue.

The worst part of the rip in this clip reads, "Two little job presses worked by foot power."
The worst part of the rip in this clip reads, “Two little job presses worked by foot power.”  The clip is also a LINK that will take you to the full two-page edition of Hunt’s Post-Intelligencer, the first following the June 6 “Great Fire,” and the one composed in part by foot power. [CLICK to open.]

In 1886, at age 33, Hunt had given up his presidency of the Agricultural College of Iowa at Ames for the exhilarating, if risky, enterprise of running his own newspaper, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer. The paper had begun in 1873 as the Seattle Gazette, a one-sheet weekly and Seattle’s first newspaper, and carried on with a variety of names and owners. Hunt’s stay lasted little more than six years, ended in bankruptcy triggered by the nation-wide economic panic of 1893.”

Although deep in debt, Hunt’s powers of persuasion soon moved the Great Northern Railroad to help pay his way to Korea, where he founded the Oriental Consolidated Mines and quickly made millions extracting gold.  After he returned to Seattle, Hunt opened an office announcing that he was prepared to “meet all his debtors and pay in full.”

Leigh Hunt began the 20th century with a safari to Egypt’s upper Nile “for his health,” but “like the wide-awake American everywhere,” soon developed his trip into a scheme to get richer by growing cotton in the Sudan with British cooperation and the labor of American Negroes.  Hunt’s characterization of his plan to give the colonizing blacks opportunities to acquire homes and skills got him no help from the black educator Booker T. Washington, who while in Paris, announced that “I am here merely to study the best known French manual training schools and have no intention of proceeding to Cairo to meet Leigh Hunt.”

In the summer of 1932 the 75-year-old Hunt’s planned visit to Seattle was cancelled when he fell from a twenty-foot ladder while examining a mine near Las Vegas, Nevada, his last hometown.  His Seattle Times obituary of October 5, 1933, made claims on him. “It was here that Mr. Hunt entered his business career, which eventually took him all over the world, and it was here that he left the imprint of his genius for organization, promotion and development.”  Hunt’s Times obit. is attached immediately below in a context of a few other stories that day.

[CLICK to ENLARGE]

ST-Oct-5,-1933-Leigh-Hunt's-obit-WEB

WEB EXTRAS

Anything to add, Paul?

The best addition is from Ron Edge.  It is the clipping from the P-I’s first issue following the fire.  It is an extra you have already encountered – we have embedded it in the story above.  We will also include a link from 2012, the feature about the Burnett Home across Fourth Avenue from Hunts, at the northeast corner of 4th and Columbia.  Include within its link are other features from the neighborhood, including one on the Meydenbauer Home, which was also on Columbia and near by at its northeast corner with Third Avenue.

The worst part of the rip in this clip reads, "Two little job presses worked by foot power."

 

One thought on “Seattle Now & Then: The Post-Fire Post-Intelligencer”

  1. I have what I think is a genuine issue of this paper, left to me after Dad passed away. Date is Saturday, June, 1889, Vol. XVI, NO. 28. The headlines are about the fire. Who would be able to appraise it for me? Teri Goldsby 361 463 2394

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